Catalog 18-19

/Catalog 18-19
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About This Catalog

This catalog explains the academic programs, the graduation requirements, the academic policies, and the academic services in effect at McPherson College as of June 1, 2018. Unless a student requests and is permitted to graduate under a subsequent catalog, the requirements and policies in this catalog shall govern the satisfactory academic progress and eligibility for graduation for all students entering McPherson College during Academic Year 2018-19.

This catalog does not constitute a contract between a student and McPherson College either expressed or implied. McPherson College reserves the right at any time to correct incidental errors or misstatements of policy or program requirements in order to align this catalog with the institution’s or faculty’s original intent. While the administration and faculty of McPherson College believe the academic programs described in this catalog are valuable and the instruction offered effectively delivered by qualified faculty, the ultimate responsibility for results such as achievement, employment, professional licensing, or other measure, lies with student. Likewise, students are ultimately responsible for knowing and fulfilling all the requirements of their academic programs. (See “Student Responsibility for Academic Progress” in the Other Academic Policies section.)

2018|Catalog 18-19|

Academic Calendar for 2018-2019

Fall Semester 2018
Aug. 15-17 Wed.-Fri. Faculty workshop
Aug. 20 Mon. Transfer Orientation; NIGHT CLASSES BEGIN
Aug. 21 Tues. DAY CLASSES BEGIN
Aug. 27 Mon. Last day to add a course
Aug. 31 Fri. President’s Opening Convocation, 12-12:50 p.m.
Last day to drop a course without a W and without $50 fee
Sept. 3 Mon. No Classes – Labor Day
Sept. 17 Wed. 20th day
Sept. 21 Fri. End of first five weeks
Sept. 25 Tues. No Classes; 1/2 Assessment Day/1/2 Professional Development Day;
Down grades due at noon
Oct. 5 Fri. Midterm
Oct. 9 Tues. Midterm grades due by noon
Oct. 11-14 Thurs.-Sun. No Classes – Fall Break
Oct. 17 Wed. Last day to withdraw from a course without a grade
Oct. 19 Fri. Honors Convocation, 12-12:50 p.m.
Oct. 20 Sat. Homecoming
Nov. 21-25 Wed.-Sun. No Classes – Thanksgiving Break
Nov. 26 Mon. Classes convene at 8 a.m.
Dec. 3-6 Mon.-Thurs. Final exams for fall semester
Dec. 11 Tues. Final grades due at noon
 

Interterm 2019

Jan. 3 Thurs. CLASSES BEGIN; last day to add a course
Jan. 7 Mon. Last day to drop a course without a W and without $50 fee
Jan. 17 Thurs. Last day to withdraw from a course without a grade
Jan. 21 Mon. No Classes – Martin Luther King, Jr. Day
Jan. 25 Fri. Final exams for Interterm
Jan. 28 Mon. Faculty workday
Jan. 31 Thurs. Final grades for Interterm due at noon
 

Spring 2019

Jan. 28 Mon. NIGHT CLASSES BEGIN
Jan. 29 Tues. DAY CLASSES BEGIN
Feb. 4 Mon. Last day to add a course
Feb. 8 Fri. Last day to drop a course without a W and without a $50 fee
Feb. 26 Tues. No Classes; 1/2 Assessment Day/1/2 Professional Development Day
Mar. 1 Fri. End of first five weeks
Mar. 5 Tues. Down grades due at noon
Mar. 15 Fri. Midterm
Mar. 16-24 Sat.-Sun. No Classes—Spring Break
Mar. 25 Mon. Classes convene at 8 a.m.
Mar. 26 Tues. Midterm grades due by noon
Mar. 26-28 Tues.-Thurs. Enrollment for upcoming & returning Seniors and 5Y students
Apr. 1-4 Mon.-Thurs. Enrollment for upcoming Juniors
Apr. 2 Tues. Last day to withdraw from a course without a grade
Apr. 8-11 Mon.-Thurs. Enrollment for upcoming Sophomores
Apr. 12 Fri. Enrollment begins for incoming Auto Restoration students
Apr. 19 Fri. No Classes – Good Friday
Apr. 22 Mon. Classes convene at 8 a.m.
Apr. 27 Sat. Enrollment begins for incoming Freshmen
Apr. 29 Mon. Enrollment begins for new Transfers
May 3 Fri. Preliminary senior grades due at noon.
Awards Convocation, 12-12:50 p.m.
May 10 Fri. No Classes – All Schools Day Holiday
May 13-16 Mon.-Thurs. Final exams for spring semester
May 17 Fri. Final senior grades due at noon
May 18 Sat. Commencement rehearsal and group photo
May 19 Sun. Commencement
May 20 Mon. MAY SESSION CLASSES BEGIN
May 21 Tues. Final grades for spring due at noon
May 27 Mon. No Classes – Memorial Day
May 31 Fri. Final exams for May Session
June 4 Tues. Final grades for May Session due at noon
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Profile and Character of the College

Founded in 1887, McPherson College is a private, residential, four-year, career-oriented liberal arts college. The college’s mission is to develop whole persons through scholarship, participation, and service. This mission leads the college to stress on-campus residency for traditional-age students as a means for encouraging participation and community involvement. The college offers the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science degrees in 23 academic majors and a Master of Education degree with emphases in English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) or high-incidence Special Education.

McPherson is a member of the Kansas Collegiate Athletic Conference, competing in seven intercollegiate sports for men and seven intercollegiate sports for women. Although full-time enrollment has historically averaged little more than 425 students, in recent years it has approached 700. The teaching faculty includes 46 full-time professors, more than three-quarters of whom hold terminal degrees. A 14:1 student-faculty ratio offers a personalized education tailored to students’ needs. Year in and year out, McPherson College is at or near the top among private Kansas colleges in the diversity of its student body. With 30 percent students of color, 40 percent women, more than 50 percent of students from out-of-state, and an international population now nearing 10 percent, McPherson is a vibrant community of learners consisting of rural and urban students and a wide variety of ethnic and faith backgrounds.

McPherson has a reputation for integrating excellent academic programs with career-preparation. The accrediting team that came to campus in December 2014 and extended the college’s accreditation through 2024, had special praise for the college’s senior capstone curriculum. They wrote: “The Team was very impressed with the Capstone program at McPherson and even more impressed with the diversity of programs and the number of students participating.… The Capstone experience utilized by all programs is excellent.” One hundred percent of 2017 McPherson College graduates who applied were accepted into graduate and professional schools. The accreditation team was similarly impressed with McPherson’s experiential learning curriculum: “Though not as promoted as the Capstone experience,” the team wrote, “the internship program of McPherson is impressive.” In 2016-17, 75 percent of graduating seniors had completed at least one internship, and 63 percent of the same graduating class had secured jobs before commencement (compared to a national average of 18 percent).

McPherson College is affiliated with the Church of the Brethren but is independent of the denomination and welcomes faculty and students from all faith traditions. The college values its roots in the church and nurtures them, striving as an institution to model the Brethren values of ethical behavior, simple lifestyles, non-violence and peace, respect for the environment and all living creatures, and the expression of faith through service. In 2016-17, 528 McPherson College students participated in community service projects, averaging more than 11.5 hours of service per student.

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Statement of Mission and Identity

McPherson College is a vibrant community of persons from diverse faiths and cultural backgrounds committed to its mission: to develop whole persons through scholarship, participation and service.

Chartered in 1887 by leaders of the Church of the Brethren, McPherson College has a 130-year history of providing excellent career-oriented liberal arts education shaped by the essential values of its founding denomination. The Church of the Brethren is a Christian denomination founded in Germany in 1708. It accepts the New Testament as the rule of faith and emphasizes the inherent value of all persons, the communal discernment of truth, the necessity of putting faith into action, and the biblical calls to simplicity, non-violence, non-conformity and transformation through education. Brethren strive to “continue the work of Jesus – peacefully…simply…together.”

McPherson College’s programs integrate career guidance and practical experiences into a traditional liberal arts curriculum that upholds the highest standards of academic excellence. Our goal is to help students discern a vocational call consistent with their gifts and interests and to prepare them for a life of meaningful work.

Community is central to McPherson College. We affirm diversity within the community, emphasizing unity and acceptance rather than judgment and rejection. Because we believe that the pursuit of truth is a collective endeavor, and that the point of scholarly learning is to advance the common good, McPherson College aspires to be a healthy community of learning where whole persons nurture and balance their physical, intellectual, and spiritual components; develop and live in respectful, reciprocal relationships with others; and are committed to responsible service to the world.

To accomplish our mission, McPherson embraces the ideals of scholarship, participation and service.

Scholarship. All absolute Truth is God’s Truth and humankind must labor diligently in the pursuit of truth we can know; thus, McPherson College upholds the highest standards of academic excellence. Faculty strive to teach students to think critically and independently, to communicate clearly and effectively, to integrate knowledge across the disciplines, and to assess the value conflicts in issues. This is done without coercion, letting the evidence lead the search, and with respect for the consciences and value differences of others.

Participation. Students apply knowledge, practice skills, and deepen and broaden their understanding of themselves and others through active participation in diverse learning experiences. A smaller community requires greater participation from its members. For these reasons, McPherson College is committed to being a small college and encouraging student participation in a variety of activities.

Service. God’s love is personified in the life of Jesus who came to serve the world. Through works of peacemaking and compassion, humanity responds to God’s love and becomes an instrument of God’s servanthood in the world. Therefore, McPherson College emphasizes service to others, encouraging all members of its community to give selflessly of themselves to others.

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The Campus

The present campus, with its 19 major buildings and 42-acre setting, has matured into an institution of which its founders would be proud. To celebrate its 100th anniversary in 1987-88, McPherson College architecturally redesigned its entire campus, closing two city streets that bisected campus on both the east and the west—a factor that has improved the quality of living and learning at McPherson College.

In the spring of 2000 state-of-the-art theatre and fine arts facilities were added to the instructional facilities, and Melhorn Science Hall opened its doors for fall 2001 classes. Although no new academic facilities have been added since that time, the existing facilities have been regularly updated. The college has little to no deferred maintenance, and the campus grounds are attractive and well groomed.

In 2016 the college invested $7.4 million in its heating and cooling system and began installing a keyless entry system on its exterior doors that includes security cameras. That keyless entry system provides an additional margin of safety for all students and employees.

Campus community members have exceptional access to healthcare services. Partners in Family Care maintains a walk-in clinic in Harter Hall. Office visits are free for students and employees, with only lab or technical services being charged to insurance. Client-Centered Counseling also maintains an office and regular hours in the Harter clinic. Up to four counseling sessions are offered to students at no charge.

McPherson College is located in predominantly rural central Kansas. According to the most recent census figures, McPherson County is home to 29,356 people; 23.3 percent of this population is under 18 years of age while 18.7 percent is 65 or older. Ethnic and racial minorities constitute 4.2 percent of the county’s population.

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Services

Academic Advising

Academic advising at McPherson College is an intentional relationship between advisor and student as they plan and reach the student’s educational, career, and personal goals. Incoming freshmen are assigned a freshman advisor. Near the end of their first semester, freshmen are assigned a faculty advisor from an area of academic interest. This advisor will help the student plan a program of study consistent with the student’s interests and abilities and oversee the student’s progress toward completing the plan of study. The faculty advisor also engages students in exploring their long-range occupational and professional goals and directs the student to resources that will help them confirm and achieve these goals.

Disability Services

Students with temporary or permanent disabilities are welcome at McPherson College under the regular admissions requirements. These students are urged to inform the college of their disability and special needs prior to their arrival to allow the college ample time to determine necessary resources and accommodations. All buildings are ADA compliant with the exception of Beeghly Hall. Persons needing assistance may notify the Admissions Office or the Director of the Royer Center for Academic Development located on the main floor of Miller Library.

Healthcare Services

Campus community members have exceptional access to healthcare services. Partners in Family Care maintains a walk-in clinic in Harter Hall. Office visits are free for students and employees, with only lab or technical services being charged to insurance. Client-Centered Counseling also maintains an office and regular hours in the Harter clinic. Up to four counseling sessions are offered to students at no charge.

Career Services

The college recognizes that general life skills such as communication, computation, logical thinking, positive interpersonal relationships, and decision making constitute the major portion of the skills people need to succeed in their careers and in life in general. In collaboration with college faculty and staff, the Career Services Office offers special programs, seminars, and courses that assist students in refining life objectives, career goals, and internships and in making sound educational choices for achieving those goals and objectives. Seminars and workshops are also offered to help students with preparing their résumés and developing the skills needed to secure employment. For additional information, consult the Career Services Office web page.

Royer Center for Academic Development

The Royer Center for Academic Development, located in Miller Library, serves students who want to learn to study more efficiently. Through individualized study, small group instruction, supplemental instruction or tutoring, students are offered personalized attention while working to improve reading, writing, math, or study skills. All tutoring services, both individual and group, are provided without additional charge.

Miller Library

Miller Library provides library and media services to the students and staff of McPherson College in support of their classroom activities. For more information, consult the Miller Library web page.

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Kansas Independent Colleges Association & College Consortium

McPherson College is a member of the Kansas Independent College Association (KICA).  KICA strengthens the competitive standing of the 19-member independent, nonprofit, regionally accredited, degree-granting colleges and universities in Kansas through professional development and collaboration, governmental advocacy, and public engagement collectively aimed at supporting the ability of students to choose and afford an independent college education that fits their goals.

Through McPherson College’s affiliation with KICA, students can benefit from special programs and expanded course offerings. Currently, KICA offers an Adaptive Special Education program. Students who participate in this program will graduate with licensure in High Incidence Special Education (intellectual disability, learning disabilities, behavior disorders, and other health impairments) at the K-6 and 6-12 levels. In the future, participating KICA members may also make synchronous distance classes available to McPherson College students. Please see the registrar for additional information. By arrangement with KICA, McPherson College students may also enroll in pre-approved online courses offered through the College Consortium platform. Students can explore the available online courses at https://www.collegeconsortium.org/institutions/mcpherson-college. All College Consortium courses must be approved by both the academic advisor and the registrar.

Member institutions of KICA include McPherson College and Baker University (Baldwin City), Benedictine College (Atchison), Bethany College (Lindsborg), Bethel College (North Newton), Central Christian College of Kansas (McPherson), Cleveland University-Kansas City (Overland Park), Donnelly College (Kansas City), Friends University (Wichita), Hesston College (Hesston), Kansas Wesleyan University (Salina), Manhattan Christian College (Manhattan), McPherson College (McPherson), MidAmerica Nazarene University (Olathe), Newman University (Wichita), Ottawa University (Ottawa), Southwestern College (Winfield), Sterling College (Sterling), Tabor College (Hillsboro), and the University of Saint Mary (Leavenworth).

 

2018|01 Institutional Profile, Catalog 18-19|

Accreditation

McPherson College is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools (230 South LaSalle Street, Suite 7-500, Chicago, Illinois 60604-1411, telephone: 800.621.7440, web address: www.ncahlc.org); by the Kansas State Department of Education (120 East 10th Street, Topeka, Kansas 66612); and by the Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (see Teacher Education Program for details). McPherson College is in good standing with all accrediting bodies. In addition, the college is a member of the following:

  • American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education
  • American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers
  • American Library Association
  • Association of Governing Boards
  • Association of Teacher Education-Kansas Brethren College Association
  • Council for Aid to Education
  • Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation
  • Council of Independent Colleges
  • Kansas Association of College Teachers of Education
  • Kansas Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers
  • Kansas Association of Private Colleges in Teacher Education
  • Kansas Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators
  • Kansas Collegiate Athletic Conference
  • Kansas Independent College Association
  • Kansas Independent College Fund
  • Kansas State Department of Education
  • McPherson Chamber of Commerce
  • McPherson Main Street
  • National Association of College and University Business Officers
  • National Association of College Stores
  • National Association of Colleges and Employers
  • National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities
  • National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics
  • National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators
  • National Association of Student Personnel Administrators
  • The Higher Learning Commission – North Central Association
  • Rocky Mountain Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators
  • South Central Kansas Regional Library System
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Institutional Policies

Nondiscrimination and EEO Statement

In accordance with state and federal law, McPherson College does not discriminate on the basis of race, creed, color, religion, national origin, ancestry, citizenship status, age, disability, sex, marital status, veteran status, genetic information, sexual orientation, or any other legally protected characteristic, in the hiring process, during employment, and in the operation of all College programs, activities, and services, including, but not limited to, academics, athletics, other extracurricular activities, the awarding of student financial aid, recruitment, admissions, and housing.

Persons having inquiries concerning the College’s compliance with this policy or any laws and regulations prohibiting discrimination are directed to contact the following:

  • A current student or potential student with questions or concerns about any type of discrimination is encouraged to bring these issues to the attention of the Vice President of Academic Affairs, who may be contacted at: (620) 242-0506 or claryb@mcpherson.edu. Additionally, any member of the college’s administration may be contacted with questions or concerns.
  • An employee with questions or concerns about any type of discrimination in the workplace or an applicant, who has applied for an open position at McPherson College, is encouraged to bring these issues to the attention of the Director of Human Resources, who may be contacted at: (620) 242-0454 or stocklib@mcpherson.edu. Additionally, employees should feel free to raise concerns of discrimination with their immediate supervisors at any time.
  • Questions or concerns regarding the College’s compliance with Title IX and its prohibition of sex discrimination may be directed to the Title IX Coordinator. McPherson has designated the following Title IX Coordinator and Deputy Title IX Coordinator as named in the College’s Sexual Misconduct Policy:

Brenda Jill Stocklin-Smith, M.ED., PHR, SHRM-CP
1600 East Euclid
Human Resources
McPherson College
McPherson KS 67460
(620) 242-0454
stocklib@mcpherson.edu 

Khalilah T. Doss, Ph.D. VP of Student Life and Dean of Students
1600 Euclid Street
Student Life
McPherson College
McPherson KS 67460
(620) 242-0501
dossk@mcpherson.edu

  • For questions or concerns related to the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, please contact:

Carole Barr
1600 East Euclid
Director of Student Success
McPherson College
McPherson KS 67460
(620) 242-0597

Brenda Jill Stocklin-Smith, M.ED., PHR, SHRM-CP
1600 East Euclid
Human Resources
McPherson College
McPherson KS 67460
(620) 242-0454
stocklib@mcpherson.edu 

  • For all other inquiries related to discrimination at the College, please contact:

D. Bruce Clary
1600 East Euclid
Vice President for Academic Affairs
McPherson College
McPherson KS 67460
(620) 242-0506
claryb@mcpherson.edu

  • The U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights (OCR) enforces discrimination laws related to race, color, national origin, sex, disability, and age. Complaints related to these protected classes can also be filed with OCR by visiting: http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/complaintintro.html.

No individual will be subject to any form of retaliation, discipline, or other adverse action for reporting conduct in violation of the College’s nondiscrimination/EEO policy, assisting/cooperating in making a complaint, or assisting with the investigation of a complaint. Any individual who believes they have experienced or witnessed retaliation should immediately notify the appropriate member(s) of the administration as identified above. Those found to be engaging in any type of discrimination in violation of the law or College policy will be subject to disciplinary action, up to and including expulsion or termination of employment.

Administrative Policy 180, Policy Against Discrimination, Harassment and Retaliation and Complaint Procedures explains the process for an individual to file a complaint.

In addition, the following policies and procedures are utilized by McPherson College in addressing various forms of discrimination complaints:

Disability Accommodations

Students with disabilities are welcome at McPherson College under the regular admissions requirements. For details about accommodations, see Disability Services on the Services page of this catalog.

Student Right to Know Information

The Student-Right-To-Know And Campus Security Act of1990, as amended by the Higher Education Technical Amendments of 1991, requires all colleges and universities participating in the Federal Student Aid Program to disclose basic institution information, graduation rates, and information on students receiving athletically related student aid. For the most up-to-date and complete information, see the Student Right to Know Information web page on the college website.

Consumer and Disclosure Information

For the most up-to-date and complete consumer and disclosure information, see the Consumer and Disclosure Information web page on the McPherson College website.

Student Records Policies

Student records are confidential but are open for inspection by the student. Records may also be inspected by parents of financially dependent students. Official transcripts must be requested through the college website https://www.mcpherson.edu/alumni/transcript-request/; other records must be requested in writing from the appropriate dean.

Privacy of Student Records

Certain information is considered to be public or directory information while other information is private in nature. Directory information includes a student’s name, address, email address, telephone number(s), date and place of birth, photograph, enrollment status, major field of study, student ID number (which cannot be used alone to access electronic systems, participation in officially recognized activities and sports, weight and height of members of athletic teams, dates of attendance at McPherson College, degrees and awards received and the most recent previous educational agency or institution attended by the student. Directory information can be disclosed without a student’s consent unless the student gives a signed notice to the college restricting such disclosure.

A federal law known as the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, or FERPA, gives students and former students the right to inspect, review and copy education records related to them. The only exceptions to this rule are private notes of teachers and administrators, medical records, parents’ financial records, confidential recommendations prior to January 1, 1975, and records to which the student has waived the right of access in writing. Students have 10 days following the release of directory information to notify the college that any or all of the information designated should not be released without his/her prior consent. This notice must be given in writing to the office of the dean of students.

Education records and personally identifiable information from those records will not be released without the written consent of the student involved, except to other college personnel, officials of other schools in which the student intends to enroll, authorized state and federal government representatives, or unless it is released in connection with the student’s application for financial aid, in response to a judicial order or subpoena, or in the case of a bona fide emergency.

The college maintains with education records of each student a record identifying all persons other than college officials who have requested or obtained access to the records and indicating the legitimate interest of those persons. This record of access is available upon request to the student in question. Finally, all personal information about a student released to a third party will be transferred on the condition that no one else shall have access to it except with the student’s consent. A complete list, with location and custodian of all records kept on college students, is obtainable from the dean of students.

Upon request, a record covered by FERPA will be made available within a reasonable time, and in no event later than 45 days after the request. The student should direct the request to the custodian of the records in question. Copies of the record will be made available to the student at the student’s expense (usually limited to cost of materials).

A student may also request explanations and interpretations of the records from the official in charge. If the student believes that a particular file contains inaccurate or misleading information or is otherwise inappropriate, the college will afford an opportunity for a hearing to challenge the content of the record. Prior to any formal hearing, the official in charge of the record is authorized to attempt to settle the dispute through informal meetings and discussions with the student.

If the student is not satisfied, he/she may request a hearing. Procedures for such a hearing will be those outlined in the student handbook for all cases coming before the Campus Hearing Board. The student will have the opportunity at the hearing to present any relevant evidence.

Academic Record

A transcript is a student’s official record of courses taken and grades earned. The records are kept and maintained by the registrar’s office. Student records are confidential, but are open for inspection by the student. Inspection of records must be made in writing, with the request being made to the registrar’s office for transcripts and to the appropriate dean for other records. The registrar will notify the student when the file is available for inspection within 20 days of the date of the request.

Student Development File

The student development file is maintained in the office of the dean of students. It contains directory information for the student, emergency contact persons, copies of correspondence between the student and the dean’s office, a record of any disciplinary action which involved the student, and summary records of student involvements on campus such as work or internship experience and achievements through student organizations. Students who wish to review the contents of their Student Development File should make a written request to the dean of students, who is responsible for maintaining the files. The dean will notify the student when the file is available for inspection within 45 days of the date of request.

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Admissions Process

McPherson College is an ideal place for students to develop as whole persons, to learn, to explore and to grow. Offering a challenging liberal arts foundation, relevant career-oriented majors, and broad opportunities for internships in real-life settings, McPherson College provides a nurturing environment in which tomorrow’s leaders can discover their life’s work and their place in the world. Students who invest in the McPherson College experience will discover success measured in terms of classroom achievement, personal relationships, career opportunities and the enrichment of their entire lives.

Individuals wishing to be considered for admission must submit the following:

  • A completed Application for Admission
  • An application fee is NOT required
  • Official copies of all academic transcripts (high school AND college, if applicable)
  • Official copy of standardized test scores – Acceptable standardized testing programs are the American College Testing Program (ACT), the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) or the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL)
  • Students who are accepted are required to pay a $150 deposit prior to being enrolled in classes. $100 is applied to the student’s account. For Automotive Restoration students the deposit is $250, with $200 applied to the student’s account.

McPherson College welcomes all students, regardless of sex, color, creed, disability, sexual orientation or national origin, with equal opportunity for admission. Specific admissions procedures and criteria follow.

First-time Freshman Applicants

After the completion of the junior year (6th semester) of high school, an official application form can be submitted online at www.mcpherson.edu/admissions/application. Applicants must ask their high school guidance counselor to forward a copy of their secondary school record directly to McPherson College. Students’ credentials are reviewed as soon as a completed application is received.

Criteria for admission include a state-certified high school transcript or the completion of the GED, corresponding standardized test scores, and appropriate personal qualifications. Recommendations from high school guidance personnel, teachers and pastors may be examined concerning character traits and personal qualifications. We welcome applications from home school applicants. Students with the following admission criteria are more likely to succeed at McPherson College:

  • A minimum cumulative high school GPA of 2.0 (3.0 preferred) and
  • A minimum ACT composite score of 18 (20 ACT preferred) or
  • A minimum SAT score of 940 (combining critical reading and math)

Students not meeting the minimum admissions requirements may appeal or be referred to the Enrollment Committee for consideration. Please contact your Admissions Counselor for more information.

Transfer Applicants

Criteria for admission include

  • Official copy of transcript(s) from all colleges or universities attended demonstrating satisfactory completion of 12 hours of college- level coursework.
  • A minimum cumulative college GPA of 2.0 from all transfer college-level coursework.

Only academic work from accredited institutions will be accepted at McPherson College. Credit accepted for transfer to McPherson College shall count as hours earned. Hours attempted and grade points achieved will not be transferred. Only courses in which a grade of C or better has been earned will be transferred as credit toward graduation. Consequently, a student’s grade point average will be dependent upon courses attempted at McPherson College.

Courses taken at another institution to replace a letter grade in a McPherson College course will not be accepted. McPherson College courses taken as a replacement course will be listed on the student’s transcript along with the initial and replacement course grades. Both course grades count toward a student’s cumulative GPA.

Applicants with fewer than 12 hours of college level credit may be required to take the ACT or SAT examination for diagnostic purposes.

Students who transfer to McPherson College will be expected to complete the general education requirements as outlined in this catalog. Transfer students holding an associate of arts or associate of science degree may be admitted with all earned credits transferring, and with general education foundation and distribution requirements met provided the student is not working toward teacher licensure. Students holding a certificate or degree other than an AA or AS will be evaluated on a course by course basis. Please refer to the General Education Requirements section.

Students wanting to transfer from McPherson College should work with the transferring institution in regards to their transfer credit policy since each institution decides what they will accept for credit.

Transfer students who have earned 64 credit hours may not transfer further two-year college credit. The last 60 hours of the bachelor’s degree must be taken at a four-year institution. Credit may be given for the service-training program conducted by the various branches of the Armed Services as recommended by the American Council on Education in “A Guide to the Evaluation of Educational Experiences in the Armed Forces.”

Reverse Transfer

McPherson College participates in a universal reverse transfer program with the Kansas Community Colleges. This program allows students to receive an associate’s degree from their most recent community college by combining credits earned at McPherson College with credits earned at the community college. Students who transfer at least 45 credit hours to McPherson College from Hesston College, Donnelly College, or any Kansas public community college are eligible to participate in the reverse transfer program.

Students who wish to participate should contact the Registrar’s Office and sign a Reverse Transfer Agreement. At the end of each semester, McPherson College will submit an official transcript back to the student’s community college for each student who is enrolled in the Reverse Transfer program and has at least 60 cumulative earned credit hours. Once the student has met all degree requirements for their declared associate’s degree, the community college will award the associate’s degree to the student.

Returning Applicants

Students who have previously attended McPherson College and who have interrupted their McPherson College program for longer than the period of one semester must make application for readmission by submitting:

  • A completed Reapplication for Admissions
  • Copies of academic transcripts from McPherson College and any colleges/universities the student has attended (students must possess a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0)

International Applicants

All non-United States citizens who are not permanent residents and who wish to study at McPherson College must complete the International Student Application.

Required Materials for Admission to McPherson College:

  1. International Application for Admission
  2. Official copies of your academic records submitted to INCRED (International Credential Evaluation).
    • Create an account at https://incredevals.org and upload an official copy of your transcript. Please choose McPherson College as the recipient of the evaluation.  INCRED charges a fee for processing. If the applicant is wanting to see if they are eligible to receive college credit for higher level high school work, they should choose the course by course evaluation.
  3.  Official TOEFL or SAT scores are required for all international students.
    • English proficiency is verified by the results of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL.) Required minimum TOEFL score for McPherson College is 79. McPherson College TOEFL code is 6404.
    • The SAT can be substituted for the TOEFL with a minimum required score of 940 composite (Reading and Math only.) McPherson College SAT code is #6404.
  4. Affidavit of Support/Bank Statements
    • The affidavit should be signed by the party responsible for payment. Include with the affidavit 6 months of bank statements that support the ability of the responsible party to make payment.
  5. A photocopy of your passport. To ensure that immigration documents are prepared accurately, please provide a copy of your valid passport.

Once a student is ACCEPTED

  • A letter of Acceptance will be emailed to you at the email address you supply on your application.
  • Please submit your $500 Enrollment/Housing Deposit.

I-20 – will be sent ONLY after your $500 Enrollment/Housing Deposit is received

The I-20 is mailed to you at the address listed on your application. You will use this to obtain an F-1 Visa which will allow you to enter the US to attend McPherson College.

Please work with the Admissions Office to arrange pick-up from the Wichita, KS (ICT) Airport.

Automotive Restoration Applicants

Individuals interested in studying automotive restoration technology must be admitted separately to the program after being admitted to the college. Enrollment in the automotive restoration technology program is limited. To be admitted into the program, an applicant must:

  • Apply to McPherson College and be accepted.
  • Prepare and Upload the Following Materials to Slideroom:

1) A brief statement of interest (between 100 – 500 words) describing the applicant’s motivation for seeking a bachelor’s degree in Automotive Restoration at McPherson College;

2) A résumé outlining applicant’s education, activities, honors, employment, service and leadership experience where applicable;

3) Submit six to 25 images that represent applicant’s aptitude for restoring antique automobiles or motorcycles, where applicable. Personal experience in automotive restoration is beneficial, but examples of an applicant’s skills and/or craftsmanship in other areas are acceptable. Images that show a progression of work or that illustrate work in process are particularly meaningful to reviewers. All images should be accompanied by captions. The captions may be included in the images themselves, added to the end of applicant’s statement of interest, or uploaded as a separate file.

Submit the aforementioned materials to Slideroom using the following link: https://mcphersoncollegeautorestoration.slideroom.com. There is a $10 fee that must be paid to Slideroom for the use of this service. Once accepted to the college, applicant’s materials will be reviewed in their entirety. A decision will be made within three to five business days. Applicants will be notified by email and a letter regarding the outcome of this review.

  • Upon acceptance into the automotive restoration program, students must submit a $250 deposit to reserve their place. $200 of the deposit will be applied to the student’s account. Entrance to the program is not finalized until acceptance and deposit are completed.
  • Early applications are encouraged because the number of students admitted to the program is limited.

Mid-year Undergraduate Entrance

Most baccalaureate degree programs are available to students who wish to start their academic careers second semester. Consequently, each year a number of students enter the college at the beginning of the spring semester. The Admissions Office welcomes inquiries concerning mid-year entrance.

Applicants for M.Ed. or Graduate Courses in Education

Students may choose any of the following options when applying to the graduate program: ESOL licensure courses, SPED licensure courses, or combine those courses with the core graduate courses to pursue a M.Ed. degree.

Applying for ESOL licensure and/or SPED licensure:

  • Application for Admission
  • Official college transcript showing bachelor’s degree earned

Applying to M.Ed. Program with ESOL or SPED licensure:

  • Application for Admission
  • Official transcripts for all colleges attended and showing bachelor’s degree earned
  • College GPA of 3.0
  • Essay stating professional goals (300 words) – please email to teachered@mcpherson.edu
  • Two letters of recommendation

All materials are reviewed by a subcommittee of the Teacher Education Board. The subcommittee’s recommendation is forwarded to Teacher Education Board for final approval.

Conditional Admission

Candidates not meeting the GPA requirement identified above may be admitted to the program on a conditional status assuming there is reasonable evidence of candidate success. Conditionally admitted candidates must earn a minimum GPA of 3.0 in their first six hours in order to remain in the program.

Transfer of Graduate Credits

After acceptance into the M.Ed. program, students who have previously completed graduate credit hours at another accredited institution may apply to have up to 15 graduate credit hours accepted toward the M.Ed. degree as long as those credits have been earned in the last 10 years at the time of entry into the master’s program.

To request that previously-earned credits be considered for transfer, the student must submit a final official graduate transcript along with a formal request listing the credits from the transcript the student wants considered for transfer. The formal request should include descriptions of the coursework and how it meets the requirements of the M.Ed. program at McPherson College.

Only courses in which a grade of B or better has been earned will be accepted for credit toward the M.Ed. degree. Consequently, a student’s grade point average depends upon courses attempted at McPherson College only. The director of the M.Ed. program at McPherson College evaluates which courses qualify for transfer. The program director may request further information from the student, for example, course descriptions or syllabi, before making a recommendation to the registrar. With the programs director’s recommendation in hand, the registrar makes the final decision about the transfer credits. The registrar’s decision is final and cannot be appealed.

Admissions Policies

Notification of Admission

Notification of acceptance is given in writing, usually within one week of completion of the application process.

Students who are admitted through the Admissions Appeal process may receive conditions of enrollment with the acceptance letter. Restrictions for conditionally admitted students continue through the first semester of enrollment. At the completion of the first full semester, the student’s academic progress will be evaluated.

Students may be admitted based on partial high school (6th or 7th semester) or college transcripts and exam score reports. However, students must provide FINAL OFFICIAL copies of all academic documentation prior to enrollment:

  • High School Transcript – Must include official seal or signature and be sent to McPherson College directly from your school. Transcript should include graduation date and cumulative GPA.
  • College/University Transcript – Must include official seal or signature, include grades for final semester of attendance and be sent directly from the college/ university to McPherson College.
  • ACT/SAT Score Reports – Must be sent directly from ACT or the College Board to McPherson College OR have the official ACT/SAT score reported on the official high school transcript.

Students will receive regular reminders from the Office of Admissions identifying information needed to complete the admissions and financial aid record.

Provisional Acceptance

There is often a cost associated with requesting an official transcript from a college or university. In an attempt to avoid paying the fee several times by requesting official transcripts in the middle of the semester and after the completion of the semester, there is an option to offer Provisional Acceptance to a transfer student without official transcripts.  Provisional Acceptance allows the student to continue through the admissions process.  Students with provisional acceptance can deposit and secure their housing and enrollment as well as receive their financial aid package.  Provisional Acceptance must be resolved by August 1st for the fall semester applicant and January 15th for the spring semester applicant. Students that remain at Provisional Acceptance will be taken out of the next term course(s)/or not allowed to enroll in the subsequent term if final official transcripts are not received before the 20th day of classes.

Here are the guidelines for provisionally accepting transfer students:

  • Unofficial transcripts must include the institution name, student name, and all courses (pass/fails/withdrawals) included.
  • Unofficial transcripts must have grades for the last completed semester included on the transcript.
  • We must have transcripts (unofficial or official) from all schools the student has attended.
  • Provisional Acceptance will be approved by the Vice President for Enrollment.
  • Official transcripts must be received by August 1 for those entering in the fall and by January 15 for those entering in the spring.

Conditional Admittance

Individuals who do not meet the admissions criteria may be considered for conditional acceptance to McPherson College. The Vice President for Enrollment and the Vice President for Academic Affairs will together evaluate the student’s academic history to determine if the student is accepted “conditionally” or denied acceptance. The “conditional” acceptance may include but not limited to the following conditions:

  1. Meet with the Vice President for Academic Affairs prior to the start of the semester.
  2. Enroll in no more than 12-13 total semester hours during the first semester.
  3. Enroll in College Reading/Study Skills – ID109 – 2 hours.
  4. Enroll in College Rhetoric – EN110 – 3 hours.
  5. Enroll in College Learning Skills – ID100 – 1 hour
  6. Meet regularly with your academic advisor as directed by him/her.
  7. Make satisfactory academic progress.
  8. Complete every course for which you are enrolled earning a grade of “C” or better.
  9. Regular class attendance is required.
  10. Any unexcused absences may result in academic suspension.
  11. Meet with the Director of the Center for Academic Development for an assessment of your academic plans and goals and arranging for any services that may be necessary to assist you in being successful..

Admissions representatives are available to answer questions related to this process. All appeals must be submitted to the Office of Admissions where they will be forwarded to the Enrollment Committee for consideration. Students will be notified in writing of the committee’s decision.

 

Student Expenses for 2018-2019

Regular Charges and Fees for 2018-2019

Tuition $ 28,160
Fees $ 791
Room Standard Double Room $ 3,528 (Dotzour, Bittinger, Morrison, and Metzler)
Harter Apts $ 5,030 (junior/senior status, 3.0 GPA)
Baer Apts $ 5,030 (junior/senior status, 3.0 GPA)
Terra Nova Luxury Apartments $ 8,000 (senior status, 3.25 GPA)
Lakeside Apartments $ 4,830 (junior/senior status, 3.0 GPA)
Deerfield, Lakeside Duplex, or Baer house $ 4,830 (junior/senior status, 3.0 GPA)
Board 19-meal (305 block) $ 4,883 (required for all first-time freshmen)
14-meal (224 block) $ 4,576
10-meal (160 block) $ 3,164
Total Charges Standard $37,362

 

Tuition – Full Time
$ 28,160
Includes twelve (12) to sixteen (16) hours for fall and spring term and four (4) hours in interterm.
Students must be enrolled full-time to receive institutional financial aid.  Excess hours over sixteen (16) hours: $ 250 per hour

Tuition – Part Time
1-7 hours: $ 430 per hour
8 to 11 hours: $ 750 per hour

Tuition – Summer School
Undergraduate: $ 430 per hour
ACCK Courses: $ 300 per hour

Room
Double Room: (see above)
McPherson College is a residential college. All unmarried students age 23 and under not living with their parents live in residence halls.
Singl
e rooms at an additional $800/semester to the double room charge. Based on availability.

Board
305 block: $ 4,883 (required for all first-time freshmen)
224 block: $ 4,576
160 block: $ 3,164 (required for all off-campus athletes and Baer students)

General Fee
$ 791
The general fee is assessed to all full-time students to assist in covering the costs associated with student activities, computer support, student life, athletics, and Student Government Association.

Student Insurance
To be determined. Proof of Insurance is needed for student athletes and international students.

Part-Time Fee
3-7 hours: $ 30 per term
8-11 hours: $ 50 per term

Graduate Tuition
McPherson students: $ 375 per hour

Special Charges and Fees

Admission
Enrollment Deposit: $ 150/$ 250 for Automotive Restoration. $ 100/$ 200 is applied to the student account.
Deposit is refundable before May 1.

Athletic Fee
$ 630

Records
Late Payment Arrangement: $ 100 after August 1
Each change of schedule: $ 50 (drop and add after the first two (2) weeks of term)
Official Transcript: $ 8+ processing fee to National Student Clearinghouse
Returned Check Charge: $ 30

Special Classes
Auditing Courses, per hour: $ 50
Senior Citizen Audit Fee: $ 25
The Vice President for Academic Affairs determines which courses may be audited. Restoration technology, studio art classes, and private music lessons may not be audited. Permission to audit is granted on a space available basis.
Private Music Lessons: $ 150 per semester hour in addition to regular tuition

Piano rental for Class Piano: $ 50
Instrument Rental: $ 50 per instrument
Auto Restoration Fee: $ 65 per class ($ 90 for TE152 Sheet Metal)
Maximum for Auto Restoration per semester: $ 260

Individual & Dual Sport I & II Fee: $ 25 per class
Scientific Writing for Behavioral Sciences Fee: $ 20 per class

Teacher Education Courses

G-CI 251 Introduction to Education Practicum: $20
CI 475/EE 475 Student Teaching: $150 per semester

Studio Art Courses

G-AR 101 Drawing I: $ 125
AR 210 Drawing II
: $ 125
G-AR 102 Painting I
: $ 125
AR 202 Painting II
: $ 125
G-AR 131 Ceramics 1
: $ 125
AR 231 Ceramics II
: $ 125
AR 103 Elementary Design
: $ 125
AR 315 Metalsmithing
: $ 125
G-AR 350 Sculpture I
: $ 125
AR 355 Sculpture II
: $ 125
AR 203 Photography I
: $ 225
AR 303 Photography II
: $ 225
AR 333 Commercial Photography I
: $ 225
AR 363 Commercial Photography II
: $ 225
AR 403 Photography Portfolio Development
: $ 225
AR 425 Concentrated Studies: $ 125
AR 475A Senior Concentration
: $ 125

Graphic Design Courses

AR 130 Design Software: $ 225
AR 205 Multi-Media Software
: $ 225
AR 230 Graphic Design I
: $ 225
AR 235 Graphic Design II
: $ 225
AR 320 Typography & Logo Branding:
$ 225
AR 330 Graphic Design III:
$ 225
AR 475G Graphic Design IV
:
$ 225
AR 335 Moving Image Software
:
$ 225
AR 470 Graphic Design Senior Show
:
$ 225

Art History Courses

Art History I: $ 100
Art History II
: $ 100
Contemporary Design
: $ 25

Athletic Fee

$630

Billing and Payment Policies

McPherson College expects the student to be financially responsible. All student accounts are in the student’s name regardless of who makes payment on the account.

Billing

Students may view their account statement on Bulldog Connect. The first charges for the fall semester will be available in July. The spring charges will be available in late November. These initial statements list tuition and applicable fees, room and board for residential students as well as estimated financial aid, payments, and the estimated balance due. Activity after the initial account statement is created may affect the amount you are responsible to pay. Such activity could include adding/dropping courses, bookstore charges, changes to room and board, and/or changes to your financial aid package.

Email communications to the student’s McPherson College email address are sent letting them know when their account statement is available. However, students are strongly encouraged to stay informed on a regular basis by accessing their account on Bulldog Connect at any time throughout the year.

Financial Aid

The Business Office will recognize credit on the student’s account balance for posted federal financial aid and issue a credit refund check within fourteen days from the posting date in accordance with Department of Education rules. For other non-federal aid, the following circumstances apply:

Institutional/Merit Awards: Credit will be recognized when the award is posted to the student account.

Outside Scholarships: Awards from outside sources will not appear on the student’s account statement until McPherson College receives the funds and the aid is posted to the student account.

Alternative Loans: Credit will be recognized when loan funds are made available to the college and the loan is posted to the student account.

Federal Work Study: Although Work Study may be part of your financial aid package, it is not a guarantee of employment and will not be deducted from your student account. Arrangement may be made in the Business Office to direct future wages to be applied directly to the student account.

Monthly Payment Plan

If an annual or semester payment is not possible, McPherson College requires students to set up a budget plan through Tuition Management Services (TMS). For a small enrollment fee ($65 per year) families can budget convenient, interest-free monthly payments beginning August 15. Further information can be found at www.mcpherson.afford.com. An exception to this policy would require individual arrangements made directly with the Business Office.

Payments

You are responsible for payment in full of your student account balance minus estimated financial aid. The payments are due as billed unless noted otherwise. The fall semester bill is due on August 15, 2018 and the spring semester bill is due on January 15, 2019. While McPherson Colleges encourages payment in full by the end of the semester, you are allowed to carry over $1,500 of unpaid expenses from the previous semester to the current semester. A larger carry over may be allowed only under specific arrangement with the Business Office.

Courses taken online through College Consortium must be paid in full upfront. If payment in full is not made before the course drop date, the student will automatically be withdrawn from the College Consortium course.

Checks should be made payable to McPherson College, and payments should be mailed to McPherson College, Attn: Business Office, PO Box 1402, McPherson, KS 67460. Cash payments are accepted in person in the Business Office. Credit card payments can be made online or by telephone. For online payments please log into Bulldog Connect to view your account and click on Make a Payment. If you have questions, please contact the Business Office at 620-242-0450 or 620-242-0459.

The college reserves the right to withhold official academic transcripts if the student fails to pay their balance in full. Diplomas will not be released if an account balance remains. Students with a balance are also not allowed to participate in Commencement.

The college will provide an unofficial copy of an academic transcript at the student’s request. It will be marked with the word “UNOFFICIAL.”

Holds

Failure to pay the balance on the student’s account by the due date places the student on a restricted enrollment status, or HOLD. Students on HOLD will not be allowed to register for classes, confirm existing pre-registrations, obtain transcripts or receive other non-essential services until their accounts are brought current. Please contact the Business Office at 620-242-0450 or 620-242-0459 for assistance with HOLD resolutions.

Late Fees

A late fee charge of $100 will be assessed on semester balances remaining unpaid 10 days after the semester due date. The exception would be those enrolled in a monthly payment plan.

Institutional Refund Policy

Students that withdraw from McPherson College on or after the first day of a term may be eligible for a refund (proration) of qualified institutional charges and non-federal financial aid. Qualified charges would include tuition, fees, room and board. Charges that are not included in a refund include, but are not limited to, books, fines, and insurance premiums. Non federal aid would include aid from the institution, state, and outside resources. McPherson College determines the percentage of adjustment by calculating earned and unearned percentages using the following method:

All calendar days from the beginning of the term to the Last Day of Attendance (LDA) are divided by the total number of calendar days in the term to determine the percentage of adjustment. Scheduled breaks of five calendar days or more and temporary break days are excluded.

  1. If the withdrawal occurs within the first 60% of the term, a pro rata adjustment will be made to the student’s account. Qualified charges and non federal aid will be adjusted individually. Earned amounts will remain posted and unearned amounts will be returned to the issuing authority. If an outside agency allows, a larger percentage of the entire award may remain posted to pay adjusted charges.
  2. If the withdrawal occurs after the first 60% of the term, no adjustment or refund is due.

Federal Financial Aid Refund Policy

In addition to the institutional refund calculation recipients, and in some cases intended recipients, of federal Title IV financial aid (with the exception of Federal Work Study), will be subject to the refund policies as mandated by the United States Department of Education. McPherson College must calculate earned and unearned federal aid using the same method as described under the Institutional Refund Policy.

  1. If the withdrawal occurs within the first 60% of the term, a pro rata adjustment will be made to the student’s account. The resulting percentages are applied to the total of Title IV aid that was disbursed and could have been disbursed. Any unearned amount must be returned to the appropriate program source in the following order until the unearned amount is satisfied:          1) Unsubsidized Federal Direct Stafford Loans, 2) Subsidized Federal Direct Stafford Loans, 3) Federal Perkins Loans, 4) Federal Direct PLUS loans, 5) Federal Pell Grants, 6) Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants, 7) Federal TEACH grants, 8)Iraq/Afghanistan Service Grants.
  2. If the withdrawal occurs after the first 60% of the term, no adjustment or refund of federal Title IV financial aid is due.
2018|03 Financial Information, Catalog 18-19|

Financial Aid

Over 99 percent of McPherson College students receive financial assistance each year from McPherson College scholarships and awards, federal and state programs, work-study programs, and educational loans.

McPherson College has a financial aid awarding policy that considers a variety of factors including academic achievement, participation in co-curricular activities, and financial need. The college’s goal is to award enough financial assistance to provide incentive, recognition, and access.

Financial Aid Application Process

To be considered for and receive financial aid, students should take the following steps:

  • Submit their Application for Admission and academic transcripts to McPherson College. Students must be admitted to McPherson College in order to be considered for aid.
  • Submit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). McPherson College’s priority deadline for FAFSA submissions is March 1 each year. McPherson College’s federal school code is 001933.
  • Review their Student Aid Report (SAR) and verification documentation to the Financial Aid Office. Students whose Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) is selected by the Department of Education for verification must complete the Verification Worksheet (Dependent, Independent) and submit official tax transcripts from the IRS for the student and/or parents/spouse. If supporting schedules are required, the college will ask for them separately.
  • Await receipt of their Financial Aid Award Notice, which the college prepares and mails, usually within 3–5 working days after their financial aid record is complete.
  • Follow the instructions enclosed with the Financial Aid Award Notice by the date indicated to acknowledge acceptance of awards.
  • Complete the required application/promissory note if taking advantage of student loan opportunities.
  • Complete entrance interview if borrowing Direct loans.

Financial Aid Calendar

October 1 – Application process begins. Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA)
November 1 – Financial Aid Award Notification begins for admitted students
March 1 – Priority Deadline for Financial Aid. Offers of aid after this date will be extended only as funds remain available.
April 1 – FAFSA submission deadline for Kansas Comprehensive Grant

Scholarships and Awards

Every student meeting McPherson College’s admission standards is eligible for a Merit Award, as long as they are enrolled full-time. In addition to the Merit Award, qualifying students may receive additional scholarship assistance based on academic achievement, co-curricular participation, demographic characteristics, leadership qualities, and major areas of interest. A financial aid calculator and detailed information about institutional awards and scholarships are available at www.mcpherson.edu/admissions/financial-aid.

Endowed Scholarship Funds

The endowed scholarships and loan funds listed below have been established through personal generosity and a desire on the part of the donors to assist future generations of students in attending McPherson College. The college is grateful for these endowed gifts, which provide a permanent expression of love and support for the college and for the students who will benefit from this kindness. These gifts fund the existing McPherson College Scholarship and Grant Program.

