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The academic program offered by the Department of Curriculum and Instruction is essential for achieving the college’s mission of developing whole persons through scholarship, participation, and service. It also reflects the heritage of the college and the Church of the Brethren, which includes a dedication to a liberal arts education and values that promote ethical behavior, non-violence and peace, a simple lifestyle, and a dedication to serving others.

The primary focus of the Department of Curriculum and Instruction is on the preparation of education professionals. Teacher education at McPherson College has long been one of the foundational cornerstones on which the institution was established.

Teacher Education Program

The Teacher Education Program at McPherson College is accredited by the Kansas State Department of Education (900 SW Jackson Street, Topeka, Kansas 66612); and by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE), www.ncate.org (now known as Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP), www.caepnet.org). This accreditation covers the Teacher Education Program at McPherson College; however, the accreditation does not include individual education courses that the institution offers to P-12 educators for professional development, relicensure, or other purposes.

Mission Statement

The mission of the Teacher Education Program of McPherson College is to develop service-oriented educators who effectively blend the art and science of teaching.

Goals, Objectives, and Dispositions

Goal I: The candidate has the knowledge bases necessary to be an effective teacher in her/his field.

To accomplish this goal, the service-oriented educator will:

Objectives:

  1. Acquire a broad liberal arts knowledge base.
  2. Demonstrate proficiency in his/her major area of licensure.
  3. Acquire effective strategies of teaching in all appropriate content areas and for all learners.
  4. Recognize how students learn and develop.

Disposition: Appreciate the connections between various areas of knowledge and commit to continuous learning.

Goal II: The candidate can apply effective teaching strategies to meet the needs of all learners.

To accomplish this goal, the service-oriented educator will:

Objectives:

  1. Use appropriate best practices for specific content areas and for diverse learners.
  2. Reflect upon his/her teaching and analyze the practices.
  3. Demonstrate understanding and use of formative and summative assessments and make modifications based on them.
  4. Provide motivational techniques based on students’ developmental and environmental needs.

Disposition: Value and respect students’ varied talents and abilities and project enthusiasm for teaching all learners.

Goal III: The candidate fosters relationships and collaborates with school constituencies. To accomplish this goal, the service-oriented educator will:

Objectives:

  1. Communicate effectively in both written and oral formats and through the use of technology
  2. Solicit input from students, parents, colleagues, and the greater community.
  3. Act on information received from stakeholders.

Disposition: Value the many ways in which people seek to communicate and encourage various modes of communication.

 

The Teacher Education Program at McPherson College focuses on three major levels of licensure. The following are lists of the levels and the programs.

6-12 Licensure Section
Biology, Chemistry, English, English for Speakers of Other Languages, History and Government, Mathematics, Psychology, High-Incidence Special Education, Speech/Theatre

K-6 Licensure Section
Elementary Education, English for Speakers of Other Languages, High-Incidence Special Education

PK-12 Licensure Section
Art, Health, Music, Physical Education, Spanish

As a student at McPherson College preparing to become a teacher, you will be asked to prove your competency with the guidance of instructors in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction and the content area departments. Course assessments, a portfolio, and interviews are a few of the instruments developed that will help you demonstrate your abilities. McPherson College is currently collecting data on different aspects of student performance. Numerous experiences are provided as observers, aides, tutors, and as participants in student teaching experiences. Those seeking licensure at all levels begin their professional work by the sophomore year and continue with incremental and sequential scheduling of their professional growth.

Admission Procedures

Procedures for admittance into the Teacher Education Program and Student Teaching are outlined in detail in the Advisor/Advisee Handbook and/or the Policies and Procedures Manual. These Handbooks are available in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction. College advisors also have copies of these handbooks. The handbook is also available online. Students should read the handbook or consult their advisors for a detailed account of admission requirements and procedures.

