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G-HI 101 Historical Introduction to Politics

3 hours
An introduction to the history of political ideas, and the ways in which politics and government have changed, yet in many ways stayed the same, from ancient Greece to the present. Topics include the questions of the limits of government power, when to disobey the law, conflict between church and state, political intervention in the economy, and how we balance our security needs with our desire to be free. (Fall)

G-HI 110 World Civilization to 1500

3 hours
An introductory survey of the history of world civilizations. The course starts in the beginning with the earliest agricultural communities in Mesopotamia, Egypt, India, and China, examines the rise of the world’s great civilizations, and concludes with the European Middle Ages. (Fall)

G-HI 120 World Civilization since 1500

3 hours
An introductory survey of the history of world civilizations. The course starts with the European Age of Exploration and continues through to the present day. Special emphasis is given to the rise and dominance of the West in world history. (Spring)

G-HI 130 Introductory Methods for Historical Analysis

3 hours
An introduction to the study of history, designed for general education for non- majors and as a core course for majors. Students will acquire an understanding of the important people, events, and concepts that shape history through the use of critical thinking and analytical skills. By approaching history as a historian, students will examine historical scholarship, primary source materials and the methods used by historians to understand the past. While specific topics will vary from year to year, sample topics include Medieval Military History and the Crusades. G-HI 130 is a prerequisite for HI 410. (Spring)

G-HI 140 American History to 1877

3 hours
An introductory survey of selected topics in the history of the United States from the pre-Columbian period to the end of Reconstruction in 1877. (Fall)

G-HI 150 American History since 1877

3 hours
An introductory survey of selected topics in the history of the United States from the period of Reconstruction to the present day. (Spring)

HI 205 Social History of the Automobile

3 hours
A study of the global development of the automobile from its precursors to concept cars of the future. Extra emphasis is given to the American automobile and its importance in American life, including attention to both the technical and corporate aspects of the topic as well as the automobile’s role in society and culture. (Spring, Monday evenings)

G-HI 210 International Travel Study in History

3 hours
An opportunity to travel abroad while studying a topic in world history at historical locations. Students gain a deeper, more personal experience of history, beyond the possibilities of pure classroom content. The specific content and travel location will change from year to year. This course fulfills the General Education Foundation requirement for a Global / Intercultural Experience and may be repeated. Contact the instructor for more information. (Occasional Interterms, odd years)

G-HI 220 Modern Europe

3 hours
A study of the modern historical forces and events that have culminated in the creation of Europe. This course explores topics including World War I and its disastrous peace settlement, the mass destruction and atrocities of World War II, and the political, cultural, and economic processes that created the European Union of the twenty-first century. (Fall, even years)

G-HI 236 Topics in Social History

3 hours
An examination of a select time, subject, or related episodes in history. This course explores the chosen topic through the lens of social history; one of the single most important developments in the late 20th century expansion of historical methods. While specific topics will vary from year to year, sample topics include Historical Epidemics and the European Witch Trials. (Fall)

G-HI 237 Topics in Political History

3 hours
An examination of a select time, subject, or related episodes in history. This course emphasizes the methods of political history, one of the oldest and most respected fields among historians. While specific topics will vary from year to year, sample topics include Fascism, The Russian Revolution, and The English Civil War. (Fall, odd years)

HI 245/AR 245 The History of Automotive Design

3 hours
Discover and examine the technological and stylistic evolution of automotive design. This course will explore ways in which automobiles, by way of their design, reflect the technology and communicate the values of the culture that produced them. Prerequisites: None. (Fall)

G-HI 261 Kansas History

3 hours
A study of the history Kansas, from the earliest Indian settlements through the political history of the modern state. The course examines the contributions Kansans have made to the total stream of American development. Designed with special relevance for public school teachers. (Spring, even years).

HI 301 Advanced Historical Topics

3 hours
An advanced study of a select time, subject, or critical period in history. This course explores the chosen topic through the lens of political history, one of the most important historical methods. While specific topics will vary from year to year, sample topics include Modern Africa, Medieval Europe, and Early modern Europe. (Spring)

G-HI 333 Technology and Society

3 hours (Language Intensive)
An advanced study of the historical development of technology as part of society and culture, exploring the ways which society and culture constrain and stimulate technologies, and the ways in which technology then shapes society and culture. Does not require previous specialized technical knowledge. This course is designed for both majors and non-majors. Prerequisite: G-EN111 or consent of the instructor. (Fall.)