Unrestricted Endowed Scholarship Fund with no specifics for awarding:

  • Walter E. Beery Scholarship Fund
  • Virgil Meyers Berkebile Scholarship
  • Earl Bowman Scholarship Fund
  • R.S. Christensen Endowment Scholarship Fund
  • Earl E. Curtis Memorial Scholarship Fund
  • Samuel L. Elrod Scholarship Fund
  • Esther Eslinger Memorial Scholarship Fund
  • Leland and Pauline Flory Endowment Scholarship Fund
  • Oscar C. Frantz & Flora Gish Frantz Scholarship
  • Roy O. Frantz Endowed Scholarship Fund
  • Harry H. and Marguerite Gilbert Memorial Endowment Scholarship
  • Raenell Hall Endowed Scholarship Fund
  • Ira M. Hoover Endowed Scholarship Fund
  • Helen Jacobs Memorial Scholarship
  • Ralph F. Johnson & Irene Ramey Johnson Memorial Scholarship Fund
  • Edith Keller Scholarship Fund
  • John Giolin Pearson Scholarship
  • Ralph H. Rindt Endowed Scholarship Fund
  • Scott Robinson Memorial Scholarship Fund
  • Ray Simmons Endowed Scholarship Fund
  • Stucky Scholarship Fund
  • Dr. Galen M. Tice & Ruth Kilmer Tice Memorial Scholarship Fund
  • Robert George Wolfe Memorial Scholarship
  • Worthington Church Scholarship Fund
  • Una Yoder Memorial Scholarship

Restricted Endowed Scholarships

  • African-American: Harrison African-American Academic Scholarship
  • Alumni Legacy Scholarshipfor children and grandchildren of alumni
  • Andes: John and Elrae Andes Performing Arts Scholarship—for performing arts &/or music majors
  • Appel Family Scholarshipsupports student with need in an internship experience
  • Austin: Charles & John Austin Memorial Scholarship Fund—western Colorado residents
  • Austin: Glen D. Austin Scholarship—western Colorado residents
  • Barrett-Jackson Auction Co.: Brian Jackson Scholarship – auto restoration students with financial need
  • Barrett-Jackson Auction Co.: Russ Jackson Scholarship – auto restoration students with financial need
  • Beam: Royce & Phyllis Bowman Beam Scholarship in Vocal Music—student(s) enrolled in Performing Arts with preference to vocal music students
  • Beech: Olive Ann Beech Scholarship—Wichita, Kansas residents
  • Beeghly: Milford & Dorothy Graham Beeghly Scholarship—Iowa or Northern Plains District Church of the Brethren
  • Bell: Pauline L. Bell Memorial Scholarship —junior or senior students majoring in music education or music
  • Bittinger: Desmond & Irene Bittinger Scholarship—institution acceptable academic standing
  • Bowman: J.L. & Elva Bowman Scholarship — science majors
  • Brammell: Ira N.H. & Freda E. Brammell Scholarship – excellent leadership ability
  • Breon: Earl & Margaret Breon Scholarship — financial need
  • Breon: Phil & Clara Breon Scholarship—financial need
  • Brown: Elizabeth & Ed Brown & Classic Thunderbird Club of S. Florida Scholarship – 2nd, 3rd, or 4th year auto restoration students
  • Brown: Larry Brown Scholarship—student athletes majoring in physical education
  • Brubaker: Earl Brubaker Scholarship—financial need
  • Butler: Edward R. & Judith Brammell Butler Student Leadership Scholarship—students who demonstrate leadership potential in student services
  • Campbell: David V. Campbell Scholarship—orphaned, handicapped, and underprivileged students
  • Casebeer: John & George Casebeer Scholarship—financial need
  • Cassler: Winston Cassler Scholarship— students studying music
  • Chisholm: Will Edwin & Olive M. Chisholm Scholarship— financial need
  • Class of 1953 Scholarship: — freshman student with financial need
  • Class of 1967 Scholarship** – full-time student in any academic program; minimum GPA
  • Cobb: Redell & Barbara Cobb Scholarship—former students of Canton-Galva High School; minimum GPA
  • Coppock: X.L. & Martha Coppock Scholarship **— financial need
  • Crago Family Scholarshipfinancial need; exchange student; minimum GPA or students(s) pursuing math, science or business major
  • Dalke: Elmer O. & Velma L. Dalke Scholarship—financial need
  • Darby: Edith & Harry Darby Foundation Scholarship— juniors and seniors
  • DeCoursey: Wesley & Verda DeCoursey Scholarship in Chemistry – fulltime student majoring in chemistry; minimum GPA; without regard for financial need
  • Dell: Lois E. Dell Scholarship Fund for Women—women who have been absent from a college campus; business majors
  • Dennison: Nora Dennison Scholarship—financial need
  • Detrick: Herbert & Lula Detrick Scholarship— financial need
  • Dodson: Susan Wheeler Dodson Scholarship – visual arts major; minimum GPA; without regard for financial need
  • Doman: David T. Doman/Franklin Club Scholarship – freshmen or sophomore auto restoration major; priority to student with H.H. Franklin Club membership
  • Dotzour: Royer & Edna Dotzour Scholarship—freshman male & female; Kingman County (KS) high school graduates; preference to Norwich high School
  • Duesenberg: Fred Duesenberg Scholarship—auto restoration student
  • Eisenbise: Bernette Eisenbise Scholarship—sophomore, junior, or senior teacher education major
  • Elliott Family Scholarshipfinancial need
  • Evans: Franklin Evans & Roberta Brown Evans Scholarship—sophomores, juniors, seniors; minimum GPA; leadership/campus involvement
  • F & J Foundation Scholarshipauto restoration student
  • Fasnacht: Everett M. & Joy C. Fasnacht Scholarship – Church of the Brethren members seeking career in church service, peace studies, conflict resolution
  • Fike: Duane & Ruthita Fike Scholarship **—financial need
  • Flory: Glen & Esther Flory Family Scholarship—financial need
  • Forror: Elizabeth Wagoner Forror & Jo Wagoner Scholarship—Church of the Brethren members or student seeking service-oriented career in health services or dependents of missionary workers
  • Forsyth/Switzer: Lyle & Florence Forsyth & Merl & Ola Switzer Scholarship – financial need
  • Frankenbery/Werner Family Scholarshipfinancial need; student(s) in natural science and education
  • Frantz: Earl & Lela Frantz Scholarship —Church of the Brethren members; financial need
  • Frantz: Edward R. & Virginia L. Frantz Scholarship – students pursuing interest in Entrepreneurship and/or athletics; enrolled full-time; financial need
  • Frantz: Merlin & ImoJean Sheller Frantz Scholarship—financial need
  • Fries: Ramona R. Fries & Arthur H. Fries Scholarship—academic merit; financial need
  • Geisert: Fred J. & Martha E. Geisert Scholarship—Dickinson County (KS) high school graduate or resident; preference to New Basel United Church of Christ, Abilene, KS, members/children
  • Gish: Warren & Luella Gish Scholarship—financial need
  • Glaser: Adelaide Glaser Scholarship—sophomores, juniors, seniors; Kansas resident; B average; financial need
  • Goering: Raymond “Dutch” & Dorothy L. Goering Scholarship—financial need
  • Greim: Mary Roop Greim Scholarship—Missouri residents
  • Groff: Forrest & Della Groff Scholarship—Church of the Brethren/Groff family members
  • Grossnickle: J. Edgar & Willa Grossnickle Scholarship—Iowa Church of the Brethren members
  • Grover: Mable Beyer Grover Scholarship—financial need
  • Haas: William W. Haas Scholarship—Dickinson County (KS) high school graduates
  • Hall: Henry & Nellie Krebbs Hall Scholarship—financial need
  • Harden: Len & Stella Harden & Joyce Harden Brown Scholarship—juniors & seniors; science, math, pre-med majors
  • Hart: Dorothy Bryant Hart Scholarship—financial need
  • Hatcher: Eugenia D. Hatcher Scholarship—female students
  • Hatfield: Verlin L. & Florence M. Hatfield Scholarship—resident students; financial need
  • Haury: Kenneth Haury Scholarship—business or accounting majors
  • Hershey: Dr. J. Willard Hershey Scholarship—juniors & seniors; science majors
  • Hess: Dick & Beverly Hess Fine Arts Fund—fine arts students; leadership/service ability
  • Hess: Dick & Beverly Hess Science Fund—science students who have demonstrated talent; financial need
  • Hess: Lou Ann (Dyck) Hess Fine Arts Fund—music students; other fine arts students
  • Hess: Lou Ann (Dyck) Hess Science Fund—biology students; other science students
  • Hewitt: Sharon & David Hewitt Scholarship—students interested in auto or motorcycle restoration; have been in foster care system and want McPherson College education
  • Hoerner: Della Hoerner Scholarship—students seeking career in nursing, medicine, medical technology
  • Hofen: Phillip J. Hofen Scholarship—Iowa residents
  • Hoffman: Paul & Joanna Hoffman Scholarship—Church of the Brethren members (US)
  • Hoffman: Samuel Hoffman Scholarship**—financial need
  • Holden Family Scholarshipstudent enrolled in automotive restoration program; financial need
  • Holl: Dennis A. Holl Scholarship—Church of the Brethren members; students with Brethren Volunteer Service experience; financial need
  • Hornbaker: Royal & Norma Hornbaker Scholarship—financial need
  • Ikenberry: Alta Gross Ikenberry Scholarship—freshman Idaho or Kansas resident, female athletes or pursuing career in education, pre-med or pre-dental
  • Ikenberry: Ernest & Olivia Ikenberry Scholarship**— financial need
  • Ingalls: Grace Vaniman Ingalls & Roscoe Ingalls Scholarship—financial need
  • Insurance Management Association Scholarshipbusiness majors; financial need
  • Jewell: J. Paul & Fern Watkins Jewell Scholarship – full-time business and economics major; preference to 2nd, 3rd, and 4th year students
  • Johnson: Daniel Palmer Johnson Scholarship—students majoring in math or science
  • Keim: Howard Keim & Winifred O’Connor-Keim Scholarship – women who will have achieved 23rd birthday prior to award
  • Kindig: Ethel Ward Kindig Scholarship—Nebraska residents; students interested in Christian ministry or service; financial need
  • Kinzie Foundation Scholarshipjuniors or seniors; Church of the Brethren members; financial need
  • Kough: John K. & Arlene Flory Kough Scholarship – Church of the Brethren members from Kansas
  • Kreider: Roy Levi Kreider Scholarship—financial need
  • Kuhn: Walter & Ruby Kuhn Scholarship—business, computer science, auto restoration majors
  • Lee: William & Mary Lee Scholarship—financial need
  • Lehman: Harry & Minnie Lehman Scholarship—financial need
  • Lehman: Harvey & Ruth Kurtz Lehman Scholarship—financial need
  • Lehman: Henry L. Lehman & Anna Burkholder Lehman Scholarship—demonstrated academic and leadership ability
  • Lengel: Leland L. Lengel Scholarship in History—sophomores, juniors, seniors; top history majors in each class; minimum GPA
  • Lichty: Henry Lichty Lovett, Dorothy Lichty Vogel, Mr. & Mrs. Glenn A. Lichty, Lucile Lichty West Scholarship—financial need
  • Long: V. Allen Long Scholarship—physical or natural science major
  • Marchand: F.E. & Cora A. Marchand Scholarship—Church of the Brethren members; financial need
  • Martin: Alice B. Martin Scholarship—financial need
  • Martin: Martha Cecile Martin Endowed Scholarship—teacher education student; McPherson County origin; financial need
  • Maune: Louie Maune Scholarship—financial need
  • McDaneld: Wallace & Nellie Wagner McDaneld Scholarship —Kansas residents; interested in Christian ministry or service; financial need
  • McGhee: Grace Brunk McGhee Scholarship— financial need
  • McGonigle: Josephine Shirar McGonigle Scholarship—science major; financial need
  • McHugh: Ellen McHugh Scholarship— financial need
  • McIlwaine: Delia Chavez McIlwaine Scholarship—music education major
  • McSpadden: Dwight McSpadden Scholarship—student athletes
  • Meguiar Family Scholarship in Automobile Restoration—auto restorations students
  • Melhorn: J. Mark & Katherine J. Ramsey Melhorn Scholarship—McPherson County student participating in at least one athletic program and intention to major in science field
  • Merkey: Samuel R. Merkey Scholarship — financial need
  • Metzler: Burton & Mabel Metzler Scholarship – financial need
  • Metzler: David & Doris Metzler Scholarship **—full time student preparing for the ministry or Christian service or PreK-12 classroom teaching
  • Miller: Delma Miller Scholarship—Church of the Brethren members
  • Miller: Oscar & Vida Miller Scholarship— financial need
  • Mingenback: Mary Mingenback Scholarship—art or music students; financial need
  • Moats/Neher: Edgar & Marie Moats/Roy & Wava Neher/Edna Neher Scholarship—preference to Ivester (Grundy Center, IA) and Osage (McKune, KS) Church of the Brethren members
  • Moore: Alma Anderson Moore Scholarship—speech/theatre students
  • Morrison: Milton & Rebecca Morrison Scholarship—financial need
  • Moyers: David W. & Florence Smith Moyers Scholarship—Church of the Brethren members who demonstrate church leadership potential
  • Mugler: Carrie Mugler Scholarship—financial need
  • Murrey: Chester & Pearl Crumpacker Murrey Scholarship—freshmen, first-year transfer; financial need
  • Myers: Phil & Jean Myers Scholarship – Priority consideration given to students who, due to unique opportunities, crisis situations, or extraordinary accomplishments and/or contributions to their community in the face of difficulties, deserve recognition and encouragement to complete their education.
  • Negley Family ScholarshipChurch of the Brethren members
  • Nichols: Connie Nichols /Ethel McClure Scholarship—interior design or art majors
  • Nonken: Ray Nonken Scholarship—Kansas residents who reside in a rural area; athletes
  • Nordling: Barbara & Bernard Nordling /Leland E. Nordling Family ScholarshipKansas residents west of Highway 81, excluding Sedgwick County; academic achievement
  • Noyes: Pat Noyes Men’s Basketball Scholarship—juniors and seniors in previous year; exemplify character of Pat Noyes (leadership, positive attitude, team player, exert maximum effort, passion for the game of basketball)
  • Pair: Paul & Pauline Vaniman Pair Scholarship for Computer Science—computer science majors
  • Pair: Pauline Vaniman Pair Scholarship for the Fine Arts—art, music, theatre majors
  • Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance Scholarship—auto restorations majors
  • Peckover: Lila Marie Peckover Scholarship—Hutchinson (KS) Community Church of the Brethren members; financial need
  • Penland: M.W. & Hallie Goforth Penland Scholarship—philosophy/religion, science, or education majors
  • Pepsi-Cola Scholarship—auto restorations majors
  • Peterson: Ernest & Inez Peterson Scholarship—juniors and seniors; business and accounting majors; minimum GPA
  • Powell Family Scholarship in Science and Religion—science or religion/philosophy majors with preference to those studying both disciplines
  • Prather: A.B. & Vera Prather Scholarship—financial need
  • Quapaw: Benjamin Quapaw Scholarship—Native-American students
  • Ray: Art Ray Track & Field /Cross Country Scholarship—Students participating in track and field or cross country; minimum GPA
  • Reed: Blake Reed Mac2Mac Scholarship—graduated from McPherson High School and participated in high school football program as a senior and plans to attend McPherson College and participate in the college’s football program; current McPherson College football player with financial need
  • Rock: Kenneth M. Rock Scholarship—upper 25% of their high school class; financial need
  • Rolls-Royce Foundation Scholarship—auto restorations students with demonstrated interest in Rolls-Royce and Bentley cars
  • Royer: William D. & Alice Nash Royer Scholarship—biology majors
  • Sahl: Bob Sahl Scholarship—auto restorations students who demonstrate interest in Pre ’16 autos; recommendation from the auto restoration faculty
  • Sargent: Paul & Rowena Vaniman Sargent Scholarship in Business—priority given to business majors; minimum GPA; financial need; nominated by business faculty
  • Sargent: Paul & Rowena Vaniman Sargent Scholarship in Foreign Language – for majors in any field with a commitment to study abroad for a minimum of one (1) semester
  • Sell: Orlin N. Sell Scholarship—students interested in Christian education or ministry
  • Sheller: Arlene Barley Sheller Scholarship—Ivester Church of the Brethren members/friends
  • Smith: Delbert L. & Barbara J. Smith Cross Country and Track & Field Scholarship—Student who participates in cross country and/or track and field; financial need
  • Smith: Dwight Smith Scholarship—financial need
  • Smith: Paul E. “Gene” Smith Scholarship—junior; football player who excelled at athletic performance, attitude, sportsmanship, and team play during sophomore year; recommendation from athletic staff
  • Snavely: Paul & Edna Snavely Scholarship—financial need
  • Snell: Dale Snell Scholarship—junior or senior music major
  • Spear: Spear Brothers Scholarship—full-time student enrolled in the Auto Restoration program; financial need
  • Staats: Elmer B. Staats & Margaret Rich Staats Scholarship for Public Service—students seeking career in public service
  • Strickler: Dale & Velma Strickler Scholarship—junior or senior students interested in social work, business or economics
  • Sutton: Charlie & Wilma Sutton Scholarship – full-time student; financial need
  • Trinity Church of the Brethren Scholarship—students interested in ministry
  • Trostle: Bernice McClellan Trostle Scholarship—priority to history majors
  • Trostle: Raymond H. Trostle Scholarship—priority to chemistry majors
  • Ullom: Victor and Rosalie Ullom Scholarship—Colorado residents; financial need
  • van Asselt/Higgins: Peggy van Asselt/Pam Higgins Scholarship**—priority to biology/foreign language double majors; financial need may be considered
  • VanGoethem: James & Lori VanGoethem Family Scholarship – full-time student; financial need; minimum GPA
  • Vaniman: Elmer E. Vaniman Scholarship in Music —music students; priority to Church of the Brethren students
  • Voshell: LaVerne M. “Tony” Voshell Athletic Scholarship—students participating in football, basketball, or track
  • Wall: Ernest A. Wall & Eunice Almen Wall & Rollyn E. Wall Scholarship—freshmen students
  • Ward: John Ward & Bonnie Martin Ward Scholarship – resident of McPherson, Kansas; planning to become a teacher
  • Watkins-Gerhard Scholarship—financial need
  • Weaver: Paul & Frances Weaver Scholarship—students pursuing career in Christian ministry; philosophy/religion students
  • Will: W. Marvin & Doreen Will Scholarship—Two annual scholarships to incoming freshmen majoring in political science, history or both
  • Wise: Jacob & Ruth Wise Scholarship—financial need
  • Witmore: Irma Cloe Witmore Scholarship—students of English, journalism, communications, theatre or library science who participate in at least one (1) extra-curricular or volunteer activity on campus each semester
  • Wittig: Randy & Sonya Wittig Scholarship—auto restoration students
  • Wittig: Roger & Rita Wittig Scholarship—auto restoration students
  • Yoder: Dayton & Hazel Yoder Scholarship—Church of the Brethren students with rural/agricultural background; academic achievement, leadership ability
  • York: H. Laverne & Evelyn Herr York Scholarship—Dickinson County (KS) residents involved in college athletics
  • Ziegler: Paul Ziegler Scholarship—priority given to member of the tennis team; demonstrate compassion, encouragement, and leadership; financial need

** not fully funded

Work Study and Employment

All students may apply for on-campus jobs, but students qualifying for the Federal College Work Study program are given priority. These jobs include clerical assistants, maintenance workers, housekeeping, resident assistants, admissions assistants, athletic event staff, etc.

Off-campus employment is usually available to students. The community of McPherson normally enjoys an unemployment rate far below the national average, and there are many requests for part-time student help. The Career Services Offices posts notices of available positions for both on- and off-campus jobs online at https://www.mcpherson.edu/career/

Other Sources of Financial Assistance

Veteran’s Benefits may be used to attend McPherson College. For information on eligibility and to obtain application materials, students should contact the Veteran’s Administration by phone at 1-888-442-4551 or online at http:www.gibill.va.gov.

Local service agencies such as Kiwanis, Rotary, Lions, PEO, AAUW and others often have funding available for qualified students. Inquire with these agencies for scholarship forms.

Other forms of financial aid may also be available. Please contact the Financial Aid Office for further information.

2018|03 Financial Information, Catalog 18-19|

Financial Aid Policies

Financial Aid Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy

To be eligible for financial aid, a student must make satisfactory academic progress. Academic progress is reviewed at the end of fall and spring semesters. Progress is based on the chart below.

First-time freshmen

Satisfactory academic progress is based on attempted hours, including all postsecondary coursework attempted. This includes failed coursework, coursework graded as incomplete and withdrawn coursework. Repeated coursework is included in the attempted hours and in the GPA hours for the term that course is recognized on the transcript.

Transfer students

A qualitative assessment is based on coursework accepted by McPherson College, and the accepted coursework is shown in both attempted and completed hours. Failed coursework, coursework graded as incomplete and withdrawn coursework are included in attempted hours. Repeated coursework is included in the attempted hours and in the GPA hours for the term that course is recognized on the transcript. A quantitative assessment is based on cumulative grade point average.

The maximum timeframe for completing a degree is 186 credit hours. The timeframe may be extended if necessary for students who have changed majors. An appeal will be required for this extension.

 

SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS:
Quantitative Qualitative
Hours attempted cumulative GPA hours earned / hours attempted
0 -15.9 1.50 50.0
16.0 – 31.9 1.60 60.0
32.0 – 46.9 1.70 62.0
47.0 – 62.9 1.80 67.0
63.0 – 77.9 1.85 67.0
78.0 – 93.9 1.90 69.0
94.0 – 108.9 1.95 71.0
109.0 – 124.9 Greater than or equal to 2.00 74.0
125.0 – 139.9 Greater than or equal to 2.00 77.0
140.0 – 186.9 Greater than or equal to 2.00 83.0

 

Students are evaluated at the end of each payment period. A student who fails to meet the quantitative or qualitative measures may not be eligible for Federal, State, and institutional financial aid. A student may fall into one of the following categories: Warning or Suspension.

  1. Warning – Students who do not achieve one or more of the academic criteria in any given semester/term are put on warning. The student is sent notification stating the policy and the consequences of a consecutive term below standards.
  2. Suspension – Students who do not achieve one or more academic criteria for a second consecutive semester are put on suspension. They are notified that their aid has been suspended and given the choice to appeal, explaining any unusual circumstances that prevented them from making academic progress. If the student chooses not to appeal, financial aid is withheld for the next payment period. If the student appeals, there are several options.
    1. Probation – If it is mathematically possible and probable that the student can meet satisfactory academic progress in one term and the student has an unusual circumstance, the student can be put on probation and given one term to fix the issue. If the student achieves the required GPA and/or pass rate, the student continues in good standing. If the student fails to meet the minimum requirements, the student is immediately put back on suspension.   Students may appeal again if there are reasons for the lack academic progress other than those cited in the original appeal).
    2. Plan – if it is not mathematically possible or is improbable that a student can achieve good standing in one term, McPherson College may choose to put the student on a multiple-term academic plan. The plan will utilize the SAP levels and a set number of credit hours per semester to get the student back into good standing. If the student meets the semester/term achievements but still lacks the cumulative requirements, the student is not put back on suspension but allowed to continue on their plan. If the student meets good standing sooner that planned, the student is put back in good standing. If the student does not meet any part of the semester/term plan, the student is put back on suspension and given the option to appeal only if there are circumstances other than those cited in the original appeal that explain the lack of academic progress.

Appeals

To appeal the student must complete an appeal form and submit a transcript. If the appeal is approved the student will be on financial aid probation for a semester. At the end of the semester another review will be completed. If the student does not meet the standards again they will not be eligible for financial aid. The student may appeal to have their financial aid reinstated however the explanation cannot be the same as the first appeal. The student has the option of being placed on an academic plan.

Academic Plans

An academic plan outlines requirements a student must make for a period of time. The academic plan may cover several semesters. The academic plan will be reviewed at the end of the fall and spring semesters. If the student is meeting the requirements of the academic plan the student will remain eligible for financial aid. If the student is not meeting the requirements financial aid will be revoked, but the student will have an option to appeal.

Code of Conduct Regarding Student Loans

Students or parents may borrow from the lending institution(s) of their choice based on the criteria that they believe is most relevant and important to their situation. McPherson College does not make lender recommendations; however, upon request, the college will make available a list of the 5–10 lenders selected most often by students and parents in past years.

  • MC does not have any revenue sharing arrangements with any lenders.
  • MC and it employees do not accept any gifts from lenders, other than gifts of de minimis value such as coffee mugs, pens, notepads, etc.
  • MC employees may not accept travel expense reimbursement, lodging, or compensation from lenders.
  • MC does not use employees of lenders to represent the College in connection with financial aid matters and we do not give permission for employees of lenders to represent themselves as employees of MC.
2018|03 Financial Information, Catalog 18-19|

Bachelor’s Degrees

Bachelor’s degrees are awarded in 23 majors. Most majors include a variety of emphases from which to choose as well as licensure programs that qualify students for a career in education. Please see the departmental curricula later in this catalog for complete descriptions of the emphases and licensure available within each major.

Major Requirements

A major consists of no fewer than 32 and no more than 62 semester hours, including all required courses for the major, regardless of prefix. Hybrid or student-designed majors are exempt from the 62-hour cap. A student-designed major is defined as a major that requires at least 20 hours from each of at least two different departments.  Not all current majors may be used towards a student-designed major. Departmental or program requirements for specific courses, field experiences, or comprehensive tests must be met. Those requirements are specified along with the departmental curricula.

Minor Requirements

A minor typically consists of a minimum of 18 credit hours of study within a particular academic discipline. Minors are available in biology, business administration, chemistry, communication, information technology (dormant), English, environmental science, environmental stewardship, graphic design, history, mathematics, Spanish, performing arts, philosophy and religion, psychology, sociology, and transformative entrepreneurship. Requirements for the minors in each of these areas are specified in the departmental sections of this catalog. For the minor to be recognized on the transcript, the student must achieve a minimal GPA of 2.0 in the minor coursework.

Teacher Education Program

The Teacher Education Program at McPherson College focuses on three major levels of licensure. The following are lists of the levels and the programs:

6-12 Licensure
Biology, Chemistry, English, English for Speakers of Other Languages, History and Government, Mathematics, Psychology, High-Incidence Special Education, Speech/Theatre.

K-6 Licensure
Elementary Education, English for Speakers of Other Languages, High-Incidence Special Education

PK-12 Licensure
Art, Health, Music, Physical Education, Spanish

 

Bachelor of Arts Degrees

A minimum of one hundred twenty-four (124) academic credit hours are required for the B.A. degree. A Bachelor of Arts degree may be obtained for the following majors:

  • Communication
  • Digital Media
  • English
  • History
  • Performing Arts
  • Philosophy and Religion
  • Spanish
  • Visual Arts

Students completing one of the above majors who want a Bachelor of Science degree must take eight additional hours in a B.S. major beyond the general education requirements in that area.

Bachelor of Science Degrees

One hundred twenty-four (124) academic credit hours are required for the B.S. degree. A Bachelor of Science degree may be obtained for the following majors:

  • Automotive Restoration
  • Biology
  • Biochemistry
  • Business Administration
  • Chemistry
  • Elementary Education (including Special Education licensure)
  • Environmental Stewardship
  • Health Science
  • History and Political Science
  • Information Technology (Dormant)
  • Mathematics
  • Physical Education & Health
  • Psychology
  • Secondary Education (see Teacher Education Program section above for options)
  • Sociology

Students completing one of the above majors who want a Bachelor of Arts degree must take two semesters of a single second human language.

Requirements for a Bachelor’s Degree

  • A minimum of 124 credit hours.
  • Fulfillment of the major program requirements.
  • Fulfillment of general education requirements, or completion of an Associate of Arts or Associate of Science degree at an accredited institution. (Note: Education majors must complete all of the general education requirements, even if they have earned an associate’s degree.)
  • A minimum, overall residential GPA of 2.0.
  • A minimum, residential GPA of 2.0 in the major.
  • A minimum of 32 credit hours completed at McPherson College.
  • 20 of the last 30 or 40 of the last 60 credit hours completed at McPherson College.
  • A minimum of 8 hours of the major completed at McPherson College.
  • The last 60 credit hours completed at a four-year college or university.
  • No more than 64 credit hours from two-year institutions counted toward the degree.
  • At least six hours outside the home department of the major, in addition to the major and general education requirements. (Students with more than one major automatically meet this requirement. Students with a student-designed major must complete at least six hours outside both home departments of the major.)
  • Approval by majority vote at Faculty Meeting.

Student-Designed Major Programs

Interdisciplinary programs allow students to combine courses from different departments into one major.

In all cases the following guidelines must be followed:

  • The student must complete the Student Designed Major form available in the registrar’s office or on Bulldog Connect.
  • An interdisciplinary major shall consist of a minimum of 44 semester hours and a maximum of 75 semester hours.
  • The instructors supervising the program must come from two or more departments.
  • The courses central to the program must come from two or more departments.
  • The program must be approved by the Educational Policies Committee no later than the second semester of the junior year.

When faculty initiate an interdisciplinary major program, two or more instructors from the appropriate departments plan the interdisciplinary concentration and submit the proposal the Educational Policies Committee following the guidelines available from the registrar’s office.

Examples of faculty-initiated, interdisciplinary degree programs include Environmental Stewardship and Health Sciences.

A student may, in consultation with a faculty advisor, propose a previously unestablished student-designed major. The chairs of each department represented in the program must approve the proposal. The proposal is submitted to the Educational Policies Committee (EPC) according to the guidelines. The student and a faculty advisor must present the proposal to EPC in person to explain and defend its academic integrity.

The following are examples of student-initiated and student-designed majors that have been approved by Educational Policies Committee and completed by recent graduates of McPherson College. They are listed here to illustrate the possibilities students may explore.

  • Family Life and Human Development
  • Pre-Nursing and Human Behavior
  • Sports Management
  • Bioethics/International Studies/Political Science
  • Psychology and Music

2018|04 Degree Programs, Catalog 18-19|

Transformative Entrepreneurship Minor

As a career-orient liberal arts college, McPherson College integrates the entrepreneurial spirit and mindset throughout its curriculum. Students who want to more intentionally develop their own entrepreneurial skills and thought processes can complete the minor in Transformative Entrepreneurship.

The Transformative Entrepreneurship minor helps students better understand the risks and processes involved in beginning an entrepreneurial venture. McPherson College’s minor is transformative in the sense that students who engage in future entrepreneurial ventures will make an impact and transform the world in some way.

McPherson College faculty have defined entrepreneurship as follows:

Entrepreneurship is the creative process of developing sustainable, innovative ventures that solve problems and meet the needs of the greater community. Balancing opportunity and risk, the entrepreneur manages resources and constructs solutions that benefit both self and society.
(Approved by faculty 2/3/11)

Students who complete a minor in transformative entrepreneurship will be able to:

  • Articulate the definition of transformative entrepreneurship
  • Articulate the roles that entrepreneurs have played in history
  • Identify and analyze opportunities and their related risks
  • Demonstrate creative processes required to develop entrepreneurial ventures
  • Determine their talents and role in effective teamwork
  • Demonstrate skill in project management and resource utilization
  • Demonstrate the process of resource acquisition through networking
  • Illustrate the interplay of economics and social change
  • Illustrate responsibility to a greater society

Transformative Entrepreneurship Curriculum

To complete the minor, students will complete the following four courses:

  • ET101 Creativity and Innovation for Transformation – 3 credit hours
  • G-ET201 Social Entrepreneurship – 3 credit hours
  • ET301/BA235 The Entrepreneur at Work – 3 credit hours
  • ET475 Entrepreneurship in Action – 2 credit hours

Additionally, students will select nine hours from the following courses. Students may choose one class from within her/his major coursework area. One class must be selected from outside the division where her/his major is housed.

Humanities

  • G-AR220 Graphic Design for Non-Art Majors
  • AR340 Web-based Design or CM350 Web Design for Effective Communication
  • G-CM130 Interpersonal Communication
  • G-PA160 Performing for the Stage
  • CM135 Media Writing
  • CM210 Multimedia Storytelling
  • G-CM218 Business & Professional Communication
  • G-CM221 Intercultural Communication
  • CM310 Public Relations
  • CM325 Conflict Communication
  • CM330 Persuasion
  • EN313 Adv. Expository Writing
  • G-PA160 Performing for the Stage
  • PA215 Seminar & Practica in Performance & Production
  • G-PR104 Ethics

Science & Technology

  • BI325 Human Ecology, Epidemiology, and Public Health
  • G-NS141 Environmental Science
  • NS415 Environmental Ethics
  • TE301 Materials and Processes
  • G-TE333 Technology & Society

Social Sciences

  • PY405 Personality Theories
  • SO206 Social Problems
  • SO260 Intro to Human Services
  • BA315 Business Law
  • BA224 Principles of Management

Additional Requirements: Students must submit a Horizon Fund grant at some point during their career. The focus of the venture proposal is open, but should reflect the student’s interests.

Transformative Entrepreneurship Course Descriptions

ET101 Creativity & Innovation for Transformative Entrepreneurship

3 hours
Interactive seminar introduces students to readings and processes from various disciplines that elucidate the interdisciplinary nature of creativity and enable students to create conditions that stimulate it. Projects and assignments are designed to encourage a “critical creativity” that challenges participants through inquiry, multi-faceted exploration and strategic development. Topics examined through writing and design assignments, group projects, and discussions include consciousness, receptivity, risk, ethics, self agency, and social engagement with the express objective of fostering creative potential and its application in all areas of experience.

G-ET201 Social Entrepreneurship

3 hours
Addresses the challenges of creating and sustaining organizations in today’s global environment. Provides an overview of the role and importance of entrepreneurship in the global economy and in society. Examines how individuals use entrepreneurial skills to craft innovative responses to societal needs.

ET301 The Entrepreneur at Work

3 hours
Explores the process of managing and growing the entrepreneurial venture. The course is designed to provide exposure to topics critical to the success of the venture in startup and early growth: business planning; growth management and strategic planning; marketing and financial strategies; exit strategies; and different modes of venturing, such as franchising, venture acquisition, and technology licensing. Prerequisite: G-ET201 or consent of the instructor.

ET475 Entrepreneurship in Action

2 hours
This capstone experience allows students to pursue their own venture or explore how an entrepreneurial mindset will serve them well in whatever career they choose. Regular discussions with entrepreneurial faculty, mentors, and entrepreneurs from the community will help students identify components of an entrepreneurial mindset and discover their use in society and their career. (Prerequisites: ET101, ET201, ET301)

2018|05 Special Programs, Catalog 18-19|

Pre-Professional Programs

Law

Although the pre-law student may choose a major in any field, a strong knowledge of history, philosophy, and economics is essential. The B.S. in Politics & History or the B.A. in Philosophy & Religion is recommended for the pre-law student. Students from each of these two majors nationally score very high on the LSAT (Law School Admissions Test) and have among the highest rates of admission to law school. The student should counsel with the pre-law advisor or with the heads of the departments of history and politics, philosophy and religion, and economics.  Law schools differ in admissions requirements, but the following course suggestions are representative of what a student interested in law should take in addition to the major.

EC 201 Principles of Economics: Macro  3 hours
EC 204 Principles of Economics: Micro  3 hours
BA 315  Legal Environment of Business  3 hours
G-HI 201  U.S. History to 1865  3 hours
G-HI 202  U.S. History since 1865  3 hours
PS 356  American Diplomacy  3 hours
G-PS 102  U.S Government  3 hours
*G-PR 104  Ethics  3 hours or G-PR 104L Ethics 4 hours (language intensive if taken for four hours.)
PY 308  Counseling  3 hours
SO 206  Social Problems  3 hours
*CM 130  Interpersonal Communication  3 hours
CM 140  Public Speaking  3 hours
G-PR 201  Introduction to Philosophy  3 hours
PR432 Topics in Philosophy  3 hours

Medicine, Osteopathy, or Dentistry

Students who prepare for application to medical, osteopathic or dental school should complete a baccalaureate degree in any field. The recommended degrees are biology or biochemistry, which provides the best collection of courses suggested by most medical or health professional schools. The required courses include a minimum of the following:

G-BI 111   College Biology I 4 hours
BI 112     College Biology II 4 hours
G-CH 111 College Chemistry I 5 hours
CH 112     College Chemistry II 5 hours
CH 251     Organic Chemistry I 5 hours
CH 252     Organic Chemistry II 5 hours
BI 310     Statistical Data Analysis 4 hours
G-PH 215 General Physics I 4 hours
PH 216     General Physics II  4 hours

Other advanced courses recommended include:

BI 225     Human Anatomy
BI 315     Human Physiology
BI 325     Human Ecology, Epidemiology and Public Health
BI 360     Cell Physiology
BI 364     Cell and Molecular Biology
CH 370     Biochemistry

A faculty member of the natural science department serves as pre-health advisor and should be consulted when planning a program to meet a specific school’s admission requirements.

Physical Therapy, Physician Assistant

A transition is under way in the physical therapy and physician assistant fields from training that culminates in a master’s degree to programs that grant the master’s or doctoral degree. Therefore, pre-physical therapy and pre-physician assistant students should first complete a baccalaureate degree at McPherson College. The recommended major is biology, which provides the best collection of courses suggested by most health professional schools. The recommended courses include a minimum of the following:

G-BI 111   College Biology I                                 4 hours
BI 112     College Biology II                               4 hours
BI 225     Human Anatomy                                 4 hours
BI 315     Human Physiology                               4 hours
G-CH 111 College Chemistry I                             5 hours
CH 112     College Chemistry II                           5 hours
G-PH 215 General Physics I                               4 hours
PH 216     General Physics II                               4 hours
BI 310     Statistical Data Analysis                       4 hours

A faculty member of the natural science department serves as pre-health advisor and should be consulted when planning a program to meet a specific school’s admission requirements.

Nursing

Nursing education varies greatly, from nine-month L.P.N. programs to two-year B.S.N. programs to even more rigorous master’s or M.S.N. programs. Therefore, it is impossible to outline a generic program to prepare all pre-nursing students for these various programs. Pre-nursing students should identify what type of professional program they aspire to and then meet with McPherson College’s pre-health advisor to develop a plan for completing the admission requirements of that program.

Optometry, Podiatry

Three years of college are the minimum requirement to be considered for admission to optometry or podiatry school; however, the vast majority of students admitted have completed a college degree, majoring in one of the sciences. The recommended degree at McPherson College is biology, which provides the best collection of courses suggested by most health professional schools. The basic admission requirements in the sciences may usually be met with the following courses:

G-BI 111   College Biology I                                 4 hours
BI 112     College Biology II                               4 hours
G-CH 111 College Chemistry I                             5 hours
CH 112     College Chemistry II                           5 hours
CH 251     Organic Chemistry I                           5 hours
CH 252     Organic Chemistry II                           5 hours
BI 310     Statistical Data Analysis                       4 hours
G-PH 215 General Physics I                               4 hours
PH 216     General Physics II                               4 hours

Other advanced courses recommended include:

BI 225     Human Anatomy
BI 234     Microbiology
BI 315     Human Physiology
CH 370     Biochemistry

A faculty member of the natural science department serves as pre-health advisor and should be consulted when planning a program to meet a specific school’s admission requirements.

Pharmacy

Students preparing for a career in pharmacy may attend McPherson College for at least two years during which the following courses must be taken: 20 hours chemistry, 16 hours biology, four hours mathematics, four hours physics, and 16 hours English, economics, and other electives in the social sciences and humanities. A faculty member of the natural science department serves as pre-health advisor and should be consulted when planning a program to meet a specific school’s admission requirements.

Social Work

McPherson College has well prepared its students majoring in the Behavioral Sciences for entrance into Master of Social Work (M.S.W.) degree programs. The pre-professional program at McPherson College commits itself to fostering student learning in career-oriented liberal arts so that students are prepared for community service and/or graduate study in social work. Students who have acquired knowledge and skills requisite for entry into the field of social services and graduate social work education demonstrate proficient knowledge, understanding, and application of psychological and sociological theories and concepts.

All accredited graduate programs in social work require a four year bachelor’s degree for admission. The pre-social work student should plan the liberal arts program to include courses in arts and humanities, social and behavioral sciences, and biological sciences. Although the pre-social work student may choose a major in any field, a strong knowledge of human services, personality theory, counseling, and social problems is strongly recommended. The B.S. in psychology or sociology, with the health and human services emphasis is recommended.

M.S.W. programs require evidence of relevant paid/volunteer work experience related to human services organizations. The pre-social work student should therefore be prepared to complete at least one one internship or field experience related to community/social services. (The College’s Career Connections program is highly recommended.)

The M.S.W. Degree prepares graduates for advances social work practices in one of three areas—clinical social practice with individuals, families, and groups; social work administration/community practice aimed at social service administration and social policy development; and school social work. With such diverse professional practice concentrations, it is difficult to outline a generic program to prepare all pre-social work students for admission to these practice areas. Students should counsel with the pre-social work advisor to help them identify the type of professional program they are considering, and to assist them in developing a plan for completing the graduate admission requirements of that program. internship or field.

Although M.S.W. programs differ in admissions requirements, the following courses, in addition to the major, are recommended for students interested in entering the social work profession at the graduate level:

PY 405 Personality Theories 3 hours
PY/SO 308 Counseling 3 hours
SO 206 Social Problems 3-4 hours

Courses in the Health & Human Services Emphasis:

SO 260 Introduction to Human Services  3 hours
SO 365 Social Work in American Society  3 hours
PY 430 Health Psychology  3 hours
SO 470 Social Gerontology  3 hours
PY/SO 388 Career Connections   1-12 hours
PY/SO 295/495 Field Experience 1-4 hours

Veterinary Medicine

At least two years of college are required to be considered for admission into a college of veterinary medicine; however, the vast majority of students admitted have completed a college degree, majoring in one of the sciences. The pre- veterinary medicine student will plan an appropriate course of study with the help of a faculty advisor. Courses are selected to meet requirements of the specific college of veterinary medicine to which the student plans to apply The following courses are representative of those required by colleges of veterinary medicine for students seeking admission:

G-BI 111   College Biology I 4 hours
BI 112     College Biology II 4 hours
BI 234     Microbiology 4 hours
BI 383     Genetics 4 hours
G-CH 111 College Chemistry I 5 hours
CH 112     College Chemistry II 5 hours
CH 251     Organic Chemistry I 5 hours
CH 252     Organic Chemistry II 5 hours
CH 370     Biochemistry 4 hours
G-EN 110, G-EN 111 College Composition 3 credit hours each
G-PH 215 General Physics I 4 hours
PH 216     General Physics II 4 hours

It is common for pre-veterinary medicine students to complete the bachelor of science degree before applying for admittance to veterinary school. A student electing to do so should pursue one of the programs at McPherson College that lead to a major in biology, chemistry, or biochemistry.

2018|05 Special Programs, Catalog 18-19|

The Chicago Center

McPherson College students interested in exploring the vital issues facing American cities have the opportunity to participate in The Chicago Center programs. Combining classroom study with action-based internships, The Chicago Center lives up to its motto: “Chicago is our classroom.” For an interterm or a semester, students receive McPherson College credit hours while they live, study and work in one of the United State’s most exciting urban environments.

The Chicago Center’s emphasis on “hands-on” experience helps students deepen their understanding of America’s economic and political structures, race and gender relations, and the role of the arts in community and social discourse. The direct link between the classroom and the internship increases student understanding of the practical work world outside the college campus. In addition to the academic coursework, the Center provides both housing and orientation training. The latter includes practical instruction in a variety of “city smart” skills ranging from basic street safety to using the city transit system.

The Chicago Center is open to students from any field of study and internships are available in a wide range of discipline areas.

2018|05 Special Programs, Catalog 18-19|

International Study

Opportunities to live and study outside the United States are available to McPherson College students. One-semester programs (both fall and spring) for sophomores, juniors or seniors are offered at all the locations listed below, with the exception of Marburg, Germany, which has no sophomore program. The study abroad course code is **297 for all departments. The student and advisor must work together to determine which courses would be beneficial to the student and keep the student on-track towards graduation.

Once the official transcript arrives from the study abroad school, the registrar’s office will be in touch with the advisor for the coursework equivalencies. Please note: Study abroad official transcripts typically take much longer to receive than domestic transcripts. If the student is also an athlete, he/she will want to work with the study abroad institution as to not impact athletic eligibility.

One of the programs many students take advantage of is the BCA program. McPherson College cooperates with Bridgewater College (Va.), Elizabethtown College (Penn.), Juniata College (Penn.), Manchester College (Ind.), and the University of LaVerne (Calif.) in the BCA program, which offers a year or semester of study for qualified college students at the following locations:

Athens, Greece
Barcelona, Spain
Brussels, Belgium
Cheltenham, England
Cochin, India
Dalian, China
Derry, Northern Ireland
Dunedin, New Zealand
Galway, Ireland
Marburg, Germany
Nancy, France
Pinar del Rio, Cuba
Quito, Ecuador
Sapporo, Japan
Strasbourg, France
Sydney, Australia
Szombathely, Hungary
Xalapa, Mexico

 

2018|05 Special Programs, Catalog 18-19|

4-1-4 Academic Calendar

McPherson College structures its academic terms on the 4–1–4 academic model; that is, the fall and spring semesters take place during four-month periods (roughly, late August through early December and late January through early May) with a one-month intervening term referred to as January Interterm. During the January Interterm, students take only one course.

Because most students average around 14 hours per semester during the fall and spring terms, and because students must complete no fewer than 124 credit hours to graduate (an average of 31 credit hours per year), most students need to enroll for Interterm classes each year in order to graduate in four years. Students should plan carefully and review their progress toward graduation with their faculty advisor or the registrar before choosing not to enroll for a January Interterm.

May Session

McPherson College also offers an intensive, two-week May Session immediately following Commencement ceremonies. Students can enroll in only one course during the May Session. The May Session is an opportunity to make up for a missed Interterm or to pick up additional credit hours toward early graduation. May Session offerings are announced before the end of the fall semester. Like all courses at McPherson College, May Session classes must make minimum enrollment requirements. Those classes not making minimum enrollments will be canceled.

Definition of Credit Hour

The credit hour is the unit of measure used at McPherson College to signify the amount of work associated with successful completion of a course. An hour of academic credit is awarded contingent upon evidence of student achievement of prescribed learning outcomes of the course. McPherson College delivers courses in both face-to-face and blended formats in terms of varying length, as follows:

  • Fall and Spring semesters of 14 weeks
  • Summer terms of 7-8 weeks
  • A January Interterm of 3 ½ weeks
  • A May Session of 2 weeks

For each hour of academic credit, a student should expect to spend 50 minutes per week in class over the course of a 14-week semester, 50 minutes per day over the course of a 14-day Interterm session, 70 minutes per day over the course of a 10-day May Session, or 85 minutes per week for an 8-week summer session. In addition, for each hour of credit, students should expect to spend approximately 2 hours outside of class for class preparation and completion of assignments. Regardless the length of the term, the well-prepared, motivated student should expect to devote approximately 40 hours per term, in and out of class, for each hour of credit.

McPherson College also offers academic credit for internships and field experiences with approved student learning outcomes and appropriate assessment of those outcomes. Student-interns can earn one hour of academic credit for every 40 hours on the job at the site of the placement.

To demonstrate compliance with U.S. Department of Education regulations and standards established by the Higher Learning Commission, all McPherson College instructors include in their syllabi a course schedule with the requisite number of class meetings for the appropriate length of time as well as a detailed list of readings, assignments, and projects indicative of the expected hours outside the classroom.

Online Coursework

McPherson College offers a small number of online courses and traditional face-to-face classes blended with an online component. Consistent with the above guidelines, for every hour of credit granted for an online course or course component, the student should expect to spend the same 40 hours per term for each hour of credit. This can include time devoted to reading lecture notes, listening to recordings of lectures, or synchronous class time. Additional time elements to consider in the online environment are readings, writing assignments (including the discussion boards), exam/quizzes and student engagement.

Student Course Load

Undergraduate students must be enrolled for a minimum of 12 credit hours to be classified as a full-time student for the fall or spring semesters. During the January Interterm, the normal full-time load is 3–4 credit hours. Graduate students must be enrolled in a minimum of six credit hours to be classified as a full-time student for fall or spring semesters.

Students may enroll in courses above 16 hours under the following conditions:

  • 17 hrs. Requires minimum residential GPA of 3.0 and approval of faculty advisor
  • 18-19 hrs. Requires minimum residential GPA of 3.5 and approval of faculty advisor
  • 20 + hrs. Requires minimum residential GPA of 3.5 and overload approval form

All credits the student takes over 16 credit hours will be charged the overload fee specified in this catalog under Regular Charges and Fees.

Freshman and Transfer Enrollment

McPherson College hosts a number of enrollment days during the spring and summer for the upcoming academic year. First-time freshmen are encouraged to attend one of these opportunities to meet with a faculty advisor and register for classes. First-time freshmen who are unable to attend an enrollment day and all transfer students will be advised of times when they may make individual appointments with the registrar to register for classes by telephone.

Returning Student Enrollment

Enrollment periods are scheduled each spring when returning students can enroll by classification. Upperclassmen receive priority and enroll first, followed by sophomores and then freshmen. These enrollment period dates are published in the Academic Calendar.

All students have access to their degree audit in Bulldog Connect. For assistance, please email registrar@mcpherson.edu. Students are strongly encouraged to schedule a junior check during the spring of their sophomore year and then a graduation check during the spring semester of their junior year. Students with 41 earned credit hours or more will receive an email reminder but the responsibility remains with the student to track their progress towards earning their degree.

It is important that students—especially juniors and returning seniors—enroll during the dates set aside for their class. Students who neglect to register during the enrollment period risk losing their seats in classes they may be required to take in order to graduate on schedule. Students who fail to enroll during their appointed enrollment period cannot be guaranteed a seat in courses filled by students who met enrollment deadlines.

Students with outstanding balances in excess of $1,500 will not be allowed to enroll for the following semester. Past due balances may result in dismissal from the college and may be placed for collection.

Student Classification

To be eligible to enroll in courses open to members of that class, a returning student must have earned hours toward a degree as listed:

Freshman             1-25 credit hours earned

Sophomore         26-56 credit hours earned

Junior                      57-89 credit hours earned

Senior                     90+ credit hours earned

Waiting Lists

Due to space limitations or pedagogical principle, all courses have a maximum number of students that can be enrolled. Once the maximum enrollment has been reached during the pre-registration period, students can be placed on a waiting list. As students with seats reserved in a course drop or withdraw, students on the waiting list will be moved into those empty seats on a first-come-first-served basis. Students who are still on a waiting list for a class when the term begins should meet immediately with their advisor to reconsider their course schedule. On occasion, an upper level student may be given priority as long as it does not hinder the progress of another student.

Academic Advising

Academic advising at McPherson College is an intentional relationship between advisor and student as they plan and reach the student’s educational, career, and personal goals.

Focal points of the advisement program at McPherson College include:

  • advising the student about his or her academic concerns, co-curricular activities and postgraduate plans
  • assisting each student to assess educational/academic objectives
  • serving as an interpreter of regulations and academic requirements
  • acting as a referral service for any personal or academic problems which may arise

With few exceptions, first-time freshmen are initially assigned a freshman advisor from the Center for Academic Development. By the end of their first semester, however, freshmen are encouraged to select a faculty advisor from their academic major or from a discipline of interest to assist them with enrolling for the next academic year and with developing a graduation plan.

Students may ask to change advisors at any time. Change of Advisor request forms are available on Bulldog Connect (my.mcpherson.edu) and from the registrar’s office.

Beginning, Adding, Dropping and Withdrawing from Classes

The dates of all deadlines are published in the annual Academic Calendar. The last day to add a course is also the last day for students to begin courses. Students are not able to drop/add courses after the first day of classes without the assistance of their academic advisor. During the second week of classes, students may drop courses without a fee. Beginning the third week of class, students will be charged a $50 fee to withdraw from a course, and a grade of W will be posted on their transcript. Students may withdraw from courses until one week after midterm grades are due. Students who withdraw from a class before that deadline will receive a notation of “W” on the permanent record in place of a letter grade. Students may not withdraw after that deadline without the grade earned at the end of the term being reported on their transcript.

Students who drop a course within the first two weeks will not receive a W on their transcript since they are within the add/drop period. However, if a student withdraws from all courses, they will receive W’s on their transcript to document their attempt at McPherson College.

Auditing Courses

With permission of the instructor and the registrar, students may register to audit courses with available seats. The auditor is expected to attend class and participate along with students taking the course for credit. An auditing student is not required to take examinations and does not receive a grade or academic credit. Restoration technology, studio art classes, and private music lessons may not be audited. The vice president for academic affairs determines which courses may be audited.

Cancellation of Courses

Due to scheduling conflicts, faculty leaves of absence, sabbatical leaves, and other factors, a course listed in the catalog or course schedule may not be offered in a particular year. The college reserves the right to cancel or reschedule any course for which there is insufficient enrollment.

Special Courses

A special course may be developed by the student, or by the student with the faculty advisor, as an independent and personal search for information and understanding in a defined area. These courses may

  • extend the range of subject matter that the student can explore;
  • enable the student to collaborate with a faculty member on work relating to the latter’s research or teaching;
  • enable the student to use special learning opportunities on and off campus;
  • offer the student a chance to test self-teaching capacity and to develop skills.

Course by Appointment

A course by appointment is a course regularly offered and listed in the catalog. It may only be taken by appointment if circumstances do not permit a student to take the course when it is regularly offered. The Application for Special Courses (signed by the student, the course instructor and the vice president for academic affairs) is due before enrolling the student in the course.

Course on Demand

A course on demand is a course that is listed in the catalog but is only taken on an individual basis. Examples of courses on demand include Field Experience, Readings and Research, Independent Study, or an advanced topics course.