Admission to the Teacher Education Program

As a general rule, the Teacher Education Board reviews candidates for admittance into the Teacher Education Program two times during an academic year, once each semester. Signs are posted on college buildings and announcements are made in campus communications and classes. Requirements for acceptance into the Teacher Education Program include, but are not exclusive of,

  • Minimum of C in G-EN111
  • Minimum of C in college level math
  • Minimum of C in G-CI150
  • Sign of support from Student Life
  • A GPA of 2.5
  • Successful completion of the C-BASE.

Practica at McPherson College

Research has proven that multiple and varied practical experiences are of utmost importance in an effective teacher education program. For that reason, students in the Teacher Education Program have the requirement of completing a minimum of two practica prior to student teaching. However, most students are encouraged to participate in more than those two. The first practicum occurs early in the student’s professional education course sequence. This practicum is primarily an observation/aide situation. The second practicum occurs later in the professional sequence and requires students to take more initiative in the actual classroom responsibilities. In fact, students are required to practice actual instructional activities.

Students are required to do one of the practicum experiences in an urban setting. Arrangements have been made for the first practicum to be completed in Wichita, Chicago, or other ethnically diverse setting. Transfer students or students with extenuating circumstances may choose to complete one of the other sessions in an urban setting. This will further enhance the program and give students a broader understanding of the entire educational enterprise. Students are placed in both grade- and content-appropriate practicum settings. It is the student’s responsibility to secure travel arrangements to the practica sites. Any expenses that are incurred are also the responsibility of the student.

All practica must be approved by the Department of Curriculum and Instruction.

Service Component

In keeping with the mission of the college and the Teacher Education Program, future teachers are expected to complete a service component as part of their program. During the student’s college career s/he must complete and document 100 hours of service prior to completing the program. Transfer students must complete 25 hours per year.

There are many possibilities for service-oriented activities. Opportunities will occasionally be made available through the Curriculum and Instruction Department. In addition, students are encouraged to seek out experiences that will be self- satisfying. For further explanation or clarification, contact any member of the Teacher Education Board.

Student Teaching at McPherson College

Student teaching is considered the capstone experience in the professional education sequence for future teachers. It is to be done after other professional coursework is completed. In cooperation with a K-12 school system, McPherson College strives to make this experience as beneficial as possible for all parties involved. Student teaching is a complete semester experience. It is offered for variable credit hours depending on the level and the experiential need of the student and the licensure area being sought. Being given the privilege to student teach is not automatic. The Teacher Education Board carefully screens all applicants for their suitability. As a general rule, the Department of Curriculum and Instruction begins the application for the student teaching process two times during an academic year. Deadlines are September 15 and February 15. Late applications are not accepted. Signs are posted on college buildings and announcements are made in campus communications and classes.

The prospective student teacher at McPherson College is expected to have:

  • the personality and character traits required of a teacher;
  • a strong liberal arts education;
  • solid professional skills;
  • profitable laboratory experiences with practitioners in the field. Before a student can student teach she/he must have:
  • gained full acceptance into the Teacher Education Program;
  • secured favorable recommendations from her/his major professor, professor of a language intensive course, one professor in teacher education, Student Life, and two supportive professionals in education;
  • achieved a cumulative grade point average of 2.5;
  • provided proof of liability insurance;
  • signed an Inquiry Form;
  • provided an up-to-date health form.

After all forms have been submitted, the student will participate in an interview with the Teacher Education Board. Ultimate decisions concerning student teaching will be made by that Board. A primary indicator of meeting the goals of the Teacher Education Program is the development of a portfolio. McPherson College students planning to become teachers develop portfolios during stages of their professional course work. These portfolios are designed to meet the overall goals of:

  1. The candidate has the knowledge bases necessary to be an effective teacher in her/his field.
  2. The candidate can apply effective teaching strategies to meet the needs of all learners
  3. The candidate fosters relationships and collaborates with school constituencies.

These portfolios include copies of units and lesson plans, reflective journals, other significant evidences of knowledge, application, and collaboration, scores of standardized assessment tools, and other documentation.

In order to defray costs, a student teaching fee will be assessed during that semester.