HI 356 American Diplomacy

3 hours
A survey of the diplomatic relations of the United States, focusing on the events since 1900. The first half of this course focuses on a historical approach, providing an understanding of American actions in the world and their consequences. The second half of the course focuses on the processes and decision makers that create United States Foreign Policy. Substantive topics include the role of the US as the “world’s policemen”, and the nature of the US response to problems such as global terrorism, hunger, human rights, economic cooperation, and climate change. (Spring, even years)

HI 410 Historiography

3 hours
An advanced study designed to train students in historical research methodology and historiography. . The seminar is designed to allow students the opportunity to become familiar with the practices and techniques of professional historians and researchers. Prerequisite: G-HI 130. Open to history majors and minors or with permission of instructor. (Fall)

HI 475/PS 475 Senior Thesis

3 hours (Language Intensive)
A capstone experience in historical research, analysis, and writing. The seminar offers students experience in seeking out and evaluating both primary and secondary sources of historical information Graduation requirement of all history majors. Prerequisite: HI 410 and permission of instructor. All students intending to take HI 475 must have a formal meeting with their thesis advisor in the previous semester. (Fall, Spring)

Special Course Options
295/495 Field Experience (1-4 hours)
297  Study Abroad (12-16 hours)
299/499 Independent Study (1-4 hours)
388 Career Connections (3-10 hours)
445 Readings and Research (1-4 hours)

 

Political Science Course Descriptions

G-PS 101 Historical Introduction to Politics

3 hours
An introduction to the history of western civilization and political ideas. This course explores politics and government from ancient Greece to the present. Topics include the questions of the limits of government power, when to disobey the law, conflict between church and state, political intervention in the economy, and how we balance our security needs with our desire to be free. (Fall)

G-PS 102 United States Government

3 hours
A critical study of systems and structure of government and politics in the United States. This course explores key issues in American politics such as the debate over gun control and the right to bear arms, prayer in public schools, abortion, and gay rights, by examining the actors and outcomes in the political process. For example, how do interest groups, mass media, and political parties shape U.S. politics? How does congress, the president, and the Supreme Court act, or fail to act, to meet the needs of society? (Fall, even years)

G-PS 125 International Relations and Globalization

3 hours
An introduction to the study of international politics focusing on understanding current problems. Central topics include understanding how nations use both military action and cooperative agreements to provide for their security and well-being: how the global trade and financial system has become an engine for wealth; understanding the gap that has grown between the rich and the poor; and the challenge posed to humanity by the environmental degradation of the earth. (Interterm, even years)

G-PS 130 Principles of Geography

3 hours
Location, Location, Location! This course explores the physical, social, historical, and cultural landscapes of the earth from a geographic perspective, to demonstrate how location in space fundamentally shapes how the diverse peoples of the world live. Required for students seeking certification as secondary teachers in Social Studies. (Fall, odd years)

G-PS 215 Global Peace Studies

3 hours (Language Intensive)
An analysis of the problem of international conflict. This course studies the economic, political, and ideological causes of international violence, and the mechanisms used to mediate and resolve modern conflicts. Prerequisite: G-EN 110 and G-EN 111 or recommendation of the instructor. (Spring, odd years)

PS 356 American Diplomacy

3 hours
A survey of the diplomatic relations of the United States, focusing on the events since 1900. The first half of this course focuses on a historical approach, providing an understanding of American actions in the world and their consequences. The second half of the course focuses on the processes and decision makers that create United States Foreign Policy. Substantive topics include the role of the US as the “world’s policemen”, and the nature of the US response to problems such as global terrorism, hunger, human rights, economic cooperation, and climate change. (Spring, even years)

PS 475/HI 475 Senior Thesis

3 hours (Language Intensive)
A capstone experience in reading, research, and writing. The seminar offers students experience in seeking out and evaluating both primary and secondary sources of political information. The seminar is designed to allow students the opportunity to become familiar with the practices and techniques of professional political scientists. Prerequisite: HI 410 and permission of instructor. Students intending to take PS 475 must have a formal meeting with their thesis advisor in the previous semester. (Fall, Spring)

 

Special Course Options
295/495 Field Experience (1-4 hours)
297  Study Abroad (12-16 hours)
299/499 Independent Study (1-4 hours)
388 Career Connections (3-10 hours)
445 Readings and Research (1-4 hours)