  • Independent Study – Ordinarily initiated by the student with the advice of the academic advisor, independent study presumes a special interest that will form the basis for a project in original research. Applicants must have a 3.0 grade-point average when they apply. Application is due 30 days prior to the final day of enrollment and must be presented to the vice president for academic affairs accompanied by a prospective course syllabus. The independent study option is course number 299 or 499 in all departments (1-4 credits).
  • Field Experience – Field experiences involve observation or participation in vocational and operational activities outside the classroom. Students, often participating without pay and for a single term or less, may or may not bring specific skills to the experience. The field experience option is course number 295 or 495 in all departments (1-4 credits).
  • Readings and Research – Reading and research courses provide an opportunity to do in-depth study in any field. Such courses, which may be initiated by the student or the instructor, may be undertaken only in the major department and only after the student has earned 12 credit hours in that department. A maximum of eight hours of research/readings credit can be counted toward graduation requirements. The Application for Special Courses (signed by the student, the course instructor and the vice president for academic affairs) is due before enrolling the student in the course. The readings and research option is course number 445 in all departments (1-4 credits).

Career Connections

The Career Connections program of McPherson College is designed to provide the students with an opportunity to gain hands-on work experience in their major fields of study and to receive academic credit for that experience. Students involved in Career Connections should realize valuable educational gains not obtained in the classroom. This knowledge should, in turn, assist the students’ transition from the classroom to the job. Appropriate paperwork must be completed before the student is registered in the experience.

Important Note: Academic departments at McPherson College are encouraged to help students develop Career Connection options consistent with institutional guidelines; however, all students considering Career Connection experiences should consult with their faculty advisor to determine whether or not their academic department has additional requirements or requirements different from those that follow.

Career Connections Internship

Internships are designed to provide students with the opportunity to gain work experience in their major fields of study and to receive college credit for that experience. Internships are normally reserved for students who have completed at least four semesters of study since they are expected to bring an appropriate level of skills into a productive employment setting. The internship option is course number 388 in all departments (1-10 credits).

Eligible Experiences

In consultation with the Career Connections coordinator, the faculty advisor must approve the student’s overall experiential learning plan. Any internship or field placement can make an acceptable Career Connections experience, as long as the student can demonstrate to the advisor and the Career Connections coordinator that it can advance previously determined and agreed upon educational goals. A student’s previous work experience, although personally valuable, does not meet the Career Connection criteria of directed, independent, and career-related learning.

Student Eligibility

To be eligible to enroll for a Career Connection option, a student must have completed 12 credit hours at McPherson College or, if a transfer student, and is a junior classification or above, must have a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0.

A student may be determined to be unplaceable at any time by either the faculty advisor or Career Connections coordinator. This may result in a student not being placed or termination of a placement.

Academic Credit Guidelines

One (1) credit hour may be awarded for approximately 40 hours of relevant internship or field placement experience.  A student may not receive more than four (4) hours of credit per semester or term for any kind of career connection’s experience unless otherwise approved by the faculty advisor, Career Services director and the Chief Academic Officer. A maximum of ten (10) hours of credit earned through Career Connections experiences can count toward graduation—six (6) for transfer students.

Complete, fully approved applications for internships are due in the registrar’s office before the first day of the experience. The Chief Academic Officer reserves the right to deny approval for any internship or field experience that is not submitted before the experience begins.

Whenever possible, academic credit should be applied to the term in which the internship or field experience is taking place. Students enrolling in Career Connections during a summer term will be charged the part-time tuition rate published in the most recent academic catalog. Internships and field experiences undertaken in the summer can only be applied to a later fall or spring term when the student is already enrolled in a minimum of 12 credit hours. If Career Connections credits push the student’s semester load beyond 16 credits, they are charged the overload fee published in the most recent catalog. Career Connections credit hours cannot be applied to an interterm if the total interterm hours exceed four credit hours.

Assessment

In addition to the 40 hours onsite for each credit hour, Career Connections also requires the student to develop goal/strategy plans and reflective log summary reports that include appendices – items the student created or came in contact with. The work log reports, along with feedback from the employer and the performance appraisal will be the primary device used by the Faculty Advisor for grading the experience. However, the Faculty Advisor may also request other journals, papers, and projects for assessment of the total experience. (See assessment objectives worksheet.)

 

Alternate Ways to Receive Academic Credit

Credit for Advanced Placement Equivalents

Students who have taken College Board Advanced Placement (AP) courses in high school and have passed one or more Advanced Placement examinations with a score of 3 or higher can receive credit for McPherson College’s equivalent course(s), as determined by the college registrar.

Credit for International Baccalaureate Equivalents

Students who have participated in the International Baccalaureate program in high school and who have passed one or more IB examinations with a score of 4 or higher can receive credit for McPherson College’s equivalents courses(s), as determined by the college registrar.

College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) Tests

Students may elect to earn credits for McPherson College courses by passing registrar-approved College Board CLEP tests with a score that meets the credit-granting scores recommended by the American Council on Education. Before registering to take a CLEP exam to test out of a particular McPherson College course, students should be sure the registrar approves the exam as an equivalent to the course for which they desire credit. No more than six hours of CLEP credit will be accepted in the area of college composition. Current CLEP credits are accepted through midterm of the semester the official scores are received by McPherson College. If the current CLEP scores are received after midterm, they will be transcribed the following semester.

The student is required to pay the fee per exam. Additionally, there is a $100 fee to post the credit on the student’s transcript.

Credit by Departmental Examination

To receive credit by institutional examination, the student must have permission from the instructor of the course and/or the department chair. Credit is granted to students who earn a grade of C or higher on the exam. The grade earned on the exam will be recorded on the student’s permanent transcript, along with the notice that the credit was awarded by examination.

Credit by departmental exam counts toward the achievement of a degree and is included in the calculation of the student’s cumulative grade-point average. However, it is not included in the calculation of the GPA for the semester in which the examination is taken.

There is a $100 fee to post the credit on the student’s transcript.

Grades

All grades are determined by the instructor in charge of the course. Grades are reported as follows:

Grading Scale

A         high honor (reserved for very distinguished work)

B         very good work of much more than average quality

C         work of good average quality

D        work of the lowest quality that will enable the student to meet the standards of McPherson College

I          work is incomplete. This mark will be given only when the reason for the incomplete has been unavoidable, as determined by the instructor and the vice president for academic affairs

F         work that does not meet the standards of McPherson College

PS      a passing grade on the pass/fail system

FL      a failing grade on the pass/fail system

CR      credit granted

NC     no credit granted

W       withdrawal from a course

IP       in progress

AU     auditing (class attendance with no credit given)

NR     not reported

Incompletes

The grade of I should be given only when there are unavoidable reasons the student has been unable to complete the work by the end of the term. When instructors give a grade of Incomplete, they must also submit an Incomplete Grade Form with an alternate grade. If a Change of Grade Form is not submitted by midterm of the following semester, the alternate grade becomes the student’s final grade for the course.

Pass/Fail Option

A student may take only one course per semester on a pass/fail basis. Students must declare this intention by the end of the second week of class. General education courses and courses required for the major may not be audited or taken pass/fail.

Grade Points

Grade points are earned as follows:

A         4 grade points for each hour of credit
B         3 grade points for each hour of credit
C         2 grade points for each hour of credit
D        1 grade point for each hour of credit
F         0 grade points earned

Grading Periods

Faculty report grades at three points in the fall and spring semesters:

  • Faculty report D’s and F’s only at the end of the first five weeks. This is a preliminary grade intended to alert students and advisors to poor academic performance while there is time to address issues and get the student the help needed to be successful. Students making all C’s or better do not receive a five-week grade report.
  • All grades are reported at midterm, or half way through the semester. Midterm grades are preliminary and in no way indicate or guarantee similar grade at the end of the semester.
  • Final grades are reported at the end of each term. These grades become a permanent part of a student’s transcript unless a course is retaken to replace the previously earned grade. Unless the instructor miscalculates the grade or submits the wrong grade by mistake, final grades cannot be changed except through the Grade Appeal Process located in the catalog.

Because they are condensed into an intensive three-week period, Interterm courses do not report five-week or midterm grades.

Final Examinations

Most courses require final examinations. A final examination period during which no regular classes meet (usually four days) is scheduled at the end of the fall and spring semesters. Final examinations or, in some cases, an alternative learning experience or evaluation activity will be given during this period according to a final examination schedule approved by the Educational Policies Committee. Final examinations for Interterm and May Session courses are given during the last scheduled class meeting of the term.

Students who have three or more final exams scheduled on the same day of the final exam period may speak with the vice president for academic affairs about arranging with the involved faculty an alternative time for one or more of the finals. Students should not ask faculty to take their exams at a time other than the time approved by EPC for any reason other than extraordinary, unavoidable circumstances. Faculty have no obligation to give exams at a time other than the time approved by EPC, and approval of the vice president for academic affairs is necessary for them to do so.

Course Repeat Policy

With the approval of the vice president for academic affairs, students may repeat a course. The last grade earned will be the grade used to compute the grade-point average. Courses taken at other institutions may not be used to repeat courses taken at McPherson College.

Some courses, such as choir, band, music ensembles, and private lessons, may be repeated multiple times.

After completing one year of intercollegiate athletic competition, students may enroll in intercollegiate competition (PE 211-21 and PE 311-21) for 1 credit hour, but a maximum of 2 credit hours for intercollegiate competition will count toward graduation. Students who transfer credits are limited to 2 credit hours for intercollegiate competition.

Grade Appeal Procedure

A student who receives a final course grade that he or she believes is biased, capricious, erroneous, or unfair must first discuss the evaluation personally with the instructor who assigned the grade. Unless the instructor is permanently absent or the vice president for academic affairs advises otherwise, no formal grade appeal may begin until that conversation has taken place.

If a student, after discussing the matter with the instructor, still believes the recorded grade is unfair, he or she should consult with the vice president for academic affairs, who may attempt to resolve the issue by conferring with the student and instructor separately and informally.

If no resolution is achieved through the intervention of the vice president for academic affairs, the student may, with the written permission of the VPAA, appeal to a review committee established as follows:

  • A member of the faculty selected by the student,
  • A member of the faculty selected by the instructor involved,
  • A member of a faculty selected either by the VPAA or the president of the college. (This member of the committee may be from another institution than McPherson College.)

The committee will determine the legitimacy of the student’s grievance. If the student’s grievance is found to be valid, the committee will recommend an alternative grade for record. Decisions of the review committee are final and not subject to further appeal.

Academic Honors

Honor Rolls

At the end of fall and spring semesters, grade-point averages for the term will be calculated and an Honor Roll and Honorable Mention Roll compiled and published. Full-time students earning a GPA of 3.55 or higher will be placed on the Honor Roll. Students earning a GPA of 3.25 to 3.54 will be placed on the Honorable Mention Roll.

Students with an Incomplete reported for the term are ineligible for the honor rolls. Grade points earned by examination will not be included in the GPA to determine whether a student is on an honor roll.

Honor Graduates

Students who have consistently achieved a high level of scholarship during their study at McPherson College will be graduated with honors. Honors are determined by calculating both the overall cumulative GPA and the cumulative GPA in the major area of study. The lower of those two GPAs determines the appropriate honor, as follows:

  • Students earning a minimum grade-point average of 3.55 to 3.74 will be graduated cum laude.
  • Students earning a minimum grade-point average of 3.75 to 3.89 will be graduated magna cum laude.
  • Students earning a minimum grade-point average of 3.90 to 4.0 will be graduated summa cum laude.

Transfer students will be considered for graduation honors based on their work at McPherson College. The only exception to this shall be for persons who have participated in a study abroad program. These grades shall not be used in the calculation of honors.

Graduation honors for students with Incompletes or outstanding classes will be calculated after all work is completed.

Satisfactory Academic Progress Standards

To remain in good academic standing at McPherson College, all students must make satisfactory academic progress (SAP). Academic SAP, as measured by McPherson College’s academic affairs office, is similar to, but distinct from, a student’s financial aid standing. An undergraduate student on academic warning or academic probation may also be, but is not necessarily, ineligible for financial aid. (See Financial Aid Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy.)

Undergraduate SAP Standards

The academic standing of an undergraduate student at McPherson College is measured by the student’s progress toward a degree within an optimum amount of time. This includes a qualitative measure (cumulative grade point average) and a quantitative measure (credit hours earned as a percentage of credit hours attempted).

Academic Warning, Probation, and Suspension Policies

Students are placed on academic warning or academic probation on the basis of the table below. Attempted hours include all postsecondary coursework attempted after completion of the high school degree, including failed coursework, repeated coursework, and coursework graded as incomplete. The cumulative grade point average used to determine a student’s academic standing includes only courses taken at McPherson College.

QUALITATIVE QUANTITATIVE
Hrs earned as % of hrs attempted
Hours attempted Warning
cum GPA
Probation
cum GPA

Warning
Probation
0 -15 1.70 1.50 85% 50%
16 – 31 1.75 1.60 85% 60%
32 – 46 1.85 1.70 85% 62%
47 – 62 1.95 1.80 85% 67%
63 – 77 <=2.00 1.85 85% 67%
78 – 93 <=2.00 1.90 85% 69%
94 – 108 <=2.00 1.95 85% 71%
109 – 124 <=2.00 <=2.00 85% 74%
125 – 139 <=2.00 <=2.00 85% 77%
140 – 155 <=2.00 <=2.00 85% 83%
156 – 170 <=2.00 <=2.00 85% 83%
171 – 186 <=2.00 <=2.00 85% 83%

Determinations of satisfactory academic progress are made immediately after the conclusion of fall and spring semesters. In some circumstances, an individual student’s academic progress may be re-evaluated at the end of summer terms or the January Interterm. Students who exceed measures listed in the Warning column for both the qualitative and the quantitative measures are considered in good academic standing. Students who are placed on academic probation or who are academically suspended will be notified within 30 days after grades are due from the faculty.

Warning

Students placed on academic warning receive a letter notifying them of their tenuous academic situation, but academic warning imposes no particular conditions upon a student. Students on academic warning should avail themselves of the support services provided by the Center for Academic Development.

Probation

Students placed on academic probation have one semester in which to raise both quantitative and qualitative satisfactory academic progress indicators above the probationary levels identified for their respective hours attempted in the table above. Students on academic probation will receive letters from the vice president for academic affairs informing them of their standing and stipulating conditions that must be met during the coming semester. These conditions may include mandatory enrollment in College Study Skills or appointments with a staff member of the Center for Academic Development, a limit upon the number of hours that can be attempted in the coming semester, and/or class attendance monitoring.

Suspension

Students who fall below the qualitative and/or quantitative probation indicators for their respective attempted hours will be reviewed by the Satisfactory Academic Progress Committee to determine their eligibility for continued enrollment. Students who are not permitted to continue their enrollment will be placed on academic suspension for one semester or one year.

After serving their term of suspension, suspended students must reapply for admission to McPherson College. To be readmitted, the student must present evidence that he or she is prepared to do better academic work. If readmitted, the student will re-enter the college on academic probation, with one semester to demonstrate an ability to make satisfactory academic progress.

Please note: Academic warning, probation, and suspension are different from financial aid warning, probation, and suspension. Students on academic warning or probation should check with the financial aid office to confirm their financial aid status.

Appealing Academic Suspension

Students who wish to appeal a decision of academic suspension may appeal within 30 days after notification of their condition by submitting a written appeal to the vice president for academic affairs. The appeal clearly explain the circumstances or behaviors that have prevented the student from making satisfactory academic progress and persuasively argue that such matters will not hinder future academic achievement. The appeal should include a specific plan the student is committed to implementing in order to work his or her way back into good academic standing. An appeal template is available from the academic affairs office.

Although he or she may consult with the Satisfactory Academic Progress Committee, the vice president for academic affairs makes the final determination regarding student appeals of academic suspension. The VPAA’s decision is not subject to further appeal.

A student who has been academically suspended has probably had his or her financial aid suspended as well, but appealing suspension is a separate process for each. The student must first appeal the academic suspension. If the vice president for academic affairs rescinds the academic suspension and allows the student to continue studies at McPherson College, the student who has also had financial aid suspended must follow the appeal procedures described in the Financial Aid Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy.

Graduate SAP Standards

The academic standing of a graduate student at McPherson College is measured by a qualitative measure (cumulative grade point average) and a quantitative measure (credit hours earned as a percentage of credit hours attempted). To maintain good academic standing, a graduate student must, at all times, maintain a 3.0 cumulative GPA and complete no less than 67 percent of all hours attempted. Any student whose GPA falls below 3.0 or who completes fewer than 67 percent of all attempted hours will be placed on academic probation. The student remains on probation until a 3.0 GPA is achieved or the percentage of hours earned totals at least 67 percent of hours attempted.

Graduation and Commencement

Graduation Requirements

In order to graduate, students must satisfactorily complete no fewer than 124 credit hours with a cumulative, grade-point average of 2.0 or higher, both overall and in the courses required for their major field of study. The grade-point average includes only courses taken at McPherson College and is calculated by dividing the number of grade points earned by the number of graded hours.

For a complete list of graduation requirements, see Requirements for the Bachelor’s Degree in the Degree Programs section and the Course Repeat Policy.

Conferral Dates

McPherson College will post degrees five times a year – December, February, May, July, and August, for those students meeting all graduation requirements. Commencement exercises are held each May for graduating seniors who are members of that class and who have successfully completed the graduation requirements, including applying for graduation and a positive senior audit. Please see the Participation in Commencement section for more details.

Graduation Checks

Students are highly encouraged to schedule two meetings with the registrar’s office to confirm they are on track to graduate. The first should be performed sometime during the spring semester of the sophomore year or first semester of the junior year. The second graduation check should be scheduled for the spring semester before the senior year. All students should be cautious about changing registration during the year. Any change that brings a senior below the stated requirements for participation in Commencement results in the student not being able to participate.

Candidacy for the Degree

In the fall, members of the senior class apply for candidacy for the degree to which their courses apply. Application is made through the registrar’s office. Only those members of the senior class that have been accepted as candidates for a degree may participate in Commencement events. Seniors not filing this application risk being overlooked for a diploma and inclusion in the Commencement program.

Participation in Commencement

Commencement exercises are held each May for graduating seniors who are members of that class and who have successfully completed the graduation requirements, including applying for graduation and a positive senior audit.

Only students who have successfully completed 118 credits out of the required 124 credits with a minimum 2.00 grade point average (both overall residential and in the major as figured by tentative senior grade due date) and do not have a balance with the college are eligible to be included in the Commencement program and participate in Commencement and its related activities without receiving a diploma. Students who participate in Commencement without actually graduating are referred to as “participators.” The diploma is conferred and a complete transcript available following completion of all requirements.

Neither senior status, number of courses attempted, time spent in college, delays in submitting off-campus or transfer work, nor other circumstances or miscommunication eliminate the 118 credit requirement for participation in Commencement. The responsibility for understanding and meeting graduation requirements rests entirely with the student. Please note: Elementary education majors cannot participate in graduation until after student teaching has been successfully completed. Secondary education majors may walk as a participator if they already have 118 earned credit hours and have met all the requirements for their major. They will then graduate after successfully completing their student teaching experience.

Diplomas

A diploma is issued to each member of the graduating class three to four weeks after Commencement under the following conditions:

  1. All requirements for the Baccalaureate degree have been successfully completed. A diploma is not issued to participators.
  2. The recipient has no outstanding financial obligations to the college.

The fee for replacing a diploma is $25 (domestic) or $35 (international).

Other Academic Policies

Student Responsibility for Academic Progress

Although McPherson College provides a thorough advising program, the ultimate responsibility for fulfilling requirements for satisfactory academic progress and graduation belongs with the student. A student must satisfy the requirements of the catalog in effect at the time that the student is admitted and begins course work in a degree program; or the student may, with the consent of his/her advisor, graduate under a subsequent catalog, provided the student complies with all requirements of the later catalog.

Students are expected to be familiar with the information presented in their applicable catalog, and to know and observe all regulations and procedures relating to their program of study. In no case will a regulation be waived or an exception granted because a student pleads ignorance of, or contends that he/she was not informed of, the regulations or procedures. Students planning to graduate should be familiar with the deadline for application for graduation and other pertinent deadlines.

Students should schedule an official junior check with the registrar’s office during the second semester of their sophomore year. A final check with the registrar’s office is required during the first term of the senior year to assure that the student will meet all graduation requirements. Part-time students should complete the senior check during the term prior to the term in which they expect to graduate.

Academic Integrity

As a community of scholars, we expect academic integrity from both students and professors. Faculty who violate standards of academic integrity are subject to discipline as provided in section 490 of the Faculty Handbook. This policy outlines the repercussions for students who behave in academically dishonest ways.

Definitions
Academic dishonesty is any act of cheating, fabrication, or plagiarism.

  • Cheating is using or attempting to use unauthorized materials, information, or study aids. Examples: copying homework, copying someone else’s test, using an unauthorized “cheat sheet,” etc.
  • Fabrication is falsification or invention of any information or citation. Examples: making up a source, giving an incorrect citation, deliberately misquoting a source, etc.
  • Plagiarism is representing the work of another (words, pictures, ideas, etc.) as one’s own in the final submission of an academic assignment, not, as a rule, in drafts or preliminary versions.

(The examples above are not exhaustive; infractions may include actions not listed.)

Procedures for Unintentional Violations of Academic Integrity
Instructors use their discretion in determining whether infractions of academic integrity are intentional or unintentional. When instructors determine an act of academic dishonesty is unintentional, they may use their professional judgment in determining the best way to remediate the student.

Procedures for Intentional Violations of Academic Integrity
When instructors determine that an act of academic dishonesty is intentional, they shall

  1. Complete and submit an Academic Dishonesty Incident Report form, including documentation of the incident, to the Vice President for Academic Affairs. (The form is available on the college Intranet site or in the Academic Affairs office.)
  2. Impose the sanction for academic dishonesty provided in their course syllabus, pending notification from the VPAA that their incident report is the first one filed against that student.

Students reported to the VPAA for the first time for an act of plagiarism shall submit documentation of their successful completion of a recommended plagiarism prevention program.
If a student has had one or more incident reports previously submitted to the VPAA, the following consequences shall ensue:

  • Second reported offense: The student shall fail the course. At the request of the reporting faculty member, the student, the faculty member, and the VPAA can meet to determine the appropriateness of an F in the course for the behavior reported.
  • Third reported offense: The student shall be suspended for the remainder of the term plus one additional full semester and fail the course in which the incident occurred. If the incident is reported prior to the last day to withdraw without a grade, the student will be withdrawn from all other courses in which he or she is enrolled. If the incident is reported after that date, the student shall receive final course grades calculated by adding zeroes for all remaining course assignments to grades received up to that point in the course. Suspended students must reapply for admission and are not guaranteed re-admittance.
  • Fourth reported offense: Dismissal with no right to appeal.

The VPAA will notify the student, the student’s advisor, and the director of academic development each time an Academic Dishonesty Incident Report is submitted. With the exception noted above for a student’s fourth infraction, students have the right to appeal any charge of academic dishonesty following the same procedures described in the Grade Appeal Policy published in this catalog.

Other Kinds of Academic Dishonesty
Academic dishonesty can also include dissimulation and aiding and abetting.

  • Dissimulation is the act of disguising or altering one’s actions so as to deceive another about the real nature of one’s actions concerning an academic exercise, including (but not limited to) fabricating excuses for missing classes, postponing tests, handing in late papers, turning in a paper for one class that was originally written for another class (when original work is requested), taking inappropriate credit for group work, etc.
  • Aiding and abetting is knowingly facilitating any act defined in this policy, including (but not limited to) students helping other students plagiarize and/or cheat by unauthorized sharing of lab work or coursework, not reporting others’ cheating incidents, etc.

Faculty retain the right to deal with instances of dissimulation and aiding and abetting as they deem appropriate, including reporting such incidents to the VPAA.

Class Attendance

Every professor has the autonomy to establish his or her own class attendance policy, which is explained in the course syllabus. Students are responsible for understanding and complying with each professor’s policy. Instructors may lower final grades or fail students who do not comply with the attendance policy set forth in the syllabus. The vice president for academic affairs may withdraw chronically absent students from one or all their courses.

Unless the instructor’s attendance policy specifies otherwise, students should notify instructors of necessary absences well in advance and arrange alternative means for completing class activities, if appropriate. When prior notification for absences is not possible, the student should explain each absence to the instructor at the next class meeting. The instructor will determine whether make-up work is allowable.

Classroom Conduct

Faculty members have the responsibility to maintain an atmosphere conducive to learning in their classrooms and labs. Therefore, when, in the judgment of the instructor, a student’s behavior undermines the learning atmosphere, the instructor may remove that student from the classroom for the remainder of the class period.

Students who repeatedly undermine the learning environment, or whose disruptive behavior includes violence, threats, or harassment, may be subject to permanent ejection from a course. Unless the instructor specifies otherwise, ejected students fail the course. Students have the right to appeal an instructor’s request for permanent removal from a course to the vice president for academic affairs.

General Education Purpose Statement

At the root of a liberal arts education is a group of courses that are usually referenced as general education requirements. To define this group of courses at McPherson College the faculty first identified qualities that would demonstrate the “ideal McPherson College graduate.” McPherson College’s general education program provides an opportunity for the development of a life-long learner who…

  • Speaks and writes clearly and effectively;
  • Acquires and evaluates information;
  • Understands and is able to use mathematical properties, processes, and symbols;
  • Understands religion and spiritual traditions as a quest for human identity and has examined his/her own beliefs;
  • Understands the concept of holistic health and is conscious of his/her physical, emotional and spiritual well-being;
  • Understands the cultural diversity of our global community;
  • Assesses value conflicts in issues and makes informed ethical decisions;
  • Understands the role of service and peace-making in the historical context of McPherson College and the Church of the Brethren;
  • Integrates knowledge and experience with exploration and choice of career;
  • Appreciates the arts and literature and is able to make informed aesthetic responses;
  • Understands his/her relationship to the physical and biological world and the methods of science;
  • Understands the economics, social, and historical contexts of society;
  • Thinks critically and creatively;
  • Demonstrates the appropriate use of technology within his/her academic discipline.

To this end, all students at McPherson College are expected to complete a common set of general education requirements, defined in terms of foundations, seminars, and distribution courses. Students must complete all the general education requirements as outlined below in order to graduate.

 

2018|08 General Education, Catalog 18-19|

General Education Foundation Courses

A. Oral Communication:

Student Learning Outcome: Students should be able to deliver messages appropriate to their audience, purpose, and context.

Performance Indicators – Students should be able to:

  1. Perform verbal and nonverbal communication behaviors that illustrate the competency of an effective communicator.
  2. Support and organize their ideas in a coherent manner.

Required: 1 Course
G-CM130 Interpersonal Communication
G-CM140 Public Speaking
G-CM218 Business and Professional Communication

B. Written Communication & Information Literacy

Student Learning Outcome for Written Communication: Students should be able to write with skill and clarity.

Performance Indicators – Students should be able to:

  1. Produce writing that shows an awareness of audience.
  2. Support their ideas with appropriate details and examples.
  3. Coherently organize their writing.
  4. Produce writing that shows careful attention to craft.

Student Learning Outcome for Information Literacy: Students should be able to demonstrate ethical and efficient use of information.

Performance Indicators – Students should be able to:

  1. Show that they can find appropriate sources.
  2. Show that they can evaluate the reliability of sources.
  3. Use information from sources appropriately in their work.

Required: 4 Courses
G-EN110 College Composition I
G-EN111 College Composition II
and:
Students pursuing a Bachelor of Arts are required to take Spanish and one Language Intensive (LI) course in their major department.  Students pursuing a Bachelor of Science are required to take 2 Language Intensive courses with at least one LI course in the student’s major department.

Language Intensive – Oral and Written Communication

Student Learning Outcome for Oral Communication: Students should be able to clearly voice a coherent message.

Performance Indicators – Students should be able to:

  1. Show that they can speak clearly and audibly.
  2. Support their ideas with appropriate research.

Speaking Component

(1) Informal oral communication exercises should be used frequently in the LI classroom. Most often, these will consist of required participation in small group and class discussions. LI instructors can make even routine student participation in class discussions and activities into helpful oral communication exercises simply by (a) raising students’ consciousness about the variety of signals they send when they speak informally in class, and (b) helping students eliminate their careless habits in speech and delivery.

(2) At least one formal oral presentation should be included in the LI course. The presentation, probably brief, may be delivered to part or all of the class, or some other audience. It may derive from a formal writing assignment, recast for oral delivery.

Student Learning Outcome for Written Communication: Students should be able to write with skill and clarity.

Performance Indicators – Students should be able to:

  1. Produce writing that shows an awareness of audience.
  2. Demonstrate effective participation in the writing process.
  3. Coherently organize their writing.
  4. Produce writing that shows careful attention to craft.

Writing Component

(1)Informal writing assignments should be frequent, perhaps one per class session, but certainly one per week. Most informal writing activities are in the “writing to learn” mode; that is, they are intended to push students to read, think about, and interpret course material more carefully and deeply than they otherwise might do. From a handful of basic, informal writing models, such as journals and microthemes, LI instructors can improvise an almost endless array of specific informal writing activities.

(2) Formal writing assignments should be substantial (but the meaning of “substantial” depends upon the course and the exact nature of the assignment.) There should be at least one formal, polished piece of writing. Whenever possible, LI instructors should give formal assignments in stages, conference with students over drafts, and allow ample time for revision(s).

Courses designated as Language Intensive:

G-AR310 Art History I
G-AR311 Art History II
BA 475 Business Strategy & Policy
BI 391 Evolution
CI 455 Teaching Learning Process
G-CM130 Interpersonal Communication
G-CM218 Business & Professional Communication
G-CM221 Intercultural Communication
CM 475A Senior Seminar in Communication Research
CM 475B Senior Project in Communication
G-EE210 Children’s Literature
EE 303 Reading/Language Arts I
G-EN210L Masterpieces of World Literature (4 hours)
G-EN220L Contemporary World Literature (4 hours)
G-EN255L American Literature II (4 hours)
G-EN270L Fiction (4 hours)
EN 313 Expository Writing
G-EN370L Poetry (4 hours)
EN 475B  Senior Project in English
G-HI333 Technology & Society
HI 475  Senior Thesis
IT 475 Senior Projects in Information Tech.
G-MA290 History of Mathematics
MA 475 Senior Project in Mathematics
ML 385 Advanced Level Composition and Conversation
NS 300 Research Methods
NS 475 Senior Research
G-PA265 Script Analysis
G-PA385  Performing Arts History & Literature I
G-PA390  Performing Arts History & Literature II
PA 475 Senior Projects in Performing Arts
PE 380 History & Philosophy of Health, PE, Sport
PE 445  Readings and Research for Health Science
G-PR104L Ethics (4 hours)
G-PR106L Spiritual Pathways
G-PS215  Global Peace Studies
PS 475  Senior Thesis
PY 450 History and Systems of Psychology
PY 475 Senior Thesis
SO 475 Senior Thesis
G-TE 333 Technology & Society
TE 475 Senior Project

C. Mathematics

Student Learning Outcome: Students should be able to use mathematical concepts.

Performance Indicators – Students should be able to:

  1. Demonstrate understanding by performing accurate computations.
  2. Apply algorithms to solve problems.

Required: 3-4 hours chosen from the following:
G-MA105   College Algebra
G-MA111   Calculus I
G-MA123  Discrete Mathematics
G-MA153   Principles of Geometry
G-MA201   Survey of Mathematics
G-BA220  Business Applied Statistics
G-MA221   Elementary Applied Statistics

D. Religion/Beliefs/Values

Student Learning Outcome: Students should be able to answer fundamental religious or philosophical questions.

Performance Indicators – Students should be able to:

  1. Develop answers relative to alternative religious/philosophical perspectives.
  2. Explain their position on religious or philosophical issues.

Required: 3-4 hours chosen from the following:
G-PR101   Old Testament-Hebrew Bible: God and People in Ancient Israel
G-PR102    Jesus: New Testament Foundations
G-PR104    Ethics
*G-PR104L  Ethics (LI if taken as G-PR104L for 4 hours)
*G-PR106L   Spiritual Pathways: Transformation, Compassion, and Vocation
G-PR107    Critical Thinking
G-PR201     Introduction to Philosophy
G-PR202     Christian Traditions
G-PR203    Science and Religion
G-PR204    Peacemaking: Religious Perspectives
G-PR206    Religion and Environmental Stewardship
G-PR304  The Church of the Brethren and Beyond: The Christian Church Serves Our World
G-PR306    World Religions

E. Wholeness/Health/Fitness

Student Learning Outcome: Students should be able to identify optional behaviors that promote lifelong personal health.

Performance Indicators – Students should be able to:

  1. Develop a personal strategy for health and fitness emphasizing the physical domain.
  2. Illustrate the relationship between personal behaviors and lifelong health and wellness.

Required: 1 course 
G-PE150     Concepts in Holistic Health
G-PE170     Personal & Community Health

F. Global/Intercultural Experience

Student Learning Outcome: Students should be able to understand they live in a world of diverse cultures.

Performance Indicators – Students should be able to:

  1. Identify social, cultural, religious, or linguistic differences.
  2. Explain how values and contributions of diverse societies affect individual experiences.

Required: 3 hours+ chosen from the following:
G-BA 342IT International Business (Travel required)
G-CI251
     Introduction to Education Practicum
G-CI333     Intercultural Education
*G-CM221 Intercultural Communication
G-EN210 Masterpieces of World Literature
*G-EN210L Masterpieces of World Literature (LI if taken as G-EN210L for four hours)
G-EN220   Contemporary World Literature
*G-EN220L Contemporary World Literature (LI if taken as G-EN220L for four hours)
*G-HI333   Technology and Society
*G-MA290   History of Mathematics
G-ML108   Spanish Level I
G-ML109   Spanish Level II
G-ML208   Spanish Level III
G-ML209   Spanish Level IV
G-ML350   Junior Year Abroad
G-PR306     World Religions
G-PS130     Principles of Geography
*G-PS215 Global Peace Studies
G-SO202   Minorities in the U.S.
*G-TE333 Technology and Society

+Students completing a Bachelor of Arts degree must take G-ML108 Level I Spanish for three hours as well as three additional hours in the Global/Intercultural Experience Foundation. These students will be required to take only one Language Intensive (LI) course.

College Seminars

In the seminar series, students will demonstrate (1) that they have explored traditional Church of the Brethren values; (2) that they understand service- learning and can complete a service project; (3) that they can make informed ethical decisions in personal and professional situations; and (4) that they have investigated career options in the fields of study. In addition, the various seminars address the following goals.

  1. G-ID101 Academic Community Essentials (ACE) Seminar: Students will show that they have learned about college life, create a degree plan, and practice good study skills, critical thinking, and conflict resolution.
  2. G-ID201 Sophomore Seminar: Students will complete a service project, develop a career plan, and show that they have explored internship options.
  3. Senior Capstone Experience: Students will complete a senior project, as designed by department faculty.
2018|08 General Education, Catalog 18-19|

General Education Distribution Courses

Humanities:

Required: 6 hours, with a course of at least two hours from each category: the arts and literature

Student Learning Outcome for Fine Arts: Students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the process by which art is created.

Performance Indicators – Students should be able to:

  1. Experience art through theory or practice.
  2. Demonstrate skill and control of the elements appropriate to the medium chosen.

G-AR101     Drawing I
G-AR102     Painting I
G-AR131     Ceramics I
G-AR220    Graphic Design for Non-Art Majors
*G-AR310   Art History I
*G-AR311   Art History II
G-AR350    Sculpture
G-PA110     Intro. Performing Arts (requires travel)
G-PA120     Music Appreciation
G-PA132     College Choir
G-PA134     College Band
G-PA160     Performing for the Stage
G-PA170     Stagecrafts

Student Learning Outcome for Literature: Students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the functions and purposes of literature.

Performance Indicators – Students should be able to:

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of literary terms and genre.
  2. Demonstrate an ability to think analytically about texts.
  3. Articulate ways in which literature is shaped by culture.

*G-EE210   Children’s Literature
*G-EN210   Masterpieces of World Literature
*G-EN220   Contemporary World Literature
G-EN235     Selected Topics in Literature
*G-EN255   American Literature II
*G-EN270   Fiction
*G-EN370   Poetry
G-PA265     Script Analysis
*G-PA385   Performing Arts Literature & History I
*G-PA390   Performing Arts Literature & History II

Natural Sciences:

Student Learning Outcome: Students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of how the natural sciences construct knowledge of the world.

Performance Indicators – Students should be able to:

  1. Summarize the current consensus of the scientific community with regards to the structure and function of some aspect of the physical or biological world.
  2. Illustrate their knowledge of the changing nature of the consensus of the scientific community with regards to the structure and function of some aspect of the physical or biological world, by outlining the historical changes in that consensus.
  3. Report on their experiences with those methods and processes of the natural sciences which they conducted in the laboratory.

Required: 7 hours, one lab, one course from life and one course from physical sciences

Life Sciences
G-BI101     Principles of Biology
G-BI106     Environmental Biology
G-BI111      College Biology I
G-BI201     Biodiversity
G-BI210     Principles of Nutrition
G-NS100  Science & Society
G-NS141     Environmental Science

Physical Sciences
G-CH101    Principles of Chemistry
G-CH106    Environmental Chemistry
G-CH111     College Chemistry I
G-NS100  Science & Society
G-NS141     Environmental Science
G-NS245    Climatology
G-PC251     Geology
G-PC275     Astronomy
G-PH215    General Physics I

Social Sciences:

Required: 9 hours, one each from behavioral sciences, social institutions, and history

Student Learning Outcome for Behavioral Sciences: Students should be able to illustrate the relationship between the self and the social world.

Performance Indicators – Students should be able to:

  1. Describe the ways in which social world shapes the self.
  2. Describe the ways in which the self alters the social world.

G-CM120   Introduction to Human Communication
G-PY101     Introduction to Psychology
G-SO101     Introduction to Sociology
G-SO246    Marriage and Family

Student Learning Outcome for Social Institutions: Students should be able to understand the basic concepts of social institutions.

Performance Indicators – Students should be able to:

  1. Identify a social institution at work in human affairs.
  2. Explain how social institutions influence peoples’ lives.

G-BA101      Introduction to Business
G-BA230     Personal Finance
G-CI150       Introduction to Education
G-EC416      Ecological Economics
G-ET201      Social  Entrepreneurship
G-PS/HI101 Historical Introduction to Politics
G-PS102       U.S. Government
G-PS125        International Relations
G-SO246      Marriage and Family

Student Learning Outcome for History: Students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of the historical method.

Performance Indicators – Students should be able to:

  1. Compose a historical question.
  2. Apply that question to historical evidence to interpret the past.

G-HI/PS101  Historical Introduction to Politics
G-HI110         World Civilization to 1500
G-HI120        World Civilization since 1500
G-HI130        Introductory Methods for Historical Analysis
G-HI140        American History to 1877
G-HI150        American History since 1877
G-HI210        International Travel Study in History
G-HI220        Modern Europe
G-HI235        Topics in World History
G-HI236        Topics in Social History
G-HI237        Topics in Political History
G-HI261        Kansas History

2018|08 General Education, Catalog 18-19|

Visual Arts Program

Purpose Statement

The McPherson College visual arts department provides 1) high-quality art instruction within the content areas of art production, art history, art criticism, and aesthetic inquiry, 2) unique art programs within the visual arts major, including graphic design, graphic design marketing, graphic design photography, studio, art teaching Licensure as well as two hybrid majors, of digital media with an emphasis in visual design and auto restoration design in conjunction with the technology department, and 3) venues for the fulfillment of academic and professional goals of students pursuing a visual arts-related career within a liberal arts context and an entrepreneurial environment at a small private college in Kansas.

Goals

The four primary goals of the visual arts department are to produce graduates who can 1) effectively execute and perform a variety of art skills with sensitivity and intelligence, 2) communicate the ability to analyze and critique works of art, 3) relate the creative process to life in personally meaningful ways, and 4) apply skills and knowledge to arts-related opportunities and professions. The visual arts department achieves these goals when graduates can:

  • demonstrate knowledge of art elements and design principles;
  • demonstrate performance in a variety of traditional and contemporary art media;
  • demonstrate abilities to analyze and critique works of art in verbal and written form;
  • demonstrate meaningful connections of art to life through the development of perceptual skills;
  • research, identify, and interpret Western and non- Western cultural contributions to art;
  • understand the qualities and the mentality needed to be a working, active artist and/or arts-related professional;
  • meet State Department of Education standards for certification in the area of art for those pursuing art teaching licensure;
  • demonstrate knowledge and skills with emerging technologies, both hardware and software, needed for opportunities and/or careers in the field of graphic design.

The visual arts department’s curriculum is designed to meet the needs of students who want to 1) develop their artistic skills and refine their aesthetic values, 2) plan for careers as artists and graphic designers, and/or for employment in arts-related positions, 3) teach art in the public schools, and 4) further their education in graduate school.

Visual Arts Major: Graphic Design Emphasis

Requirements (56 required hours)

G-AR 101 Drawing I (2 hours)
G-AR 102 Painting I: Acrylics OR
G-AR 202 Painting II: Watercolors (2 hours)
AR 103 Elementary Design (3 hours)
AR 130 Design Software (2 hours)
AR 203 Photography I (2 hours)
AR 205 Multi-Media Software (2 hours)
AR 210 Drawing II: Figure Drawing (2 hours)
AR 230 Graphic Design I (3 hours)
AR 235 Graphic Design II (3 hours)
AR 303 Photography II (3 hours)
G-AR 310 Art History I (4 hours)
G-AR 311 Art History II (4 hours)
AR 312 Themes in Contemporary Art (3 hours)
AR 320 Typography and Logo Branding (2 hours)
AR 330 Graphic Design III (3 hours)
AR 335 Moving Image Software (3 hours)
AR 340 Web-Based Design I (3 hours)
G-AR 350 Sculpture I (3 hours)
AR 450 Web-Based Design II (3 hours)
AR 470 Graphic Design Senior Show (1 hour)
AR 475G Graphic Design IV (3 hours)

Suggested Supporting courses

G-AR 102 Painting I: Acrylics OR
G-AR 202 Painting II: Watercolors (2 hours)
CM 210 Multi-Media Storytelling I (3 hours)
BA 327 Consumer Behavior (3 hours)
BA 360 Marketing Research  (3 hours)
AR 388 Internship in Graphic Design (3 hours)

Majors in the graphic design emphasis are required to produce a senior exhibition during the spring semester of their senior year.

Visual Arts Major: Graphic Design Photography Emphasis

Requirements 

G-AR 101 Drawing I (2 hours)
G-AR 102 Painting I: Acrylics OR
G-AR 202 Painting II: Watercolors (2 hours)
AR 103 Elementary Design (3 hours)
AR 130 Design Software (2 hours)
AR 203 Photography I (2 hours)
AR 205 Multimedia Software (2 hours)
AR 210 Drawing II (2 hours)
AR 230 Graphic Design I (3 hours)
AR 235 Graphic Design II (3 hours)
AR 303 Photography II (3 hours)
G-AR 311 Art History II (4 hours)
AR 333 Commercial Photography I (3 hours)
AR 363 Commercial Photography II (3 hours)
AR 320 Typography and Logo Branding (2 hours)
AR 330 Graphic Design III (3 hours)
AR 335 Moving Image Software (3 hours)
AR 340 Web-Based Design I (3 hours)
G-AR 350 Sculpture I (3 hours)
AR 450 Web-Based Design II (3 hours)
AR 403 Photography Portfolio Development (1 hour)
AR 470 Graphic Design Senior Show (1 hour)
AR 475G Graphic Design IV (3 hours)

Suggested Supporting courses

G-AR 102 Painting I: Acrylics OR
G-AR 202 Painting II: Watercolors (2 hours)
CM 210 Multimedia Storytelling I (3 hours)
BA 327 Consumer Behavior (3 hours)
BA 360 Marketing Research  (3 hours)
AR 388 Internship in Graphic Design (3 hours)

Majors in the graphic design photography emphasis are required to produce a senior exhibition during the spring semester of their senior year.

Visual Arts Major: Graphic Design Marketing Emphasis

Requirements: 71 combined hours: 40 hours art + 31 hours business

G-AR 101 Drawing I (2 hours)
G-AR 102 Painting I: Acrylics OR
G-AR 202 Painting II: Watercolors (2 hours)
AR 103 Elementary Design (3 hours)
AR 130 Design Software (2 hours)
AR 203 Photography I (2 hours)
AR 230 Graphic Design I (3 hours)
AR 235 Graphic Design II (3 hours)
G-AR 311 Art History II (4 hours)
AR 330 Graphic Design III (3 hours)
AR 335 Moving Image Software (3 hours)
AR 340 Web-Based Design I (3 hours)
G-AR 350 Sculpture I (3 hours)
AR 450 Web-Based Design II (3 hours)
AR 470 Graphic Design Senior Show (1 hour)
AR 475 Graphic Design IV (3 hours)
G-BA 130 Principles of Business Management (3 hours)
EC 202 Survey of Economics (3 hours)
AC 202 Survey of Accounting (3 hours)
BA 315 Business Law (3 hours)
BA 321 Marketing (3 hours)
BA 322 Advertising and Promotion (3 hours)
BA 327 Consumer Behavior (3 hours)
BA 360 Marketing Research (3 hours)

Suggested Supporting Courses

AR 205 Multi-Media Software (2 hours)
AR 305 Typography and Logo Branding (2 hours)
AR 303 Photography II (3 hours)

Majors in the graphic design marketing emphasis are required to produce a senior exhibition during the spring semester of their senior year.

Visual Arts Major: Studio Emphasis

Requirements: 52 required hours

G-AR 101 Drawing I (2 hours)
G-AR 102 Painting I: Acrylics (2 hours)
AR 103 Elementary Design (3 hours)
G-AR 131 Ceramics I (2 hours)
AR 130 Design Software (2 hours)
G-AR 202 Painting II: Watercolors (2 hours)
AR 203 Photography I (2 hours)
AR 210 Drawing II: Figure Drawing (2 hours)
AR 230 Graphic Design I (3 hours)
AR 231 Ceramics I (2 hours)
AR 303 Photography II (3 hours)
G-AR 310 Art History (4 hours)
G-AR 311 Art History II (4 hours)
AR 312 Themes in Contemporary Art (3 hours)
AR 315 Metalsmithing and Jewelry (3 hours)
AR 325 Concentrated Study (2 hours)
G-AR 350 Sculpture I (3 hours)
AR 355 Sculpture II (3 hours)
AR 425 Concentrated Study (2 hours)
AR 475A Senior Concentration (3 hours)

Suggested Supporting courses

AR 235 Graphic Design 2 (3 hours)
AR 340 Web-based Design (3 hours)
AR 335 Moving Image Software (3 hours)

Majors in the studio emphasis are required to produce a senior exhibition during the spring semester of their senior year.

Digital Media: Visual Design emphasis

(See also Digital Media: Communication emphasis in the Communication Program section in this catalog.)

Requirements: 25 credit hours of digital media core courses and 27 credit hours of visual design emphasis.

AR 130 Design Software (2 hours)
AR 205 Multimedia Software (2 hours)
AR 230 Graphic Design I (3 hours)
CM 330 Persuasion and Social Influence (3 hours)
AR 335 Moving Image Software (3 hours)
AR 340/CM 350 Web Design I (3 hours)
CM 360 Videography I
AR 450/CM440
Web Design II (3 hours)
CM 410
Videography II (3 hours)

AR 103 Elementary Design (3 hours)
AR 203 Photography I (2 hours)
AR 235 Graphic Design II (3 hours)
AR 260 UX/UI Prototyping (2 hours)
AR 265 UX/UI Application (2 hours)
AR 303 Photography II (3 hours)
AR 320 Typography/Logo Branding (2 hours)
AR 330 Graphic Design III ( 3 hours)
AR 333 Commercial Photography I (3 hours)
AR 475G Graphic Design IV (3 hours)
AR 470 Graphic Design Senior Show (1 hour)

Suggested Supporting Courses:
BA 221
Marketing (3 hours)
BA 322 Advertising and Promotion (3 hours)
BA 327 Consumer Behavior (3 hours)
BA 427 Marketing Research (3 hours)
ET 101 Creativity and Innovation (3 hours)

Visual Arts Major: Licensure emphasis for teaching Art in the Public Schools (PK-12)

Requirements: 52 required hours. In addition to the required courses in the visual arts department, licensure art majors complete 44 hours in professional education requirements through the curriculum and instruction department.

G-AR 101 Drawing I (2 hours)
G-AR 102 Painting I: Acrylics (2 hours)
AR 103 Elementary Design (3 hours)
AR 130 Design Software (2 hours)
G-AR 131 Ceramics I (2 hours)
G-AR 202 Painting II: Watercolors (2 hours)
AR 203 Photography I (2 hours)
AR 210 Drawing II: Figure Drawing (2 hours)
AR 230 Graphic Design I (3 hours)
AR 231 Ceramics II (2 hours)
AR 303 Photography II (3 hours)
G-AR 310 Art History I (4 hours)
G-AR 311 Art History II (4 hours)
AR 312 Themes in Contemporary Art (3 hours)
AR 315 Metalsmithing and Jewelry (3 hours)
G-AR 350 Sculpture I (3 hours)
AR 355 Sculpture II (3 hours)
AR 358/EE 301 Elementary Art Methods (2 hours)
AR 401/CI 401 Secondary Art Methods (2 hours)
AR 475A Senior Concentration (3 hours)

Majors in the licensure emphasis are required to produce a senior exhibition during the spring semester of their senior year.

Graphic Design Minor

Requirements: 21 require hours

G-AR220 Graphic Design for Non-Art Majors (3 hours)
AR 235 Graphic Design II (3 hours)
AR 320 Typography & Logo Branding (3 hours)
AR 335 Moving Image Software (3 hours)
AR 330 Graphic Design III (3 hours)
AR 340 Web Design I (3 hours)
AR 475G Graphic Design IV (3 hours)

Visual Arts Minor

A minor in the visual arts may be earned by completing 18 credit hours from four course categories: 1) two foundation courses for seven credit hours, 2) four credit hours in two-dimensional courses, 3) five credit hours in three-dimensional courses, and 4) three credit hours in graphic design.

Foundation Courses: 7 hours total

Choose one of three art history courses:

G-AR 310 Art History I, OR
G-AR 311 Art History II, OR
AR 312 Themes in Contemporary Art
AR 103 Elementary Design (3 hours)

Two-dimensional Courses: choose 4 hours total

G-AR 101 Drawing I (2 hours)
G-AR 102 Painting I (2 hours)
G-AR 202 Painting II (2 hours)
AR 203 Photography I (2 hours)
AR 210 Drawing II (2 hours)

Three-dimensional Courses: choose 4 hours total

G-AR 131 Ceramics I (2 hours)
AR 231 Ceramics II (2 hours)
AR 315 Metalsmithing and Jewelry (3 hours)
G-AR 350 Sculpture I (3 hours)
AR 355 Sculpture II (3 hours)

Graphic Design Course: 3 hours

G-AR 220 Graphic Design for Non-Art Majors (3 hours)

2018|Art and Graphic Design, Catalog 18-19|

Visual Arts Course Descriptions

G-AR 101 Drawing I

2 hours
An introduction to the techniques and aesthetics of drawing from observation, with an emphasis on the exploration and application of basic design principles. A variety of media will be presented, including pencil, ink, charcoal, and conté crayon. (Fall and Spring)

G-AR 102 Painting I: Acrylics

2 hours
This course provides an introduction to the techniques and aesthetics of opaque painting, with an emphasis on the exploration and application of color theory.  Painting medium is acrylic paint. (Fall and Spring)

AR 103 Elementary Design

3 hours
This course will focus on the principles and elements of design. With the components of form, line, shape, value, texture, color, space, content, and style, students will learn to develop whole, integrated compositions. Emphasis will be placed on the formal and structural elements of design in various media in order to provide a visual vocabulary for how art works are created. (Fall)

AR 130 Design Software

2 hours
An introduction to graphic design software. Basic operating systems of Macintosh computers and software will be demonstrated as well as print-, photography-, and vector-based design techniques using Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, and InDesign. (Fall)

G-AR 131 Ceramics I

2 hours
The emphasis of this course is in exploring clay and glaze as an art medium. This will be accomplished through an exploration of: hand building techniques and throwing on the potter’s wheel, the various drying stages of clay, slip, stain and glaze application, the firing processes, and the historical and contemporary significance of clay as a functional and expressive medium for the ceramicist.  This course is level 1 and is required for all art majors; no prerequisites.  (Fall and Spring)

G-AR 202 Painting II: Advanced Explorations in 2D (Fall), Water color (Spring)

2 hours
Advanced techniques and explorations of acrylic painting. (Fall)

2 hours
An introduction to the techniques and aesthetics of transparent watercolor painting, with an emphasis on the exploration and application of color theory. (Spring)

AR 203 Photography I

2 hours
An introduction to photography with an emphasis on developing a working familiarity of the concepts and techniques required to take aesthetic photographs using the 35mm single lens reflex camera as well as the development of aesthetic photographic prints. Students will become familiar with processes involved in both film and digital photography, including the traditional darkroom and digital software such as Adobe Photoshop. The history of photography in society and some alternative photographic processes will also be explored. (Spring).