Student Responsibility

Students are ultimately responsible for following procedures and proper sequencing of events leading to professional development and licensure. It is important for students who plan to enter the Teacher Education Program at McPherson College to contact the chair of the program and/or the appropriate advisor.

Licensure in Kansas

Those seeking licensure in Kansas must pass the Professional Knowledge section of the Principles of Learning and Teaching (PLT) with a score of 160; candidates must also take a test in their particular content area. The passing scores for each content test are listed in the Advisor/Advisee Handbook. Requirements for licensure to teach in the public schools, either elementary or secondary, vary from state to state. Students who plan to certify in a state other than Kansas should, upon enrollment, consult the chair of teacher education or the state in which they plan to teach to make sure that they are enrolled in a program that is appropriate.

In the state of Kansas, teaching is considered to be a profession. Therefore, the Kansas State Department of Education has a Professional Practices Commission to exercise disciplinary and advisory functions over those requesting licensure or working as a certified professional. Teacher licensure can be denied, suspended, or revoked for both felony and non-felony actions.

McPherson College is in compliance with the federal Title II reporting guidelines.

 

Elementary Education Major

K-6 Licensure

Requirements

Along with the General Education requirements, the following is a suggested sequence; the academic advisor and/or Curriculum and Instruction faculty will assist the individual student to develop the optimal sequencing of courses.

Freshman year:
G-PY 101  Introduction to Psychology (3 hours)
G-CI 150 Introduction to Education (3 hours)
SE 210 Introduction to Infants, Children & Youth with Special Needs (3 hours)

Sophomore year:
CI 220  Principles and Strategies of Teaching (3 hours)
G-CI 251 Introduction to Education Practicum (1 hour)
*G-EE 210  Children’s Literature (3 hours)
G-CI 333  Intercultural Education (2 hours)
PY 204  Child and Adolescent Development (3 hours)
CI 232  Educational Technology (2 hours)
EE 230  Mathematics Content for Elementary Teachers (3 hours)

Junior Year:
CI 426/PE 426  Methods for Teaching Health in Elem. & Sec. (1 hour)
*CI 455  Teaching-Learning Process (3 hours)
*EE 303  Reading/ Language Arts I (4 hours)
EE 307  Methods for Teaching Math in the Elementary School (3 hours)
EE 306  Methods for Teaching Science in the Elem. School (3 hours)
EE 309  Methods for Teaching Social Studies  in the Elem. School (3 hours)
EE 301/ AR 358  Methods for Teaching Art in the Elem. School (1 hour)
EE 304/ MU 370  Methods for Teaching Music in the Elem. School (1 hour)
EE 305/ PE 305  Methods for Teaching Phys Ed in the Elem. School (1 hour)
EE 375  Elementary Ed. Practicum and Seminar (1-4 hours)
EE 444  Reading/Language Arts II (3 hours)

Senior Year:
EE 465  Student Teaching in the Elementary School (6 or 12 hours)
CI 476  Professional Seminar in Education (2 hours)

6-12 Licensure

Requirements

Along with the general education requirements and the academic requirements for the specific content area, the following is a suggested sequence; the academic advisor and Curriculum and Instruction faculty will assist the individual student to develop the optimal sequencing of courses.

Freshman year:
G-PY 101  Introduction to Psychology (3 hours)
G-CI 150  Introduction to Education (3 hours)

Sophomore year:
G-CI 333  Intercultural Education (2 hours)
PY 204  Child and Adolescent Development (3 hours)
SE 210  Intro to Infants, Children and Youth with Special Needs (3 hours)
CI 220  Principles and Strategies of Teaching (3 hours)
G-CI 251  Intro to Education Practicum (1 hour)
CI 232  Educational Technology (2 hours)

Junior Year:
*CI 455  Teaching-Learning Process (3 hours)
CI 4xx  Secondary Methods for Academic Majors (3 hours)
CI 315  Reading in the Content Field (2 hours)
CI 351  Secondary Education Practicum and Seminar (2 hours)

Senior year:
CI 475  Student Teaching (6 or 12 hours)
CI 476  Professional Seminar in Education (2 hours)

PK-12 Licensure

Requirements

Along with the general education requirements and the academic requirements for the specific content area, the following is a suggested sequence; the academic advisor and Curriculum and Instruction faculty will assist the individual student to develop the optimal sequencing of courses.