AR 205 Multimedia Software

2 hours
A working overview of Adobe’s Premiere Pro editing software. On mastering the concepts in this course, students will understand the main principles and functionality of audio and visual narrative editing. (Spring)

AR 210 Drawing II

2 hours
A continued experience in the techniques and aesthetics of drawing with an emphasis on the human figure from direct observation. Prerequisite: G-AR 101. (Spring)

G-AR 220 Graphic Design for Non-Art Majors

3 hours
An introduction to graphic design for non-art majors focusing on the foundation of graphics through design principles and elements. Topics will cover branding and advertising basics. Basic operating systems of Macintosh computers will be demonstrated as well as Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, and an introduction to Apple Motion. No prerequisite; however, G-AR 101 Drawing I and AR 103 Elementary Design strongly recommended. (Spring)

AR 230 Graphic Design I

3 hours
An introduction to graphic design focusing on the foundation of graphics through design principles and elements. Topics over conceptual thinking, uses of typography & symbols, advertising & commercials, logos, corporate identity & packaging design will be covered. Prerequisite: AR 130 Design Software, G-AR 101 Drawing I and AR 103 Elementary Design strongly recommended. (Fall)

AR 231 Ceramics II

2 hours
An advanced experience in exploring clay and glaze as an art medium. This will be accomplished through an exploration of: hand building techniques and/or throwing on the potter’s wheel, the various drying stages of clay, slip, stain and glaze application, the firing processes, and the historical and contemporary significance of clay as a functional and expressive medium for the ceramicist.  Prerequisite: G-AR 131 (Spring)

AR 235 Graphic Design II

3 hours
A course focusing on using design principles and elements for three-dimensional packaging in relation to print media. Photoshop, Illustrator, and InDesign will be used. Prerequisite: AR 230 Graphic Design I (Spring)

AR 245/HI 245 The History of Automotive Design

3 hours
Discover and examine the technological and stylistic evolution of automotive design. This course will explore ways in which automobiles, by way of their design, reflect the technology and communicate the values of the culture that produced them. Prerequisites: None. (Spring)

AR 260 UX/UI Prototyping

2 hours
Build the expertise needed to design interactions between the consumer and the product. Create more natural and intuitive user experiences through analysis, prototyping, usability testing, and evaluation. (Fall, even years)

AR 265 UX/UI Application

2 hours
Learn to apply techniques and tools to improve the usability, accessibility, and pleasure with which people interact with digital interfaces. Using a project-based approach, become skilled at interaction design, information architecture, and interface design. (Fall, odd years)

AR 303 Photography II

3 hours
A continuation in the study of photography with a focus on stationary studio lighting techniques as applied to specific photography subjects, still life and product photography using the digital 35mm single lens reflex camera and software such as Light Room and Adobe Photoshop. Prerequisite: AR 203 Photography I or consent of the instructor. (Fall)

G-AR 310 Art History I

4 hours, Language Intensive
A study of art, its meanings and functions in society, and major trends in the evolution of art. Encompasses prehistoric through the Middle Ages. (Fall)

G-AR 311 Art History II

4 hours, Language Intensive
A study of major art movements and individual artists from the Renaissance to contemporary art. Interrelates art to diverse aspects of society, and explores meaning and function of art as an integral part of life. (Spring)

AR 312 Themes in Contemporary Art

3 hours
This course is a study of a variety of themes in contemporary visual art of the late 20th and early 21st centuries, designed for art majors and all students interested in contemporary art issues.  Students will study works produced by contemporary artists beginning with the postmodern period through to the present day. The students will also begin to find their own place in today’s art by producing one advanced piece of inter-media art and reflecting on it in writing. (Spring)

AR 315 Metalsmithing and Jewelry

3 hours
This studio course is an introduction to the techniques, materials, and aesthetics of jewelry and small metal sculpture design and fabrication. Students will design and fabricate jewelry and small sculpture utilizing stones and metals such as silver, copper, and brass. Basic metalsmithing techniques will be covered such as forging and shaping, silver solder, casting, enameling, as well as a variety of other assemblage methods.  (Spring)

AR 320 Typography and Logo Branding

2 hours
A course focusing on type design with an emphasis on design techniques using typography in layout and logo branding using the font editing program Glyphs and and Adobe Illustrator. Prerequisite: AR130 Design Software (Fall)

AR 325 Concentrated Studies

2 hours
Advanced studies of a selected studio medium based on intense production, supplemented with research and/or written reviews of regional exhibitions. Structure of the course is mutually determined by the professor and student. May be repeated. (Fall and Spring)

AR 330 Graphic Design III

3 hours
A course focusing on advanced projects in graphic design, including print, packaging and multi-media. This course functions as a preparatory experience leading into AR 475G Graphic Design IV. Prerequisite: AR 235 Graphic Design II. (Fall)

AR 333 Commercial Studio Photography I

3 hours
This course focuses on important aspects of commercial studio photography, including but not limited to: professional practice, workflow, advanced use of digital camera, advanced lighting techniques for studio shoots. Prerequisites: Photography I and II or consent of instructor. (Spring, even years)

AR 335 Moving Image Software

3 hours
An introduction to Moving Image design software, including animation techniques using the following software: Adobe After Effects & Maxon Cinema 4D.  Prerequisites: AR 130 Design Software. (Spring)

AR 340 Web Based Design I (Cross-Listed with CM 350 Web Design I)

3 hours
An introduction to web design, web usability, and standards-compliant web sites built with HTML and CSS.  Prerequisite: AR 130 Design Software. AR 230 Graphic Design I recommended but not required. (Interterm)

G-AR 350 Sculpture I

3 hours
An introduction to the design, fabrication and aesthetics of sculpture. Emphasis will be on the exploration of common materials and methods used in sculpture. Processes of additive/subtractive, assemblage, and casting will be explored as students create work in clay, stone, metal, and found objects. (Spring)

AR 355 Sculpture II

3 hours
Advanced experiences in the design, fabrication and aesthetics of sculpture, with an emphasis on design/build and the exploration of more complex materials and methods used in sculpture. Prerequisite: G-AR 350 Sculpture I or consent of the instructor. (Fall, even years)

AR 358/EE 301 Methods for Teaching Art in the Elementary School

2 hours
A comprehensive study of elementary art curricula and methods relevant to today’s educator in the public schools. Topics to be covered include: current techniques and materials, issues in art, basic art and design concepts, the developmental stages of children related to age-appropriate art teaching, and curriculum implementation. (Fall)

AR 363 Commercial Studio Photography II

3 hours
This course continues the study of commercial studio photography techniques. This includes, but is not limited to: advanced photo shoots for advertising, such as architectural, product, fashion, and street/journalism photography. Prerequisites: Photography I and II and preferably AR333 Commercial Studio Photography I or consent of instructor. (Spring, odd years)

AR 388 Internship in Graphic Design

3 hours
Students will apply to the graphic design program director for acceptance to enter an intern relationship with a local or regional business or graphic design firm for one semester with close monitoring from the graphic design program director. Acceptance of application for the internship is determined by the visual arts department faculty. Therefore, the student must be granted acceptance prior to enrollment. Prerequisites: AR 230 Graphic Design I, AR 235 Graphic Design II, and AR 330 Graphic Design III. An internship can be taken concurrently with Graphic Design III. Instructor approval required. (Fall & Spring)

AR 401/CI 401 Methods for Teaching Art in the Secondary School

2 hours
A comprehensive study of secondary art curricula and methods relevant to today’s educator in the public schools. Topics to be covered include: the role of the art teacher in a public school system, developing a secondary art curriculum, exposure to Discipline Based Art Education, motivating students, developing realistic expectations, establishing criteria for grading, assessing individual needs in the classroom, and discipline in the classroom. (Spring)

AR 403 Photography Portfolio Development

1 hour
Students produce a professional portfolio including both still and motion imagery. The portfolio will reflect the student’s personal style as well as display the student’s ability in a variety of photographic genres. Prerequisites: AR203, AR303, AR333, AR363 or consent of instructor. (Fall, odd years)

AR 425 Concentrated Studies

2 hours
Preparation for Senior Exhibition and/or highly advanced studies of a selected studio medium based on intense production, supplemented with research and/or written reviews of regional exhibitions. Structure of the course is mutually determined by the professor and student. May be repeated. (Fall and Spring)

AR 450 Web Based Design II (Cross-Listed with CM 440 Web Design II)

3 hours
A recap of HTML and CSS and a more detailed exploration of responsive design. Students will utilize grids for layout and explore advanced styling for building dynamic web pages. Focuses on the skills students need to competently create and maintain their work, using best practices advocated by professional web designers. Prerequsite: CM 340/AR 350 Web Design I. (Spring)

AR 470 Graphic Design Senior Show

1 hour
A course focused on preparation for the Senior Graphic Design Exhibition. Various design projects will be updated and executed. Graphic work produced will become the foundation for the students’ Senior Exhibition. A senior exhibition is required and is a component of this course. Can be taken concurrently with AR 475G Graphic Design IV. (Fall and Spring)

AR 475A Senior Concentration

3 hours
This course that requires the senior art major to concentrate their work in a selected area of study. With the aim of this experience being to increase professional proficiency, the student will work under the close supervision of the professor. This course provides also an introduction to professional practices (application to exhibits, grant writing, gallery practice, amongst others) necessary for artists. A senior exhibition is required and is a main component of this course. Students are strongly encouraged to enroll in this course in both semesters, which will allow them to focus on the preparation for their Senior Exhibition and on the development of a strong body of work. Instructor’s approval required.  (Fall and/or Spring of senior year)

AR 475G Graphic Design IV

3 hours
Advanced large-scale projects will be produced as final pieces to be used as the students’ graphic portfolio. Professional development issues will be covered, including preparation for freelance work, billing clients, and constructing a personal portfolio to be sent to prospective employers. Prerequisite: AR 330 Graphic Design III. (Spring)

Special Course Options
295/495 Field Experience (1-4 hours)
297  Study Abroad (12-16 hours)
299/499 Independent Study (1-4 hours)
388 Career Connections (3-10 hours)
445 Readings and Research (1-4 hours)

2018|Art and Graphic Design, Catalog 18-19|

Auto Restoration Technology Program

Purpose Statement

The department of technology commits itself to developing whole persons through experiential problem solving and the systematic study of technology.

The department achieves this purpose when its students:

  • Demonstrate awareness of how technology changes and interacts with society.
  • Possess a professional orientation for employment or advanced programs, or develop vocational interests in technology.
  • Have acquired technical skills and craftsmanship through systematic study, experiences with technological artifacts, and the solving of technical problems.

Technology Major

McPherson College offers a unique degree program of authentic auto restoration technology emphasizing hands-on skills and historical research. This program results in a unique departmental blend of contemporary technology and traditional craftsmanship. The Bachelor of Science in Technology major has six different emphases from which to choose:

Historic Automotive Technology Emphasis

The goal of the Historic Automotive Technology emphasis is to develop graduates who are prepared for professional pursuits in the area of automotive history and/or graduate study.

Program objectives

This program achieves its purposes when graduates:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the major technological systems of the automobile.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of authentic antique automobile restoration materials, methods and techniques.
  • Demonstrate proficiency in the use of the materials and tools necessary to complete authentic automobile restoration work.
  • Demonstrate the attitudes, knowledge and skills necessary to pursue a successful career in antique automobile restoration.
  • Possess knowledge of historical automotive research material sources, methods and techniques necessary to complete historically accurate automotive restorations.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the historical role of the automobile in modern society.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the role of the automobile in the history of transportation, technology and science.

Requirements

Auto Restoration Technology Core Courses

TE 100  Intro to Restoration (2 hours)
TE 141  Engine Rebuilding (4 hours)
TE 145  Drive Train Rebuilding (3 hours)
TE 152  Sheet Metal Restoration (4 hours)
TE 162  Woodworking Fundamentals (OR)
TE 262  Machining Technology (3 hours)
TE 202  Research & Documentation (2 hours)
TE 271  Chassis Restoration (4 hours)
TE 275  Automotive Paint Restoration (4 hours)
TE 281  Automotive Trim (4 hours)
TE 385  Restoration Assembly Processes (4 hours)

History Core Courses

G-HI130  Introd. Mthds. For Hist. Analysis (3 hours)
HI 205  Social History of the Automobile (3 hours)
*G-HI/TE 333  Technology & Society (3 hours)
*HI 410  Colloquium in Historiography (3 hours)
*HI 475  Senior Thesis (3 hours)

History Electives

At least 6 credit hours drawn from the following list:
AR/HI 245  The History of Automotive Design (3 hours)
G-HI 150  American History since 1877 (3 hours)
G-HI 220  Modern Europe (3 hours)
G-HI 236  Topics in Social History (3 hours)
G-HI 237  Topics in Political History (3 hours)
HI 301 Advanced Topics in History (3 hours)

Automotive Restoration Management Emphasis

The goal of the Automotive Restoration Management emphasis is to develop graduates who are prepared for professional pursuits and/or graduate study.

Program Objectives

This program achieves its purposes when its graduates:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the major technological systems of the automobile.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of authentic antique automobile restoration materials, methods and techniques.
  • Demonstrate proficiency in the use of the materials and tools necessary to complete authentic automobile restoration work.
  • Demonstrate the attitudes, knowledge and skills necessary to pursue a successful business career in antique automobile restoration.
  • Capitalize on Automotive Restoration Technology program connections with automotive business to place students in productive internships.
  • Demonstrate knowledge, understanding, and application of the principles, concepts, and tools in each key content area of their major.
  • Perform research, analysis, and critical thinking necessary to integrate key content from various business disciplines and other dimensions of society.
  • Perform effectively in groups.
  • Persuasively communicate business-related ideas in a variety of media and settings.

Requirements

Automotive Restoration Technology Core

HI 205  Social History of the Automobile (3 hours)
TE 100  Intro to Restoration (2 hours)
TE 162  Woodworking Fundamentals (OR)
TE 262  Machining Technology (3 hours)
TE 141  Engine Rebuilding (4 hours)
TE 145  Drive Train Rebuilding (3 hours)
TE 152  Sheet Metal Restoration (4 hours)
TE 202  Research & Documentation (2 hours)
TE 271  Chassis Restoration (4 hours)
TE 275  Automotive Paint Restoration (4 hours)
TE 281  Automotive Trim (4 hours)
TE 385  Restoration Assembly Processes (4 hours)
37 hours

Business Management Courses

G-BA 130 Principles of Business Management (3 hours)
EC 202  Survey of Economics (3 hours)
AC 202  Survey of Accounting (3 hours)
BA 221  Marketing (3 hours)
BA 235  Small Business Management (3 hours)
BA 315  Business Law (3 hours)
BA 325  Financial Management I (3 hours)
BA 339  Human Resources Management (3 hours)
*BA 475  Business Strategy and Policy (3 hours)
27 hours

64 hours in major

Automotive Communication Emphasis

The goal of the Automotive Communications Major 0ption is to develop graduates who have the skills and technical knowledge to communicate effectively in a variety of media to an audience focused on automotive issues.

Program Objectives

This program achieves its purposes when its graduates:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of methods and techniques necessary to complete and document historically accurate automotive restorations.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the historical role of the automobile in modern society and of historical automotive research material sources.
  • Demonstrate oral and written communication skills necessary to pursue a successful career in automotive communication, publishing or other media.
  • Design attractive, effective documents, graphics, and publications targeted at specific audiences.
  • Understand the media of communication, including mass media and computer technologies.
  • Make ethical choices in their professional lives.

Requirements

Automotive Restoration Technology Core Courses

HI 205  Social History of the Automobile (3 hours)
TE 100  Intro to Restoration (2 hours)
TE 162  Woodworking Fundamentals (OR)
TE 262  Machining Technology (3 hours)
TE 141  Engine Rebuilding (4 hours)
TE 145  Drive Train Rebuilding (3 hours)
TE 152  Sheet Metal Restoration (4 hours)
TE 202  Research & Documentation (2 hours)
TE 271  Chassis Restoration (4 hours)
TE 275  Automotive Paint Restoration (4 hours)
TE 281  Automotive Trim (4 hours)
TE 385  Restoration Assembly Processes (4 hours)
37 hours

Communication Core Courses

Students must complete the listed courses from the core communication curriculum and the listed courses from the multimedia communication emphasis.

Communications Core

G-CM 120  Intro to Human Communication (3 hours)
CM 135  Media Writing (3 hours)
G-CM 140  Public Speaking (3 hours)
CM 210  Multimedia Storytelling (3 hours)
*G-CM 221  Intercultural Communication (3 hours)
CM 305  Editing, OR
CM 310  Public Relations and Social Media Campaigns (3 hours)
CM 315  Communication Practica (3 hours)
CM 375  Junior Seminar (1 hour)
CM 388  Career Conn. in Communication (OR)
TE 388  Career Conn. In Technology (3 hours)
*CM 475A  Seminar in Communication Research (2 hours)
*CM 475B Senior Project in Communication (1 hour)
*EN 313  Expository Writing (OR)
EN 420  Creative Writing (3 hours)
31 hours

68 hours in major

Automotive Restoration Design Technology Emphasis

The Automotive Restoration Design Technology emphasis is for the student who wishes to pursue a career in automotive art. This option will develop majors who possess the technical knowledge and artistic abilities necessary to execute a variety of art skills sensitively and intelligently, analyze and critique art, and relate the creative process to life in personally meaningful ways.

This degree option within the technology and art departments is oriented to meet the needs of students who (1) wish to develop and refine their aesthetic values (2) plan for careers as automotive artists (3) plan to further their art education in graduate school.

Program Objectives

This program achieves its purposes when its graduates:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the major technological systems of the automobile.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of authentic antique automobile restoration materials, methods and techniques.
  • Demonstrate proficiency in the use of the materials and tools necessary to complete authentic automobile restoration work.
  • Possess knowledge of historical automotive research material sources, methods and techniques necessary to complete and document historically accurate automotive restorations.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the historical role of the automobile in modern society.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the role of the automobile in the history of transportation, technology and science.
  • Demonstrate the attitudes, knowledge and skills necessary to pursue a successful career in automotive art using a variety of media.
  • Demonstrate performance in a variety of art media.
  • Demonstrate analysis and critique in verbal and written form.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of design principles and elements.
  • Demonstrate awareness of Western and non- Western cultural contributions to art.
  • Demonstrate meaningful connections of art to life through the development of keen perceptual abilities.

Requirements

Automotive Restoration Technology Core Courses

HI 205  Social History of the Automobile (3 hours)
TE 100  Intro to Restoration (2 hours)
TE 110  Technical Drawing/CAD (3 hours)
TE 141  Engine Rebuilding (4 hours)
TE 145  Drive Train Rebuilding (3 hours)
TE 152  Sheet Metal Restoration (4 hours)
TE 162  Woodworking Fundamentals (OR)
TE 262  Machining Technology (3 hours)
TE 202  Research & Documentation (2 hours)
TE 271  Chassis Restoration (4 hours)
TE 275  Automotive Paint Restoration (4 hours)
TE 281  Automotive Trim (4 hours)
TE 385  Restoration Assembly Processes (4 hours)
37 hour

Art Core Courses

G-AR 101  Drawing I (2 hours)
G-AR 102  Painting I – Acrylics (2 hours)
AR 103  Elementary Design (3 hours)
G-AR 202  Painting II – Advanced Explorations in 2D (Fall) or Water color (Spring) (2 hours)
AR 203  Photography I (2 hours)
G-AR 220  Graphic Design for Non-Art Majors (3 hours)
AR/HI 245  The History of Automotive Design (3 hours)
G-AR 311  Art History II (4 hours)
AR 312 Contemporary Themes in Art (3 hours)
AR 335  Moving Image Software (3 hours)
AR 475A  Senior Concentration (4 hours)
31 hours

68 hours in major

Automotive Restoration Design Major Internship/Field experience (recommended):

TE 295/495  Field Experience (work experience in automotive Art/Design) (OR) (1 – 4 hours)
TE 388  Career Connections (Internship in automotive Art/Design) (1 – 12 hours)
1-12 hours total

Automotive Restoration Technology Emphasis

The Automotive Restoration Technology emphasis is for the student who intends to pursue the authentic restoration of vintage and classic vehicles and develop values of craftsmanship, with attention to detail and an emphasis on authenticity. Graduates will be able to reference a wide variety of processes, methods and will have research capabilities. Graduates will be able to understand the automobile as a technological system and understand its development and role in the world.

Program Objectives

This program achieves its purposes when its graduates:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the major technological systems of the automobile.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of authentic antique automobile restoration materials, methods and techniques.
  • Possess knowledge of historical automotive research material sources, methods and techniques necessary to complete and document historically accurate automotive restorations.
  • Demonstrate proficiency in the use of the materials and tools necessary to complete authentic automobile restoration work.
  • Demonstrate the attitudes, knowledge and skills necessary to pursue a successful business career in antique automobile restoration.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the historical role of the automobile in modern society.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of related and supporting scientific fields.

Requirements

Automotive Restoration Technology Core Courses

HI 205  Social History of the Automobile (3 hours)
TE 100  Intro to Restoration (2 hours)
TE 141  Engine Rebuilding (4 hours)
TE 145  Drive Train Restoration (3 hours)
TE 152  Sheet Metal Restoration (4 hours)
TE 162  Woodworking Fundamentals (3 hours)
TE 202  Research & Documentation (2 hours)
TE 262  Machining Technology (3 hours)
TE 271  Chassis Restoration (4 hours)
TE 275  Automotive Paint Restoration (4 hours)
TE 281  Automotive Trim (4 hours)
TE 301  Materials and Processes (3 hours)
TE 360  Electrical & Electronic Systems (4 hours)
TE 375  Junior Seminar (1 hour)
TE 385  Restoration Assembly Processes (4 hours)
TE 475  Technology Senior Project (4 hours)

6 credit hours from the following upper-level courses:

TE 341  Advanced Engine Rebuilding (3 hours)
TE 414 Advanced Topics in Electrical and Electronic Systems (4 hours)
TE 452  Advanced Sheet Metal Restoration (3 hours)
TE 462 Advance Machining (Independent Study – On Demand) (3 hours)
TE 480  Advanced Automotive Paint Restoration (3 hours)
TE 481  Applied Trim and Upholstery (3 hours)

3 credit hours from the following courses:

TE 252  Vintage Panel Restoration (3 hours)
TE 242  Re-Babbitting (spring – on demand) (3 hours)
TE 353  Finishing Touches (3 hours)
TE 380  Applied Diagnostics (3 hours)
TE 388  Internship (3 hours)

60 hours in major

Recommended Supporting Courses:

AR/HI 245  The History of Automotive Design (3 hours)
G-CH 101  Principles of General Chemistry (4 hours)
G-PH 215  General Physics (4 hours)
TE 110  Engineering Drawing/CAD (3 hours)

 

2018|Catalog 18-19, Technology|

Auto Restoration Technology Course Descriptions

TE 100 Intro To Restoration

2 hours
A course designed to provide an overview of the restoration core courses, elective courses, general safety and shop knowledge. This course will provide historical information about the automotive industry, information about research, documentation and planning a restoration project. Prerequisites: None. Students must pass this course with a “C” or better to continue taking courses with TE100 as a prerequisite. (Fall)

TE 110 Engineering Drawing/CAD

3 hours
This course blends the art and science of freehand sketching and technical drafting as students are introduced to the graphic languages as a medium of technical communication. Topics include freehand (isometric) sketching and traditional (orthographic) drafting as well as an introduction to two and three dimensional CAD (Computer Assisted Drawing) tools and processes. Prerequisites: None. (Spring, odd years)

TE 141 Engine Rebuilding

4 hours
A course designed to teach students the basics of automotive engine restoration. This course includes work in basic engine and related systems, operational theory, disassembly procedures, diagnosis of mechanical faults, evaluating engine condition, engine rebuilding techniques and engine machining processes. Students will work on vintage automobile engines, rebuilding engine components as determined by the instructor. Lab Fee. Prerequisite: TE 100, TE 262 taken concurrently or consent of the instructor. TE100 may be taken concurrently (Fall, Spring)

TE 145 Drive Train Rebuilding

3 hours
A course designed to teach students the basics of automotive drive train restoration. This course includes work in basic transmission and differential operational theory, disassembly procedures, diagnosis of mechanical faults and evaluating transmission and final drive condition, transmission and differential rebuilding techniques and procedures. Students will work on vintage automobile transmissions and differential assemblies as determined by the instructor. Lab Fee. TE 100 may be taken concurrently. (Fall, Spring)

TE 152 Sheet Metal Restoration

4 hours
A course designed to teach students the basics of welding and auto body panel fabrication as used in automobile restoration. This course includes work in basic welding processes, techniques, operational theory and related systems and basic auto body panel fabricating processes, techniques, tool operational theory and related fabrication systems, assembly procedures for auto body panels, and evaluating metal body component condition. Lab Fee. TE 100 may be taken concurrently. (Fall, Spring)

TE 162 Woodworking Fundamentals

3 hours
This course will introduce students to the concepts and practices of basic woodworking, including planning, fabrication and finishing, while stressing the safe operation of power tools used in basic woodworking. The course will also examine the history and evolution of the American automobile in general and automotive coach building in particular. TE 100 may be taken concurrently. Lab Fee. (Fall, Spring)

TE 202 Research & Documentation

2 hours
This course will introduce students to practical research, documentation and planning related to restoring antique automobiles. (Spring)

TE 206 Motorcycle History and American Society

3 hours
A study of the evolution of motorcycle culture, and the impact of that culture on American society. Prerequisite: TE100 (Fall)

TE 242 Re-Babbitting

3 hours
An intensive, lab-based course in the restoration and re-Babbitting of antique automotive engines and mechanical components. Lab Fee. Prerequisites: TE 100, TE 141, TE 262 (On Demand)

TE 245 The History of Automotive Design

3 hours
Discover and examine the technological and stylistic evolution of automotive design. This course will explore ways in which automobiles, by way of their design, reflect the technology and communicate the values of the culture that produced them. Prerequisites: TE100 (Fall)

TE 252 Vintage Panel Restoration

3 hours
An intensive, lab-based course in the restoration or fabrication of antique auto body panel components (not applicable as an advanced course). Lab Fee. Prerequisites: TE 100, TE 152. (Interterm)

TE 262 Machining Technology

3 hours
An introduction to machining technology. Students are introduced to blueprint reading, precision measurement, the theory and operation of machine tools, layout techniques and the use of layout tools, the characteristics of common industrial metals used in machining processes, machine maintenance, and nontraditional machining processes. Lab work required. Lab Fee. TE100 may be taken concurrently (Fall, Spring)

TE 271 Chassis Restoration

4 hours
A course designed to teach students the basics of automotive chassis restoration. This course includes restoration work in basic frame, suspension, wheel, brake and drive train components. Operational theory and other related chassis systems, disassembly procedures, diagnosis of mechanical faults, component condition, and brake systems machining processes are also included. Students will work on vintage automobile chassis and related components. Lab Fee. Prerequisite: TE 100, TE 141, TE 145. (Fall, Spring)

TE 275 Automotive Paint Restoration

4 hours
A course designed to teach students the basics of automotive paint restoration. This course emphasizes panel preparation, paint systems and paint application, disassembly and documentation procedures, diagnosis of auto body and interior painted surface faults and evaluating the auto body condition. Students will work on vintage automobile bodies and related components. Lab Fee. TE100 may be taken concurrently (Fall, Spring)

TE 281 Automotive Trim

4 hours
A course designed to teach students the basics of automotive trim (upholstery) restoration. This course includes restoration work in basic automotive seats, interior panels, convertible and other top covering restoration. Also included are disassembly procedures, diagnosis of upholstery and trim and interior faults and evaluating the interior condition. Students will work on vintage automobile interiors and related components. Lab Fee. TE 100 may be taken concurrently (Fall, Spring)

TE 301 Materials and Processes

3 hours
This course will explore the history and cultural impacts of the development of engineering materials and processes. Students will gain a working knowledge of the properties and strengths of materials and gain a working knowledge of classic industrial processes and be able to apply that knowledge to the restoration and preservation of antique automotive systems and structures. This class will include field trips to various industrial facilities.. Lab Fee. Prerequisites: TE100 (Interterm.)

TE 311 Advanced Topics in Engineering Drawing/CAD

4 hours
A continuation of TE 110. Includes revolutions, tolerance dimensioning, threads and fasteners, sections, working drawings, surface and solid generation. Prerequisite: TE 110 (On demand)

G-TE/HI 333 Technology and Society

3 hours (Language Intensive)
An introduction to the historical development of technology as part of society and culture, exploring the ways which society and culture constrain and stimulate technologies, and the ways in which technology then shapes society and culture. Does not require previous specialized technical knowledge. This course is designed for both majors and non-majors. Prerequisite: G-EN 111 or consent of the instructor. (Fall)

TE 341 Advanced Engine Rebuilding

3 hours
This course is designed to build on the skills and knowledge gained in TE 141. This class will focus on designs and construction techniques which apply specifically to vintage engines. This class will also explore the practical application of techniques gained in TE 141 to more complex and vintage engines. Repairing damaged or severely worn components will be the focus of one major Rebuilt engines will then be tested on a dynamometer to assess the rebuild. Lab Fee. Prerequisites: TE 100, TE 141, TE 262. (Fal, Spring)

TE 342 Motorcycle Engine Rebuilding

3 hours
This course will focus on rebuilding single and multi-cylinder engines used in motorcycles prior to 1970 as well as various other small engines of similar design. Lab Fee. Prerequisite: TE141 (On Demand)

TE 353 Finishing Touches

3 hours
A course designed to teach three skills needed for the restoration of early era vehicles. Students will learn to restore and polish hard trim moldings, restore wood grained Interior moldings and the art of pinstriping. Lab Fee. Prerequisites: TE 100, TE 152, TE 275 or consent of the instructor. (on demand)

TE 360 Electrical and Electronic Systems

4 hours
This course will address the characteristics and operations of electrical and electronic systems with special emphasis on their practical application in automotive systems. The course will introduce Ohm’s Law, electrical power, circuit elements and magnetism and induction in electrical circuits. Special emphasis Is given to the use of this knowledge In the repair, restoration, and preservation of classic and antique automotive electrical systems. Prerequisite: TE 100,TE 141, TE 271. (Fall, Spring).

TE 371 Motorcycle Drivetrain & Chassis Restoration

3 hours
This course on diagnosing problems, repairing and restoring motorcycle transmissions and chassis components including forks, wheels and tires, and brakes. Lab Fee. Prerequisite: TE271 (on demand)

TE 375 Junior Seminar (Restoration Technology emphasis only)

1 hour
This course will explore how to create a professional portfolio, how to properly research restoration, how to manage tasks in relation to a timeline, how to prepare for senior project, and professional ethics. Note: Students must earn a “C” or better in order to move on to take TE475. For juniors in Option V. Prerequisites: TE 100, TE 141, TE145, TE 152 or consent of the instructor (Fall)

TE 380 Applied Diagnostics

3 hours
An exploration of vintage automotive diagnostics, including a basic overview of automotive electrical systems, fuel and ignition systems, drive train and chassis systems. Basic failure modes of these systems will be explored and will be experienced in the laboratory. Integration of the theory and practice of diagnostics will be explored in a classroom and lab setting. Proper use of diagnostic tools, diagnostic literature and methodology will be taught. Students will work with vintage automobiles and related components. Lab Fee. Prerequisites: TE 100, TE 141, TE 145, TE 271, TE 360. (Fall, Spring)

TE 384 Motorcycle Restoration Assembly Processes

4 hours
A course designed to allow students to refine their skills from other courses in a comprehensive format. Students will work on vintage motorcycles and their components, rebuilding and reassembling these components. Lab Fee. Prerequisite: TE 262, TE 275, TE 281, TE 342, TE 371 or consent of the instructor. (Spring)

TE 385 Restoration Assembly Processes

4 hours
A course designed to allow students to refine their skills from other courses in a comprehensive format. Students will work on vintage automobiles and their components, rebuilding and reassembling these components. Hard metal trim restoration and other specialized restoration processes may also be explored depending on project vehicles available. Lab Fee. Prerequisite: TE 100, TE 141, TE 145, TE 152, TE 162, TE 262, TE 271, TE 275, TE 281 or consent of the instructor. (Fall, Spring)

TE 406 Advanced Topics in Woodworking and Design

4 hours
A study of the nature of wood, identification of wood, and joinery. Special emphasis is given to the use of this knowledge in the design, construction, restoration and preservation of automotive coachwork and related wood products. Prerequisites: TE 110 and TE 162. Lab fee. (On Demand)

TE 414 Advanced Electrical & Electronic Systems

3 hours
A student-guided study of the design, operation, and characteristics of specialized automotive electrical systems including gauges and instruments, clocks and radios, lighting and accessory systems, and specialized ignition systems. This course will address reading and interpreting automotive wiring diagrams and will include design and construction of authentic wiring looms and harnesses. Special emphasis is given in this course to the repair, restoration and preservation of classic and antique automobile electrical systems. Lab Fee. Prerequisites: TE 360 (Spring)

TE 452 Advanced Sheet Metal Restoration

3 hours
A study of special sheet metal restoration techniques, including the use of power tools in fabrication, creating complex compound curves, repairing extremely damaged components and the craft of creating custom tooling. Students will build experience and confidence in their skills in the laboratory. Lab Fee. Prerequisites: TE 100, TE 152. (Spring)

TE 475 Technology Senior Project (Restoration Technology emphasis only)

4 hours (Language Intensive)
This course will be a practical and realistic experience in which students will study a specific aspect of automotive restoration and complete restoration work on one of many college-owned vintage cars or projects related to their study. Students will present the completed research and restoration plan to complete a capstone experience. Prerequisite: TE 375. (Fall, Spring)

TE 480 Advanced Automotive Paint Restoration

3 hours
This course will build on concepts introduced in TE 275. Safety issues related to painting, paint history, special painting techniques and proper documentation of vehicle components will be a major emphasis. Students will work to increase their painting skills through practical experience. Lab Fee. Prerequisites: TE 100, TE 275. (Fall, Spring)

TE 481 Applied Trim and Upholstery

3 hours
This course builds on the concepts introduced in TE281. Deeper instruction will be given in automotive trim areas such as organization and setup, button tufting, leather, and automotive textiles. Measuring, documenting, and estimating of materials to replace/restore an automotive interior will also be emphasized. Lab Fee. Prerequisites: TE 100, TE 281. (Spring)

Special Course Options
295/495 Field Experience (1-4 hours)
297  Study Abroad (12-16 hours)
*299/499 Independent Study (1-4 hours)
388 Career Connections (3-10 hours)
*445 Readings and Research (1-4 hours)

* Prerequisite Policy: (TE 299/499 and TE 445)
The student must submit to the appropriate instructor a written proposal of study, prior to enrollment in the course, including the following components:

  1. statement of the student’s acceptance of the goals of topics courses: to provide the opportunity for specialized unit shop teaching endorsements, study of advanced content, and the development of teaching and training skills;
  2. goals, project plans, and a detailed weekly schedule, consistent with the course syllabus;
  3. evidence of academic maturity, self-motivation, and desire to serve as an appropriate role model for students in lower-level classes in similar content area;
  4. agreement to schedule the lab time of the topics course at the same time the lower-level course is offered; and
  5. evidence that the student has completed all lower-level course(s) in the corresponding content area with a minimum B (3.0) average and a minimum B (3.0) overall college grade point average; or permission of the instructor to waive the grade

Upon instructor approval of the proposal, an interview will be scheduled with the student to discuss the arrangement and any further details prior to granting final permission for the student to enroll in the course.

2018|Catalog 18-19, Technology|

Business Program

Purpose Statement

The department commits itself to fostering students’ learning so that they are prepared for professional pursuits and/or graduate study.

The department achieves this purpose when its graduates can

  • demonstrate knowledge, understanding, and application of the principles, concepts, and tools in each key content area of their major;
  • perform research, analysis, and critical thinking necessary to integrate key content from various business disciplines and other dimensions of society;
  • perform effectively in groups;
  • persuasively communicate business-related ideas in a variety of media and settings.
  • develop a global mindset recognizing the diversity of cultures, practices, traditions, and philosophies. Be able to adapt to a changing world.

One major and two interdisciplinary majors are available within the Department of Business Administration. Within the Business Administration major, there are four emphasis areas, and a student must choose at least one area in which to concentrate their study: Management, Marketing, Finance, and Accounting.

Core Requirements for all Business Majors: 37 hours

G-BA 130 Principles of Business Management (3 hours)
EC 201 Principles of Economics: Macro (3 hours)
EC 204 Principles of Economics: Micro (3 hours)
AC 205 Financial Accounting (3 hours)
AC 206 Managerial Accounting (3 hours)
*G-CM 218 Business and Professional Communication (3 hours)
G-BA 220 Business Applied Statistics (4 hours)
BA 221 Marketing (3 hours)
BA 315 Business Law (3 hours)
BA/AC 320 Management/Accounting Information Systems (3 hours)
BA 325 Financial Management (3 hours)
*BA 475 Business Strategy and Policy (3 hours)

Accounting Emphasis

AC 305 Intermediate Accounting I (3 hours)
AC 306 Intermediate Accounting II (3 hours)
AC 315 Cost Accounting (3 hours)
AC 316 Individual Income Tax (3 hours)
AC 437 Principles of Auditing (3 hours)

Hours in ACCOUNTING: 15 hours
Business Elective Hours: 6 hours
37 Core + 15 ACCOUNTING + 6 Elective = 58 total hours

Management Emphasis

BA 324 Organizational Behavior (3 hours)
BA 339 Human Resource Management (3 hours)
BA 342 International Business (3 hours)
BA 490 Operations Management (3 hours)

Hours in MANAGEMENT: 12 hours
Business Elective Hours: 9 hours
37 Core + 12 MANAGMENT + 9 Elective = 58 total hours

Finance Emphasis

AC 305 Intermediate Accounting I (3 hours)
BA 451 Money and Banking (3 hours)
BA 426 Financial Analysis (3 hours)
BA 428 Investments (3 hours)

Hours in FINANCE: 12 hours
Business Elective Hours: 9 hours
37 Core + 12 FINANCE + 9 Elective = 58 total hours

Marketing Emphasis

BA 322 Advertising and Promotion (3 hours)
BA 327 Consumer Behavior (3 hours)
BA 342 International Business (3 hours)
BA 427 Marketing Research (3 hours)

Hours in Marketing: 12 hours
Business Elective Hours: 9 hours
37 Core + 12 MARKETING + 9 Elective =58 total hours

Departmental Minor

Business Administration Minor: 21 total hours

G-BA 130 Principles of Business Management (3 hours)
AC 202 Survey of Accounting (3 hours)
EC 202 Survey of Economics (3 hours)
*G-CM 218 Business and Professional Communication (3 hours)
BA 221 Marketing (3 hours)
BA 315 Business Law (3 hours)
BA 325 Financial Management (3 hours)

 

Other Business Emphases

In addition to the prescribed majors outlined above, there are other ways in which a student may seek a major within this department.

Technology Major: Automotive Restoration Management

The goal of the Automotive Restoration Management emphasis is to develop graduates who are prepared for professional pursuits and/or graduate study.

Art Major: Graphic Design Marketing

Student-Designed Majors

McPherson College offers students the opportunity to create their own major courses of study. Proposals for such majors must be approved by the Educational Policies Committee and must satisfy criteria for acceptable levels of academic rigor and integrity. The student-designed major section of this catalog provides more information. Students have successfully proposed such personalized programs in business-related areas such as Music Business.

CPA Study

Students who are currently interested in sitting for the CPA (Certified Public Accountants) exam must meet the requirements as determined by the State Board of Accountancy. One of the requirements to sit for the CPA exam is 150 hours of college credit. McPherson College advises students pursuing a career in public accounting to complete their undergraduate degree at McPherson College and then complete a master’s degree in business or accounting. For additional information, contact the chair of the business department.

 

2018|Business, Catalog 18-19|

Business Course Descriptions

Economics

EC 201 Principles of Economics: Macro

3 hours
The first semester of general economics deals with these major topics: supply and demand, the market system, the role of government; unemployment, economic fluctuations; fiscal and monetary policy approaches to economic stabilization; impact of international trade issues on domestic economic problems. (Fall)

EC 202 Survey of Economics

3 hours
This course is designed to provide non-business majors with a basic understanding of key economic principles from both the “macro” and “micro” perspectives. Topics will include: supply and demand, economic goals and measures, market types, economic fluctuations, monetary and fiscal policy, and international trade. (Spring)

EC 204 Principles of Economics: Micro

3 hours
The second semester of general economics study. The course focuses on concepts of supply and demand in the context of perfect and imperfect product and resource markets. In addition, students apply economic concepts to a variety of current topics, labor unions, income distribution, and health care. Prerequisite: EC 201. (Spring)

EC 452 International Finance (dormant)

3 hours

Accounting

AC 202 Survey of Accounting

3 hours
This course is designed for managers and personnel in organizations of all sizes who must work with, and understand, accounting and financial information; without overemphasizing the mechanics and technical language of accounting. Students will learn how to read and use financial statements and financial information to make business decisions. Topics include fundamental financial accounting, fundamental cost accounting, terminology, cash and internal control, financial statement analysis, and cash flow. (Fall)

AC 205 Financial Accounting

3 hours
A study of the elements of accounting, the balance sheet, income statement, principles of double entry accounting, the process of closing books, and depreciation methods. (Fall)

AC 206 Managerial Accounting

3 hours
A continuation of Financial Accounting, with the emphasis on various entity capital structures, analysis and interpretation of financial statements, statement of cash flows, present value concepts, and introduction to cost accounting. Prerequisites: AC 205. (Spring)

AC 305 Intermediate Accounting I

3 hours
The first of two in-depth financial accounting courses. The conceptual framework, critical analysis of generally accepted accounting principles, and applications are stressed. Topics include the balance sheet, income statement, the statement of cash flows debt financing, equity financing, earnings per share, and accounting changes and error correction. Prerequisites: C or better in AC 205. (Fall)

AC 306 Intermediate Accounting II

3 hours
The second of two in-depth financial accounting courses. Continued in-depth analysis of generally accepted accounting principles and related applications are emphasized. Topics include the earnings management, revenue cycle, revenue recognition, inventory and cost of goods sold, non-current operating assets, investments, leases, income taxes, pensions, other payroll topics, derivatives, contingencies, etc. Prerequisites: AC 305.(Spring)

AC 315 Cost Accounting

3 hours
The study of standard costing, cash budgeting, process costing, job order costing and their applications to the management decision process. Prerequisite: AC 206, G-BA 130. (Fall, even years)

AC 316 Individual Income Tax

3 hours
The study of individual income tax theory, planning and application. Prerequisites: G-BA 130 and AC206. (Fall)

AC 320 Accounting Information Systems

3 hours
The concept of accounting information systems refers to all accounting procedures designed and implemented to ensure that transactions are properly recorded, processed, and disclosed. This course will use the case method of instruction to assist student skill development in evaluation and construction of accounting systems. This course also provides comprehensive understanding and practical application skills of Intuit’s Quickbooks software. Prerequisites: G-BA 130, and AC 206 concurrently. (Spring)

AC 437 Principles of Auditing

3 hours
The following topics are included in this course: theory and application of the following concepts: materiality, risk, internal control evaluation, and audit evidence (analytical and substantive). Students will learn to evaluate the risk of financial statement assertions and choose appropriate audit procedures. This course concentrates on auditing standards generally accepted in the United States as issued by the AICPA auditing standards board and PCOAB. Other items include financial statement fraud, independence, legal liability, and ethical responsibilities. Concurrent: AC 306 and AC 320. (Spring, odd years)

Business Administration

G-BA 130 Principles of Business Management

3 hours
This course introduces the student to the management process. The course takes an integrated approach to management by examining the role of the manager from a traditional and contemporary perspective while applying decision-making and critical-thinking skills to the challenges facing managers in today’s globally diverse environment. The course examines the techniques for controlling, planning, organizing resources and leading a social institution. Introductory finance and accounting principles will also be addressed. (Fall and Spring)

G-CM 218 Business and Professional Communication

3 hours (Language Intensive)
Business and Professional Communication is a course designed to expose students to strategies for effective communication in a business environment. Students will deal with both oral and written forms of communication. The course will also deal with the effective communication of information through the use of spreadsheets and graphs, as well as on-line communication skills that are essential to success in today’s business environment. Students will learn effective techniques for using technology to enhance an oral presentation as well. (Fall)

G-BA 220 Business Applied Statistics

4 hours
This course is a study of the principles of descriptive statistics, probability, sample and population relationships, estimation, and hypothesis testing. The student will receive a solid foundation in mathematical theory, practical application, and Microsoft Excel.  Prerequisites: ID119 Intermediate Algebra with a grade of C or better, or three years of high school mathematics and an ACT mathematics score of 22 or an SAT math score of 560. (Spring)

BA 221 Marketing

3 hours
A study of marketing institutions and the functions which they perform: pricing, promotion, distribution, and product development. The course will also address effects of external domestic and international environments on marketing strategy. Prerequisite: G-BA 130. (Fall)

G-BA 230 Personal Finance

3 hours
This course provides an overview of personal and family financial planning with an emphasis on financial recordkeeping, planning your spending, tax planning, consumer credit, making buying decisions, purchasing insurance, selecting investments, and retirement and estate planning. This class is recommended for non-business majors. (Fall, Interterm)

BA 235 Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management

3 hours
Focus is on the start-up and development of a small business. Topics include acquisition of capital; design of accounting systems and cash control; principles of taxation and payroll deductions; financial statement analysis; legal issues related to workers’ compensation, product liability, contracts fundamentals, and forms of business organization; election, hiring, and appraisal of employees; marketing of product; inventory control; location and facilities analysis; and regulatory impacts. Course requires preparation of a complete business plan. Concurrent: G-BA 130. (Fall)

BA 315 Business Law

3 hours
This course is designed to help students master the fundamental and legal and regulatory knowledge necessary to perform in today’s business environment. Students will develop an understanding of how to solve a legal problem and will study topics such as contracts, sales governed by the UCC, bankruptcy, principle- agent relationships and employer/employee legal issues. (Spring)

BA 320 Management Information Systems

3 hours
The concept of management information systems refers to all management procedures designed and implemented to insure that data related to the basic goals, strategies, and operations of the business entity are properly and timely collected, processed, and reported. This course will use the case method of instruction to assist student skill development in evaluation and construction of management systems.  This course also provides comprehensive understanding and practical application skills of Microsoft’s Access software. Prerequisites: G-BA 130. (Spring)

BA 322 Advertising and Promotion

3 hours
Advertising and promotion is a course that directly relates to marketing and how advertising drives the company’s’ marketing plan. The class will explore all forms of print and electronic media and learn to evaluate the effectiveness of advertising. The class will revolve around applying material from the text, to developing and executing an actual advertising plan. Client meetings will be held with the organization we will be preparing advertising. After the completion of this course, students will have a full understanding of what goes into an advertising campaign. The students will have a greater appreciation for what it takes to produce a 30-second commercial and budgeting, negotiating and persuading the client. Prerequisite: BA 221 (Fall)

BA 324 Organizational Behavior

3 hours 
In depth exploration of the management functions of organizing and leading/directing. Emphasis on individual motivation, group process and team management, leadership styles and effectiveness, organizational communication, decision-making, managing global workforces and diversity, management of change, organizational culture, and organizational design. Prerequisite: G-BA 130, Grade of C or better in EC 204 or EC 202. (Fall)

BA 325 Financial Management 

3 hours
A study of concepts in financial management including the time-value of money, ratio analysis, cost of capital, capital budgeting, and the valuation of stocks and bonds. The course includes a term project to evaluate the performance of publicly traded companies within an industry. (Book Fee) Prerequisites: AC 206 (Fall)

BA 327 Consumer Behavior

3 hours
This course is designed to help students evaluate why people do what they do when they buy something. Students will examine behavioral science concepts applicable to understand the buyer’s behavior and investigate specific processes of consumer decision-making. Topics will include: purchase decisions, reference groups; and sociological, psychological, and economic aspects of consumer behavior. Additional topics will include: environmental influences on consumer evaluation, consumer attitudes, and post-purchase evaluation. Prerequisite: BA 221. (Spring)

BA 339 Human Resource Management

3 hours 
A study of the processes, problems, and opportunities associated with the human resources deployed by an organization. Major topics include planning, staffing, training and development, compensation, employee relations. Prerequisite: G-BA 130. (Spring)

BA 342 International Business

3 hours
This course is a study from the manager’s perspective in the fields of international trade and investment, balance of payments, international financial markets, monetary systems, national trade policy, and international laws. This course also addresses cultural variables in business, and examines how each of a number of basic management activities must be handled differently in the international environment. Prerequisites: EC 204, G-BA 130. (Fall)

G-BA 342IT International Business Travel Trip

3 hours
This course is designed to deliver students a holistic experience of a country other than the United States, with primary attention given to business commerce, and trade relations in a foreign country. Topics experienced will include: economic history through present day, cultural, as well as other historical attributes. The course destination can change year-by-year. Prior course destinations include: Costa Rica and Australia.

BA 345 Customer Sales Management

3 hours
This course is designed to demystify the negative stereotypes of sales by exposing students to the sales process and how it fits into the structure of a business and specifically within marketing. Students will practice customer management tactics, negotiation, and persuasive sales techniques. Prerequisites: G-BA 130, BA 221, G-CM 218. (Spring)

BA 426 Financial Analysis

3 hours
A continuation of Financial Management examining in greater depth the topics of capital budgeting, capital structure, financial forecasting, working capital management, acquisitions, and dividend/stock repurchase policies. The primary teaching method is application utilizing case studies. Through these case studies, students will gain an intermediate to advanced proficiency level in Microsoft Excel. Prerequisites: BA 325, and AC 305 recommended. (Spring)

BA 427 Marketing Research

3 hours
This course focuses on the different types of marketing research (qualitative and quantitative) as well as the complex issues at each stage of the marketing research process, including research objectives, questionnaire construction (specifically for survey research), sampling, data collection, and statistical analysis. Accordingly, this course is appropriate for both prospective users of research results and prospective marketing researchers. Prerequisite: C or better in BA 221, BA 322, and concurrent BA 327.  (Spring)

BA 428 Investments

3 hours
A study of investment media, sources of investment information, the stock risk, modern portfolio theory, and the analysis and evaluation of industries and firms. As part of this class students manage $350,000 of the college’s endowment. Prerequisite: EC 204 or EC 202, and BA 325 (Spring)

BA 451 Money and Banking

3 hours
A study of the nature and function of money, its relation to prices, and the many functions of the American banking system. Prerequisite: EC 204, AC 206. (Fall)

BA 475 Business Strategy and Policy

3 hours (Senior Seminar and Language Intensive)
This is a capstone course for all Business majors. This course is an intense study of the role of strategic planning in the success of an organization. It provides a framework for such planning and the practical application of strategic planning through case studies. Prerequisites: Prior completion of or contemporaneous enrollment in all other major requirements. (Spring)

BA 490 Operations Management

3 hours
Operations Management encompasses the theory and application of managing both service and manufacturing industry processes.  Topics include: value chain, supply chain, inventory, resource, quality, sequencing, as well as capacity management techniques and practices. Additional areas of emphasis include: operations strategy, goods and services design, facility design, forecasting, process selection and sequencing. Students can expect to learn both the theoretical basis and mathematical application of operations management processes. Prerequisites: G-BA 130. (Fall)

 

Special Course Options
295/495 Field Experience (1-4 hours)
297  Study Abroad (12-16 hours)
299/499 Independent Study (1-4 hours)
388 Career Connections (3-10 hours)
445 Readings and Research (1-4 hours)

2018|Business, Catalog 18-19|

Communication Program

Purpose Statement

The mission of the communication department is to prepare competent communicators by providing students a foundation in communication theory and practice that will enhance their personal, civic, and professional lives.

Students who complete the communication major can expect to develop

  • the ability to express audience-centered messages clearly in both speaking and writing.
  • confidence and competence in speaking encounters whether for public presentations or for building interpersonal and professional relationships.
  • strategies for overcoming communication barriers.
  • media literacy including knowledge about how media are created and how media affect how we communicate.

Students who complete the digital media major with the communication emphasis will develop competence in

  • the ability to express audience-centered messages clearly in both speaking and writing.
  • obtaining still images, audio, and video, and combining these media with text to tell stories effectively.
  • designing, laying out, and publishing content online and in print.
  • media literacy including knowledge about how media are created and how media affect how we communicate.

Communication Major

G-CM 120  Introduction to Human Communication (3 hours)
*G-CM 130 Interpersonal Communication (3 hours)
CM 135  Media Writing (3 hours)
G-CM 140  Public Speaking (3 hours)
CM 210  Multimedia Storytelling (3 hours)
G-AR 220  Graphic Design for non-art majors (3 hours)
*G-CM 221  Intercultural Communication (3 hours)
G-MA 221  Elementary Applied Statistics (4 hours)
CM 240  Gender Communication (3 hours)
CM 305  Editing (3 hours)
CM 310  Public Relations (3 hours)
*EN 313  Advanced Expository Writing (3 hours)
CM 315  Communication Practica (2 hours)
CM 325  Conflict Communication (3 hours)
CM 330  Persuasion and Social Influence (3 hours)
CM 350  Web Design I (3 hours)
CM 375  Junior Seminar in Communication (1 hour)
*CM 475A  Senior Seminar in Communication Research (2 hours)
*CM 475B Senior Project in Communication (1 hour)

Total: 52 hours

Digital Media Major

All students completing the digital media major must complete the core courses (25 credit hours). They will then elect to complete the courses in either the communication or the visual design emphasis.

Core Courses
AR 130
Design Software (2 hours)
AR 205 Multimedia Software (2 hours)
AR 230 Graphic Design I (3 hours)
CM 330 Persuasion and Social Influence (3 hours)
AR 335 Moving Image Software (3 hours)
CM 350/AR 340 Web Design I (3 hours)
CM 360 Videography I (3 hours)
CM 440/AR 450 Web Design II (3 hours)
CM 410 Videography II (3 hours)

Total: 25 hours

Choose one area of emphasis:

Communication Emphasis
G-CM 120
Introduction to Human Communications (3 hours)
CM 135 Media Writing (3 hours)
CM 210 Multimedia Storytelling I (3 hours)
G-CM 221 Intercultural Communication (3 hours)
CM 305 Editing (3 hours)
EN 315 Expository Writing (3 hours)
CM 315 Communication Practica (2 hours)
CM 310 Public Relations and Social Media Campaign (3 hours)
CM 375 Junior Seminar (1 hour)
CM 475A Senior Seminar in Communication Research (2 hours)
CM 475B Senior Project in Communication (1 hour)

Total: 27 hours

OR:

Visual Design Emphasis
AR 103
Elementary Design (3 hours)
AR 203 Photography I (2 hours)
AR 235 Graphic Design II (3 hours)
AR 260 UX/UI Prototyping (2 hours)
AR 265 UX/UI Application (2 hours)
AR 303 Photography II (3 hours)
AR 320 Typography/Logo Branding (2 hours)
AR 330 Graphic Design III (3 hours)
AR 333 Commercial Photography I (3 hours)
AR 475G Graphic Design IV (3 hours)
AR 470 Graphic Design Senior Show (1 hour)

Total: 27 hours

Suggested Supporting Courses for either emphasis
BA 221
Marketing
BA 322 Advertising and Promotion
BA 327 Consumer Behavior
BA 427 Marketing Research
ET 101 Creativity and Innovation

Competency Exam

Students who plan to major in communication, or the communication emphasis of the digital media major, must pass a writing competency exam. This exam will be offered in the spring semester, before pre-enrollment for the fall. Transfer students will take the exam early in their first semester at the college. Students who fail the exam may re-take it after participating in guided study and practice of writing.

Communication Minor

A minor in communication consists of G-CM 120 Introduction to Human Communication (3 hours), and any other 17 hours of communication courses.  Communication practica may make up no more than four hours of coursework in the minor.

2018|Catalog 18-19, Communication|

Communication Course Descriptions

Course Descriptions – Communication

G-CM 120 Introduction to Human Communication

3 hours
An introduction to the elements of the communication process in its personal and social aspects. Students will examine the breadth of the field of communication including intrapersonal, interpersonal, small group, mass media, intercultural, and public communication. Students will examine how humans use emerging media—websites, online channels, social media sites, etc.—to create a sense of self, express themselves to others, and to gain a fuller picture of the generalized other in society. Written communication skills will be emphasized through specific assignments. (Fall, Spring)

G-CM 130 Interpersonal Communication

3 hours (Language Intensive)
An oral communication course designed to acquaint students with the basic concepts of human communication as well as the more specialized skills needed to develop and maintain interpersonal relationships. Self-concept, self-disclosure, perception, relationship development, and mass media portrayals of interpersonal relationships are among the major units covered. (Fall)

CM 135 Media Writing

3 hours
A study of contemporary media emphasizing information media literacy and reporting and writing the news for various media including web, broadcast media, and social media. (Spring)

G-CM 140 Public Speaking

3 hours
Study and practice of a wide range of formal and informal public speaking activities. Students will focus on developing an extemporaneous delivery of speeches based on experience with and research of topics. Students will practice multiple types of speeches including speeches to inform, to persuade, and for special occasions. (Fall, Interterm, Spring)

CM 210 Multimedia Storytelling

3 hours
An introduction to the use of text, graphics, audio, and video for telling multimedia stories. Prior completion of CM135 Journalism and AR203 Photography I recommended but not required. (Fall)

G-CM 218 Business and Professional Communication

3 hours (Language Intensive)
This course is designed to expose students to strategies for effective communication in a business environment. Students will learn skills to improve both oral and written communication. Topics include using technology to enhance presentations, nonverbal communication in the workplace, and communicating about discrimination. (Fall, Spring)

G-CM 221 Intercultural Communication

3 hours (Language Intensive)
This course provides a broad overview of the study in communication both between and within nations, cultures, and subcultures. Students will investigate issues related to communication between people of different cultural orientations and also examine how cultural others are misperceived in interpersonal interactions and misrepresented in the media. Students will examine tensions between cultures and discuss ways to approach them by delving into specific cultural and communication rituals different from our own. Films will be used to study different cultural elements and concepts. (Spring, even years; Interterm, odd years)

CM 240 Gender Communication

3 hours
This course examines the influence of gender on communication in interpersonal, instructional, organizational and mass mediated contexts. Topics of examination include interpersonal violence, discrimination, and other contemporary social problems. Focus will be given to understanding gender as a cultural group. (Spring, even years.)

CM 305 Editing

3 hours
An introduction to editing. Students learn how to correct, tighten and clarify texts and how to apply design principles to a variety of documents and publications. (Fall, odd years)

CM 310 Public Relations and Social Media Campaigns

3 hours
A service learning course that allows the study of the fundamental principles, strategies, and skills used in contemporary public relations. The course aims to give students practice in analyzing and responding ethically to PR issues and in researching, planning, writing, and designing a variety of PR materials. Students will examine how PR professionals use social media to send campaign messages to various publics. Students will work as a class on a PR campaign for a non-profit organization. Prerequisite of Junior standing or instructor permission. (Spring, odd years)

CM 315 Communication Practica (A – G listed below)  1 hour each
Experience for students on the campus newspaper or other student publication. May be repeated, with not more than two hours in any one emphasis and six hours maximum. (Fall, spring)

CM 315A Communication Practicum: Reporting

1 hour
Gathering and writing news for the campus paper or other student publication. Prerequisite: Consent of publication’s faculty adviser.

CM 315B Communication Practicum: Editing

1 hour
Copy editing, headline writing, and production management for the campus newspaper or other student publication. Prerequisite: Selection by faculty advisor and Editor-in-Chief to an editorial position or consent of the publication’s adviser.

CM 315C Communication Practicum: Layout and Design

1 hour
Designing and creating copy using a desktop publishing system. Prerequisite: Selection by faculty advisor and Editor-in-Chief to an editorial position or consent of the publication’s adviser.

CM 315D Communication Practicum: Advertising

1 hour
Selling and designing advertisements for the campus publications. Prerequisite: Selection by faculty advisor and Editor-in-Chief to an editorial position or consent of the publication’s adviser.

CM 315E Communication Practicum: Photojournalism

1 hour
Taking and editing photographs for student publications. Prerequisite: AR 203 Photography or consent of the publication’s adviser.

CM 315F Communication Practicum: Multimedia

1 hour
Developing multimedia stories for online student publications. Prerequisite: CM 210 Multimedia Storytelling or consent of the publication’s adviser.

CM 315G Communication Practicum: Video

1 hour
Theory and practice of video production through hands-on video experience. Students will practice shooting and editing video from live-action events. Editing software choice is up to the student, though Adobe Premiere Pro is highly recommended. Elective for communication major and minor to meet communication practicum requirement. Prerequisite: CM210 Multimedia Storytelling.

CM 325 Conflict Communication

3 hours
This course examines issues related to sources of conflict in communication. Orientations to conflict and the management of conflict will be examined. A critique and synthesis of conceptual approaches and research is covered that pertains to conflict in interpersonal, organizational, and public communication settings. (Spring, odd years)

CM 330 Persuasion and Social Influence

3 hours
An examination of theories of persuasion, persuasion variables, principles of effective persuasion, and persuasion in interpersonal, small group, organizational and mediated contexts. In addition to studying verbal persuasion, students will examine the nature of visual persuasion in everyday life, discover how visual imagery influences behavior, develop strategies to protect themselves from the unwanted messages images convey, and learn how to use persuasion wisely in their own creations. (Fall)

CM 350 Web Design I (Cross-Listed with AR 340 Web Design I)

3 hours
An introduction to web design, web usability, and standards-compliant web sites built with HTML and CSS. Prerequisite: AR 130 Design Software. AR 230 Graphic Design I recommended but not required.  (Interterm)

CM 360 Videography I

3 hours
Video production for promotional videos, title sequences, and commercials, with a duration under 1 minute. Students will practice shooting and editing video, and producing graphics, for creative sequences that promote different subjects. Prerequisite: CM 210 Multimedia Storytelling. (Fall)

CM 375 Junior Seminar in Communication

1 hour
This course will cover an in-depth study of media theory and ethics. Students will consider how media impact their audiences. Case studies will be examined to enhance the understanding of ethical decision-making. (Fall)

CM 410 Videography II

3 hours
Short-form video production for news items, short films, and documentaries. Includes the use of photography, video, audio, and graphics for telling compelling video stories with a duration between 4 and 10 minutes. Students will practice shooting and editing video for various situations with a focus on creativity in film-making. Prerequisite: CM 210 Multimedia Storytelling. (Spring)

CM 440 Web Design II (Cross-Listed with AR 450)

3 hours
A recap of HTML and CSS and a more detailed exploration of responsive design. Students will utilize grids for layout and explore advanced styling for building dynamic we pages. Focuses on the skills students need to competently create and maintain their work, using best practices advocated by professional web designers. Prerequisite: CM 340 Web Design I. (Spring)

CM 475A Senior Seminar in Communication Research

2 hours (Language Intensive)
This course will introduce qualitative and quantitative research methods. Students will learn how to search for, comprehend, and create research documents. Ethics and professional conduct will be included in classroom discussions. Class time will also be devoted to the discussion of post college plans including job searching, resume writing, cover letter creation, and interviewing. (Fall)

CM475B Senior Project in Communication

1 hour (Language Intensive)
Each student will complete a service learning thesis project using communication skills learned throughout the program. The projects will be presented in a public forum at the end of the semester. (Spring)

CM 388 Career Connections in Communication

4-8 hours
An internship in a career-related position. For communication majors and minors only.

Special Course Options
295/495 Field Experience (1-4 hours)
297  Study Abroad (12-16 hours)
299/499 Independent Study (1-4 hours)
388 Career Connections (3-10 hours)
445 Readings and Research (1-4 hours)

 

2018|Catalog 18-19, Communication|

Teacher Education Program

The academic program offered by the Department of Curriculum and Instruction is essential for achieving the college’s mission of developing whole persons through scholarship, participation, and service. It also reflects the heritage of the college and the Church of the Brethren, which includes a dedication to a liberal arts education and values that promote ethical behavior, non-violence and peace, a simple lifestyle, and a dedication to serving others.

The primary focus of the Department of Curriculum and Instruction is on the preparation of education professionals. Teacher education at McPherson College has long been one of the foundational cornerstones on which the institution was established.

Teacher Education Program

The Teacher Education Program at McPherson College is accredited by the Kansas State Department of Education (900 SW Jackson Street, Topeka, Kansas 66612); and by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE), www.ncate.org (now known as Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP), www.caepnet.org). This accreditation covers the Teacher Education Program at McPherson College; however, the accreditation does not include individual education courses that the institution offers to P-12 educators for professional development, relicensure, or other purposes.

Mission Statement

The mission of the Teacher Education Program of McPherson College is to develop service-oriented educators who effectively blend the art and science of teaching.

Goals, Objectives, and Dispositions

Goal I: The candidate has the knowledge bases necessary to be an effective teacher in her/his field.

To accomplish this goal, the service-oriented educator will:

Objectives:

  1. Acquire a broad liberal arts knowledge base.
  2. Demonstrate proficiency in his/her major area of licensure.
  3. Acquire effective strategies of teaching in all appropriate content areas and for all learners.
  4. Recognize how students learn and develop.

Disposition: Appreciate the connections between various areas of knowledge and commit to continuous learning.

Goal II: The candidate can apply effective teaching strategies to meet the needs of all learners.

To accomplish this goal, the service-oriented educator will:

Objectives:

  1. Use appropriate best practices for specific content areas and for diverse learners.
  2. Reflect upon his/her teaching and analyze the practices.
  3. Demonstrate understanding and use of formative and summative assessments and make modifications based on them.
  4. Provide motivational techniques based on students’ developmental and environmental needs.

Disposition: Value and respect students’ varied talents and abilities and project enthusiasm for teaching all learners.

Goal III: The candidate fosters relationships and collaborates with school constituencies. To accomplish this goal, the service-oriented educator will:

Objectives:

  1. Communicate effectively in both written and oral formats and through the use of technology
  2. Solicit input from students, parents, colleagues, and the greater community.
  3. Act on information received from stakeholders.

Disposition: Value the many ways in which people seek to communicate and encourage various modes of communication.

 

The Teacher Education Program at McPherson College focuses on three major levels of licensure. The following are lists of the levels and the programs.

6-12 Licensure Section
Biology, Chemistry, English, English for Speakers of Other Languages, History and Government, Mathematics, Psychology, High-Incidence Special Education, Speech/Theatre

K-6 Licensure Section
Elementary Education, English for Speakers of Other Languages, High-Incidence Special Education

PK-12 Licensure Section
Art, Health, Music, Physical Education, Spanish

As a student at McPherson College preparing to become a teacher, you will be asked to prove your competency with the guidance of instructors in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction and the content area departments. Course assessments, a portfolio, and interviews are a few of the instruments developed that will help you demonstrate your abilities. McPherson College is currently collecting data on different aspects of student performance. Numerous experiences are provided as observers, aides, tutors, and as participants in student teaching experiences. Those seeking licensure at all levels begin their professional work by the sophomore year and continue with incremental and sequential scheduling of their professional growth.

Admission Procedures

Procedures for admittance into the Teacher Education Program and Student Teaching are outlined in detail in the Advisor/Advisee Handbook and/or the Policies and Procedures Manual. These Handbooks are available in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction. College advisors also have copies of these handbooks. The handbook is also available online. Students should read the handbook or consult their advisors for a detailed account of admission requirements and procedures.

Admission to the Teacher Education Program

As a general rule, the Teacher Education Board reviews candidates for admittance into the Teacher Education Program two times during an academic year, once each semester. Signs are posted on college buildings and announcements are made in campus communications and classes. Requirements for acceptance into the Teacher Education Program include, but are not exclusive of,

  • Minimum of C in G-EN111
  • Minimum of C in college level math
  • Minimum of C in G-CI150
  • Sign of support from Student Life
  • A GPA of 2.5
  • Successful completion of the C-BASE.

Practica at McPherson College

Research has proven that multiple and varied practical experiences are of utmost importance in an effective teacher education program. For that reason, students in the Teacher Education Program have the requirement of completing a minimum of two practica prior to student teaching. However, most students are encouraged to participate in more than those two. The first practicum occurs early in the student’s professional education course sequence. This practicum is primarily an observation/aide situation. The second practicum occurs later in the professional sequence and requires students to take more initiative in the actual classroom responsibilities. In fact, students are required to practice actual instructional activities.

Students are required to do one of the practicum experiences in an urban setting. Arrangements have been made for the first practicum to be completed in Wichita, Chicago, or other ethnically diverse setting. Transfer students or students with extenuating circumstances may choose to complete one of the other sessions in an urban setting. This will further enhance the program and give students a broader understanding of the entire educational enterprise. Students are placed in both grade- and content-appropriate practicum settings. It is the student’s responsibility to secure travel arrangements to the practica sites. Any expenses that are incurred are also the responsibility of the student.

All practica must be approved by the Department of Curriculum and Instruction.

Service Component

In keeping with the mission of the college and the Teacher Education Program, future teachers are expected to complete a service component as part of their program. During the student’s college career s/he must complete and document 100 hours of service prior to completing the program. Transfer students must complete 25 hours per year.

There are many possibilities for service-oriented activities. Opportunities will occasionally be made available through the Curriculum and Instruction Department. In addition, students are encouraged to seek out experiences that will be self- satisfying. For further explanation or clarification, contact any member of the Teacher Education Board.

Student Teaching at McPherson College

Student teaching is considered the capstone experience in the professional education sequence for future teachers. It is to be done after other professional coursework is completed. In cooperation with a K-12 school system, McPherson College strives to make this experience as beneficial as possible for all parties involved. Student teaching is a complete semester experience. It is offered for variable credit hours depending on the level and the experiential need of the student and the licensure area being sought. Being given the privilege to student teach is not automatic. The Teacher Education Board carefully screens all applicants for their suitability. As a general rule, the Department of Curriculum and Instruction begins the application for the student teaching process two times during an academic year. Deadlines are September 15 and February 15. Late applications are not accepted. Signs are posted on college buildings and announcements are made in campus communications and classes.

The prospective student teacher at McPherson College is expected to have:

  • the personality and character traits required of a teacher;
  • a strong liberal arts education;
  • solid professional skills;
  • profitable laboratory experiences with practitioners in the field. Before a student can student teach she/he must have:
  • gained full acceptance into the Teacher Education Program;
  • secured favorable recommendations from her/his major professor, professor of a language intensive course, one professor in teacher education, Student Life, and two supportive professionals in education;
  • achieved a cumulative grade point average of 2.5;
  • provided proof of liability insurance;
  • signed an Inquiry Form;
  • provided an up-to-date health form.

After all forms have been submitted, the student will participate in an interview with the Teacher Education Board. Ultimate decisions concerning student teaching will be made by that Board. A primary indicator of meeting the goals of the Teacher Education Program is the development of a portfolio. McPherson College students planning to become teachers develop portfolios during stages of their professional course work. These portfolios are designed to meet the overall goals of:

  1. The candidate has the knowledge bases necessary to be an effective teacher in her/his field.
  2. The candidate can apply effective teaching strategies to meet the needs of all learners
  3. The candidate fosters relationships and collaborates with school constituencies.

These portfolios include copies of units and lesson plans, reflective journals, other significant evidences of knowledge, application, and collaboration, scores of standardized assessment tools, and other documentation.

In order to defray costs, a student teaching fee will be assessed during that semester.

Student Responsibility

Students are ultimately responsible for following procedures and proper sequencing of events leading to professional development and licensure. It is important for students who plan to enter the Teacher Education Program at McPherson College to contact the chair of the program and/or the appropriate advisor.

Licensure in Kansas

Those seeking licensure in Kansas must pass the Professional Knowledge section of the Principles of Learning and Teaching (PLT) with a score of 160; candidates must also take a test in their particular content area. The passing scores for each content test are listed in the Advisor/Advisee Handbook. Requirements for licensure to teach in the public schools, either elementary or secondary, vary from state to state. Students who plan to certify in a state other than Kansas should, upon enrollment, consult the chair of teacher education or the state in which they plan to teach to make sure that they are enrolled in a program that is appropriate.

In the state of Kansas, teaching is considered to be a profession. Therefore, the Kansas State Department of Education has a Professional Practices Commission to exercise disciplinary and advisory functions over those requesting licensure or working as a certified professional. Teacher licensure can be denied, suspended, or revoked for both felony and non-felony actions.

McPherson College is in compliance with the federal Title II reporting guidelines.

Elementary Education Major

K-6 Licensure

Requirements

Along with the General Education requirements, the following is a suggested sequence; the academic advisor and/or Curriculum and Instruction faculty will assist the individual student to develop the optimal sequencing of courses.

Freshman year:
G-PY 101  Introduction to Psychology (3 hours)
G-CI 150 Introduction to Education (3 hours)
SE 210 Introduction to Infants, Children & Youth with Special Needs (3 hours)

Sophomore year:
CI 220  Principles and Strategies of Teaching (3 hours)
G-CI 251 Introduction to Education Practicum (1 hour)
*G-EE 210  Children’s Literature (3 hours)
G-CI 333  Intercultural Education (2 hours)
PY 204  Child and Adolescent Development (3 hours)
CI 232  Educational Technology (2 hours)
EE 230  Mathematics Content for Elementary Teachers (3 hours)

Junior Year:
CI 426/PE 426  Methods for Teaching Health in Elem. & Sec. (1 hour)
*CI 455  Teaching-Learning Process (3 hours)
*EE 303  Reading/ Language Arts I (4 hours)
EE 307  Methods for Teaching Math in the Elementary School (3 hours)
EE 306  Methods for Teaching Science in the Elem. School (3 hours)
EE 309  Methods for Teaching Social Studies  in the Elem. School (3 hours)
EE 301/ AR 358  Methods for Teaching Art in the Elem. School (1 hour)
EE 304/ MU 370  Methods for Teaching Music in the Elem. School (1 hour)
EE 305/ PE 305  Methods for Teaching Phys Ed in the Elem. School (1 hour)
EE 375  Elementary Ed. Practicum and Seminar (1-4 hours)
EE 444  Reading/Language Arts II (3 hours)

Senior Year:
EE 465  Student Teaching in the Elementary School (6 or 12 hours)
CI 476  Professional Seminar in Education (2 hours)

6-12 Licensure

Requirements

Along with the general education requirements and the academic requirements for the specific content area, the following is a suggested sequence; the academic advisor and Curriculum and Instruction faculty will assist the individual student to develop the optimal sequencing of courses.

Freshman year:
G-PY 101  Introduction to Psychology (3 hours)
G-CI 150  Introduction to Education (3 hours)

Sophomore year:
G-CI 333  Intercultural Education (2 hours)
PY 204  Child and Adolescent Development (3 hours)
SE 210  Intro to Infants, Children and Youth with Special Needs (3 hours)
CI 220  Principles and Strategies of Teaching (3 hours)
G-CI 251  Intro to Education Practicum (1 hour)
CI 232  Educational Technology (2 hours)

Junior Year:
*CI 455  Teaching-Learning Process (3 hours)
CI 4xx  Secondary Methods for Academic Majors (3 hours)
CI 315  Reading in the Content Field (2 hours)
CI 351  Secondary Education Practicum and Seminar (2 hours)

Senior year:
CI 475  Student Teaching (6 or 12 hours)
CI 476  Professional Seminar in Education (2 hours)

PK-12 Licensure

Requirements

Along with the general education requirements and the academic requirements for the specific content area, the following is a suggested sequence; the academic advisor and Curriculum and Instruction faculty will assist the individual student to develop the optimal sequencing of courses.

Freshman year:
G-PY 101  Introduction to Psychology (3 hours)
G-CI 150  Introduction to Education (3 hours)
SE 210  Intro to Infants, Children & Youth with Special Needs (3 hours)

Sophomore year:
G-CI 333  Intercultural Education (2 hours)
PY 204  Child and Adolescent Development (3 hours)
G-CI 251  Intro to Education Practicum (1 hour)
CI 220  Principles and Strategies of Teaching (3 hours)
CI 232  Educational Technology (2 hours)

Junior Year:
Methods for Teaching Art, Music or PE in Elem. Schools (2-3 hours)
(Those seeking licensure in Spanish take one Methods class (CI 404)
CI 351  Secondary Ed. Practicum and Seminar (1 hour)
EE 375  Elementary Ed. Practicum and Seminar (1 hour)
*CI 455  Teaching-Learning Process (3 hours)
Methods for Teaching Art, Music or PE in Sec. Schools (2-3 hours)
CI 315  Reading in the Content Field (2 hours)

Senior Year:
CI 475  Student Teaching in the Secondary School (6 or 12 hours)
EE 465  Student Teaching in the Elementary School (6 or 12 hours)
CI 476  Professional Seminar in Education (2 hours)

English for Speakers of Other Languages (K-6) Licensure

Requirements

Same professional education requirements as for K-6 license, plus:

EN 230  Linguistics (2 hours)
EN 335  Advanced English Grammar (2 hours)
G-SO 202  Minorities in the U.S. (3 hours)
CI 428  Methods for Teaching ESL in the Elem. and Sec. Schools (3 hours)

English for Speakers of Other Languages (6-12) Licensure

Requirements

Same professional education requirements as for 6-12 licensure in other fields, plus:

EN 230  Linguistics (2 hours)
EN 335  Advanced English Grammar (2 hours)
G-SO 202  Minorities in the U.S. (3 hours)
CI 428  Methods for Teaching ESL in the Elem. and Sec. Schools (3 hours)

Special Education Licensure

Through a joint effort with the Kansas Independent Colleges Association (KICA), McPherson College offers an Adaptive Special Education program. Students who participate in this program will graduate with licensure in High Incidence Special Education (intellectual disability, learning disabilities, behavior disorders, and other health impairments) at the K-6 and 6-12 levels.

High Incidence Special Education: Courses Required for all levels:

SPED 310  Foundations for Special Education (4 hours)
SPED 315  General Methods for Special Education Services (4 hours)
SPED 345  Behavioral Management (2 hours)
SPED 499  Capstone Issues (1 hour)

Courses Required for Level K-6:

SPED 321  Grades K-6 Methods for Special Needs (4 hours)
SPED 331  Grades K-6 Field Experience (1 hour)
SPED 431  Grades K-6 Clinical Experience (Student Teaching) (6 hours)
(OR)
*SPED 433  Grades K-6 Internship (4-6 hours)
*Those already holding special education licensure

Courses required for Level 6-12:

SPED 361  Grades 6-12 Methods for Special Needs (4 hours)
SPED 371  Grades 6-12 Field Experience (1 hour)
SPED 471  Grades 6-12 Clinical Experience (Student Teaching) (6 hours)
(OR)
* SPED 473  Grades 6-12 Internship (4-6 hours)
* Those already holding special education licensure

Optional:
SPED 220  Field Experience in Services for Student with Special Needs (1 hour)
SPED 320  Beginning American Sign Language (2 hours)
SPED 322  Intermediate American Sign Language (2 hours)
SPED 678  Topics in Special Education (1 hour)

2018|Catalog 18-19, Curriculum & Instruction|

Teacher Education Course Descriptions

(Course numbers listed in parentheses after McPherson College numbers are ACCK course numbers.)

CI 101 (SPED 320) Beginning American Sign Language

2 hours
The purpose of this course is to learn the basics of sign language. It will provide the student with an opportunity to express and receive signed communication. (Fall and Spring)

CI 105 Social Studies Review for Teachers

1 hour
This course is designed as a review for the C-BASE exam. Candidates who have failed the social studies portion of the C-BASE twice are required to take this course. The course will meet by appointment for the first weeks of the semester (until the C-BASE is offered). (Fall and Spring)

CI 106 Mathematics Review for Teachers

1 hour
This course is designed as a review for the C-BASE exam. Candidates who have failed the mathematics portion of the C-BASE twice are required to take this course. The course will meet by appointment for the first weeks of the semester (until the C-BASE is offered). (Fall and Spring)

G-CI 150 Introduction to Education

3 hours
This course provides an overview of the historical role of schools in our society, the current governance and finance structures, and the challenges schools face in this new century. It also addresses planning for a career in professional education, and becoming a successful teacher.(Fall and Spring)

CI 202 (SPED 322) Intermediate American Sign Language

2 hours
The purpose of this course is to increase conversational sign language and to introduce interpreting skills. It will provide the student with an opportunity to increase his/her ability to express and receive signed communication, expand his/ her vocabulary, and improve his/her fluency in signing.(Spring)

CI 220 Principles and Strategies of Teaching

3 hours
A general methods class required of all education students. This course must be taken before or concurrent with other EE or CI courses. If taking concurrent, must have permission from the instructor. The class provides an introduction to teaching, including defining the teaching act, developing classroom communities, classroom management, assessment and evaluation, models of teaching, integration of technology, and professional responsibilities.(Fall and Spring) A minimum grade of C in CI 220 is required as a prerequisite for ALL 300 & 400 level CI, EE or SE courses except G-CI 333.

CI 232 Educational Technology

2 hours
Educational Technology is designed to ensure that teacher education candidates understand the function of technology in schools and society, exhibit skills using instructional tools and technology to gather, analyze, and present information, improve instructional practices, facilitate professional productivity and communication, and help all students use instructional technology effectively. (Fall and Spring)

G-CI 251 Introduction to Education Practicum

1 hour
This practicum is conducted in the Wichita Public Schools or another urban district. It must be completed before enrolling for EE375 or CI 351. Students are required to spend 30 contact hours in a classroom. This class is offered every semester; however, a block of time must be established to ensure a worthwhile and quality experience. Students will maintain a reflective journal with emphasis on recording observations of teaching and learning, management techniques, the diversity of the student population, and the use of technology. Prerequisite: G-CI 150 and consent of the Director of Field Experiences. (Interterm; Fall or Spring by education department approval only) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

CI 315 Reading in the Content Field

2 hours
This course provides students seeking licensure at the PK-12 and 6-12 level the strategies necessary for reading to learn. The strategies learned are appropriate for all content areas and all learners. Future educators will learn how to plan instruction based upon the knowledge of all students, community, subject matter, curriculum outcomes, and current methods of teaching reading. Prerequisite: CI 220. (Fall)

G-CI 333 Intercultural Education Seminar

2 hours
A study of our diverse society and how it pertains to education and the educational setting. Students electing to participate in the related field study that adequately depicts intercultural relations in an educational setting must also enroll in CI 495 Field Experience in Education. Prerequisite: CI220. (Fall and Spring)

CI 351 Secondary Education Practicum & Seminar

1-4 hours
A field experience and seminar for those seeking licensure at the secondary or PK-12 level. This course is offered for variable hour credit depending on the student’s past experience(s) and licensure area(s). Student should consult with her/his advisor and the chair of the Department of Curriculum & Instruction for appropriate registration. This practicum must occur between CI 251 and CI 475. It is recommended that students seeking license at the 6-12 level take this class in conjunction with the appropriate content methods class. Prerequisites: CI 220. Completed application and interview to Teacher Education Program required. Concurrent with CI455.  (Fall and Spring) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

CI 401/AR 401 Methods for Teaching Art in the Secondary School

2 hours
This is a comprehensive study of secondary art curricula and instructional methods relevant to today’s art educator in the public schools. Discussions will address a multitude of current trends, issues, and “hot” topics on the national scene, including the National Art Standards as part of the Goals 2000 program and Quality Performance Accreditation (QPA) in Kansas public schools. Considerable time and effort will be spent on writing and developing art curricula around the four content areas of art production, art history, art criticism, and aesthetics. Preparing and delivering a micro-teaching experience at McPherson High School is also a component of this course. Prerequisite: CI 220. (Spring)

CI 404 (ED 450) Methods for Teaching Modern Language

3 hours
This course is designed to prepare the prospective second language teacher for successful teaching at the PK-12 level. It provides theories of second language acquisition and second language teaching methods. Includes planning strategies, measurement/evaluations, test item construction, effective discipline, inclusionary practices, and technology media. Students become familiar with professional organizations and their publication/resources. In microteaching, including group and self-evaluation, students demonstrate current second language methodology. Prerequisite: CI 220. (As needed)

CI 406 (ED 406) Methods for Teaching Natural Science in the Secondary School

3 hours
This six-week course is designed to provide the prospective teacher with knowledge and skill for teaching the natural sciences at the secondary level (grades 6-12). Content includes curriculum selection and design, safe laboratory management and operation, integration of curriculum, inclusionary practices, methods and modalities of teaching, assessment, classroom application of various forms of technology, and professional organizations. Microteaching, classroom observation and group and self-evaluation are included. Prerequisite: CI 220. (Spring)

CI 407 (ED 467) Methods for Teaching Mathematics in the Secondary School

3 hours
This course is designed to provide the prospective secondary level (grades 6-12) mathematics teacher the methods of teaching contemporary mathematics content. Topics include methods of presentation, awareness of national mathematics organizations, the writing of unit/daily lesson plans, microteaching of a math lesson, selecting materials, techniques of assessment, inclusionary practices, classroom application of various forms of technology, and techniques of assessment. Prerequisite: CI 220. (Spring)

CI 408 (ED 440) Methods for Teaching Social and Behavioral Science in the Secondary School

3 hours
This course is designed to prepare students for successful teaching at the secondary level (grades 6-12) in both the social and behavioral sciences. Emphasis is placed on different approaches and practices of instruction planning and classroom management, selection and classroom application of various forms of technology, evaluation and questioning techniques, state assessments, research methods, professional organizations and the inclusive classroom. Prerequisite: CI 220. (Spring)

CI 410/PE 410 Methods for Teaching Physical Education in the Secondary Schools

2 hours
A study of various teaching techniques and analysis of fundamental skills of physical education activities in the secondary school setting. The course offers an opportunity to explore various teaching techniques in individual, dual, and team activities in the field of physical education for the secondary schools. Prerequisites: PE 110, PE 160, PE 161, G-CI 150, G-CI 251, CI 220. (Interterm)

CI 416 (ED 416) Methods for Teaching Speech and Theatre in the Secondary School

3 hours
This course requires students to apply speech and drama content to the techniques needed for effective secondary level (grades 6-12) classroom teaching. Opportunities are provided for students to exercise their teaching skills in the areas of unit plans, daily lesson plans, teaching strategies, evaluation, assessment, classroom management, inclusion and different learning styles. Discussions of resource allocation, safety, classroom application of various forms of technology, and professional organizations are also included. Each student is encouraged to develop his/her personal philosophy of education and incorporate it in relation to integrity/ethics in the classroom and personal evaluation to maintain a sense of balance and growth. Prerequisite: CI 220. (Spring)

CI 417 (ED 415) Methods for Teaching English and Language Arts in the Secondary School

3 hours
This course is designed to assist student teachers in becoming confident, effective professional educators in secondary level English (grades 6-12). Students will become familiar with a variety of specific methods to use in teaching literature, composition, and language. Among topics to be considered will be current trends in English curriculum development, the six-trait writing process, inclusionary practices, classroom organization, assessment, classroom application of various forms of technology, and professional organizations. Each student will develop a unit of instruction suitable for a secondary level classroom. Prerequisite: CI 220. (Spring)

CI 426/PE 426 Methods for Teaching Health in the Elementary & Secondary School

1 or 2 hours (1 hour for ELED majors; 2 hours for PE majors)
This course is designed to acquaint the student with a variety of methods and modalities for teaching school health. The health problems of the individual school child and her/his environment will also be studied. Students will be videotaped when teaching a lesson. Prerequisites: G-PE 150 or G-PE 170,G-CI 150, G-CI 251, and CI 220. (Fall)

CI 428 Methods for Teaching English as a Second Language in the Elementary & Secondary School

3 hours
This course is designed to prepare students to teach English to non-native speakers at either the K-6 level or the 6-12 level. Students will be exposed to teaching techniques, lesson and unit planning, and language assessment. Cultural issues will also be explored. Prerequisite: CI 220. (Fall of even years)

CI 451/PA 451 Methods for Teaching General Music in the Elementary School

3 hours
For music education majors. The methods and materials for music teaching at elementary level. (Fall, odd years)

CI 453/PA 453 Methods for Teaching Vocal Music in the Secondary School

3 hours
For music education majors. The methods and materials for music teaching at secondary level. (Spring, even years)

CI 454/PA 454 Methods for Teaching Instrumental Music in the Secondary School

3 hours
For music education majors. The methods and materials for music teaching at secondary level. (Spring, odd years)

CI 455 The Teaching-Learning Process

3 hours (Language Intensive)
A comprehensive course that deals primarily with the learner, the learning process, and the learning situation. Examines the role of the teacher in relationship to each of these. This class should be taken the semester before student teaching. Prerequisite: CI 220. Concurrent with junior practicum  – EE 375 or CI 351. (Fall and Spring)

CI 475 Student Teaching in the Secondary School

6 or 12 hours
Student Teaching in the Secondary School at McPherson College is a capstone experience allowing students to practice the skills and talents necessary to become effective educators. McPherson College offers student teaching at the appropriate level for all licensure purposes. Student teaching occurs after students have fulfilled all the necessary requirements as outlined in the Advisor/Advisee Handbook. The student teaching experience is scheduled for a minimum of 14 consecutive weeks. Placement and hours may depend on the area(s) of licensure. Students enrolled in this course must have completed the student teaching application process and be concurrently enrolled in CI 476. (Fall and Spring) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

CI 476 Professional Seminar in Education

2 hours
This is a capstone seminar for teaching candidates allowing an interactive opportunity to reflect upon and share their insight, expertise, and commitment to professional education. Must be taken in conjunction with CI 475 and/or EE 465. (Fall and Spring)

CI 495/295 Field Experiences in Education

1-4 hours
An elective laboratory oriented field experience that the student elects to take, or is assigned to, in an educational setting that is designed to enrich their understanding of the profession of education. This experience may or may not be tied to requirements in another course within the department or college. Involvement may be in an educational related role or with an approved experience anywhere in the world. Arrangements must be made in advance. (Fall/Interterm/Spring. By Permission Only.) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

G-EE 210 Children’s Literature

3 hours (Language Intensive)
In this course students use the language arts of reading, writing, listening, and speaking to explore the historical development of children’s literature in English from its origins through the contemporary period, with an emphasis on contemporary works. While exploring how children’s literature artfully structures people’s experiences, values, and cultures, students will learn the elements of children’s literature, different genres, and current issues pertaining to children’s literature.    Students will also develop presentation skills for sharing literature with children. For elementary education majors, the knowledge and appreciation of children’s literature developed in the course will serve as foundational knowledge for the Reading/Language Arts methods courses. Prerequisite: Sophomore status or consent of instructor. (Spring)

EE 230 Mathematics Content for Elementary Teachers

3 hours
This course will prepare prospective elementary school teachers to understand and apply the basic principles underlying mathematics. It will acquaint them with the topics in mathematics needed for successful mathematics instruction in K-6 classrooms. Topics covered include set theory, computational algorithms, the real and rational numbers, algebraic reasoning, 2D and 3D geometry, statistics and probability, and basic ideas of number theory. This course serves as a prerequisite for EE307. Prerequisite: College-level math course or instructor consent. (Fall)

EE 301/AR 358 Methods for Teaching Art in the Elementary School

1 or 4 hours (1 hour for ELED majors, 4 hours for Art majors)
This course is a comprehensive study of elementary art curricula and methods relevant to today’s educator in the public schools. Topics to be covered include: current techniques and materials, issues in art, basic design concepts, the developmental states of children in an art program, and curriculum implementation. (Fall)

EE 303 Reading and Language Arts I

4 hours (Language Intensive)
This course delivers the knowledge base for understanding and using concepts from emerging literacy, reading, language and child development to teach reading, writing, speaking, viewing, listening, and thinking skills and to help all students successfully apply their developing literacy skills to many different situation, materials, and ideas. This course focuses on literacy assessment and evaluation and methods for teaching K-3 grade levels. (Fall)

EE 304 Methods for Teaching Music in the Elementary School

1 hour
This course is for elementary education majors. The emphasis is placed on methods for teaching elementary school children and the integration of music into the elementary school curriculum. Prerequisite: CI 220.(Fall)

EE 305/PE 305 Methods for Teaching Physical Education in the Elementary School

1 or 2 hours (1 hour for ELED majors, 2 hours for PE majors)
This course is designed to introduce prospective elementary school physical education and classroom teachers to the fundamentals, principles, and practices of physical education at the elementary school level. Movement exploration and methods will be stressed in the variety of play activities introduced. Additionally, this course has been designed to integrate theory and concept learning with practical laboratory experiences. Prerequisites: CI 150, CI 220 and G-CI 251. (Spring)

EE 306 Methods for Teaching Science in the Elementary School

3 hours
This course provides the knowledge base for future elementary teachers to understand and use fundamental concepts in science (including physical, life, and earth and space) as well as concepts in science and technology, science in personal social perspective, the history and nature of science, the unifying concepts of science, and the inquiry process scientists use in discovery of new knowledge to build a base for scientific and technological literacy for all students. Prerequisite: CI 220. (Fall) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

EE 307 Methods for Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary School

2 hours
This course provides the knowledge base for future elementary teachers to know, understand, and use the major concepts, procedures, and reasoning processes of mathematics that define numbers and operations, geometry, measurement, data analysis and probability, and algebra so that all students understand relationships that can represent phenomena, solve problems, and manage data. This course includes a field experience. Prerequisite: CI 220 and EE 230 or Instructor’s consent. (Spring) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

EE 309 Methods for Teaching Social Studies in the Elementary School

3 hours
A class designed for equipping elementary pre-service teachers with skills, strategies, and major concepts germane to the six social studies literacies: history, geography, socio-politics, citizenship, economics, and culture. This course includes a field experience. Prerequisite: CI 220. (Spring) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

EE 375 Elementary Education Practicum & Seminar

1-4 hours
A field experience and seminar for those seeking licensure in elementary education at the K-6 level and those seeking licensure in art, physical education, and Spanish at the PK-12 level. This course is offered for variable hour credit depending on student’s past experience(s) and licensure area(s). Student should consult with her/his advisor and the Chair of Teacher Education Program for appropriate registration. This practicum must occur between CI 251 and EE 465. Prerequisites: CI 220. Completed application to Teacher Education Program required. (Fall and  Spring; Interterm by education department permission only) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

EE 444 Reading/Language Arts II

3 hours
This course provides a structure for providing future elementary teachers an opportunity to use concepts from emerging literacy, reading, language and child development to teach reading, writing, speaking, viewing, listening, and thinking skills and to help all students successfully apply their developing literacy skills to many different situation, materials, and ideas. This course focuses on assessment and evaluation and teaching strategies for grades 4-6. This course includes a field experience. Prerequisites: EE 303 and CI 220 (Spring) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

EE 465 Student Teaching in the Elementary School

6 or 12 hours
Student Teaching in the Elementary School at McPherson College is a capstone experience allowing students to practice the skills and talents necessary to become effective educators. McPherson College offers student teaching at the appropriate level for all licensure purposes. Student teaching occurs after students have fulfilled all the necessary requirements as outlined in the Advisor/Advisee Handbook. The student teaching experience is scheduled for a minimum of 14 consecutive weeks. Placement and hours may depend on the area(s) of licensure. Students enrolled in this course must have completed the student teaching application process and be concurrently enrolled in CI 476. (Fall and Spring) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

SE 210 Introduction to Infants, Children, and Youth with Special Needs

3 hours
This class is a survey of federal and state mandates for special education, including an overview of categorical exceptionalities delineated in the laws; service delivery systems; advocacy groups; the concept of natural environments and least restrictive environments; and the purpose and function of the IFSP and IEP. The class, which is required for all students seeking licensure in education, is designed to introduce all pre-service teachers to mild and moderate disabilities. The course also serves as a foundation for additional special education coursework. This course is a prerequisite for other special education courses. (Fall and Spring)

SPED 220 Field Experience in Services for Students with Special Needs

1 hour
An early field placement for directed observation of special education teachers working with elementary- or secondary-level students with mild/moderate disabilities. (Fall, Interterm, Spring, and Summer) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

SPED 310 Foundations for Special Education Services

4 hours
This course addresses historical perspectives and current practices (Module A), laws, regulations, and policies governing practice (Module B), and affects of individual differences, language, and culture on educational performance (Module C). The course includes a supervised field experience (Module D). Concurrent: Modules A-D. (Fall & Spring)

SPED 315: General Methods for Special Education Services

4 hours
This course addresses assessments used for eligibility, placement and curricular decisions (Module A), the special education process from pre-identification through individual program implementation (Module B), and effective collaboration and communication skills with diverse learners, families, colleagues, and community stakeholders (Module C). The course includes a supervised field experience (Module D). Concurrent: Modules A-D Prerequisite: SPED 310 (Fall & Spring)

SPED 321 Grades K-6 Methods for Special Needs

4 hours
This course addresses IEP implementation using evidence-based practices. Emphasis is on collaborative teaching models. Topics of study include lesson planning, basic skill and content area instruction, adapting methods and materials, positive behavior supports, and progress monitoring. SPED 331: Grades K-6 Field Experience must be taken concurrently. Prerequisites: SPED 310 & 315. (Fall & Spring)

SPED 331 Grades K-6 Field Experience

1 hour
This course is a supervised field experience with children in grades K-6 who have an identified disability. The course will emphasize evidence-based practices and techniques presented in SPED 321. Students will participate in IEP development, lesson planning, and instruction. SPED 321: Grades K-6 Methods for Special Needs must be taken concurrently. Prerequisites: SPED 310 & 315. (Fall & Spring) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

SPED 341 Grades PreK-3 Methods

4 hours
Grades PreK-3 Methods, addresses strategies to individual and group needs using evidence-based practices. Topics of study include learning plans, embedded instruction within a tiered framework, setting up the environment, adapting methods and materials, positive behavior supports, and progress monitoring. SPED 351, Grades PreK-3 Field Experience, must be taken concurrently. SPED 341 will involve 15 to 20 contact hours including 10 hours reading/pre-literacy and writing/pre-writing interventions with 1 child.

SPED 345 Behavior Management

2 hours
This course addresses culturally sensitive methods for preventing and intervening with problem behavior. Topics include school-wide discipline systems, classroom management, social skills instruction, student support meetings (Module A) and functional analysis, non-aversive intervention, and behavior intervention plans (Module B). (Fall & Spring)

SPED 351 Grades PreK-3 Field Experience

1 hour
SPED 351 is a supervised field experience with children in grades PreK-3 who have an identified disability. The course will emphasize evidence-based practices and techniques presented in SPED 341. Students will participate in IEP development, lesson planning, and instruction.

SPED 361 Grades 6-12 Methods for Special Needs

4 hours
This course addresses IEP implementation, including transition components. Emphasis is on self-determination, self-advocacy, career awareness, and post- school options in specific outcome areas. Topics of study include curriculum standards, lesson planning, basic skills instruction, learning strategies, adapting methods, materials and assessments, positive behavior supports, and progress monitoring. SPED 371: Grades 6-12 Field Experience must be taken concurrently. Prerequisites: SPED 310 & 315. (Fall)

SPED 371 Grades 6-12 Field Experience

1 hour
This course is a supervised field experience with children in grades 5-12 who have an identified disability. The course will emphasize evidence-based practices and techniques presented in SPED 361. Students will participate in IEP development, lesson planning, and instruction. SPED 361: Grades 6-12 Methods for Special Needs must be taken concurrently. Prerequisites: SPED 310 & 315. (Fall) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

SPED 381 Grades 4-12 Methods

4 hours
The SPED 381 course covers both general and specific methods used by special educators to teach students with disabilities. The course includes transition planning and IEP development, instructional planning, and selection of instructional methods to meet the needs of students with adaptive special education needs. Approaches for selecting methods and materials, for delivering instruction, and for evaluating instructional outcomes based on assessment information will also be demonstrated. (Spring)

SPED 391 Grades 4-12 Field Experience

1 hour
The SPED 391 field experience course requires the learner to be assigned to work with a cooperating special education teacher for 15 hours and to work in the same setting(s) as the cooperating teacher. The learner may function in programs described as self-contained, interrelated, categorical, resource, itinerant, special day school, or some combination of these. This one-hour credit placement is made by arrangement through ACCK. Outside preparation time will be required (six to nine hours per week outside preparation) beyond attendance at field experience meetings and required field-based hours. The grade for this class is contingent upon successful completion of the SPED 381 Methods course. (Spring) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

SPED 431 Grades K-6 Clinical Experience (Student Teaching)

5-6 hours
This course is a supervised teaching experience with a special educator who provides services for elementary level students with adaptive learning needs. The preservice teacher will work collaboratively with the cooperating special educator, families, and school team members to apply research-based knowledge of assessment, instruction aligned to IEP goals, and positive behavioral supports. Emphasis is on reflective, culturally sensitive practice. Prerequisites: SPED 210, 310, 315, 345, and 321 or 331. Concurrent or subsequent semester: SPED 499. (Fall, Spring & Summer) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

SPED 433 Grades K-6 Internship

4-6 hours
This course is a supervised teaching experience with an on-site mentor who provides or supervises services for elementary level students with adaptive learning needs. Emphasis is on application of research-based content knowledge and pedagogy and reflective, culturally sensitive practice. This internship is designed for practicing teachers adding grades K-6 adaptive licensure or for students who have completed a special education clinical experience. Prerequisites: SPED 210, 310, 315, 345, and 321 or 331. Concurrent or subsequent semester: SPED 499. (Fall, Spring & Summer) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

SPED 451 Grades PreK-12 Clinical Experience

5 hours
This course is a supervised teaching experience with a special educator who provides services for any of the grades PreK–12 level students with adaptive learning needs.  The pre-service teacher will work collaboratively with the cooperating special educator, families, and school team members to apply research-based knowledge of assessment, instruction aligned to IEP goals, and positive behavioral supports.  Emphasis is on reflective, culturally sensitive practice.  Prerequisites: SPED 310, 315, 345, 341, 351, 361, and 371.  Concurrent or subsequent semester: SPED 499. (Fall, Spring & Summer) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

SPED 453 Grades PreK-12 Internship

5 hours
This course is a supervised teaching experience working with an on-site mentor and/or evaluator. Emphasis is on application of research-based content knowledge and pedagogy and reflective, culturally sensitive practice. This internship is designed for the student hired on a waiver teaching in his/her own classroom. The intern will apply knowledge from all coursework and learning experiences to appropriately adapt and modify learning; manage students and classroom environment being culturally-sensitive to student and family differences;  align and implement learning with IEP goals; assess learning; develop and implement academic and behavior intervention plans based on assessments and best practices; develop a case study/IEP,  plan, implement, and evaluate lessons; plan and implement appropriate transitions, education and services for the specified grade level (PreK-12)/ages of students; and practice systematic self-evaluation.  Prerequisites: SPED 310, 315, 345, 341, 351, 361, and 371.  Concurrent or subsequent semester: SPED 499. (Fall, Spring & Summer) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

SPED 471 Grades 6-12 Clinical Experience (Student Teaching)

5-6 hours
This course is a supervised teaching experience with a special educator who provides services for secondary level students with adaptive learning needs. The pre-service teacher will work collaboratively with the cooperating special educator, families, and school team members to apply research-based knowledge of assessment, instruction aligned to IEP goals, and positive behavioral supports. Emphasis is on reflective, culturally sensitive practice. Prerequisites: SPED 210, 310, 315, 345, and 361 or 371 Concurrent or subsequent semester: SPED 499. (Fall, Spring & Summer) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

SPED 473 Grades 6-12 Internship

4-6 hours
This course is a supervised teaching experience with an on-site mentor who provides or supervises services for secondary level students with adaptive learning needs. Emphasis is on application of research-based content knowledge and pedagogy and reflective, culturally sensitive practice. This internship is designed for practicing teachers adding grades 6-12 adaptive licensure or for students who have completed a special education clinical experience. Prerequisites: SPED 210, 310, 315, 345, and 361 or 371. Concurrent or subsequent semester: SPED 499. (Fall, Spring & Summer) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

SPED 499 Capstone Issues

1 hour
This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to reflect on their clinical experience or internship and professional role with peers, ACCK faculty, and special educators. Topics of discussion include professionalism, ethical issues, advocacy, diversity, and resources. Prerequisites: SPED 210, 310, 315, 345, 321 & 331 or 361 & 371. Concurrent or previous semester: SPED 431 or SPED 471 (or comparable Internship). (Fall, Spring & Summer)

SPED 349 Communication Development and Communication Disorders

3 hours
This class offers a survey of normal and atypical language development, assessment, bilingual education, contributions of the educator to overcoming language problems, and the relationships between oral language and reading and writing. There are no prerequisites for this course. (Interterm and Summer)

SPED 380/678 Topics in Special Education:

1 hour
This course will focus on bringing the students up to date on current methods, changes In the field of special education, and new information related to the characteristics of children and youth with special needs. With consent of advisor.