Freshman year:
G-PY 101  Introduction to Psychology (3 hours)
G-CI 150  Introduction to Education (3 hours)
SE 210  Intro to Infants, Children & Youth with Special Needs (3 hours)

Sophomore year:
G-CI 333  Intercultural Education (2 hours)
PY 204  Child and Adolescent Development (3 hours)
G-CI 251  Intro to Education Practicum (1 hour)
CI 220  Principles and Strategies of Teaching (3 hours)
CI 232  Educational Technology (2 hours)

Junior Year:
Methods for Teaching Art, Music or PE in Elem. Schools (2-3 hours)
(Those seeking licensure in Spanish take one Methods class (CI 404)
CI 351  Secondary Ed. Practicum and Seminar (1 hour)
EE 375  Elementary Ed. Practicum and Seminar (1 hour)
*CI 455  Teaching-Learning Process (3 hours)
Methods for Teaching Art, Music or PE in Sec. Schools (2-3 hours)
CI 315  Reading in the Content Field (2 hours)

Senior Year:
CI 475  Student Teaching in the Secondary School (6 or 12 hours)
EE 465  Student Teaching in the Elementary School (6 or 12 hours)
CI 476  Professional Seminar in Education (2 hours)

English for Speakers of Other Languages (K-6) Licensure

Requirements

Same professional education requirements as for K-6 license, plus:

EN 230  Linguistics (2 hours)
EN 335  Advanced English Grammar (2 hours)
G-SO 202  Minorities in the U.S. (3 hours)
CI 428  Methods for Teaching ESL in the Elem. and Sec. Schools (3 hours)

English for Speakers of Other Languages (6-12) Licensure

Requirements

Same professional education requirements as for 6-12 licensure in other fields, plus:

EN 230  Linguistics (2 hours)
EN 335  Advanced English Grammar (2 hours)
G-SO 202  Minorities in the U.S. (3 hours)
CI 428  Methods for Teaching ESL in the Elem. and Sec. Schools (3 hours)

Special Education Licensure

Through a joint effort with the Kansas Independent Colleges Association (KICA), McPherson College offers an Adaptive Special Education program. Students who participate in this program will graduate with licensure in High Incidence Special Education (intellectual disability, learning disabilities, behavior disorders, and other health impairments) at the K-6 and 6-12 levels.

High Incidence Special Education: Courses Required for all levels:

SPED 310  Foundations for Special Education (4 hours)
SPED 315  General Methods for Special Education Services (4 hours)
SPED 345  Behavioral Management (2 hours)
SPED 499  Capstone Issues (1 hour)

Courses Required for Level K-6:

SPED 321  Grades K-6 Methods for Special Needs (4 hours)
SPED 331  Grades K-6 Field Experience (1 hour)
SPED 431  Grades K-6 Clinical Experience (Student Teaching) (6 hours)
(OR)
*SPED 433  Grades K-6 Internship (4-6 hours)
*Those already holding special education licensure

Courses required for Level 6-12:

SPED 361  Grades 6-12 Methods for Special Needs (4 hours)
SPED 371  Grades 6-12 Field Experience (1 hour)
SPED 471  Grades 6-12 Clinical Experience (Student Teaching) (6 hours)
(OR)
* SPED 473  Grades 6-12 Internship (4-6 hours)
* Those already holding special education licensure

Optional:
SPED 220  Field Experience in Services for Student with Special Needs (1 hour)
SPED 320  Beginning American Sign Language (2 hours)
SPED 322  Intermediate American Sign Language (2 hours)
SPED 678  Topics in Special Education (1 hour)