Special Course Options
295/495 Field Experience (1-4 hours)
297  Study Abroad (12-16 hours)
299/499 Independent Study (1-4 hours)
388 Career Connections (3-10 hours)
445 Readings and Research (1-4 hours)

 

2018|Catalog 18-19, Curriculum & Instruction|

English Program

Purpose Statement

The English department commits itself to developing graduates who can read critically and communicate effectively and who understand the changing nature of language.

The department achieves this purpose when its graduates

  • demonstrate an ability to accomplish various purposes through effective communication – oral, written, and electronic – and to help others achieve them;
  • demonstrate an understanding of ways in which aspects of culture such as history, religion and social norms are reflected in literature;
  • demonstrate an ability to analyze literary texts;
  • demonstrate a knowledge of research tools and strategies, especially in literature, and the critical and ethical use of appropriate documentation;
  • demonstrate knowledge of the structure of English, of the Standard American dialect, of both traditional and modern grammars, and of the nature of language.

English Major

Requirements

I. Complete the following courses:

EN 230  Linguistics (2 hours)
*EN 250  American Literature I (3 hours)
*G-EN 255  American Literature II (3 hours)
*EN 313  Advanced Expository Writing (3 hours)
EN 335  Advanced English Grammar (2 hours)
EN 340  British Literature I (3 hours)
EN 345  British Literature II (3 hours)
EN 375  Junior Seminar in English (2 hours)
EN 430  History and Structure of English (2 hours)
EN 475A  Seminar in English (1 hour)
*EN475B   Seminar in English (1 hour)
*G-EN 210  Masterpieces of World Literature, OR
*G-EN 220  Contemporary World Literature (3 hours)
G-EN 270 Fiction (3 hours), OR
G-EN 370 Poetry (3 hours, OR
EN 420 Creative Writing (3 hours)

II. Complete 7 elective hours in English. These may include additional hours in English and American literature, as well as the following courses:

G-CM 120  Intro. to Human Communication (3 hours)
CM 305  Editing (3 hours)
*G-EN 210  Masterpieces of World Literature (3-4 hours)
*G-EN 220  Contemporary World Literature (3-4 hours)
G-EN 235  Topics in Literature (3 hours) (may be taken more than once if topic differs)
EN 320  Young Adult Literature (2 hours)
EN 350  Theory & Practice of Tutoring Writing (1 hour)
*G-EN 370  Poetry (3-4 hours)
*G-EN 270  Fiction (3-4 hours)
*G-PA 385  Performing Arts History & Literature I or
*G-PA 390  Performing Arts History & Literature II (3 hours)
EN 420  Creative Writing (3 hours)
EN 445  Readings and Research in English (2-4 hours)

III. Complete the following supporting courses

Communication courses (3 hours)
Spanish Level II, or the equivalent in some natural language

Requirements for teaching licensure (6-12) in English

I. Complete the following courses:

EN 230  Linguistics (2 hours)
EN 335  Advanced English Grammar (2 hours)
EN 430  History and Structure of English (2 hours)
EN 320  Young Adult Literature (2 hours)
*G-EN 370  Poetry (3 hours), OR
*G-EN 270  Fiction (3 hours), OR
EN 420 Creative Writing (3 hours)
*G-EN 210  Masterpieces of World Literature, or
*G-EN 220  Contemporary World Literature (3 hours)
*EN 250  American Literature I (3 hours)
*G-EN 255  American Literature II (3 hours)
EN 340  British Literature I (3 hours)
EN 345  British Literature II (3 hours)
*EN 313  Advanced Expository Writing (3 hours)
EN 375  Junior Seminar in English (1 hour)
EN 475A  Seminar in English (1 hour)
*EN475B   Seminar in English (1 hour)

II. Complete the following supporting courses:

Journalism courses (3 hours)
G-ML 109  Spanish Level II, or the equivalent in some natural language
CI 417  Methods for Teaching English and Language Arts in the Secondary School (3 hours)

Other courses required by the Curriculum & Instruction Department for licensure.

Students must take the Praxis II examination: English Language, Literature, and Composition: Content Knowledge.

Competency Exam

Students who plan to major in English must pass a writing competency exam. This exam will be offered in the fall semester. Transfer students will take the exam early in their first semester at the college. Students who fail the exam may re-take it after participating in guided study and practice of writing.

English As a Second Language (6-12) Endorsement

Requirements

Same professional education requirements as for 7-12 endorsement in other fields, plus:

G-CI 333  Intercultural Education Seminar (2 hours)
EN 230  Linguistics (2 hours)
EN 335  Advanced English Grammar (2 hours)
G-SO 202  Minorities in the U.S. (3-4 hours)
CI 428  Methods for Teaching English as a Second Language (3 hours)
CI 475  Student Teaching/Practicum (6-12 hours)
CI 476  Professional Seminar in Education (2 hours)

Student teaching/practicum is to include ESL experience; for those already certified, student teaching/practicum is four credit hours.

Note: Non-native speakers of English must contact the Department of Curriculum and Instruction regarding proficiency requirements.

English Minor

A minor in English consists of 20 hours of English courses chosen from the list of courses in the English major and must include courses in both literature and writing. G-EN 110 and G-EN 111 do not count as part of the 20 hours for the minor.

2018|Catalog 18-19, English|

English Course Descriptions

Course Descriptions – Composition And Linguistics

G-EN 110 College Composition I

3 hours
A course designed to help students develop college-level skills in writing. Required of all entering freshmen. (Fall)

G-EN 111 College Composition II

3 hours
A continuation of G-EN 110, designed to help students develop college-level skills in writing and information literacy with an emphasis on writing from research. Required of all entering freshmen. (Spring)

EN 230 Linguistics

2 hours
An introductory course in linguistics to introduce students to the discipline and help them analyze the structure, phonology, morphology, and syntax of the English language. Includes some study of families of languages and fundamental differences among languages around the world. (Fall)

EN 313 Advanced Expository Writing

3 hours (Language Intensive)
An advanced study and practive of explanatory, persuasive and creative non-fiction. (Spring)

EN 335 Advanced English Grammar

2 hours
Systematic study of the structure of the English language and a consideration of current theories of analysis. (Spring)

EN 350 Theory and Practice of Tutoring Writing

0-1 hour
An introduction to the theory of composition and writing pedagogy and guided practice in responding to student writing. Required of students before or during their first semester as tutors in the college’s Writing Lab. (Every semester, as needed)

EN 351 Practicum in Tutoring Writing

0-1 hour
Experience in reading and responding responsibly to student writing as a tutor in the college’s Writing Lab. Prerequisite: EN 350 Theory and Practice of Tutoring Writing. Required of students who tutor in the college’s Writing Lab (except those enrolled in EN 350). (Every semester)

EN 375 Junior Seminar

2 hours
A study of literary theory and techniques of literary analysis, both classical and contemporary, and an exploration of careers in English. (Fall)

EN 420 Creative Writing

3 hours
Study and practice in writing original poetry and fiction. (Drama is an option for those who desire it.) Establishing a writing discipline is emphasized. Upper-level students only unless instructor permission is granted. (Spring, odd years)

EN 430 History and Structure of English

2 hours
A study of the development of the English language and a descriptive structural grammar of English, emphasizing the phonology, morphology and the syntax of current English. Social and regional English will be analyzed as well as differences in oral and written English. Prerequisite: EN 230. (Spring, odd years)

Course Descriptions – Literature

G-EN 210 Masterpieces of World Literature

3 hours 
A study of masterworks of world literatures, from beginnings through the twentieth century. (Fall)

*G-EN 210L Masterpieces of World Literature

4 hours (Language Intensive)
A study of masterworks of world literatures, from beginnings through the twentieth century. (Fall)

G-EN 220 Contemporary World Literature

3 hours
A study of important contemporary works from various world cultures. (Spring)

*G-EN 220L Contemporary World Literature

4 hours (Language Intensive)
A study of important contemporary works from various world cultures. (Spring)

G-EN 235 Selected Topics in Literature

3-4 hours
A focused study of the literature of a particular group, period, or region. Topics vary. (Fall, Interterm)

EN 250 American Literature I

3 hours
A study of writers and works (including Native American works) dating from European explorations of the New World to 1865.  (Fall, even years)

G-EN 255 American Literature II

3 hours
A study of writers and works dating from 1865 to the present. Effort is made to fairly represent works by Native Americans and American minorities.  (Spring, odd years)

*G-EN 255L American Literature II

4 hours (Language Intensive)
A study of writers and works dating from 1865 to the present. Effort is made to fairly represent works by Native Americans and American minorities. Language- intensive if taken for 4 credit hours. (Spring, odd years)

G-EN 270 Fiction

3 hours
An introduction to the elements of fiction and the historical development of the genre. Emphasis is upon development of critical reading skills. Writing of short fiction is also required. (Fall, odd years)

*G-EN 270L Fiction

4 hours (Language Intensive)
An introduction to the elements of fiction and the historical development of the genre. Emphasis is upon development of critical reading skills. Writing of short fiction is also required. Language-intensive only if taken for 4 credit hours. (Fall, odd years)

EN 320 Young Adult Literature

2 hours
A review of the literature and themes appealing to young adults. The course includes selection and evaluation of literature and methods of presenting literature to young adults. Designed for educators. (Spring, odd years)

EN 340 British Literature I

3-4 hours
A study of major writers and works from the earliest times through Shakespeare. (Fall, odd years)

EN 345 British Literature II

3-4 hours
A study of major writers and works from Romanticism through the 20th century. (Spring, even years)

G-EN 370 Poetry

3 hours
A study of poets and poetic techniques. Some writing of poetry required. (Spring, odd years)

*G-EN 370L Poetry

4 hours (Language Intensive)
A study of poets and poetic techniques. Some writing of poetry required. (Spring, odd years)

EN 375 Junior Seminar in English

1 hour
A study of literary theory and techniques of literary analysis, both classical and contemporary with some exploration of careers in English. (Fall)

EN 445 Readings and Research in English

1-4 hours
Special research and intensive reading on special topics, genres, movements. Open only to students with 12 hours of course work or more in English. (by appointment only)

EN 475A Seminar in English

1 hour
The first half of the capstone course for English majors. Students will produce a major critical project demonstrating competencies in speech, writing, and information literacy. Completing a creative thesis is an option, but requires an application and faculty approval.  Students may enroll for the course spring, interterm, or fall during the senior year.

EN 475B Seminar in English

1 hour (Language Intensive)
A continuation of the senior project; students must complete both A and B. Students may enroll for the course spring, interterm, or fall during the senior year.

Special Course Options
295/495 Field Experience (1-4 hours)
297  Study Abroad (12-16 hours)
299/499 Independent Study (1-4 hours)
388 Career Connections (3-10 hours)
445 Readings and Research (1-4 hours)

2018|Catalog 18-19, English|

Health, Physical Education and Recreation Program

Purpose Statement

The department of health, physical education and recreation commits itself to developing graduates who embrace the liberal arts philosophy and who can demonstrate a variety of skills efficiently and effectively, analyze and critique movement, and understand the interrelationship of health, fitness, and wholeness in life.

The department achieves this purpose when its graduates

  • develop a personal strategy for health and fitness, emphasizing the physical domain, understanding that behaviors learned are a lifelong process.
  • understand the concepts of physical education and health content and apply these concepts for the development of a physically educated individual.
  • demonstrate a heightened awareness of the impact of play on the quality of life.
  • meet State Department of Education standards and NCATE standards for licensure in the area of physical education and health (applies to those seeking teaching certification in physical education and health).

The department offers programs designed for teaching physical education and health in the elementary and secondary schools, graduate preparation, and a related area of special emphasis in sports management. In cooperation with the department of natural sciences, it also hosts an interdisciplinary degree in health science.

Physical Education and Health Major

Completion of the required and supporting courses listed below, plus courses and/or a selected emphasis area of professional preparation should total a minimum of 37 semester hours in the department of physical education and 11 semester hours of required related courses.

Requirements

PE 110  Introduction to Team Sports (2 hours)
G-PE 150  Concepts of Holistic Health (2 hours)
PE 160  Intro to Dual and Individual Sports I (2 hours)
PE 161  Intro to Dual and Individual Sports II (2 hours)
G-PE 170   Personal and Community Health (2 hours)
PE 180  First Aid and Personal Safety (2 hours)
PE 210  Human Sexuality (3 hours)
PE 220  Human Anatomy and Physiology for Physical Education (2 hours)
PE 280  Care and Treatment of Athletic Injuries (3 hours)
PE 288  Psychology and Sociology of Sport (2 hours)
PE 330  Physiology of Exercise (3 hours)
PE 375  Junior Seminar (1 hour)
*PE 380  History and Philosophy of Sport and Physical Education (3 hours)
PE 411  Kinesiology (3 hours)
PE 450  Organization & Administration of Health, Physical Education, and Athletics (3 hours)
PE 475  Senior Seminar (2-6 hours)

Required Supporting Courses

G-BI 101 Principles of Biology 4 hours) or
G-BI 111 College Biology (4 hours) or
G-BI 106 Environmental Biology (4 hours)

Additional Requirements for Teacher Education Majors, PK-12

Professional Education Requirements

Related Courses:

PY 101  Introduction to Psychology (3 hours)
PY 204  Child and Adolescent Development (3 hours)
CI 232  Educational Technology (2 hours)
CI 333  Intercultural Education (2 hours)

Education Courses:

CI 150  Introduction to Education (3 hours)
CI 251  Introduction to Education Practicum (1 hour)
SE 210  Intro to Infant, Child, Youth with Special Needs (3 hours)
CI 220  Principles & Strategies of Teaching (3 hours)
CI 315  Reading in the Content Field (2 hours)
CI 455  The Teaching-Learning Process (3 hours)

Methods Courses:

PE/CI 426  Methods of Teaching School Health (2 hours)
PE/EE 305  Methods of Teaching PE in Elementary School (2 hours)
PE/CI 410  Methods of Teaching PE in Secondary School (2 hours)

Observations & Student Teaching:

CI 351  Secondary Education Practicum (1 hour)
EE 375  Elementary Education Practicum (1 hour)
EE 465  Student Teaching in the Elementary School (6 hours)
CI 475  Student Teaching in the Secondary School (6 hours)
CI 476  Professional Seminar in Education (2 hours)

Total Hours 45 hours

Additional Requirements for Sports Management Emphasis

G-BA 130  Principles of Business Management (3 hours)
EC 202  Survey of Economics (3 hours)
AC 202  Survey of Accounting (3 hours)
BA 221  Marketing (3 hours)
*BA 339  Human Resource Management (3 hours)

Health Science Interdisciplinary Major

Required Courses

G-BI 111 College Biology I (4 hours)
BI 112  College Biology II (4 hours)
G-CH 111 College Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 112 College Chemistry II (5 hours)
G-PH 215 General Physics I (4 hours)
PH 216 General Physics II (4 hours)
G-BI 210 Principles of Nutrition (3 hours)
BI 225 Human Anatomy (4 hours)
BI 315 Human Physiology (4 hours)
PE 180 First Aid and Personal Safety (2 hours)
PE 280 Care and Treatment of Athletic Injuries (3 hours)
PE 288 Psychology and Sociology of Sport (2 hours)
PE 330 Physiology of Exercise (3 hours)
PE 411 Kinesiology (3 hours)
PE/BI 445 Readings and Research: Research Methods in Health Science (1 hour)
PE 475 Senior Seminar – Kinesiology Internship (2 hours)
G-MA 221 Elementary Applied Statistics (4 hours)
G-PY 101 Introduction to Psychology

Recommended Supporting Courses

G-PE 150 Concepts in Holistic Health (2 hours)
G-PE 170 Personal and Community Health

Additional Requirements for Some Pre-professional Programs

PY 204 Child and Adolescent Development (3 hours) OR
PY 305 Abnormal Psychology (3 hours)
BI 207 Medical Terminology (2 hours)
BI 404 Biomedical Ethics (2 hours)
G-MA 105 College Algebra
Trigonometry (or above)
Communication course
Sociology course
Business course

Health, Physical Education & Recreation Course Descriptions

PE 110 Introduction to Team Sports

2 hours
This course is an introduction to the organization, strategy, rules and practice of team sports. Team Sports covered in this course will include, but not be limited to ultimate frisbee, team handball, field hockey, speedball, whiffleball, eclipse ball, cageball, volleytennis,  and mattball. Students will gain experience leading and officiating these events. (Fall )

PE 140 Introduction to Rhythms and Dance

2 hours
The purpose of this course is to provide students with a wide spectrum of information on rhythmic activities and dance. Students will learn body movements and how to perform them to music. Students will also choreograph and teach developmentally appropriate rhythmic activities and dance to others. (On Demand)

G-PE 150 Concepts in Holistic Health

2 hours
This course is designed to present the student with cognitive health and wellness principles and to offer suggestions for their application. These principles will be examined using a traditional approach with a variety of cultural influences. Major areas of study include mind-body interrelatedness and control, stress management, individual fitness, health and health related topics, and lifestyle management (including play). (Fall, Spring)

PE 160 Introduction to Individual and Dual Sports I

2 hours
This course is comprised of an introduction to the fundamentals, organization, and practice of tennis, golf, bowling, badminton, dance-ballroom/swing, orienteering, disc golf, and blow guns. This course exists because a basic understanding of the physical and mental principles in individual and dual sports is essential for the fullest and richest enjoyment. (Fall)

PE 161 Introduction to Individual and Dual Sports II

2 hours
This course is comprised of an introduction to the organization and practice of racquetball, Pickleball, archery, ladderball, table tennis, billiards, dance – square/ line and fishing/camping. Individual and dual sports are an integral part of our society. This course exists because a basic understanding of the physical and mental principles in individual and dual sports is essential for the fullest and richest enjoyment. (Spring)

G-PE 170 Personal and Community Health

2 hours
The purpose of this course is to provide students with a wide variety of information concerning personal and community health and wellness. It is designed to have an overview of the physical, mental, emotional, social, and spiritual components of health as they combine to influence the complete human being. Included within the course will be an introduction to the management of stress, physical fitness, nutrition and weight management, drug use and abuse, noninfectious and infectious diseases, sexuality and fertility, consumerism, environmental concerns and the maturing adult. Additionally, a practical approach to setting up a personal improvement plan for lifetime wellness will be stressed. (Fall, Spring)

PE 180 First Aid and Personal Safety

2 hours
This course is designed for all students to understand and prevent accident situations, to treat a wide variety of accident and emergency situations including use of supportive equipment and psychological first aid, and receive American Red Cross certification for CPR. (Interterm)

PE/PY/SO 210 Human Sexuality

3 hours
A study of female roles, male roles, values, life adjustments, sexual identities, religion, language, and behavior differences based on cultural, educational and socioeconomic factors related to human sexuality. Course uses lectures, audio- visuals, discussions, guest resource persons, assigned readings, and projects or papers to present information. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or higher or instructor consent. (Spring)

PE 220 Human Anatomy and Physiology for Physical Education

2 hours
Anatomy and physiology is designed to introduce the student to the science of the body structure and function. Content is presented in a simple to complex pattern which includes the design and function of cells, body systems, and the interdependence of systems. (Fall)

PE 280 Care and Treatment of Athletic Injuries

3 hours
The purpose of this course is to provide students with a wide spectrum of information on the care and treatment of athletes and their injuries. It is designed to provide an overview of emergency procedures and on-court assessment of injured athletes. The importance of preventative measures and an overview of the responsibilities of an athletic trainer will be addressed. Preparation and taping for game day will be discussed theoretically and rehearsed practically.Prerequisite: PE 220. (Spring)

PE 288 Psychology and Sociology of Sport

2 hours
This course is designed to expose the student to the principles of psychology and sociology as applied to a sports setting. The purpose being performance enhancement for both players and coaches with the ultimate goal of individual/human enrichment. (Spring)

PE/EE 305 Methods for Teaching Physical Education in the Elementary School

2 hours
This course is designed to introduce prospective elementary school physical education and classroom teachers to the fundamentals, principles, and practices of physical education at the elementary school level. Movement exploration and methods will be stressed in the variety of play activities introduced. Additionally, this course has been designed to integrate theory and concept learning with practical laboratory experiences. Prerequisites: G-CI 150, CI 151. (Spring)

PE 426/CI 426 Methods for Teaching Health in Elementary and Secondary School

2 hours
A course designed to acquaint the student with a variety of methods and modalities for teaching school health. The health problems of the individual school child and his/her environment will also be studied. Students will be videotaped when teaching a lesson. Prerequisites: G-PE 150 or G-PE 170, G-CI 150, CI 151. (Fall)

PE 327 Personal Training I

3hours
This course is designed to be a two course series which will enable the successful student the tools to pass the ACSM exam in order to become a certified personal trainer (ACSM – American College of Sports Medicine). The first (Fall) course will be primarily theoretical, emphasizing the science of personal training and behavior modification.

PE 329 Personal Training II

1 hour
This course is designed to be a two course series which will enable the successful student the tools to pass the ACSM exam in order to become a certified personal trainer (ACSM – American College of Sports Medicine). This second (Spring) course will incorporate a more practical approach, focusing on client screening and developing exercise programs. Prerequisite: PE 327.

PE 330 Physiology of Exercise

3 hours
This course is designed for future educators, coaches, and a variety of other health professionals including physical therapists, occupational therapists, fitness programmers and other persons interested in his field. This course will provide concepts for safe and sensible conduct of sport and physical education programs as well as any other exercise-based programs. Prerequisites: G-BI 101 or G-BI 106 or G-BI 111, PE 220. (Spring)

PE 340 Leadership in Camping/Recreation

3 hours
This course introduces students to the knowledge and skills necessary for leading safe, successful camping and recreation programs. The class will camp at different sites around Kansas. A fee (in addition to tuition) is required to cover the cost of food and transportation. (On Demand)

PE375 Junior Seminar

1 hour
This course is designed to help students foster relationships with colleagues and other professionals in the learning community for the promotion of health and physical education techniques for learning and teaching. (Fall)

PE 380 History & Philosophy of Sport & Physical Education

3 hours (Language Intensive)
A study of the development of sport and physical education as affected by major historical periods and events. (Fall)

PE/EE 410 Methods for Teaching Physical Education in the Secondary Schools

2 hours
A study of various teaching techniques and analysis of fundamental skills of physical education activities in the secondary school setting. The course offers an opportunity to explore various teaching techniques in individual, dual, and team activities in the field of physical education for the secondary schools. Prerequisites: PE 110, PE 160, PE 161, G-CI 150, CI 251. (Interterm,)

PE 411 Kinesiology

3 hours
Kinesiology is the study of human motion based on anatomical, physiological and mechanical principles. The study of the human body as machine for the performance of work will be examined from three major areas, mechanics, anatomy and physiology. All students should have prerequisite courses of Principles of Biology and Introductory Chemistry. All students who have met the above requirements are welcome to participate in this course, but it will be taught from the perspective of those going into physical education and/or coaching. Prerequisites: G-BI 101, G-CH 101. (Fall, odd)

PE 450 Organization and Administration of Health, Physical Education and Athletics

3 hours
It is the goal of this course to introduce students to a variety of situations involving organization and administrative skills, and through this process, provide students with a broad range of organizational and administrative alternatives useful in the successful administration of school health, physical education and athletic programs. (Fall, odd)

PE 445 Readings and Research – Health Science

1 hour Language Intensive
This course is designed for the enrichment of a student’s study in the discipline either by research on a topic not covered in the regularly offered courses or by research done on or off campus. Students will write an academic research paper on the topic of their choosing and then present this research in a formal setting. This course is only open to seniors in the Physcial Education department or seniors in the Health Science major. (Spring)

PE 475 Senior Seminar

2 hours
This is the culminating or “capstone” course for Physical Education majors that do not participate in student teaching. Discussion of current topics in Physical Education and the Allied Health fields would be combined with field experience to give the student a practical understanding of the fields they have chosen to pursue.

Intercollegiate Competition:

PE 209 & 309 Intercollegiate Cheerleading (1 hour)
PE 211 & 311 Intercollegiate Softball – Women (1 hour)
PE 212 & 312 Intercollegiate Tennis (1 hour)
PE 213 & 313 Intercollegiate Football-Men (1 hour )
PE 214 & 314 Intercollegiate Basketball (1 hour)
PE 215 & 315 Intercollegiate Cross Country (1 hour)
PE 216 & 316 Intercollegiate Track and Field (1 hour)
PE 217 & 317 Intercollegiate Volleyball-Women (1 hour)
PE 219 & 319 Intercollegiate Soccer (1 hour)
PE 221 & 321 Intercollegiate Baseball (1 hour)

After completing one year of intercollegiate athletic competition, students may enroll in intercollegiate competition (PE 211-21 and PE 311-21) for 1 credit hour, but a maximum of 2 credit hours for intercollegiate competition will count toward graduation. Students who transfer credits are limited to 2 credit hours for intercollegiate competition.

 

Special Course Options
295/495 Field Experience (1-4 hours)
297 Study Abroad (12-16)
299/499 Independent Study (1-4 hours)
388 Career Connections (3-10 hours)
445 Readings and Research (1-4 hours)

History & Politics Program

Purpose Statement

The Department of History and Politics majors are designed to develop student scholarship in the study of history and political science, to nurture historical and political awareness, and to enhance critical and analytical skills. Graduates are prepared for a variety of careers where strong research, organization, and writing skills are needed, as well as for graduate and professional programs in history, political science, and law. The program also prepares graduates for careers in secondary education with a specialization in social studies. Majors at McPherson have the advantage of the college’s central Kansas location, with research access to local, state, and federal libraries and archives. The department serves this purpose for students at McPherson College by

  • providing wide access to available formal courses in the disciplines of history and politics;
  • offering opportunities for independent research and reading in the relevant fields;
  • encouraging students to study further in related graduate and professional programs;
  • supporting and encouraging students with interests in careers related to the disciplines to pursue such careers;
  • meeting State Department of Education standards for certification in the area of social studies (applies to candidates for teacher certification only)

Course Content

General Education – History: Students will demonstrate scholarship in the study of history, historical and political awareness; and critical and analytic skills in at least one area of world civilization.” — College Catalog. Courses fulfilling the history general education requirement are either 100 – or 200 – level classes. They are designed to emphasize how historic events shape people’s lives, as well as how historic events are interpreted in different ways.

100 level – No prior college experience required, no prior history coursework required. Designed to provide the most direct supervision of students. Includes emphasis on introductory terms and concepts. Student work emphasizes recall and use of material delivered in the course and completion of more directly prescribed assignments.

200 level – Suitable for students with no prior history coursework, students should have prior college experience. Students develop skill locating, interpreting and applying resources beyond those specifically provided by the instructor. Increased emphasis on both written and oral presentation consistent with the standards of the discipline. Higher expectations for engagement of students in classroom. Students expected to apply course content to subject areas beyond those directly delivered in the course.

300 level – Designed for students at the sophomore level or higher with previous college history coursework. Students develop skill in independently locating, interpreting and applying resources. Increased emphasis on both written and oral presentation consistent with the standards of the discipline, including a minimum 10 page written research paper and formal oral presentation. High expectations for engagement of students in classroom.

400 level – Intended for advanced students conducting largely independent research and project development. Students will locate resources, conduct research and implement curriculum of their own design, with faculty consultation and supervision.

Program Emphases

Bachelor of Arts in History

Goals: To prepare graduates for careers and post graduate education in history, museum studies, law, archival work, and related fields.

Objectives:

  • Students should be able to demonstrate field specific methodology in written and oral course work.
  • Students should be able to discuss major problems in history drawing upon substantive knowledge in a field.
  • Students should be able to analyze and critique theoretical frameworks for understanding historical continuity and change in human communities.
  • Students should be able to assess and utilize materials in the media and popular culture as historians in the course of their daily lives.

Requirements: A minimum of 42 credit hours as described below.

I. Core Courses:

G-SO 101  Introduction to Sociology
G-HI 101  Historical Introduction to Politics
G-HI 130  Introductory Methods for Historical Analysis
EC 201  Elementary Economics: Macro
Or EC 202  Survey of Economics
HI 410  Historiography
*HI 475  Senior Thesis

II. Foundations: Complete 6 hours from the following list:

G-HI 110  World Civilization to 1500
G-HI 120  World Civilization since 1500
G-HI 140  American History to 1877
G-HI 150  American History since 1877

III. Complete the following required supporting courses:

G-ML 108  Level I Spanish
And G-ML 109  Level II Spanish
OR
Two semesters in an equivalent foreign language program

Complete 6 hours in each of the following subfields for a total of 18 hours. At least 6 of these hours must be at the 300 level.

Social History:

G-PR 202  History of Christianity
G-HI 236 Topics in Social History
*PE 380  History & Philosophy of Sports and Physical Education
*G-HI 333  Technology and Society
G-HI 261  Kansas History

Political History:

G-HI 101  Historical Introduction to Politics
G-HI 220  Modern Europe
G-HI 237  Topics in Political History
HI 301  Advanced Historical Topics
HI/PS 356  American Diplomacy

Cultural History:

HI 205  Social History of the Automobile
*G-MA 290  History of Mathematics
*G-PA 385  Performing Arts History and Literature I
*G-PA 390  Performing Arts History and Literature II
*G-AR 310  Art History I
*G-AR 311  Art History II

 

Bachelor of Arts in History for Teaching Licensure (6-12)

Goals: To prepare graduates for careers in teaching social studies in grades 6-12.

Required curriculum: History and Government 6-12

Endorsement Number: History & Government 71599

Requirements: A minimum of 9 hours in U.S. History; 9 hours in World History; 9 hours in Political Science; plus 15 hours of supporting course work for a total of 42 hours. In addition, the candidate for teaching licensure must complete the Teacher Education Professional Education Requirements.

I. Complete the following courses in U.S. History:

G-HI 140  American History to 1877
G-HI 150  American History since 1877
HI 361  Kansas History

II. Complete the following courses in World History:

G-HI 110  World Civilization to 1500
G-HI 120  World Civilization since 1500
G-HI 101  Historical Introduction to Politics

III. Complete the following courses in Government:

G-PS 102  United States Government
G-PS 130 Principles of Geography
PS 356  American Diplomacy

All history majors seeking Social Studies certification:

G-SO 101  Introduction to Sociology
G-HI 130  Introductory Methods for Historical
EC 201  Elementary Economics-Macro
Or EC 202  Survey of Economics
HI 410  Historiography
*HI/PS 475  Senior Thesis

Other courses required by Curriculum and Instruction Department for licensure.

 

Bachelors of Science in Politics and History

Goals: To prepare graduates for careers and post graduate education in politics, government, law, library science and related fields.

Objectives:
Students should be able to demonstrate field specific methodology in written and oral course work.
Students should be able to discuss major problems in history drawing upon substantive knowledge in a field.
Students should be able to analyze current political problems and issues. Students should be able to assess and utilize materials in the media and popular culture as historians in the course of their daily lives.

Requirements: A minimum of 42 hours in history and political science.

I. Required Courses:

G-HI 101  Historical Introduction to Politics
G-PS 102  United States Government
G-HI 130  Introductory Methods for Historical Analysis
G-PS 130  Principles of Geography
G-HI 120  World Civilization since 1500
G-HI 150  American History since 1877
G-SO 101  Introduction to Sociology
G-PS 125  International Relations and Globalization
Or *G-PS 215  Global Peace Studies
EC 201  Elementary Economics: Macro
Or EC 202  Survey of Economics
G-MA 221  Elementary Applied Statistics
PS 356  American Diplomacy
+ One additional History or Politics course at the 300 level or above
HI 410  Historiography
*HI 475  Senior Thesis

 

History Minor

A minor in history consists of 18 hours of history courses chosen from the list of courses in the history major and must include courses in both world and American history. At least two courses counting toward the history minor must be for upper level credit.

2018|Catalog 18-19, History & Politics|

History & Politics Course Descriptions

G-HI 101 Historical Introduction to Politics

3 hours
An introduction to the history of political ideas, and the ways in which politics and government have changed, yet in many ways stayed the same, from ancient Greece to the present. Topics include the questions of the limits of government power, when to disobey the law, conflict between church and state, political intervention in the economy, and how we balance our security needs with our desire to be free. (Fall)

G-HI 110 World Civilization to 1500

3 hours
An introductory survey of the history of world civilizations. The course starts in the beginning with the earliest agricultural communities in Mesopotamia, Egypt, India, and China, examines the rise of the world’s great civilizations, and concludes with the European Middle Ages. (Fall)

G-HI 120 World Civilization since 1500

3 hours
An introductory survey of the history of world civilizations. The course starts with the European Age of Exploration and continues through to the present day. Special emphasis is given to the rise and dominance of the West in world history. (Spring)

G-HI 130 Introductory Methods for Historical Analysis

3 hours
An introduction to the study of history, designed for general education for non- majors and as a core course for majors. Students will acquire an understanding of the important people, events, and concepts that shape history through the use of critical thinking and analytical skills. By approaching history as a historian, students will examine historical scholarship, primary source materials and the methods used by historians to understand the past. While specific topics will vary from year to year, sample topics include Medieval Military History and the Crusades. G-HI 130 is a prerequisite for HI 410. (Spring)

G-HI 140 American History to 1877

3 hours
An introductory survey of selected topics in the history of the United States from the pre-Columbian period to the end of Reconstruction in 1877. (Fall)

G-HI 150 American History since 1877

3 hours
An introductory survey of selected topics in the history of the United States from the period of Reconstruction to the present day. (Spring)

HI 205 Social History of the Automobile

3 hours
A study of the global development of the automobile from its precursors to concept cars of the future. Extra emphasis is given to the American automobile and its importance in American life, including attention to both the technical and corporate aspects of the topic as well as the automobile’s role in society and culture. (Spring, Monday evenings)

G-HI 210 International Travel Study in History

3 hours
An opportunity to travel abroad while studying a topic in world history at historical locations. Students gain a deeper, more personal experience of history, beyond the possibilities of pure classroom content. The specific content and travel location will change from year to year. This course fulfills the General Education Foundation requirement for a Global / Intercultural Experience and may be repeated. Contact the instructor for more information. (Occasional Interterms, odd years)

G-HI 220 Modern Europe

3 hours
A study of the modern historical forces and events that have culminated in the creation of Europe. This course explores topics including World War I and its disastrous peace settlement, the mass destruction and atrocities of World War II, and the political, cultural, and economic processes that created the European Union of the twenty-first century. (Fall, even years)

G-HI 236 Topics in Social History

3 hours
An examination of a select time, subject, or related episodes in history. This course explores the chosen topic through the lens of social history; one of the single most important developments in the late 20th century expansion of historical methods. While specific topics will vary from year to year, sample topics include Historical Epidemics and the European Witch Trials. (Fall)

G-HI 237 Topics in Political History

3 hours
An examination of a select time, subject, or related episodes in history. This course emphasizes the methods of political history, one of the oldest and most respected fields among historians. While specific topics will vary from year to year, sample topics include Fascism, The Russian Revolution, and The English Civil War. (Fall, odd years)

HI 245/AR 245 The History of Automotive Design

3 hours
Discover and examine the technological and stylistic evolution of automotive design. This course will explore ways in which automobiles, by way of their design, reflect the technology and communicate the values of the culture that produced them. Prerequisites: None. (Spring)

G-HI 261 Kansas History

3 hours
A study of the history Kansas, from the earliest Indian settlements through the political history of the modern state. The course examines the contributions Kansans have made to the total stream of American development. Designed with special relevance for public school teachers. (Spring, even years).

HI 301 Advanced Historical Topics

3 hours
An advanced study of a select time, subject, or critical period in history. This course explores the chosen topic through the lens of political history, one of the most important historical methods. While specific topics will vary from year to year, sample topics include Modern Africa, Medieval Europe, and Early modern Europe. (Spring)

G-HI 333 Technology and Society

3 hours (Language Intensive)
An advanced study of the historical development of technology as part of society and culture, exploring the ways which society and culture constrain and stimulate technologies, and the ways in which technology then shapes society and culture. Does not require previous specialized technical knowledge. This course is designed for both majors and non-majors. Prerequisite: G-EN111 or consent of the instructor. (Fall.)

HI 356 American Diplomacy

3 hours
A survey of the diplomatic relations of the United States, focusing on the events since 1900. The first half of this course focuses on a historical approach, providing an understanding of American actions in the world and their consequences. The second half of the course focuses on the processes and decision makers that create United States Foreign Policy. Substantive topics include the role of the US as the “world’s policemen”, and the nature of the US response to problems such as global terrorism, hunger, human rights, economic cooperation, and climate change. (Spring, even years)

HI 410 Historiography

3 hours
An advanced study designed to train students in historical research methodology and historiography. . The seminar is designed to allow students the opportunity to become familiar with the practices and techniques of professional historians and researchers. Prerequisite: G-HI 130. Open to history majors and minors or with permission of instructor. (Fall)

HI 475/PS 475 Senior Thesis

3 hours (Language Intensive)
A capstone experience in historical research, analysis, and writing. The seminar offers students experience in seeking out and evaluating both primary and secondary sources of historical information Graduation requirement of all history majors. Prerequisite: HI 410 and permission of instructor. All students intending to take HI 475 must have a formal meeting with their thesis advisor in the previous semester. (Fall, Spring)

Special Course Options
295/495 Field Experience (1-4 hours)
297  Study Abroad (12-16 hours)
299/499 Independent Study (1-4 hours)
388 Career Connections (3-10 hours)
445 Readings and Research (1-4 hours)

 

Political Science Course Descriptions

G-PS 101 Historical Introduction to Politics

3 hours
An introduction to the history of western civilization and political ideas. This course explores politics and government from ancient Greece to the present. Topics include the questions of the limits of government power, when to disobey the law, conflict between church and state, political intervention in the economy, and how we balance our security needs with our desire to be free. (Fall)

G-PS 102 United States Government

3 hours
A critical study of systems and structure of government and politics in the United States. This course explores key issues in American politics such as the debate over gun control and the right to bear arms, prayer in public schools, abortion, and gay rights, by examining the actors and outcomes in the political process. For example, how do interest groups, mass media, and political parties shape U.S. politics? How does congress, the president, and the Supreme Court act, or fail to act, to meet the needs of society? (Fall, even years)

G-PS 125 International Relations and Globalization

3 hours
An introduction to the study of international politics focusing on understanding current problems. Central topics include understanding how nations use both military action and cooperative agreements to provide for their security and well-being: how the global trade and financial system has become an engine for wealth; understanding the gap that has grown between the rich and the poor; and the challenge posed to humanity by the environmental degradation of the earth. (Interterm, even years)

G-PS 130 Principles of Geography

3 hours
Location, Location, Location! This course explores the physical, social, historical, and cultural landscapes of the earth from a geographic perspective, to demonstrate how location in space fundamentally shapes how the diverse peoples of the world live. Required for students seeking certification as secondary teachers in Social Studies. (Fall, odd years)

G-PS 215 Global Peace Studies

3 hours (Language Intensive)
An analysis of the problem of international conflict. This course studies the economic, political, and ideological causes of international violence, and the mechanisms used to mediate and resolve modern conflicts. Prerequisite: G-EN 110 and G-EN 111 or recommendation of the instructor. (Spring, odd years)

PS 356 American Diplomacy

3 hours
A survey of the diplomatic relations of the United States, focusing on the events since 1900. The first half of this course focuses on a historical approach, providing an understanding of American actions in the world and their consequences. The second half of the course focuses on the processes and decision makers that create United States Foreign Policy. Substantive topics include the role of the US as the “world’s policemen”, and the nature of the US response to problems such as global terrorism, hunger, human rights, economic cooperation, and climate change. (Spring, even years)

PS 475/HI 475 Senior Thesis

3 hours (Language Intensive)
A capstone experience in reading, research, and writing. The seminar offers students experience in seeking out and evaluating both primary and secondary sources of political information. The seminar is designed to allow students the opportunity to become familiar with the practices and techniques of professional political scientists. Prerequisite: HI 410 and permission of instructor. Students intending to take PS 475 must have a formal meeting with their thesis advisor in the previous semester. (Fall, Spring)

 

Special Course Options
295/495 Field Experience (1-4 hours)
297  Study Abroad (12-16 hours)
299/499 Independent Study (1-4 hours)
388 Career Connections (3-10 hours)
445 Readings and Research (1-4 hours)

2018|Catalog 18-19, History & Politics|

Mathematics Program

Purpose Statement

The purpose of the mathematics program is to develop students who understand mathematics as an academic discipline, who can use mathematics as a problem-solving tool in other disciplines, and who are skilled in mathematical reasoning, problem solving, critical thinking and communication.

The mathematics program achieves this purpose when its students

  • have received a coherent, broad-based coverage of the discipline of mathematics;
  • demonstrate conceptual and procedural understanding of mathematics;
  • can apply their knowledge to specific, constrained problems and produce solutions;
  • possess a foundation of theory that will enable lifelong learning and development;
  • meet State Department of Education standards for licensure in the area of mathematics (applies to education majors in mathematics only).

The information technology program at McPherson College commits itself to producing graduates who understand the field of computing as an academic discipline and as a profession within the context of a larger society.

The program achieves this purpose when its students

  • have received a coherent and broad-based coverage of the discipline of computing;
  • are prepared for graduate study as well as for the programming profession;
  • understand the ethical and societal issues associated with the computing field;
  • can apply their knowledge to specific, constrained problems and produce solutions;
  • possess a foundation of theory that will enable lifelong learning and development;
  • have experience with contemporary tools that lead to good experimental methods

Mathematics Major

The department offers a major and minor in mathematics. Mathematics is a discipline essential to all facets of the employment world and an excellent background for a variety of specific professions; the emphasis of our program is teacher preparation, and secondary teaching licensure is available. Mathematics is also an excellent background for graduate studies in diverse fields.

Requirements

42 hours of mathematics courses including the following:

G-MA111  Calculus I (4 hours)
MA112  Calculus II (4 hours)
G-MA123  Discrete Mathematics (3 hours)
G-MA153  Principles of Geometry (3 hours)
G-MA201  Survey of Mathematics (3 hours)
MA212  Calculus III (4 hours)
G-MA221  Elementary Applied Statistics (4 hours)
MA366  Differential Equations (4 hours)
*G-MA290  History of Mathematics (3 hours)
MA411  Introduction to Algebraic Structures (4 hours)
MA342  Modern Geometry (4 hours)
MA375  Junior Seminar (1 hour)
*MA475  Senior Project (2 hours)

Required Supporting courses (all mathematics majors)

IT 100  Computers and Information Technology (3 hours)
IT 200  Introduction to Programming (3 hours)
IT 201  Data Structures (3 hours)
PH205  College Physics I (5 hours)

Required Supporting Courses (students seeking teaching licensure)

See Teacher Education Handbook

Required Supporting Course (students not seeking teaching licensure)

PH205  College Physics II (5 hours)

Mathematics Minor

Requirements

G-MA 111  Calculus I (4 hours)
MA 112  Calculus II (4 hours)
G-MA 221  Elementary Applied Statistics (4 hours)

Plus one course from the following list
G-MA123  Discrete Math (3 hours)
G-MA153  Principles of Geometry (3 hours)
G-MA201  Survey of Mathematics (3 hours)
*G-MA290  History of Mathematics (3 hours)

Plus one course from the following list
MA212  Calculus III (4 hours)
MA366  Differential Equations (4 hours)
MA342  Modern Geometry (4 hours)
MA411  Algebraic Structures (4 hours)

Mathematics Course Descriptions

G-MA 105 College Algebra

4 hours
A study of elementary concepts of sets, fundamental properties of the real number system, linear and nonlinear relations, functions and their graphical representations, matrices and determinants, permutations and combinations, and mathematical induction.  (Spring)

MA 106 Pre-Calculus

4 hours
A detailed study and analysis of algebraic and transcendental functions. Includes their properties, related analytic geometry, limits and continuity. This course is recommended for student who have taken College Algebra with a grade of C or better, or have successfully completed a high school Trigonometry course. (on demand)

G-MA 111 Calculus I

4 hours
Review of functions, graphs and models; introduction to limits, derivatives and integrals of algebraic and trigonometric functions; applications of differentiation and integration.  (Spring)

MA 112 Calculus II

4 hours
Limits, derivatives and integrals of exponential, logarithmic and inverse trigonometric functions; techniques of integration; calculus of parametric and polar-coordinate equations; infinite sequences and series; first-order differential equations. Prerequisite: G-MA 111 Calculus I with a grade of C or better. (Fall)

G-MA 123 Discrete Mathematics

3 hours
A study of some of the basic topics of discrete mathematics, including elementary logic, properties of sets, functions and relations, mathematical induction, counting problems using permutations and combinations, trees, elementary probability, and an introduction to graph theory.  (Fall, even years)

G-MA153 Principles of Geometry

3 hours
A coverage of the basic principles of Euclidean geometry. Topics include points, lines, segments, rays, angles, congruence, parallel lines, polygons (special attention is given to triangles and quadrilaterals), geometric similarity, properties of right triangles, area of various plane regions, solid geometry, and an introduction to trigonometry.  (Fall)

G-MA 201 Survey of Mathematics

3 hours
A study of the philosophy, nature, significance and use of mathematics from early times to the present. Topics may include the use of graph theory to solve optimization problems in management science; conflict resolution using fair division; mathematical analysis of voting systems; applications of geometry to the size and shape of objects and to calculating inaccessible distances; geometric growth and decay; non-Euclidean geometry; number systems; logic; and probability and statistics.  (Spring)

MA 212 Calculus III

4 hours
Three-dimensional coordinate systems; vectors and vector-valued functions; partial derivatives; multiple integrals; vector calculus; second-order differential equations. Prerequisite: MA 112 Calculus II with a grade of C or better. (Spring)

G-MA 221 Elementary Applied Statistics

4 hours
A study of the principles of descriptive statistics, probability, sample and population relationships, estimation, and hypothesis testing. The computer is used as an aid in problem solving. This course is recommended for students who have completed three years of high school math or Discrete Math with a C or better.  (Fall and Spring)

G-MA 290 History of Mathematics 

3 hours (Language Intensive) This course satisfies the Global/Intercultural general education requirement; it does not count as a math general education course.
Study of some of the most influential mathematicians from antiquity to the modern era, and their impact on the development of mathematical thought. Particular emphasis is given to the contributions of different ethnic groups and cultures.  (Interterm, odd years)

MA 342 Modern Geometry

4 hours
A survey of selected topics in Euclidean geometry, projective geometry, non- Euclidean geometry, foundations of geometry and convex figures. Required for secondary education mathematics majors. Prerequisite: MA 112 Calculus II with a grade of C or better. (Spring, even years)

MA 366 Differential Equations

4 hours
Introduction to methods and applications of ordinary differential equations. Topics include first order differential equations and applications, higher order linear differential equations with applications, Laplace transforms and an introduction to numerical methods. Prerequisite: MA 112 Calculus II with a grade of C or better. (Fall, odd years)

MA 375 Junior Seminar

1 hour
A colloquium-type seminar. Junior mathematics majors prepare for an independent senior project in mathematics and select a project topic. (Fall)

MA 411 Algebraic Structures

4 hours
A survey of abstract algebra, with an emphasis on linear algebra. Topics include bijections, projections, groups, rings, matrices, modules, vector spaces and eigen values. Prerequisite: MA 112 Calculus II with a grade of C or better (Spring, odd years)

MA 441 Combinatorics and Graph Theory

3 hours
A study of directed graphs, trees, circuits, paths, network flows, basic combinatorics, generating functions, difference equations. Emphasis on applications and on use of computer in problem solutions. Prerequisite: MA 112 Calculus II with a grade of C or better. (on demand)

MA 475 Senior Project

2 hours (Language Intensive)
Students will investigate an advanced topic in a field of mathematics outside their classroom experience. Students will work in continual consultation with their research advisor. Regular informal oral and written updates of the project are required. The project culminates with a formally written project and a formal oral presentation of the project. (Fall)

 

Special Course Options
295/495 Field Experience (1-4 hours)
297  Study Abroad (12-16 hours)
299/499 Independent Study (1-4 hours)
388 Career Connections (3-10 hours)
445 Readings and Research (1-4 hours)

Information Technology Program – Dormant

Information Technology Major – This program is dormant at present

The department offers a major and minor in information technology. The major will prepare students for a variety of careers in computer science but emphasizes data management with web site development applications..

Requirements

39 hours of information technology courses including:

IT 100  Computers and Information Technology (3 hours)
IT 110  Web Development Tools (3 hours)
IT 200  Introduction to Programming (3 hours)
IT 201  Data Structures (3 hours)
IT 210  Information Technology Systems (3 hours)
IT 220  Programming in a Second Language (3 hours)
IT 301  Computer Systems (3 hours)
IT 360  Human Computer Interaction (3 hours)
IT 401  Operating Systems (3 hours)
IT 421  Database Management Systems (3 hours)
IT 431  Data Communications and Networks (3 hours)
IT 460  Information Security (3 hours)
IT 375  Junior Seminar (1 hour)
IT 475  Senior Project (2 hours)

Required supporting courses:

MA 123  Discrete Mathematics (3 hours)
G-MA221  Elementary Applied Statistics (4 hours)
AR340  Web-Based Design (3 hours)

Recommended supporting courses

AR230  Graphic Design I

Information Technology Minor

Requirements

21 hours of information technology including:

IT 100  Computers and Information Technology (3 hours)
IT 200  Introduction to Programming (3 hours)
IT 201  Data Structures (3 hours)
IT 210  Information Technology Systems (3 hours)
IT 301  Computer Systems (3 hours)
IT 360  Human Computer Interaction (3 hours)

Two courses at the 300 or above level (6 hours)

Required supporting courses

MA 123  Discrete Mathematics (3 hours)
G-MA221  Elementary Applied Statistics (4 hours)
AR240  Web-Based Design (3 hours)

Recommended supporting courses

AR 320  Graphic Design I

 

Information Technology Course Descriptions

IT 100 Computers and Information Technology

3 hours
An overview of computer technology and its relation to society. Through a hands-on approach, students will learn basic concepts of computer architecture, operating systems, computer communications, software engineering, programming languages, and applications software. Students will have the opportunity to reflect on the integration of computer technology and society (past/present/future).

IT 110 Web Development Tools

3 hours
This course introduces students to one or more web development tools. The specific tool(s) introduced will vary depending on the interest and needs of the students and faculty. The list of tools that may be introduced includes but is not limited to the following: Flash, Dreamweaver, Photoshop, Adobe Premiere, or 3-D Studio Max. This course may be taken multiple times provided the emphasis is different for each time enrolled.

IT 200 Introduction to Programming

3 hours
An introductory course for computer science majors. A rigorous study of problem solving using a high-level procedural language. Topics covered will include simple types, expressions, structure types, fundamental control structures, simple and formatted input and output, procedures, documentation, file manipulation, design methodologies, and debugging techniques. Students will complete several programming projects. Prerequisite: Mathematics equivalent to high school algebra.

IT 201 Data Structures

3 hours
A continuation of Introduction to Programming. The improvement of design skills and programming style is emphasized through practice with increasingly complex data structures and programming projects. Students are introduced to several classic algorithms, pointers, functions, recursion, and a second programming language. Prerequisite: IT200 Introduction to Programming

IT 210 Information Technology Systems

3 hours
Information Technology (IT) is a field which includes the development of systems for educational, business, and civil use. This course provides a foundation for the student of Information Technology. Various IT systems and terminology used in the field will be introduced. The systems development lifecycle, project management, and the role of IT personnel in selecting and developing new systems will be explored.

IT 220 Programming in a Second Language

3 hours
This course introduces students to current languages used in web development. The specific language(s) or language applications introduced will vary depending on the interest and needs of the students and faculty. The list of languages that may be introduced includes but is not limited to the following: Visual BASIC .NET or Visual C++ .NET Implementing Web Applications; or Visual BASIC .NET or Visual C++ .NET developing XML Web Services; or Javascript; or PHP. This course may be taken multiple times provided the emphasis is different for each time enrolled. Prerequisite: IT 201 Data Structures in C++.

IT 301 Computer Systems

3 hours
A study of machine organization, using assembly language. Alternative architectures, instruction formats, addressing modes, logic and arithmetic operators, and appropriate programming techniques are explored through several programming projects and lectures. Prerequisite: IT 201 Data Structures.

IT 360 Human Computer Interaction

3 hours
The discipline of Information Technology (IT) requires an understanding of the user when developing IT applications and systems. This course provides a basis for learning user centered systems design and development. An introduction to the basic concepts of human-computer interaction, including human factors, performance analysis, cognitive processing, usability studies, environment, and training will be given.

IT 375 Junior Seminar

1 hour
A colloquium-type seminar studying an advanced topic or a collection of topics. Junior computer science majors prepare for an independent senior project in computer science and select a project topic.

IT 401 Operating Systems

3 hours
An introduction to the major concept areas of operating systems, including process, memory, device, and file systems management; concurrency; synchronization; historical development of operating systems; and system structure. Prerequisite: IT 301 Computer Systems.

IT 421 Database Management Systems

3 hours
Levels of abstraction found in typical database management systems. A study of various models for databases. Query processing and data manipulation. Database design theory. Implementations of various models discussed. Security and integrity of system. Role of database administration. Prerequisite: IT 201 Data Structures in C++ and IT 110 Information Technology Systems.

IT 431 Data Communications and Computer Networks

3 hours
A survey of data communications and networks. Covers practice, theory and applicable standards in the areas of transmission systems, network architectures, network controllers and virtual environments for application programs. Prerequisite: CS 301 Computer Systems.

IT 460 Information Security

3 hours
Information Security is paramount in today’s business world. This course provides an overview of the field of Information Security. Students will be exposed to security issues, practices, and tools. In addition, disaster recovery planning, security planning and threat analysis will be fully explored.

IT 475 Senior Project

2 hours (Language Intensive)
Students will investigate an advanced topic in a field of information technology outside their classroom experience. Students will work in continual consultation with their research advisor. Regular informal oral and written updates of the project are required. The project culminates with a formally written project and a formal oral presentation of the project.

 

Special Course Options
295/495 Field Experience (1-4 hours)
297  Study Abroad (12-16 hours)
299/499 Independent Study (1-4 hours)
388 Career Connections (3-10 hours)
445 Readings and Research (1-4 hours)

Spanish Program

Purpose Statement

The Department of Modern Languages commits itself to the teaching of a second language. Equally important in second language acquisition is the development and nurturing of intercultural awareness and sensitivity.

The department achieves its goals when its graduates

  • Communicate effectively using interpersonal, interpretive, and presentation skills in Spanish.
  • Demonstrate an ability to interact effectively with Spanish-speaking cultures, showing an understanding of different cultural perspectives and products.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the nature of language and language acquisition.

Spanish Major

Requirements

Emphasis 1:

A minimum of 32 semester hours, including:

G-ML108  Level I Spanish (3 hours)
G-ML109  Level II Spanish (3 hours)
G-ML208  Level III Spanish (3 hours)
G-ML209  Level IV Spanish (3 hours)
ML350  Immersion Experience (12 hours – the equivalent of a semester abroad)
ML384  Intermediate-Level Composition and Conversation (3 hours)
*ML385  Advanced-Level Composition and Conversation (3 hours)
ML475 Senior Seminar (2 hours)

The following courses may be taken abroad:

ML308  Spanish Language Literature (3 hours or equivalent)
ML458 Structure of the Spanish Language (2 hours or equivalent, such as advanced grammar)

Emphasis 2:

A minimum of 32 semester hours, including:

G-ML108  Level I Spanish (3 hours)
G-ML109  Level II Spanish (3 hours)
G-ML208  Level III Spanish (3 hours)
G-ML209  Level IV Spanish (3 hours)
ML350  Immersion Experience (4 hours – at least 3 weeks immersion)
ML384  Intermediate-Level Composition and Conversation (3 hours)
*ML385  Advanced-Level Composition and Conversation (3 hours)
ML475 Senior Seminar (2 hours)
ML308 Spanish Language Literature (3 hours)
ML458 Structure of the Spanish Language (2 hours or equivalent, such as advanced grammar)

A minimum of 9 credit hours approved by the department and selected from culture studies courses, such as the following:

G-ML370 Service Learning Opportunity (1-4 hours)
*G-CI333 Intercultural Education Seminar (2 hours)
G-CM221 Intercultural Communication (3 hours)
G-SO202 Minorities in the U.S. (3 hours)
*G-PS215 Global Peace Studies (3 hours)
G-PS130 Principles of Geography (3 hours)
*G-PR106 Spiritual Pathways: Transformation, Compassion, and Vocation (3 hours)
G-PR306 World Religions (3 hours)
Courses in a language other than English or Spanish (3-9 hours)

Required Supporting Courses:

EN230  Linguistics (2 hours)

Students who can demonstrate language proficiency (via a placement exam) may be waived from enrolling in G-ML108 and G-ML109.

All students seeking a B.A. degree are required to enroll for one semester of Spanish. Students who have had zero to one year of high school Spanish will be placed in Spanish I. Students who have had two to three years of high school Spanish will be placed in Spanish II. Students who have had four to six years of high school Spanish may be waived from the Spanish language requirement if they can demonstrate language proficiency via written and oral examination.

Teaching Licensure in Spanish (PK-12)

The requirements for teaching licensure in Spanish are specified in the Curriculum and Instruction Department listing. They include the major in Spanish and professional education requirements.

Spanish Minor Requirements

A minimum of 18 semester hours, including at least 6 hours beyond G-ML209 Level IV Spanish.

Note: The following courses may be counted toward fulfillment of the 18 semester hours:

G-ML 108  Level I Spanish (3 hours)
G-ML 109  Level II Spanish (3 hours)
G-ML 208 Level III Spanish (3 hours)
G-ML 209 Level IV Spanish (3 hours)

Teaching Licensure in English as a Second Language (ESL)

Requirements

The requirements for teaching licensure in English as a Second Language are specified in the Curriculum and Instruction Department listing and in the English Department listing.

2018|Catalog 18-19, Modern Languages|

Spanish Course Descriptions

G-ML 108 Level I Spanish

3 hours
Acquisition of the four skills: hearing, speaking, reading, and writing. Latin American and Spanish cultural aspects are an integral part of this course. Classes conducted in Spanish. Tutorial sessions required. (Fall and Spring)

G-ML 109 Level II Spanish

3 hours
A continuation of G-ML 108 with emphasis on mastery of the verb tenses and building of vocabulary. Classes conducted in Spanish. Tutorial sessions may be required. (Spring)

G-ML168/268 Spanish for Travelers

4 hours
Language immersion experience in Spanish-speaking countries.

G-ML 208 Level III Spanish

3 hours
A review of grammatical principles followed by readings and vocabulary expansion. Classes conducted in Spanish. Oral preparation necessary for discussion of topics, short stories, and cultural research. (Fall)

G-ML 209 Level IV Spanish

3 hours
A continuation of G-ML 208 with increased emphasis on original reading selections in Spanish and student compositions. (Spring)

EN 230 Linguistics

2 hours
An introductory course in linguistics to familiarize students with the discipline and to help them to analyze the structure, phonology, morphology, and syntax of the English language, while also learning about families of languages and some fundamental differences in languages around the world. (Fall)

ML 308 Spanish Language Literature

3 hours
A study of Spanish language literature.

ML 350 Immersion Experience

4-36 hours
Students in Emphasis 1 are required to spend the equivalent of one semester (at least 12 credit hours) abroad or in comparable immersion programs. Students may fulfill this requirement in a variety of ways, but must first seek approval from the Spanish program director. See ML350 syllabus for specific requirements. Students in Emphasis 2 are required to spend at least 3 weeks (4 credit hours) in an immersion experience.

ML 384 Intermediate-Level Composition and Conversation

3 hours
A course designed to correct weaknesses in writing skills and to develop conversational skills, with equal emphasis to both. Taught completely in Spanish. Prerequisite: G-ML209 or equivalent. (Fall)

ML 385 Advanced-Level Composition and Conversation

3 hours (Language Intensive)
A course designed to put into practice skills learned at Intermediate levels. Focuses on Idiomatic expressions, difficult grammar structures and extensive vocabulary. Taught completely in Spanish. Prerequisite: ML 384 or equivalent. (Spring)

G-ML 370 Service Learning Opportunity

4 hours
Students will travel for the purpose of a community service project wherein they are required to participate actively in disaster relief work. In addition to the on-site relief work, students are required to participate in scheduled group sessions, which are designed to assist the student in acquiring additional cultural knowledge about the said travel site.

ML 475 Senior Seminar in Spanish

2-4 hours
The individual project of the senior student in areas of literature, language, or language pedagogy. The content of this course is open to the interest of the student regarding aspects of the culture that have not been studied previously. (Fall/Spring)

CI 404 Methods for Teaching Modern Language in the Secondary Schools

3 hours
Students will study the appropriate and most effective ways of teaching foreign language and culture. Practical applications of strategies and techniques are utilized to accomplish the objectives. Curriculum, evaluation, audio-visual materials, music, folklore, customs, gestures, and professional language organizations are included in this study.

ML 458 Structure of the Spanish Language

2 hours
The systematic analysis of the phonology, morphology and syntax of Spanish from the standpoint of structure, historical and contrastive linguistics.

Special Course Options
295/495 Field Experience (1-4 hours)
297  Study Abroad (12-16 hours)
299/499 Independent Study (1-4 hours)
388 Career Connections (3-10 hours)
445 Readings and Research (1-4 hours)

 

2018|Catalog 18-19, Modern Languages|

Natural Science Program

Purpose Statement

The Department of Natural Science provides:

  • a career-oriented approach to pre-professional preparation in the health sciences
  • a liberal arts and sciences approach to environmental health and sustainability
  • a hands-on approach to education in the laboratory and through student research
  • preparation to meet the Kansas State Department of Education standards for licensure in biology and chemistry

Student Learning Outcome: Students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of how the natural sciences construct knowledge of the world.

Performance Indicators

Students should be able to:

  1. Summarize the current consensus of the scientific community with regards to the structure and function of some aspect of the physical or biological world.
  2. Illustrate their knowledge of the changing nature of the consensus of the scientific community with regards to the structure and function of some aspect of the physical or biological world, by outlining the historical changes in that consensus.
  3. Report on their experiences with those methods and processes of the natural sciences which they conducted in the laboratory.

Biochemistry Major (Recommended for Pre-Medical Students)

Requirements

G-CH 111  College Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 112  College Chemistry II (5 hours)
CH 251  Organic Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 252  Organic Chemistry II (5 hours)
CH 201  Quantitative Analysis (4 hours)
CH 370  Biochemistry (4 hours)
G-BI 111  College Biology I (4 hours)
BI 112  College Biology II (4 hours)
BI/CH 310  Statistical Data Analysis (4 hours)
BI/CH 373  Cell Physiology/Biochemistry II (4 hours)

Select one from the following:

BI 283  Genetics (4 hours)
BI 345 Plant Ecophysiology (4 hours)
BI 354  Microbial Ecophysiology (5 hours)
BI 364  Cell and Molecular Biology (4 hours)
BI 384  Advanced Genetics (4 hours)
CH 390  Instrumental Analysis (3 hours)

Required Supporting Courses

G-PH 215  General Physics I (4 hours)
PH 216  General Physics II (4 hours)
*NS 300  Research Methods (1 hour)
NS 375  Junior Seminar (1 hour)
*NS 475  Senior Research (2 hours)

Biology Major

Requirements

A minimum of 32 semester hours of biological science coursework, including

G-BI 111  College Biology I (4 hours)
BI 112  College Biology II (4 hours)
BI 283  Genetics (4 hours)
BI 310  Statistical Data Analysis (4 hours)

8 credit hours chosen from among the 300 Level BI Courses

Required Supporting courses

G-CH 111  College Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 112  College Chemistry II (5 hours)
CH 251  Organic Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 252  Organic Chemistry II (5 hours)
G-PH 215  General Physics I (4 hours)
*NS 300  Research Methods (1 hour)
NS 375  Junior Seminar (1 hour)
*NS 475  Senior Research (2 hours)

Biology Major – Teaching Licensure in Biology (6-12)

Biology Major for Teacher Licensure

A minimum of 32 semester hours, including:

G-BI 111  College Biology I (4 hours)
BI 112  College Biology II (4 hours)
G-BI 201  Biodiversity (4 hours)
BI 283  Genetics (4 hours)
*NS 300  Research Methods (1 hour)
NS 375  Junior Seminar (1 hour)

12 credit hours chosen from among the remaining BI or NS courses numbered 200 of higher, including at least one organismal course and one population course.

Required Supporting Courses

G-CH 111  College Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 112  College Chemistry II (5 hours)
CH 251  Organic Chemistry I (5 hours)
CI 232  Educational Technology (2 hours)
G-MA 221  Elementary Applied Statistics (4 hours)
G-PE 170  Personal and Community Health (2 hours)
G-PH 215  General Physics I (4 hours)
G-PY 101  Introduction to Psychology (3 hours)

Students pursuing this major must also meet all professional requirements for teacher licensure in the Curriculum and Instruction Department.

Biology Minor

Requirements

A minimum of 20 semester hours, including

G-BI 111  College Biology I (4 hours)
BI 112  College Biology II (4 hours)
BI 283  Genetics (4 hours)

At least eight hours of additional biology courses

Required supporting courses

G-CH 111  College Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 251  Organic Chemistry I (5 hours)

Health Science Interdisciplinary Major

Required Courses

G-BI 111 College Biology I (4 hours)
BI 112  College Biology II (4 hours)
G-CH 111 College Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 112 College Chemistry II (5 hours)
G-PH 215 General Physics I (4 hours)
PH 216 General Physics II (4 hours)
G-BI 210 Principles of Nutrition (3 hours)
BI 225 Human Anatomy (4 hours)
BI 315 Human Physiology (4 hours)
PE 180 First Aid and Personal Safety (2 hours)
PE 280 Care and Treatment of Athletic Injuries (3 hours)
PE 288 Psychology and Sociology of Sport (2 hours)
PE 330 Physiology of Exercise (3 hours)
PE 411 Kinesiology (3 hours)
PE/BI 445 Readings and Research: Research Methods in Health Science (1 hour)
PE 475 Senior Seminar – Kinesiology Internship (2 hours)
G-MA 221 Elementary Applied Statistics (4 hours)
G-PY 101 Introduction to Psychology

Recommended Supporting Courses

G-PE 150 Concepts in Holistic Health (2 hours)
G-PE 170 Personal and Community Health

Additional Requirements for Some Pre-professional Programs

PY 204 Child and Adolescent Development (3 hours) OR
PY 305 Abnormal Psychology (3 hours)
BI 207 Medical Terminology (2 hours)
BI 404 Biomedical Ethics (2 hours)
G-MA 105 College Algebra
Trigonometry (or above)
Communication course
Sociology course
Business course

Chemistry Major

Requirements

A minimum of 36 semester hours including

G-CH 111  Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 112  Chemistry II (5 hours)
CH 251  Organic Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 252  Organic Chemistry II (5 hours)
CH 201  Quantitative Analysis (4 hours)
CH 390  Instrumental Analysis (3 hours)
CH 385  Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (4 hours)
CH 400  General Physical Chemistry (5 hours)

Required supporting courses

PH 205  College Physics I (5 hour)
PH 206  College Physics II (5 hour)
*NS 300  Research Methods (1 hour)
NS 375  Junior Seminar (1 hour)
*NS 475  Senior Research (2 hours)
G-MA 111  Calculus I (4 hours)
MA 112  Calculus II (4 hours)

Recommended supporting courses

G-BI 111  College Biology I (4 hours)
BI 112  College Biology II (4 hours)

Chemistry Major – Teaching Licensure in Chemistry (6-12)

Chemistry Major for Teacher Licensure:

A minimum of 32 hours including:

G- CH 111  College Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 112  College Chemistry II (5 hours)
CH 251  Organic Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 201  Quantitative Analysis (4 hours)
CH 310  Statistical Data Analysis (4 hours)
CH 385  Advanced Inorganic (4 hours)
CH 388  Lab Assisting Internship (2 hours)

Remaining hours must come from CH 252 Organic Chemistry II or CH courses 300 level or above.

Required courses:

G-BI 111  College Biology I (4 hours)
BI 112  College Biology II (4 hours)
CI 406 (ED 406) Methods for Teaching Natural Science in the Secondary School (3 hours)
G-PH 215  General Physics I (4 hours)
PH 216  General Physics II (4 hours)
*NS 300  Research Methods (1 hour)
NS 375  Junior Seminar (1 hours)

Suggested Courses:

G-NS 141  Environmental Science (4 hours)
G-PC 251  Geology (4 hours)
G-PC 275  Astronomy (4 hours)
CH 252  Organic Chemistry II (5 hours)
G-MA 111  Calculus I (4 hours)
MA 112  Calculus II (4 hours)
PH 205  College Physics I (replace G-PH 215) (5 hours)
PH 206  College Physics II (replace G-PH 216) (5 hours)
*NS 475  Senior Research (2 hours)

Students pursuing this major must also meet all professional requirements for teacher licensure in the curriculum and instruction department.

Chemistry Minor

Requirements

A minimum of 24 hours including

G-CH 111  College Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 112  College Chemistry II (5 hours)
CH 251  Organic Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 252  Organic Chemistry II (5 hours)
CH 201  Quantitative Analysis (4 hours)

Environmental Stewardship Major

This program achieves its purposes when its graduates:

  • demonstrate knowledge of contemporary theories in the natural sciences
  • demonstrate skill in the application of laboratory and field experimental techniques
  • demonstrate knowledge of contemporary theories of human social systems and behavior
  • demonstrate a critical understanding of their personal rôles in history, culture, and community
  • evaluate the impacts of human society and Earth’s natural systems on one another
  • differentiate between their personal belief system and societal belief systems
  • express a personal environmental ethic

Required Natural Science Courses:

G-BI 106  Environmental Biology or
G-BI 201  Biodiversity (4 hours)
G-CH 106  Environmental Chemistry (4 hours)
G-NS 141  Environmental Science (4 hours)
G-PH 215  General Physics I (4 hours)
G-PC 251  Geology (4 hours)
G-NS 245  Climatology (4 hours)
BI 316  Ecology (4 hours) or
BI 325  Human Ecology, Epidemiology and Public Health (4 hours)
BI 334  Microbial Ecophysiology (5 hours) or
BI 345  Plant Ecophysiology (4 hours)
NS 404  Environmental Ethics (2 hours)
BI/EC 416  Ecological Economics (2 hours)
NS 495  Field Experience (4 hours)

Electives from Humanities, Social Science, and Technology:

Select at least 24 hours from the following:

CM 325  Conflict Communication (3 hours)
EC 202  Survey of Economics (3 hours)
Up to 2 courses (G-HI or HI200+) (6 hours)
G-PE 170  Personal/Community Health (2 hours)
G-PS 125  International Relations (3 hours)
G-PS 130  Principles of Geography (3 hours)
G-PS 215  Global Peace Studies (3 hours)
PY/SO 303  Social Psychology (3-4 hours)
G-SO 101  Introduction to Sociology (3 hours)
SO 206  Social Problems (3-4 hours)
SO 320  Urban Sociology (3 hours)
*G-TE 333  Technology and Society (3-4 hours)

Other courses as approved by both the advisor and co-advisor.

Other Course Requirements:

NS 350 Stewardship Seminar1/semester (4 required)
*NS 300  Research Methods (1 hour)
NS 375  Junior Seminar (1 hour)
*NS 475  Senior Research (2 hours)

Environmental Science Minor

Requirements

G-BI 106  Environmental Biology or
G-CH106  Environmental Chemistry (4 hours)
G-NS 141  Environmental Science (4 hours)
G-PC251  Geology (4 hours)
G-NS 245  Climatology (4 hours)
NS 493  Field Experience (4 hours)

Environmental Stewardship Minor

Requirements

G-NS 141  Environmental Science (4 hours)
G-PC 251  Geology or
G-PC245  Climatology (4 hours)
NS495  Field Experience (4 hours)
NS350  Stewardship Seminar (2 hours)

Electives from Environmental Stewardship Major Electives list (6 hours)

2018|Catalog 18-19, Natural Science|

Natural Science Course Descriptions

Biology Course Descriptions

G-BI 101 Principles of Biology

4 hours
An introduction to the principles of biology, with an emphasis on the biology of humans. This course does not apply toward a major in biology. Laboratory is included. (Fall)

G-BI 105 Concepts in Biology Now

3 hours
This course introduces students to key concepts in biology, including the cellular basis of life, genetics, evolution and ecology. Students will also explore the historical and contemporary scientific issues around these topics. This course does not include a laboratory. (Interterm, odd years)

G-BI 106 Environmental Biology

4 hours
A one-semester introduction to the principles of biology, with an emphasis on biological interactions in the environment. This course does not apply toward a major in biology or biochemistry. Laboratory is included.

G-BI 111 College Biology I

4 hours
A rigorous introduction to the unity and diversity of life. This course focuses on the contributions of genetics, ecology and evolution to the biodiversity of the planet. The laboratory exercises are designed to provide a variety of practical experiences, as well as to illustrate the principles discussed in lecture. (Fall)

BI 112 College Biology II

4 hours
A continuation of G-BI 111 with a rigorous introduction to organismal structure and function. Explores the organization and processes of living systems at the levels of biomolecules, organelles, cells, organ systems, and organisms. Lab work includes studies of enzyme action, cellular respiration, organismal development and anatomy. Prerequisite: G-BI 111 with a grade of C or better. (Spring)

G-BI 201 Biodiversity

4 hours
A fundamental study of biological diversity as an assessment of life on earth. This will progress from the individual to the community, focusing on biodiversity and ecology from an evolutionary perspective and also on applied environmental research. The course includes laboratory work as an option for the 4th credit hour. (Spring)

BI 207 Medical Terminology

2 hours
An introduction to the study of medical terms that brings to life the language of medicine. This course will help students develop an understanding of how to communicate fluently in a healthcare setting. This course will explain medical terms in the context of the anatomy and physiology of different body systems as well as how the body works in health and disease. This course does not include a laboratory. (Spring, even years)

G-BI 210 Principles of Nutrition

3 hours
Physiology and chemistry of digestion, absorption, and metabolism of nutrients; nutrient functions; requirements; and effects of nutrient deficiencies and toxicities.  This course does not include a laboratory. Prerequisites: G-CH 101 or G-CH 111 with a grade of C or better or with consent of instructor (Interterm, even years)

BI 225 Human Anatomy

4 hours
A lecture/laboratory course in the fundamentals of human anatomy, with emphasis on macroscopic structures at the tissue, organ and organ system levels of organization. Some attention will be given to the perspectives of histology and developmental biology. The course includes laboratory work, primarily dissection of a comparative mammal, the domestic cat. (Fall, even years)

BI 234 Microbiology

5 hours
A study of microorganisms, with emphasis on the bacteria. A consideration of their structure, metabolism, classification, identification, and human and ecological relationships. Laboratory is included. Prerequisites: BI 112, CH 251 with grades of C or better or consent of instructor. (Spring, even years)

BI 283 Genetics

4 hours
Basic genetic concepts including classical Mendelian inheritance, cytogenetics, population genetics, and the molecular basis of gene action. Laboratory experiences coordinated with lecture topics. Pre-requisites: BI 112, with a grade of C or better. (Fall)

BI 310 Statistical Data Analysis (also cross-listed as CH 310 Statistical Data Analysis)

4 hours
A study of fundamental concepts including data types, distributions, and hypothesis testing; and of the applications of spreadsheets and other software for data manipulation and statistical analysis. This course does not include a laboratory. Prerequisite: G-MA221 or consent of instructor. (Spring, odd years; Interterm, even years)

BI 315 Human Physiology

4 hours
A rigorous introduction to the fundamentals of human neurophysiology, cardiac-physiology, muscular & circulatory physiology and excretory & respiratory physiology. Laboratory experiences include case studies of human physiological problems. Prerequisite: BI 112, with a grade of C or better. (Spring, odd years)

BI 316 Ecology

4 hours
A study of relationships between organisms and their environments, including both physical and biotic environments. The course includes both laboratory and field work. Prerequisites: BI 112 with a grade of C or better. (Spring, even years)

BI 325 Human Ecology, Epidemiology, and Public Health

4 hours
A study of the relationships between humans and their environments, including both physical and biotic environments, with special emphasis on understanding the nature of healthy relationships in comparison to the disease state. This course does not include a laboratory. Prerequisites: BI 112 with a grade of C or better. (Fall, odd years)

BI 345 Plant Ecophysiology

4 hours
This course will explore the physiological processes that influence the growth, reproduction, survival, adaptation and evolution of plants. The physiological processes to be explored include water relations, mineral nutrition, solute transport, and energetics (photosynthesis and respiration). The influence of biotic and abiotic factors will be included to provide a context in which to discuss stress physiology and its ecological consequences. Laboratory is included. (Fall, even year, or Microbial Ecophysiology)

BI 354 Microbial Ecophysiology

5 hours
A study of the ecophysiology of microorganisms (with emphasis on Bacteria and Archaea), focusing on the diversity and utility of their metabolic pathways. This course includes both lecture and laboratory work. (Fall, even years;, or Plant Ecophysiology)

BI 364 Cell and Molecular Biology

4 hours
The molecular organization, function and evolution of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Lab work includes chromosome analysis, cellular fractionation, cell culture, and electrophoretic studies. Prerequisites: BI 112, CH 252 with grades of C or better. (Fall, odd years)

BI 370 Biochemistry (also cross-listed as CH 370 Biochemistry)

4 hours
A basic study of the chemistry and metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids. The course provides an understanding of the structural and functional relationships of chemical constituents of cells and the role that they play in the processes of life. Laboratory is included. Prerequisite: CH 252 or consent of instructor with concurrent enrollment. Laboratory is included (Fall, odd years)

BI 373 Cell Physiology (also cross-listed as CH 373 Biochemistry II)

4 hours
A rigorous study of the fundamentals of cell physiology, concentrating on intermediary metabolism and its regulation. Lab work includes computational biology and shadowing physicians. Laboratory is included. Prerequisites: BI 112, CH252 and BI/CH 370 with grades of C or better or consent of instructor. (Spring, even years)

BI 384 Advanced Genetics

4 hours
This upper-level course will extend on topics presented in Genetics (B1283). The course will delve deeper into genetics with a specific focus on the molecular- scale processes responsible for producing our phenotype and their relationships to evolutionary change. The lab component focuses on various current lab techniques used in the field of genetics. (Spring, odd years)

BI 391 Evolution 

4 hours (Language Intensive)
A study of the history, philosophical underpinnings, and implications of Charles Darwin’s Theory of Evolution by Natural Selection. This course does not include a laboratory. Prerequisites: BI 112 with a grade of C or better. (Interterm, odd years)

BI 393 Topics in Biology

1-4 hours
One specific topic will be covered each time this course is offered. Possible topics include (but are not limited to) molecular genetics, vertebrate zoology, functional morphology, quantitative biology, and advanced ecology. Prerequisite: BI 112 with a grade of C or better and consent of the instructor.

BI 404 Biomedical Ethics

2 hours
This seminar examines both the factual and ethical dimensions of decisions regarding healthcare. Students will use a case study approach to apply the ethical principles of autonomy, non-maleficence, beneficence, and justice to diverse situations. Alternative ethical systems and ethics in research are considered. This course does not include a laboratory. (Spring, even years)

BI 445 Readings and Research in Biology

1-4 hours
Enrichment of a student’s study in the discipline either by readings on a topic not covered in the above courses or by research done on or off campus. Prerequisites: 12 semester hours in the department or program with an average of C or better, and consent of the instructor. Open only to students majoring in the department or program.

BI 495 Field Experience in Biology

1-4 hours
A planned experience in one of the field-oriented or professionally related phases of biological science. The specific area and content must be agreed upon in advance by the student, faculty advisor, and Vice President for Academic Affairs. Specific examples that are offered periodically, especially during Interterm are Field Experience in Puerto Rico and observations of various health careers with practicing professionals.

Special Course Options
295/495 Field Experience (1-4 hours)
297  Study Abroad (12-16 hours)
299/499 Independent Study (1-4 hours)
388 Career Connections (3-10 hours)
445 Readings and Research (1-4 hours)

 

Chemistry Course Descriptions

G-CH 101 Principles of General Chemistry

4 hours
A one semester ‘preparatory’ general chemistry course for those who have not had high school chemistry. The course introduces basic chemical concepts of atoms, molecules, chemical reactions, chemical equations and a review of mathematics pertaining to problem solving in Chemistry. This course does not apply toward a major in biology, biochemistry, or chemistry but satisfies the general education ‘Physical Science’ requirement. Laboratory is included. (Fall)

G-CH 106 Environmental Chemistry

4 hours
A one-semester introduction to the principles of chemistry, with an emphasis on chemical interactions in the environment and sustainability. This course does not apply toward a major in biology, biochemistry, or chemistry. Laboratory is included.

G-CH 111 College Chemistry I

5 hours
A study of the principles, laws, and concepts of chemistry as they relate to the periodic table and systematic study of the properties of the elements. A study of modern atomic and molecular structure. Laboratory is included. Prerequisite: High School Chemistry or G-CH101 with a C or above. (Fall)

CH 112 College Chemistry II

5 hours
A continuation of CH 111. Includes study of the chemistry of metals and nonmetals, chemistry of solutions, chemical equilibrium and qualitative analysis. Laboratory is included. Prerequisite: G-CH 111. (Spring)

CH 201 Quantitative Analysis

4 hours
A study of the principles and methods of analytical chemistry by the methods of volumetric and gravimetric analysis, precipitimetry, acidimetry and oxidation- reduction titrations. Laboratory is included. Prerequisite: CH 112, or consent of the instructor. (Fall, even years)

CH 251 Organic Chemistry I

5 hours
A study of the principles of organic chemistry, the physical and chemical properties of carbon compounds with emphasis on the mechanisms of organic reactions, the nomenclature of the compounds, and methods of organic synthesis. The carbon compounds discussed include some of the common alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, cycloalkanes, alkylhalides, ethers and alcohols. Laboratory is included. Prerequisite: G-CH 112 with a grade of C or above, or consent of instructor. (Fall)

CH 252 Organic Chemistry II

5 hours
A continuation of CH 251. Includes study of basic spectroscopy as a basic tool for structural analysis and the chemistry of aromatic compounds, aldehydes, ketones, amines, carboxylic acids and their functional derivatives. Laboratory is included. Prerequisite: CH 251 with a grade of C or above. (Spring)

CH 310 Statistical Data Analysis (also cross-listed as BI 310 Statistical Data Analysis)

4 hours
A study of fundamental concepts including data types, distributions, and hypothesis testing; and of the applications of spreadsheets and other software for data manipulation and statistical analysis. This course does not include a laboratory. Prerequisite: G-MA221 or consent of instructor. (Spring, odd years; Interterm, even years)

CH 370 Biochemistry (also cross-listed as Bi 370 Biochemistry)

4 hours
A basic study of the chemistry and metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and nucleic acids. The course provides an understanding of the structural and functional relationships of chemical constituents of cells and the role that they play in the processes of life. Prerequisite: CH 252 or consent of instructor with concurrent enrollment. Laboratory is included. (Fall, odd years)

CH 373 Biochemistry II (also cross-listed as BI 373 Cell Physiology)

4 hours
A rigorous study of the fundamentals of cell physiology, concentrating on intermediary metabolism and its regulation. Laboratory is included. Prerequisites: BI 112, CH252 and BI/CH 370 with grades of C or better or consent of instructor. (Spring, even years)

CH 385 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

4 hours
Further study of inorganic chemistry including structure and bonding, coordination chemistry, organometallic chemistry, the chemistry of transition metals and a more detailed systematic study of the families of the periodic table. Laboratory is included. Prerequisite: CH 112, CH 252. (Spring, even years)

CH 390 Instrumental Analysis

3 hours
Advanced work in quantitative analysis with emphasis on the principles and methods of electrochemical, spectroscopic and chromatographic analysis. Laboratory is included. Prerequisite: CH 201, PH 206 or PH216, or consent of the instructor. (Spring, odd years)

CH 393 Topics in Chemistry

1-4 hours
One specific topic will be covered each time this course is offered. Prerequisite: CH112 with a grade of C or better and consent of the instructor.

CH 400 General Physical Chemistry

5 hours
A study of the physical-chemical properties of matter. Topics covered include thermodynamics, the kinetic theory of gases, chemical kinetics, quantum mechanics, and statistical mechanics. Laboratory is included. Prerequisite: CH 252, G-MA 111, PH 206 (or concurrent enrollment). (on demand)

CH 445 Readings and Research in Chemistry

1-4 hours
Enrichment of a student’s study in the discipline either by reading on the topic not covered in the above courses or by research done on or off campus. Prerequisite: 12 semester hours in the department or program with an average of C or better, and consent of instructor. Open only to students majoring in the department or program.

Special Course Options
295/495 Field Experience (1-4 hours)
297  Study Abroad (12-16 hours)
299/499 Independent Study (1-4 hours)
388 Career Connections (3-10 hours)
445 Readings and Research (1-4 hours)

 

Natural Science Course Descriptions

G-NS 100 Science in Society

3 hours
The goals of this course are to build scientific literacy and to increase awareness of what Science has to offer to individuals and to Society. Classes will include lectures, faculty-led discussions of assigned readings, student-led discussions of “Science in the News” topics, and student presentations of semester projects/term papers. This course does not include a laboratory. (Spring, even years)

G-NS 141 Environmental Science

4 hours
A study of the environmental issues that arise from the complex relationships between humans and the earth. Emphasis will be placed on a scientific understanding and a search for solutions to environmental problems. Laboratory is included. (Fall)

G-NS 245 Climatology

3 hours
This study of the Earth’s climate system will emphasize the physical and biological processes that determine climate: e.g. radiative transfer, atmospheric and oceanic energy transfer, energy balance, the hydrologic cycle, and related geological, biological, and anthropogenic influences; and will consider their interactive effects on climate change. This course does not include a laboratory. (Spring, even years)

NS 300 Research Methods

1 hour (Language Intensive)
Preparation for participation in an independent laboratory research project in the natural sciences. Topics covered include scientific literature searches, research design, data handling, research evaluation, scientific writing, and reporting. To be taken during the sophomore or junior year. (Fall)

NS 350 Stewardship Seminar

1 hour
A weekly discussion of the interrelationships among the current contents of the student’s other courses, in light of their relationships to the goals of the Environmental Stewardship major.

NS 375 Junior Seminar

1 hour
Preparation for participation in an independent laboratory research project in the natural sciences. Topics covered include literature searches, research design, data handling, research evaluation, scientific writing and reporting, career exploration, and scientific ethics. (Spring)

NS 404 Environmental Ethics

2 hours
This seminar examines both the factual and ethical dimensions of our current and possible future environments. Students will use a case study approach to apply different ethical frameworks to choices that arise from human interaction with the natural order. This course does not include a laboratory. (on demand)

NS 416 Ecological Economics

2 hours
This seminar will provide an historical overview of various schools of ecological and economic thought, and present the principles uniting ecology with economics. Students will use a case study approach to analyze economic policies constrained by ecological reality, including economic growth theory and policy as it pertains to issues of societal and ecological sustainability. This course does not include a laboratory. (on demand)

NS 475 Senior Research

2 hours (Language Intensive)
Experience in the planning, conducting, and reporting of scientific research. The student research works in continual consultation with the research advisor. Selection of the research topic and consent of the advisor must be obtained in advance of enrollment. Prerequisite: NS 375 and consent of research advisor.

NS 495 Field experience in the Natural Sciences

1-4 hours
A planned experience in a field-oriented aspect of both the biological and physical sciences.

Special Course Options
295/495 Field Experience (1-4 hours)
297  Study Abroad (12-16 hours)
299/499 Independent Study (1-4 hours)
388 Career Connections (3-10 hours)
445 Readings and Research (1-4 hours)

 

Physical Science Course Descriptions

G-PC 251 Geology

4 hours
An introductory course that focuses on the scientific study of the earth. The course emphasizes the study of earth materials, changes in the surface and interior of the earth, and the dynamic forces that cause those changes. Laboratory is included. (Interterm, odd years)

G-PC 275 Astronomy

4 hours
The structure and evolution of the universe, from nearby planets to distant quasars, are examined. Topics include recent discoveries concerning planets, stars, galaxies, pulsars, and black holes as well as their evolution, the structure of the universe today and how it will be in the future. The emphasis is descriptive rather than mathematical. Laboratory is included. (Interterm, even years)

PC 445 Readings and Research in Physical Science

1-4 hours
Enrichment of a student’s study in the discipline either by reading on a topic not covered in the above courses or by research done on or off campus. Prerequisite: 12 semester hours in the department or program and the consent of the instructor. Open only to students majoring in the department or program.

Special Course Options
295/495 Field Experience (1-4 hours)
297  Study Abroad (12-16 hours)
299/499 Independent Study (1-4 hours)
388 Career Connections (3-10 hours)
445 Readings and Research (1-4 hours)

 

Physics Course Descriptions

PH 205 College Physics I

5 hours
A first course for chemistry and mathematics majors with a calculus background. Topics covered are mechanics, wave motion, and thermodynamics with emphasis placed on the use of mathematics to formulate problems and to explain physical phenomena. Prerequisite: G-MA 111. Laboratory is included. (Fall, odd years)

PH 206 College Physics II

5 hours
A continuation of PH 205. Topics covered are electricity, magnetism, and optics. Prerequisite: PH 205. Laboratory is included. (Spring, even years)

G-PH 215 General Physics I

4 hours
A first course for premed, biology, and other science majors with a college algebra background. Topics covered are mechanics, wave motion, and thermodynamics with emphasis placed on the understanding of physical concepts to formulate problems and to explain physical phenomena. Lab is included. Prerequisite: MA 105 College Algebra. (Fall)

PH 216 General Physics II

4 hours
A continuation of G-PH 215. Topics covered are electricity, magnetism, and optics. Lab is included. Prerequisite: PH 215. (Spring)

 

Special Course Options
295/495 Field Experience (1-4 hours)
297  Study Abroad (12-16 hours)
299/499 Independent Study (1-4 hours)
388 Career Connections (3-10 hours)
445 Readings and Research (1-4 hours)

2018|Catalog 18-19, Natural Science|

Performing Arts Program

Purpose Statement

The Department of Performing Arts commits itself to developing – through a professional-based approach supported by academic instruction – our students’ knowledge and skills of music and theatre with a multicultural view and interdisciplinary commitment towards artistic creativity, collaboration, ethics, scholarship, professionalism and service.

The department achieves this purpose when its students

  • Demonstrate an understanding of performing arts fundamentals, theory and history;
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the elements of music;
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the components of technical theatre;
  • Demonstrate basic performance skills;
  • Participate actively in performance and production experiences;
  • Demonstrate readiness to enter the professional world of the performing arts through the completion of a senior project; and
  • Meet Kansas State Department of Education and National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education standards for licensure in the area of music or theatre (education emphasis only)

Performing Arts Major

All Performing Arts majors take the following requirements

Requirements

ET 101  Creativity and Innovation (3 hours)
G-PA 110  Introduction to Performing Arts (3 hours)
PA 140  Music Theory I (3 hours)
G-PA 160  Performing for the Stage (3 hours)
G-PA 170  Stagecrafts (3 hours)
PA 365 A  Conducting (2 hours) OR
PA 365 B  Directing (2 hours)
G-PA 385  Performing Arts History & Literature I (3 hours)
G-PA 390  Performing Arts History & Literature II (3 hours)
PA 375  Junior Seminar (1 hour)
PA 475  Senior Projects (2 hours)

In addition, students are required to take the following courses based on their chosen emphasis.

Music

PA 144  Sight Singing & Ear Training I (1 hour)
PA 240  Music Theory II (3 hours)
PA 244  Sight Singing & Ear Training II (1 hour)
PA 330  Private Lessons (4 hours)
PA 340  Music Theory III (3 hours)
PA 344  Sight Singing & Ear Training III (1 hour)
PA 440  Music Theory IV (3 hours)
PA 444  Sight Singing & Ear Training IV (1 hour)

Students in this emphasis are required to pass the Piano Proficiency Exam and must enroll in one hour of piano per semester until proficiency is passed. Students in this emphasis are also required to enroll in at least one ensemble per semester of residence.

Theatre

PA 220  Stage Make-up (2 hours)
PA 250  Dance I: Ballet and Ballroom (2 hours)
*G-PA265  Script Analysis (3 hours)
PA 350  Dance II: Jazz & Tap (2 hours)
PA 370  Theatrical Design (3 hours)
PA 372  Costuming (2 hours)
PA 400  Theatrical Form and Style (3 hours)
PA215B  Stage Management Practicum (1 hour)

* Students in this emphasis are required to enroll for three additional practica and be involved in a majority of productions for the season.

Students may choose to add a Music or Theatre Teaching Licensure by completing all the requirements of the Teacher Education Program as well as the following:

Music Teaching Licensure

Guitar Proficiency Exam or 1 hr guitar (0-1 hour)
Piano Proficiency Exam (0 hour)
Performance Arts History & Literature courses (4 hours each Plus Teacher Education Program Requirements)
PA 275  Instrumental Techniques Lab (2 hours)
CI/PA 451 Methods for Teaching Music in the Elementary School (3 hours)
CI/PA 454  Methods for Teaching Instrumental Music in the Secondary School (3 hours)
CI/PA 465  Advanced Conducting and Rehearsal Techniques (2 hours)

Theatre Teaching Licensure

G-CM 120  Intro to Human Communication (3 hours)
G-CM 130  Interpersonal Communication (3 hours)
G-CM 140  Public Speaking (3 hours)
PA 370  Theatrical Design (3 hours)
PA 372  Costuming (3 hours)
*G-PA265  Script Analysis (3 hours)

Performing Arts Minor

G-PA 110  Introduction to Performing Arts (3 hours)
PA 140  Music Theory I (3 hours)
G-PA 160  Performing for the Stage (3 hours)
G-PA 170  Stagecrafts (3 hours)
One History of Performing Arts Course (3 hours)
Department electives (7 hours)

2018|Catalog 18-19, Performing Arts|

Performing Arts Course Descriptions

G-PA 110 Introduction to Performing Arts

3 hours
An introduction to the various aspects of performing arts, this course is designed for both the major and non-major. Students discover the art of collaboration as the element binding all productions together. Major sections covered include structure, setting, style, genre, and audience analysis. Students will attend area productions to observe the various levels of presentation, i.e. educational, professional, community, etc. (Interterm)

PA 115 Performance & Production Lab

1 hour (Can be repeated), by consent of Instructor
These practica are designed to give students a hands-on approach to learning and experiencing the various areas of performing arts. Each practica will be supervised by a member of the departmental faculty and the student will need to complete a journal or portfolio of the work accomplished.

A. Acting
The student will be given credit for rehearsing and performing in a departmental production.

B. Set Construction
The student will assume the position of master carpenter/crew head for the construction of a departmental production. Student could assist the designer in drafting, supervise the scene shop during the construction period, and be a member of the production staff, attending appropriate meetings in the pre- production aspects of the show.

C. Properties
The student will accept the responsibilities of prop master for a departmental production. This may include some property design. The student will be a member of the production staff, attending appropriate meetings in the pre-production aspects of the show.

D. Sound
The student will be responsible for securing all sound effects, underscoring, and setting up all amplification for a departmental production. Student will also run sound for the production and be a member of the production staff, attending appropriate meetings in the pre-production aspects of the show.

G-PA 120 Music Appreciation

3 hours
This course is designed to introduce students to the elements, vocabulary, history, and development of music in Western civilization. Students will be introduced to major style traits, composers, significant compositions, and genres within music thereby gaining greater awareness of how being human is experienced and expressed through the creative process. Music Appreciation assumes a holistic approach and affords students the unique opportunity to study connections between the arts. This course meets The Arts requirement of the Humanities general education distribution requirement. (Interterm, even years)

G-TH 125 Theatre & Film: Stage to Screen

3 hours
This course is designed as an appreciation course of the artistic medium of cinema. Students will gain analytical tools to study film. The study will highlight films that originate as theatrical plays and musicals in order to compare the transition from stage to screen. Students will study narrative styles, genres, history, theory, and film analysis. (Interterm, odd years)

G-PA 132 College Choir

0-1 hour
Open to all students. Students will develop a knowledge of and appreciation for artistic creativity through singing some of the great choral repertoire of the past and present, experiencing the pleasure of singing in a quality ensemble, and developing the singer’s vocal ability. The choir performs on major concerts fall and spring terms and tours during spring term to churches and schools. Prerequisite: entrance interview and informal audition. College Choir meets The Arts requirement of the Humanities general education distribution requirement when taken for credit.

G-PA 134 College Band

0-1 hour
This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to musically express themselves through the study and performance of band literature. It is open to all students with appropriate experience, regardless of major. The band and any ensembles developed from it will perform a variety of wind, band and jazz literature. College Band meets The Arts requirement of the Humanities general education distribution requirement when taken for credit. Prerequisite: Entrance interview and informal audition with the band director.

PA 136 Performing Arts Tour

3 hours, by consent of instructor
Travel, lecture, and performance tour of a region of the U.S. or foreign country. Study involves the functions of performing art and its interaction with culture, emotion, language, dance, art, sculpture and architecture.

PA 140 Music Theory I

3 hours
This is a foundation course in harmonic concepts and their application in reading, studying and performing music. Students will learn the fundamentals of music including musical notation, major and minor scales, key and time signatures, intervals, triads, and seventh chords. This course is a core requirement for students seeking music licensure and for those pursuing the Performing Arts music and theatre tracks. Co-requisite: PA 144, Sight Singing and Ear Training I. (Fall, even years)

PA 144 Sight Singing and Ear Training I

1 hour
A study including sight singing, rhythmic performance, improvisation exercises, dictation (melodic, harmonic, rhythmic), and related skills, all designed to develop the student’s musical ear to the highest degree possible. (Fall, even years)

PA 150 Yoga

1 hour (Can be repeated)
Introductory class for students. Students will utilize their own body-instrument and increase flexibility while strengthening their muscle core and breath capacity. (Spring)

G-PA 160 Performing for the Stage

3 hours
Students develop confidence and leadership skills as they pertain to aural performance. Students will practice and perform basic ideas through theatre monologues, poems, song lyrics or prose. Diction, enunciation, dialect, and a basic introduction to the International Phonetic Alphabet will be covered as well as charisma, charm, professionalism and marketability. (Spring)

G-PA 170 Stagecrafts

3 hours
The study of a wide variety of “craft/skills” used when preparing a script for performance. The student work will focus on basic set construction practices and scene painting techniques. Other areas covered include the hanging and focusing of lighting instruments, basic costume stitching, the creation of sound effects and the creation of stage properties. The student will work on productions to be staged by the department during the current season. (Fall, Spring)

PA 215 Performance & Production Lab

1 hour (Can be repeated), by consent of Instructor
These practica are designed to give students a hands-on approach to learning and experiencing the various areas of performing arts. Each practica will be supervised by a member of the departmental faculty and the student will need to complete a journal or portfolio of the work accomplished.

A. Box Office/Publicity/House Management
Student will take charge of the front of house responsibilities for a departmental production. This includes press releases, First Nighters information, lobby displays, program copy, securing ushers and coordinating with dinner staff. The student will be a member of the production staff, attending appropriate meetings in the pre- production aspects of the show.

B. Stage Management
Production experience in the professional duties of stage manager, including participation as stage manager in pre-production, rehearsal, and performance phases of a production. The student will be a senior member of the production staff, attending meetings in the pre-production aspects of the show.

C. Dinner Theatre
The student will work with the director of First Nighters in establishing a menu, creating shopping lists, organization of the kitchen, supervising workers, creating décor for dining space and overseeing clean up of the kitchen and dining space. The student will be a member of the production staff, attending appropriate meetings in the pre-production aspects of the show.

D. Event Planning
The student will work with building supervisors and organization leaders to plan and execute events in the Brown, Friendship, and Mingenback complex. The student will be responsible for coordinating the events and planning the set-ups and tear-downs.

PA 220 Stage Make-Up

2 hours
Practical application of various types and styles of professional and theatrical make-up from day-to-day use through specialty applications with some time spent on special effects. Student fee for make-up kit. (Fall, even years)

PA 232 Vocal Ensemble

0-1 hour (Can be repeated)
Vocal ensemble is a select performance group formed by audition from members of the McPherson College Choir. It is designed to give students opportunity to sing and perform some of the great vocal chamber literature in a variety of settings. Prerequisite: simultaneous enrollment in college choir and consent of instructor. (Fall, Spring)

PA 234 Instrumental Ensemble

0-1 hour (Can be repeated)
This course consists of select trios, quartets, quintets, jazz band or combos, and other like-instrument ensembles organized by audition according to interest and available students. Prerequisite: Simultaneous enrollment in college band or consent of instructor. (Fall, Spring)

PA 240 Music Theory II

3 hours
This course offers a foundation in analyzing and writing music that will benefit any musical endeavor and is essential for a music educator. Students will be introduced to structural elements of writing music including four-part voice writing using triads in root position, harmonic progressions and harmonic rhythm, and part writing using triads in first and second inversion. This course is designed for students seeking music licensure and for those pursuing the Performing Arts music and theatre tracks. Prerequisite: Successful completion of PA 140, Music Theory I. Co-requisite: PA 244, Sight Singing and Ear Training II. (Spring, odd years)

PA 244 Sight Singing and Ear Training II

1 hour
A continuation of PA 144, Sight Singing and Ear Training I. Prerequisite: Successful completion of PA 144 Sight Singing and Ear Training I. Co-requisite: PA 240, Music Theory II. (Spring, odd years)

PA 250 Dance I: Ballet & Ballroom

2 hours
Dance course covering basic vocabulary and technique for Ballet, Waltz, Cha Cha, Tango, Merengue, Jive, Foxtrot and Quickstep. (Spring, even years)

G-PA 265 Script Analysis

3 hours (Language Intensive)
This course will explore the structure of dramatic works. Emphasis will be placed on the process of interpreting a text and translating it to the performing arts. Students will strengthen skills in reading, listening, writing, script and other character interpretation as they develop an appreciation of dramatic literature and the author’s art and craft. (Fall, even years)

PA 274 Instrumental Techniques Lab

1 hour (Can be repeated) By consent of Instructor
This course provides students with hands-on experience in playing and teaching band instruments at the public school level with emphasis on a functional knowledge of teaching materials, fingerings, acoustics, tone production, rudiments, and care of the instruments. This course is designed for students seeking music licensure. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Methods for Teaching Instrumental Music in the Secondary School and permission of the Instructor. (Spring, odd years)

PA 315 Performance & Production Lab

2 hour
These practica are designed to give students a hands-on approach to learning and experiencing the various areas of performing arts. Each practica will be supervised by a member of the departmental faculty and the student will need to complete a journal or portfolio of the work accomplished.

A. Design
The student will serve as either scenic or costume designer for a departmental production. The student will work with the director from the early stages of the pre- production meetings, present the designs at the first production meeting and will be a member of the production staff, attending appropriate meetings in the pre- production aspects of the show.

B. Costuming
Student will assume the responsibilities of the costume shop supervisor for a departmental show. This will include assisting the designer in shopping for fabric, patterning, cutting and supervising crew members in the construction of the garments. The student will be a member of the production staff, attending appropriate meetings in the pre-production aspects of the show.

C. Make-up
Student will be responsible for designing and realizing the make-up designs for a departmental production. The student will be a member of the production staff, attending appropriate meetings in the pre-production aspects of the show.

D. Lighting
The student will act as lighting designer for a departmental production. This will also include the supervision of hanging the design and running lights for the production. The student will be a member of the production staff, attending appropriate meetings in the pre-production aspects of the show.

PA 330 Private Lesson

1 hour (Can be repeated), by consent of Instructor
These lessons offer an intensive learning experience through a one-to-one setting. Students will develop their musicianship and technical ability through the preparation, interpretation and performance of representative works of the past and the present.

A. Voice
Students will develop their ability to access musical and literary resources for vocal music; their understanding of appropriate vocal pedagogy; their ability to identify, through visual and aural analysis, composers and music representing diverse styles, periods, cultures, genres, and techniques of musical organization; and their ability to evaluate musical performances. Open to all students.

B. Piano
Students will have the opportunity for musical growth both in performance of piano literature and in knowledge of the interrelationships between performance, history, and theory. Open to all students.

C. Guitar
Students will 1) address personal levels of skill and technique as appropriate for guitar; 2) become aware of professional recordings and performances on the instrument; 3) study appropriate literature for the instrument. Open to all students.

D. Brass, Woodwind or Percussion
Students will 1) address personal levels of skill and technique (posture, breathing, tonal concept, resonance, embouchure, range, vibrato, melodic interpretation, poise, performing etiquette, melody, phrasing, style, harmony, rhythms, intonation, articulations, alternate fingerings, and memory) as appropriate for each instrument studied; 2) become aware of professional recordings and performances on the instrument; 3) study appropriate literature for the instrument. Open to all students.

E. Organ
Students will have the opportunity for musical growth both in performance of organ literature and in knowledge of the interrelationships between performance, history, and theory. Open to all students.

PA 340 Music Theory III

3 hours
This course is a continuation of Music Theory II. Students will be introduced to cadences, phrases, periods and sentences, non-chord tones, and diatonic seventh chords as they explore the structural elements of writing music at a more advanced level. This course is designed for students seeking music licensure and for those pursuing the performing arts music track. Prerequisite: Successful completion of PA 240 Music Theory II. Co-requisite: PA 344, Sight Singing and Ear Training III. (Fall, odd years)

PA 344 Sight Singing and Ear Training III

1 hour
A continuation of PA 244, Sight Singing and Ear Training II. Prerequisite: Successful completion of PA 244, Sight Singing and Ear Training II. Co-requisite: PA 340, Music Theory III. (Fall, odd years)

PA 350 Dance II: Jazz & Tap

2 hours
The student will be exposed to Basic Tap, Charleston, Jitterbug, Swing Dancing, Hip-Hop, Step Dancing and Stomp. (Spring, odd years)

PA 365A Conducting

2 hours
A study of the fundamental gesture, technique, and score preparation. Additional focus is given to oral communication and writing related to the art of conducting and self-evaluation.  Pre-requisites: PA 340 or Instructor Approval. (Fall, even years)

TH 365 Stage & Technical Directing

3 hours
(Fall, even years)

PA 370 Theatrical Design

3 hours
Students will study the basic concepts for design as it applies to scenery, costumes, lighting, and sound. Students will be working as a team of designers, moving from area to area but also allowing for concentration in at least one of the above areas of the theatrical design. Students will focus on designs for the department’s season of concerts, plays, musicals, senior recitals or musical reviews. (Spring, even years)

PA 372 Costuming

2 hours
Theatrical costumes and their construction will be the focus of this course. Students may have the opportunity to do some design work. Students will work on various construction techniques, learn how to measure the actor’s body, draft and alter patterns, shop for fabric and build various costume pieces, i.e. bodice/jackets, sleeves, skirts, slacks and undergarments. Labs will consist of working on departmental productions as well as the creation of teaching tools. (Spring, odd years)

PA 375 Junior Seminar

1 hour
Students at the Junior level will meet bi-monthly throughout their Junior year in a seminar setting and will:

  • clarify and focus their major goals – academic and vacational
  • formulate their Senior project proposal
  • further develop their career resumes and/or portfolios
  • discuss internships

G-PA 385 Performing Arts History and Literature I

3-4 hours (Language Intensive)
This course will allow students to study music and theatre in relationship, thereby gaining greater awareness of how being human is experienced and expressed through the creative process. This course assumes a holistic approach and affords students the unique opportunity to study connections between the performing arts. Students will be introduced to selected major characteristics and issues in American, Western European, ethnic, and worlds music and theatre from Greek to the mid-19th century. Students seeking licensure in music will enroll in the additional credit hour to prepare for the Praxis exam. (Spring, odd years)

G-PA 390 Performing Arts History and Literature II

3-4 hours (Language Intensive)
Part two is a continued study of the music and theatre relationship. This course surveys the performing arts in the last 200 years highlighting the most important changes and challenges to the field in that time. Students pursuing licensure in music will enroll in the additional credit to prepare for the Praxis exam. (Fall, odd years)

PA 400 Theatrical Form and Style

3 hours
An examination of the major historic period styles in acting, design, and directing. Students will read plays that will work with the various techniques discussed in class. (Spring, even years)

PA 410 Special Topics in Performing Arts

2 hours
This course is designed to give students the opportunity to experience a variety of topics in the Performing Arts that could be linked to the production calendar or topics that are not covered in the regular series of courses. Examples might include a seminar covering a specific playwright to be produced, an acting style being used in the staging of a production, or rendering skills needed to prepare a portfolio.

PA 415 Performance & Production Lab

1 hour (Can be repeated), by consent of Instructor
These practica are designed to give students a hands-on approach to learning and experiencing the various areas of performing arts. Each practica will be supervised by a member of the departmental faculty and the student will need to complete a journal of the work accomplished.

A. Musical Theatre
The student will be given credit for rehearsing and performing in a departmental production of a musical or musical revue.

B. Directing
Student will take responsibility for directing a show not connected to another class. Student will be in charge of all aspects from budget through supervision and selection of cast and crews.

C. Choreography
Student will receive credit for planning, teaching and rehearing the movement for a performance. Student will be in charge of integrating the blocking with the movement and support the piece as part of the directing team.

D. Technical Direction
Student will take responsibility for directing the technical aspects of a show not connected to another class. Student will be in charge of all aspects from budget through supervision of crews and designs.

PA 440 Music Theory IV

3 hours
This course is a continuation of Music Theory III. In this upper-level course, students will be introduced to advanced chromaticism, secondary functions, modulations, and larger musical forms from major historic periods in music. Students will also explore materials and techniques used in Twentieth-Century Music. This course is designed for students seeking music licensure and for those pursuing the Performing Arts music track. Prerequisite: Successful completion of PA 340, Music Theory III. Co-requisite: PA 444, Sight Singing and Ear Training IV. (Spring, even years)

PA 444 Sight Singing and Ear Training IV

1 hour
A continuation of PA 344, Sight Singing and Ear Training III. Prerequisite: Successful completion of PA 344, Sight Singing and Ear Training III. Co-requisite: PA 440 Music Theory IV. (Spring, even years)

PA 451/CI 451 Methods for Teaching General Music in the Elementary School

3 hours
For music education majors. The methods and materials for music teaching at elementary level. (Fall)

PA 453/CI 453 Methods for Teaching Vocal Music in the Secondary School

3 hours
Students learn choral literature, pedagogy, rehearsal techniques, rehearsal planning, music literacy strategies, assessment and grading, rehearsal management, and administration of a middle and high school choral program. This course is designed for students seeking music licensure. Prerequisite: Permission of the Instructor. (Spring, even years)

PA 454/CI 454 Methods for Teaching Instrumental Music in the Secondary School

3 hours
This course provides an overview of and practical applications in the basic technical aspects of organizing, administrating, teaching, and conducting instrumental ensembles at the public school level. This course is designed for students seeking music licensure. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Instrumental Techniques Lab and permission of the instructor. (Spring, odd years)

PA 465 Advanced Conducting and Rehearsal Techniques

2 hours
This course provides students an in-depth study of band or choral teaching methods and advanced study and practice in band or choral conducting. Topics will include conducing and rehearsal techniques, score study and repertoire. This course is designed for students seeking music licensure. Prerequisite: Successful completion of PA 365, Conducting. (Spring, odd years)

PA 475 Senior Project

2 hours
Each performing arts major is required to complete this capstone experience. Four of the more popular projects are listed, but each student is allowed to create a project to match his/her interests and expertise in the performing arts.

Recital Project
The student will complete an intensive preparation of skills and research in conjunction with a performance. Research could include Western European, Musical Theatre and American classic. Prerequisite, Private lessons.

Directing Project
Intensive development of directing skills and process, including text analysis and exploration of craft fundamentals as a basis for director/actor /designer collaboration and effective staging, with particular emphasis on challenges of style in text and production. Examination of process of conceptualization in dramatic production; centrality of theatric conceptualization in interpretation of dramatic text. Students direct a full-length play under observation, with discussion and critique of work in progress with faculty advisor. Prerequisite, PA365, Directing and PA365B, Directing.

Acting Project. Student will be involved in the selection of the role in one of the department’s production for a culminating acting experience. Student will be involved with the director in examining the script, creating the approach to the show, and setting goals for the production. An intensive rehearsal process as the student prepares the role in collaboration with the entire production team and cast. Prerequisite, G-PA160, Performing for the Stage.

Design Project
Complete responsibility for the design of one of the following elements for a departmental production, depending on the student’s primary area of interest: sets, costumes, lighting, makeup, or sound. Student will be working in collaboration with the director and other designers assigned to the production. Prerequisite, PA370, Theatrical Design.

Special Course Options
295/495 Field Experience (1-4 hours)
297  Study Abroad (12-16 hours)
299/499 Independent Study (1-4 hours)
388 Career Connections (3-10 hours)
445 Readings and Research (1-4 hours)

2018|Catalog 18-19, Performing Arts|

Philosophy & Religion Program

Purpose Statement

The Philosophy and Religion department offers courses designed to help students critically reflect upon religious and philosophical traditions that for millennia have deeply shaped how human beings have understood their lives as a whole in relationship to all that exists. In so doing, students will critically consider their own worldview, while at the same time understanding more deeply and with greater empathy the worldviews of others. Travel courses offered through the program superbly complement the rest of the curriculum for this purpose. The practical benefits of the major are many. It provides excellent background for professions such as business, education, social work, and humanitarian assistance – to name just a few – that require understanding and empathy across widely diverse cultures. The major develops critical thinking skills essential to success in these and other professions, especially law. The major is one of the two recommended at McPherson College for the pre-law student. In addition, given the possibility the major offers for focusing specifically on the Christian tradition, it can assist students who seek to understand their chosen profession, whatever it may be, as Christian ministry, or who want preparation for entering seminary upon graduation. Whatever their career path, students will find their study of philosophy and religion empowering them to live with a deeper sense of purpose, a surer sense of their vocation, and greater appreciation for values such as peacemaking, stewardship, and service that contribute to the well-being of the world.

The Department of Philosophy and Religion achieves its purpose when its graduates:

  • demonstrate an understanding of the world’s major religious traditions and the diverse ways each is interpreted, with a special emphasis on how these traditions help shape both the human experience of the world around us and our response to it;
  • demonstrate the ability to critically engage the western philosophical tradition as it addresses fundamental questions about the nature of reality, the meaning of our experience, and the purpose of life;
  • demonstrate the ability to critically evaluate and improve their own thinking;
  • demonstrate the ability to bring the study of religion and philosophy to bear on their quest to understand the meaning and purpose of their own lives.

Philosophy/Religion Major

Requirements (All courses are 3 hours unless otherwise specified)

Core Courses (18 hours):

G-PR 106L Spiritual Pathways: Transformation, Compassion, and Vocation
G-PR 107 Critical Thinking
G-PR 201 Introduction to Philosophy
G-PR 306 World Religions
PR 375 Junior Seminar (1 hour)
PR 431 Topics in Religious or Theological Studies OR
PR 432 Topics in Philosophy
PR 475 Senior Seminar/Thesis (2 hours)

Electives (12 hours from the following):

G-PR 101 Old Testament-Hebrew Bible: God and People in Ancient Israel
G-PR 102 Jesus: New Testament Foundations
G-PR 104 or G-PR 104L Ethics (3 hours if G-PR 104; 4 hours if G-PR 104L)
G-PR 202 Christian Traditions
G-PR 203 Science and Religion
G-PR 204 Peacemaking: Religious Perspectives
G-PR 206 Religion and Environmental Stewardship
PR 303 Readings in Theology/Philosophy (2 or 3 hours, depending on the semester)
G-PR 304 The Church of the Brethren and Beyond: The Christian Church Serves Our World
PR411 Travel (3 or 4 hours, depending on the semester)

Supporting Courses (12 hours from the following)*:

G-ET 201 Social Entrepreneurship
EN 230 Linguistics (2 hours)
G-CM 130 Interpersonal Communication
G-CM 221 Intercultural Communication
CM 240 Gender Communication
CM 325 Conflict Communication
BI 404 Biomedical Ethics (2 hours)
NS 404 Environmental Ethics (2 hours)
G-HI/PS 101 Historical Introduction to Politics
G-PS 215 Global Peace Studies
HI 313 Medieval Europe
PY/SO 210 Human Sexuality
PY/SO 308 Counseling
PY 405 Personality Theories

*Note: alternative courses will be considered and can be approved by the department chair on a case-by-case basis.

 

Philosophy/Religion Minor

Requirements (all courses are 3 hours)

G-PR 106L Spiritual Pathways: Transformation, Compassion, and Vocation
G-PR 201 Introduction to Philosophy
plus a minimum of 12 more hours of any courses with a PR prefix.

 

Peace Studies Minor

The Department also coordinates and provides oversight for a minor in Peace Studies. Peace Studies is an interdisciplinary field of study that seeks understanding of the causes of human conflict and violence. It then strives to develop methods for resolving conflicts nonviolently and for promoting peace through justice at all levels of human society and in human relationships with the natural environment. The minor can complement any number of majors, for example, Political Science, History, or Environmental Stewardship, especially for those students seeking to couple their major field and professional training to values of social justice and peacemaking.

Students who complete a minor in Peace Studies will be able to:

  • demonstrate that they understand some of the most important causes and consequences of interpersonal, societal, and international conflict and violence; and
  • demonstrate that they understand a variety of methods for conflict resolution and peacemaking that address these causes and promote the well-being of human communities and of the planet on which we live.

Requirements (all courses are 3 hours unless otherwise specified)

Core Courses (12 hours)

G-PS 125 International Relations
G-PR 204 Peacemaking: Religious Perspectives
G-PS 215 Global Peace Studies
CM 325 Conflict Communication

Electives (at least 6 hours from the following)

G-PR 104 Ethics
G-NS 141 Environmental Science (4 hours)
G-ET 201 Social Entrepreneurship
G-SO 202 Minorities in the US (3-4 hours)
G-PR 206 Religion and Environmental Stewardship
SO 206 Social Problems (3-4 hours)
G-CM 221 Intercultural Communication
CM 240 Gender Communication
NS 404 Environmental Ethics (2 hours)

2018|Catalog 18-19, Philosophy & Religion|

Philosophy & Religion Course Descriptions

G-PR 101 Old Testament-Hebrew Bible: God and People in Ancient Israel

3 hours
An exploration of the history, literature, and religion of ancient Israel using selected portions of the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) as primary sources. The course focuses on major themes that have shaped the life and faith of both Jewish and Christian religious communities to this day, and will provide students opportunities to consider how these themes might inform their thinking about their own lives. (Fall)

G-PR 102 Jesus: New Testament Foundations

3 hours
An introduction to the New Testament that focuses on understanding the life and teachings of Jesus in his first-century context. The course will also explore how these foundational texts continue to inform Christian life and faith, and will provide students opportunities to ponder the potential impact of these reflections on their own lives. (Fall)

G-PR 104 or *G-PR 104L Ethics

3 hours (not Language Intensive) or 4 hours (Language Intensive)
This course enables students to think critically about moral values and the process of ethical decision-making. Students will be challenged, both to understand how and why others think about the moral life as they do, and to evaluate critically their own moral values and the ways they resolve ethical problems. (Fall, Interterm, and Spring)

*G-PR 106L Spiritual Pathways: Transformation, Compassion, and Vocation

3 hours (Language Intensive)
An introduction to religion that considers (1) how different religious traditions understand life as a journey in search of spiritual awakening and transformation and (2) how these different traditions in turn see compassion for others and devotion to service as two keys to living an authentic human life. In view of the preceding, the course culminates with a reflection on the meaning of personal vocation and offers students an opportunity to consider their own individual life callings. (Fall)

G-PR 107 Critical Thinking

3 hours
This course will help students understand how we draw conclusions about what is true in any and all aspects of life. The goal of the course is for students to develop their skill at evaluating the quality of their thinking, especially by becoming aware of common ways in which our reasoning goes wrong. The course will encourage students to consider both how critical thinking can become a way of life, and the positive impact that critical thinking can have on our world. (Spring)

G-PR 201 Introduction to Philosophy

3 hours
This course will introduce students to the activity of philosophy. In dialogue with the Western philosophical tradition, students will practice systematic, critical, and deep reflection on some of the most fundamental questions that can be asked, for example, What can we know, and how? What does it mean to be human? Does life have ultimate meaning, and what might that meaning be? Students will be introduced to the concept of a “life philosophy” and provided the opportunity to develop their own personal philosophies of life. (Fall, and Interterm even years)

G-PR 202 Christian Traditions

3 hours
An exploration of different, contemporary traditions of Christian faith and practice that will help students grasp some of the diverse ways that Christians today understand the meaning of following Jesus. The course will consider important texts from these diverse traditions, as well as biographies of some of their key representatives, and then ponder their significance for Christians and non-Christians alike who seek to live lives of meaning and purpose. (Spring)

G-PR 203 Science and Religion

3 hours
Especially in the United States, science and religion are typically presupposed to be in conflict with each other. This course starts from a different presupposition. It begins by exploring in some detail the story of the universe told by contemporary cosmology and evolutionary biology, and in the process invites students to consider how a dialogue between science and faith might lead to a rich, coherent, and personally meaningful understanding of humanity and of humanity’s place in the universe. (Spring)

G-PR 204 Peacemaking: Religious Perspectives

3 hours
This course critically engages diverse religious perspectives on peacemaking. It begins by exploring the various positions on non-resistance, non-violence, and humanitarian service taken by the historic peace churches: Mennonite, Quaker, and Brethren. It then seeks precedents for these positions in Christianity’s past, and finally moves forward into the present, with special attention to conversations within and between different world religions about the religious roots of violence, and about the vital contribution that religious believers and communities can make to world peace. (Spring, odd years)

G-PR 206 Religion and Environmental Stewardship

3 hours
Beginning with Christianity and then exploring the perspectives of other religions, western and eastern, this course explores how religious belief and practice impact human attitudes toward the natural world, shaping in turn both how environmental problems are perceived, and the steps that are, or are not, taken to address these problems, such as global climate change, preserving biological diversity, and the consequences of environmental degradation for the poor. Throughout, students will be given opportunities to evaluate critically their own sense of vocation to environmental stewardship. (Spring, even years)

G-PR 302 Politics and Religion

3 hours
This course considers how religion and politics have influenced each other in the United States, as well as the ways that Americans have understood those influences. Topics include the interplay between church and state, the politics of sexuality, gender, and race, and the relation between religion and democracy.

PR 303 Readings in Theology/Philosophy

2-3 hours
In recent years, this course has been designed around the topic of thanatology: examining origin of death cultural mythologies, psychological stages of dying, interpretations of near death experiences, organ-tissue donations, world funeral practices, and beliefs of life after death in the world’s major faiths. However, the course may cover other topics as well.

G-PR 304 The Church of the Brethren and Beyond: The Christian Church Serves Our World

3 hours
With special emphasis on the Church of the Brethren, a study of how Christian churches are helping to serve others and bring peace amidst the many cultural, racial, and political struggles of our day.

G-PR 306 World Religions

3 hours
An introduction to major world religions, including, but not limited to: Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. The goal is for students to understand key teachings and practices of each, and thereby to develop an understanding of and empathy for how adherents of these traditions experience life and the world around them. Finally, student will consider how their study of these traditions might contribute to their own life and thought.

PR 375 Junior Seminar

1 hour
Philosophy and Religion majors during their junior year are required to meet together to critically reflect on the idea of vocation from a variety of religious and philosophical perspectives, and then both to research a profession they are considering and to reflect on how pursuing that profession might answer to their developing sense of vocation.

PR 411 Travel

3-4 hours (Can be repeated)
Students from all majors have the unique opportunity to experience firsthand the religions and philosophies of different cultures and environments through international or domestic travel. (Interterm)

PR 431 Topics in Religious and Theological Studies

3 hours
An in-depth study of a particular religion or topic in religious studies, or of a particular person or topic in Christian history or theology. Emphasis will be placed on critically reading key texts and understanding religious or theological subjects in their appropriate contexts, and then engaging them from the perspectives of students’ own interests and life philosophies. Topics will vary from year to year. For example, the course might study Islam or Buddhism, or topics like religious ritual or religious art and architecture. Or it might focus on a figure such as Augustine or Thomas Merton, or on topics like Christian worship or problems in Christian ethics. (Fall, even years)

PR 432 Topics in Philosophy

3 hours
A study of a specific field within philosophy that will introduce its important questions and help students understand and evaluate critically the different answers that philosophers have proposed. The emphasis throughout will be on practicing the methods of philosophical reflection and debate. Topics will vary year to year, for example, philosophy of law, philosophy of science, philosophy of mind, philosophy of religion, or aesthetics (philosophy of art). (Fall, odd years)

PR 475 Senior Seminar/Thesis

2 hours
Senior Philosophy and Religion majors are required to do a senior thesis with the topic approved by their departmental advisor no later than midterm of the fall semester. Students may enroll for the course fall, interterm, or spring during their senior year, but are expected to work on their project throughout the year in consultation with their departmental advisor, and to meet periodically with other Philosophy and Religion seniors as they do so.

Special Course Options
295/495 Field Experience (1-4 hours)
297  Study Abroad (12-16 hours)
299/499 Independent Study (1-4 hours)
388 Career Connections (3-10 hours)
445 Readings and Research (1-4 hours)

2018|Catalog 18-19, Philosophy & Religion|

Psychology Program

Purpose Statement

The psychology program commits itself to developing majors with pre- professional training and non-majors with basic knowledge of and skills in psychology. The program achieves this purpose when its students:

  • understand themselves, others, and how individuals interact within social systems
  • have acquired knowledge and skills requisite for entry into selected professions, especially pre-professional careers in the behavioral sciences
  • have acquired knowledge and skills requisite for entry into graduate programs in psychology and related fields
  • have bridged the gap between theory and practice through Internships
  • meet State Department of Education standards for certification in the area of psychology (applies to candidates for teacher certification in psychology)

In addition to preparing its majors, psychology contributes to the general education program and serves other majors.

Teaching licensure is available in this area. Students who wish to double major in psychology and sociology need have only one emphasis.

Psychology Major

Requirements

G-PY 101  Introduction to Psychology (3 hours)
PY 204  Child and Adolescent Development (3-4 hours)
PY/SO 303  Social Psychology (3 hours)
PY 305  Abnormal Psychology (3-4 hours)
PY/SO 308  Counseling (3 hours)
PY/SO 335  Research Methods I (4 hours)
PY 336  Research Methods II (4 hours)
PY/SO 375  Junior Seminar (1 hour)
PY 405  Personality Theories (3 hours)
PY 415  Learning, Memory, and Cognition (3 hours)
*PY 450  History and Systems of Psychology (3 hours)
PY/SO 474  Scientific Writing for the Behavioral Sciences (2 hours)
*PY/SO 475  Senior Seminar/Thesis (2 hours)
G-MA 221  Elementary Applied Statistics (4 hours)

Psychology majors seeking 6-12 teaching licensure may substitute Student Teaching in the Secondary School (CI 475) for Senior Seminar/Thesis (PY 475).Students seeking special education licensure may use the Adaptive Special education program as their required emphasis.

Child Development Emphasis

PY 254  Parent-Child Relations (3 hours)
PY 354  Child Development and Social Policy (3 hours)
PY 454  Applied Behavior Analysis and Youth (3 hours)
PY 470  Developmental Psychopathology (3 hours)

Health and Human Services Emphasis

SO 260  Introduction to Human Services (3 hours)
SO 365  Social Work in American Society (3 hours)
PY 430  Health Psychology (3 hours)
SO 470  Social Gerontology (3 hours)

Recommended courses for Students interested in Human Services careers

PY/SO 210  Human Sexuality (3 hours)
G-SO 101  Introduction to Sociology (3 hours)
G-SO 202  Minorities in the U.S. (3-4 hours)
SO 206  Social Problems (3-4 hours)
G-SO 246  Marriage and Family (3-4 hours)

As much practical experience in human service placements as possible

Psychology Minor

Requirements

G-PY 101  Introduction to Psychology (3 hours)
PY 204  Child and Adolescent Development (3-4 hours)
PY/SO 303  Social Psychology (3 hours)
PY 305  Abnormal Psychology (3-4 hours)

Electives to total 18 hours

 

2018|Catalog 18-19, Psychology|

Psychology Course Descriptions

G-PY 101 Introduction to Psychology

3 hours
A survey of psychology emphasizing applications to the life of the student. Assumptions of psychological scientists are examined and scientific methods of investigating and reasoning about human behavior are introduced. (Fall, Spring)

PY 204 Child and Adolescent Development

3-4 hours
A basic course dealing with the various processes of child and adolescent development. The overarching goal or mission of the course is to present the basic knowledge of child development in an applied context in which the established knowledge base of child psychology is used to suggest solutions to social problems of children in this society and in the world community. Prerequisite: G-PY 101 Introduction to Psychology. (Spring)

PY/SO/PE 210 Human Sexuality

3 hours
A study of female roles, male roles, values, life adjustments, sexual identities, religion, language, and behavior differences based on cultural, educational and socioeconomic factors related to human sexuality. Course uses lectures, audio- visuals, discussions, guest resource persons, assigned readings, and projects or papers to present information. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or higher or instructor consent. (Spring)

PY 254 Parent-Child Relations

3 hours
A study of parenting across the lifespan. Topics include parenting styles, parenting strategies, and parenting in different family systems. (Spring)

PY 295 Field Experience in Psychology

1-4 hours
Various types of placements are available for practical experience relevant to the psychology major. Examples: institutions for people with developmental disabilities, adolescent group-homes, the Big Brother/Big Sister program, and others.

PY/SO 303 Social Psychology

3 hours
A study of the individual as he/she is affected by other persons. Topics covered include: interpersonal relations, social learning, conformity and individuality, attitudes, groups and organizations, and others. Discussion and involvement methods are emphasized. Prerequisite: 6 hours in the behavioral sciences or instructor consent. (Spring)

PY 305 Abnormal Psychology

3-4 hours
A study of behaviors variously classified as abnormal, psychopathic, sociopathic, disordered, mentally ill, retarded, neurotic, psychotic, deviant and others. Prerequisite: 6 hours in psychology and junior standing. (Fall, odd years)

PY/SO 308 Counseling

3 hours
A study of the theory and practice of counseling including a survey of the various systems of psychotherapy (person-centered therapy, psychoanalysis, behavioral therapy, cognitive-behavioral therapy, etc.) and learning, through role- play, of skills needed to be a helper. Prerequisite: PY 405 or instructor consent. (Spring)

PY/SO 335 Research Methods I

4 hours
The basic research methods course for behavioral science majors. Correlational, survey, and case study techniques, basic experimental design, research ethics, and general professional conduct of empirical investigation are studied in a team- taught format. Lecture, laboratory, and practical field exercises are used as learning methods. Prerequisite: G-MA221. Concurrent enrollment is acceptable. (Fall)

PY/SO/PE 336 Research Methods II

4 hours
The second of the two basic research methods courses for behavioral science majors. Relatively advanced scientific research designs and statistical analyses are studied. SPSS, a statistical package, is used for most of the work in the course. Prerequisites: G-MA 221 and PY/SO 335. (Interterm)

PY 354 Child Development and Social Policy

3 hours
A study of the relation between children and government. The course considers the interrelations between social policy and research findings from the field of child and adolescent psychology. ( Interterm)

PY/SO 375 Junior Seminar

1 hour
Several topics and issues are examined in a seminar format. These include ethical practices and concerns as they relate to research and clinical work, the development and execution of basic and applied research, and career development and related matters. Students work toward developing appropriate research topics for their senior theses and may explore internship opportunities. (Spring)

PY 405 Personality Theories

3 hours
Personality is the field within psychology that specializes in how individuals think, feel, and behave with an emphasis on the person as a whole. The course covers the five basic approaches to personality: the trait approach, the biological approach, the psychoanalytic approach, the phenomenological approach, and the behaviorist/learning theory/cognitive approach. Junior or Senior standing or permission of the instructor required. (Fall)

PY 415 Learning, Memory, Cognition

3 hours
An advanced survey course dealing specifically with current research findings in the areas or behavioral and cognitive psychology. The course will focus on what psychological science has discovered about human learning, memory, and forgetting. Prerequisite: G-PY 101, PY 303, PY/SO 335 or instructor consent. (Spring, odd years)

PY 430 Health Psychology

3 hours
A study of the fundamentals of human psychological and biomedical factors in the areas of health, wellness, and physical/mental illness. The course presents clinical applications of personality and social psychological theories, as they relate to cultural beliefs, human development, and different diseases; introduces key determinants of behavior, such as personality, family, ethnicity, and religion; and explores behavioral/motivational research in the emerging field of alternative and complementary medicine. Health care prevention, intervention, and maintenance issues and strategies are presented within the context of the community health support system. Career opportunities in health psychology are also explored. (Fall, odd years)

PY 445 Readings and Research in Psychology

1-4 hours
An opportunity to take a course by readings that is not offered in the regular curriculum. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. (By appointment)

PY 450 History and Systems of Psychology

3 hours (Language Intensive)
A study of psychology’s origins, development as a field, and current status, examined in a seminar format. Prerequisite: Upper division majors/minors only or instructor consent. (Spring, even years)

PY 454 Applied Behavior Analysis and Youth

3 hours
A study of the field of applied behavior analysis and its use in solving the behavior problems of children and adolescents. The course explores fundamental issues related to behavior change, including assessment, measurement, and ethics. (Fall, even years)

PY 470 Developmental Psychopathology

3 hours
A study of psychopathology as it relates to children and adolescents. The course explores the causes of and treatments for various psychological disorders and considers issues related to assessment and diagnosis. (Spring)

PY/SO 474 Scientific Writing for the Behavioral Sciences

2 hours
This course is intended to help students develop the skills needed for writing research reports in the social sciences. It is a research-based course in which students learn to synthesize what they have read and presenting it as a scientific review of the literature; these are the primary goals. Thus, it focuses on how to apply social science theories and research methods to the writing of the senior research proposal. This course also provides students with the opportunity to prepare papers for regional conferences in psychology and sociology. Research manual required. (Fall)

PY/SO 475 Senior Seminar/Thesis

2 hours (Language Intensive)
This is the culminating or capstone course for behavioral science majors. Coordinated guidance is given on the preparation of the Senior Thesis. Discussion of current topics in sociology and psychology is combined with guidance on practical matters such as application to graduate study, developing a career, and so on. (Spring)

PY 495 Field Experience in Psychology

1-4 hours
More advanced placements and arrangements in applied psychology. See PY 295. NOTE: PY 495 requires permission of the instructor before enrollment.

 

Special Course Options
295/495 Field Experience (1-4 hours)
297  Study Abroad (12-16 hours)
299/499 Independent Study (1-4 hours)
388 Career Connections (3-10 hours)
445 Readings and Research (1-4 hours)

2018|Catalog 18-19, Psychology|

Sociology Program

Purpose Statement

The sociology program commits itself to developing majors with pre-professional training and non-majors with basic knowledge of and skills in sociology. The program achieves its purpose when its students:

  • understand the dynamic relation between the individual and society
  • have acquired knowledge and skills requisite for entry into selected professions, especially pre-professional careers in the behavioral sciences
  • have acquired knowledge and skills requisite for entry into graduate programs in sociology and related fields
  • can critically analyze their society through exposure to sociological theories and research methods
  • have bridged the gap between theory and practice through internships
  • have enhanced their sensitivity to others by studying customs, beliefs, and practices that are different from their own

In addition to preparing its majors, sociology contributes to the general education program and serves other majors. Students who wish to double major in sociology and psychology need have only one emphasis.

Sociology Major

Requirements

G-SO 101  Introduction to Sociology (3 hours)
SO 206  Social Problems (3-4 hours)
G-SO 202  Minorities in the U.S. (3-4 hours
SO/PY 303  Social Psychology (3 hours)
SO 320  Urban Sociology (3 hours)
SO/PY 335  Research Methods I (4 hours)
SO/PY 336  Research Methods II (4 hours)
SO/PY 375  Junior Seminar (1 hour)
SO 401  Sociological Theory (4 hours)
SO 450  Sociology Proseminar (3 hours)
SO/PY 474  Scientific Writing for the Behavioral Sciences (2 hours)
*SO/PY 475  Senior Seminar/Thesis (2 hours)
G-MA 221  Elementary Applied Statistics (4 hours)

Criminal Justice Emphasis

SO 275  Criminal Justice (3 hours)
SO 355  Juvenile Delinquency (3 hours)
SO 455  Police and Law Enforcement (3 hours)
SO 460  Correctional Institutions (3 hours)

Health and Human Services Emphasis

SO 260  Introduction to Human Services (3 hours)
SO 365  Social Work in American Society (3 hours)
PY 430  Health Psychology (3 hours)
SO 470  Social Gerontology (3 hours)

Recommended supporting courses

PY/SO 308  Counseling (3 hours)
G-BI 101  Principles of Biology (4 hours)
EC 201  Elementary Economics: Macro (3 hours)
G-PS 101  Historical Introduction to Politics (3 hours)
G-PS 102  U.S. Government (3 hours)
G-PY 101  Introduction to Psychology (3 hours)
*G-TE 333  Technology and Society (3 hours)
Foreign Language

Recommended courses for Students interested in Human Services careers

PY/SO 210  Human Sexuality (3 hours)
PY/SO 308  Counseling (3 hours)
G-SO 246  Marriage and Family (3-4 hours)
As much practical experience in human service placements as possible

Sociology Minor

Requirements

G-SO 101  Introduction to Sociology (3 hours)
SO 206  Social Problems (3-4 hours)
SO 401  Sociological Theory or
SO 450  Sociology Proseminar (3-4 hours)
SO/PY 303  Social Psychology (3 hours)
SO/PY 335  Research Methods I (4 hours)
18 hours required

Social Work

McPherson College has well prepared its students majoring in the Behavioral Sciences for entrance into the Master of Social Work (M.S.W.) degree programs. The pre-professional program at McPherson College commits itself to fostering student learning in career-oriented liberal arts so that students are prepared for community service and/or graduate study in social work. Students who have acquired knowledge and skills requisite for entry into the field of social services and graduate social work education demonstrate proficient knowledge, understanding, and application of psychological and sociological theories and concepts.

All accredited graduate programs in social work require a four-year bachelor’s degree for admission. The pre-social work student should plan the liberal arts program to include courses in arts and humanities, social and behavioral sciences, and biological sciences. Although the pre-social work student may choose a major in any field, a strong knowledge of human services, personality theory, counseling, and social problems is strongly recommended. The B.S. in psychology or sociology, with the health and human services emphasis, is recommended.

M.S.W. programs require evidence of relevant paid/volunteer work experience related to human services organizations. The pre-social work student should therefore be prepared to complete at least one internship or field experience related to community/social services. (The College’s Career Connections program is highly recommended.)

The M.S.W. Degree prepares graduates for advances social work practices in one of three areas—clinical social practice with individuals, families, and groups; social work administration/community practice aimed at social service administration and social policy development; and school social work. With such diverse professional practice concentrations, it is difficult to outline a generic program to prepare all pre-social work students for admission to these practice areas. Students should counsel with the pre-social work advisor to help them identify the type of professional program they are considering, and to assist them in developing a plan for completing the graduate admission requirements of that program or field.

Although M.S.W. programs differ in admissions requirements, the following courses, in addition to the major, are recommended for students interested in entering the social work profession at the graduate level:

PY 405  Personality Theories (3 hours)
PY/SO 308  Counseling (3 hours)
SO 206  Social Problems (3-4 hours)

Courses in the Health & Human Services Emphasis:

SO 260  Introduction to Human Services (3 hours)
SO 365  Social Work in American Society (3 hours)
PY 430  Health Psychology (3 hours)
SO 470  Social Gerontology (3 hours)
PY/SO 388  Career Connections (1-12 hours)
PY/SO 295/495  Field Experience (1-4 hours)

2018|Catalog 18-19, Sociology|

Sociology Course Descriptions

G-SO 101 Introduction to Sociology

3 hours
An introduction to the general field of sociology and its principle subdivisions; the nature of culture; the socialization of the individual; the character and behavior of social groups; social organization and institutions; social interaction, deviant behavior and social change. (Fall, Interterm)

G-SO 202 Minorities in the U.S.

3-4 hours
An exploration of the problems faced by physical, cultural, economic, and behavioral minority groups in American society; the causes and consequences of prejudice, stereotypes, and discrimination; the nature of minority-majority group interaction; current crises and possible solutions; and some comparison with similar situations in other countries. Prerequisite: Course not open to first semester freshmen. Second semester freshmen by instructor consent. (Fall, Spring)

SO 206 Social Problems

3-4 hours
A study of contemporary American and world social problems, including prostitution, drug addiction, poverty, sexism, racism, and war. ( Spring)

SO/PY 210 Human Sexuality

3 hours
A study of female roles, male roles, values, life adjustments, sexual identities, religion, language, and behavior differences based on cultural, educational and socioeconomic factors related to human sexuality. Course uses lectures, audio- visuals, discussions, guest resource persons, assigned readings, and projects or papers to present information. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or higher or instructor consent. (Spring)

G-SO 246 Marriage and Family

3-4 hours
This course explores the institution of marriage and family in American society from a sociological perspective. Topics covered include socialization, dating, courtship, marriage, parenting, dysfunctions, divorce and remarriage. Family dynamics and major social changes affecting the family are discussed. The course allows the individual to explore her/his own marriage and family attitudes and experiences. (Interterm, Spring)

SO 260 Introduction to Human Services

3 hours
An introduction to the history, theory, practice, and trends in human services. The goals, functions, and organization of human services are examined in the context of contemporary social problems; a historical survey of human services is presented as a background against which current efforts can be viewed; major theories, techniques, and methods that govern helping efforts are covered; a description of consumers of human services, and the strategies both consumers and service providers initiate to overcome barriers to effective service delivery, are discussed. Career opportunities in the human services field are also explored. (Spring)

SO 275 Criminal Justice

3 hours
An introduction to the field of criminology and the American criminal justice system. Emphasis is placed upon the nature of crime, and trends and theories of crime along with components and functions of the criminal justice system including police, courts, and corrections. (Spring)

SO 285/PE 285 Sociological Implications of Sport & Recreation

2 hours
A study of the interrelationships of sport and society.

SO/PY 303 Social Psychology

3 hours
A study of the individual as he/she is affected by other persons. Topics covered include: interpersonal relations, social learning, conformity and individuality, attitudes, groups and organizations, and others. Discussion and involvement methods are emphasized. Prerequisite: 6 hours in the behavioral sciences or instructor consent. (Spring)

SO/PY 308 Counseling

3 hours
A study of the theory and practice of counseling including a survey of the various systems of psychotherapy (person-centered therapy, psychoanalysis, behavioral therapy, cognitive-behavioral therapy, etc.) and learning, through role- play, of skills needed to be a helper. (Spring)

SO 320 Urban Sociology

3 hours
A study of the development of modern cities, theories of urban growth, and urban problems and policies. Topics will include urbanization, urban renewal, economic restructuring and globalization, international migration, culture and politics of urban places, gentrification, crime and poverty, and ecological patterns of land use. ( Fall)

SO/PY 335 Research Methods I

4 hours
The basic research methods course for behavioral science majors. Correlational, survey, and case study techniques, basic experimental design, research ethics, and general professional conduct of empirical investigation are studied in a team- taught format. Lecture, laboratory, and practical field exercises are used as learning methods. Prerequisite: G-MA 221. Concurrent enrollment is acceptable. (Fall)

SO/PY 336 Research Methods II

4 hours
The second of the two basic research methods courses for behavioral science majors. Relatively advanced scientific research designs and statistical analyses are studied. SPSS, a statistical package, is used for most of the work in the course. Prerequisites: G-MA 221 and SO/PY 335. (Interterm)

SO 355 Juvenile Delinquency

3 hours
A comprehensive examination of juvenile delinquency and the juvenile justice system. An emphasis on the causes of juvenile delinquency; its relation to family, school, peers, and society; treatment of juvenile delinquents; and criminal proceedings and the family court. (Fall)

SO 365 Social Work in American Society

3 hours
An introduction to the social work movement, profession, and practice in the United States. The course examines the social welfare policies and client populations that engage social workers, and explores the social work practice settings that range from child maltreatment and health care to work with older adults and corrections. Social issues are raised and case examples are presented to give insight into the clients and issues for which social workers initiate advocacy and social change through leadership positions in American society. Career opportunities in the social work profession are also explored. (Fall)

SO/PY 375 Junior Seminar

1 hour
Several topics and issues are examined in a seminar format. These include ethical practices and concerns as they relate to research and clinical work, the development and execution of basic and applied research, and career development and related matters. Students work toward developing appropriate research topics for their senior theses and may explore internship opportunities. (Spring)

SO 401 Sociological Theory

4 hours
A review and analysis of historical sociological theory including the masters of sociology: Durkheim, Weber, Marx, Pareto, Veblen, and others. Prerequisite: Six hours in sociology. (Spring, even years)

SO 425 Deviant Behavior

3 hours
This course exposes the student to the perspectives, principles, issues and research findings of the deviant behavior field. Topics covered include: poverty, substance abuse, prostitution, homosexuality, violent behavior, family violence, mental disorders, crime and social control. Prerequisite: SO 206, SO/PY 335 or instructor consent. ( Fall)

SO 430 Topics in Behavioral Sciences

3 hours
This course explores topics not normally found in regular offerings allowing students the opportunity to explore and grow their sociological imagination as well as their knowledge of theory and research methods. (Fall)

SO 450 Proseminar in Sociology

3 hours
An advanced-level seminar to integrate the information learned in earlier sociology courses. The goal is to bring full circle the sociological knowledge of students who are about to graduate. The course will explore a number of enduring sociological issues, including the meaning of sociology, the purpose of sociology and the effect sociology has on the world. Prerequisite: Upper division majors/minors only or instructor consent. (Spring, odd years)

SO 455 Police and Law Enforcement

3 hours
An analysis of the evolution of police, the police system, and the police role. Organization and jurisdiction of local, state, and federal law enforcement agencies along with philosophical and ethical issues surrounding their role will be discussed. (Fall, even years)

SO 460 Correctional Institutions

3 hours
An exploration of the historical and philosophical development of correctional systems with an emphasis on categories of inmates, treatment policies and their effectiveness, staff organization and training and their relation to the criminal justice system, and problems associated with correctional practices and procedures. (Fall, odd years)

SO 470 Social Gerontology

3 hours
A comprehensive introduction to an emerging field dealing with the social aspects of human aging. The course covers major areas of theory, research, social policy, and practice that impact older adults, and discusses the strengths and contributions that elders bring to their peers, families, and communities. The historical overview of aging in the United States, as well as the human and social meanings behind longevity population shift, is also explored. Also examined are social issues and psychological perspectives and strategies, as well as political and economic situations that produce undesirable outcomes as well as promote well- being in later life. Career options in the field of social gerontology are also explored. (Fall, even years)

SO/PY 474 Scientific Writing for the Behavioral Sciences

2 hours
This course is intended to help students develop the skills needed for writing research reports in the social sciences. It is a research-based course in which students learn to synthesize what they have read and present it as a scientific review of the literature; these are the primary goals. Thus, it focuses on how to apply social science theories and research methods to the writing of the senior research proposal. This course also provides students with the opportunity to prepare papers for regional conferences in sociology and psychology. Research manual required. (Fall)

SO/PY 475 Senior Seminar/Thesis

2 hours (Language Intensive)
This is the culminating or capstone course for behavioral science majors. Coordinated guidance is given on the preparation of the Senior Thesis. Discussion of current topics in sociology and psychology is combined with guidance on practical matters such as application to graduate study, developing a career, and so on. (Spring)

SO 495 Field Placement

1-4 hours
Practical experience working in an established social agency, mental health clinic, or correctional institution. Supervision and direction given on the job by the agency personnel. College personnel visit and give consultation.

 

Special Course Options
295/495 Field Experience (1-4 hours)
297  Study Abroad (12-16 hours)
299/499 Independent Study (1-4 hours)
388 Career Connections (3-10 hours)
445 Readings and Research (1-4 hours)

2018|Catalog 18-19, Sociology|

Graduate Program and Courses in Education

The graduate level courses offered by the Curriculum and Instruction Department prepare candidates to grow professionally as service-oriented educators. Choose any of the following options: an ESOL licensure, SPED licensure only or combine those programs with the core graduate courses in education to earn the M.Ed.

These three programs (ESOL licensure, SPED licensure, and the core) are provided by the Department of Curriculum and Instruction and, like the undergraduate Teacher Education Program, are governed by the Teacher Education Board.

Teacher Education Program

The Teacher Education Program at McPherson College is accredited by the Kansas State Department of Education (900 SW Jackson Street, Topeka, Kansas 66612); and by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE), www.ncate.org (now known as Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP), www.caepnet.org). This accreditation covers the Teacher Education Program at McPherson College; however, the accreditation does not include individual education courses that the institution offers to P-12 educators for professional development, relicensure, or other purposes.

Mission Statement

The mission of the Teacher Education Program of McPherson College is to develop service-oriented educators who effectively blend the art and science of teaching.

Goals, Objectives, and Dispositions

Goal I: The candidate has the knowledge bases necessary to be an effective teacher in her/his field.

To accomplish this goal, the service-oriented educator will:

Objectives:

  1. Acquire a broad liberal arts knowledge base.
  2. Demonstrate proficiency in his/her major area of licensure.
  3. Acquire effective strategies of teaching in all appropriate content areas and for all learners.
  4. Recognize how students learn and develop.

Disposition: Appreciate the connections between various areas of knowledge and commit to continuous learning.

Goal II: The candidate can apply effective teaching strategies to meet the needs of all learners.

To accomplish this goal, the service-oriented educator will:

Objectives:

  1. Use appropriate best practices for specific content areas and for diverse learners.
  2. Reflect upon his/her teaching and analyze the practices.
  3. Demonstrate understanding and use of formative and summative assessments and make modifications based on them.
  4. Provide motivational techniques based on students’ developmental and environmental needs.

Disposition: Value and respect students’ varied talents and abilities and project enthusiasm for teaching all learners.

Goal III: The candidate fosters relationships and collaborates with school constituencies. To accomplish this goal, the service-oriented educator will:

Objectives:

  1. Communicate effectively in both written and oral formats and through the use of technology
  2. Solicit input from students, parents, colleagues, and the greater community.
  3. Act on information received from stakeholders.

Disposition: Value the many ways in which people seek to communicate and encourage various modes of communication.

In addition to meeting the Goals, Objectives, and Dispositions of The Teacher Education Program, the graduate-level program must also meet the additional graduate-level Student Learning Outcomes:

  1. Demonstrate graduate-level problems solving and analytical skills.
  2. (Re)Establish a personal philosophy of education.
  3. Develop graduate-level action research and writing skills.
  4. Develop an understanding of current research, best practices, and new approaches to teaching and/or learning.

Licensure Requirements

The Kansas State Department of Education (KSDE) is the licensing authority in Kansas. According to Kansas regulations, the ESOL and SPED endorsements are considered added endorsements and require a teacher to already hold a license in another endorsement area prior to getting these endorsements. Those teachers choosing to add the ESOL endorsement must pass Praxis licensure exam 5361 with a minimum score of 138.

As a general rule, the ESOL endorsement will be added at the level (k-6, 6-12, or pk-12) at which the regular license is held. It is possible in some cases to add the endorsement at another level. Please consult the licensure officer (Dr. Kirchner) for details.

It is possible to seek the licensure-only option for the ESOL endorsement for candidates who do not desire the graduate courses or who already hold a master’s degree.

A provisional license is available for candidates who have been hired to teach ESOL classes while simultaneously completing the licensure coursework. A provisional license is good for two years and may be renewed once with proof of successful completion of coursework. In order to obtain the provisional license a candidate must 1) already hold a valid teaching license, 2) have completed at least 50 percent of the ESOL program, 3) complete a plan of study, and 4) show proof of employment in the area.

Those students seeking the SPED endorsement must complete the special education content area test, Praxis II. Students will complete the 5543 Special Education Core Knowledge and Mild to Moderate Applications test with a minimum score of 155.

It is possible to seek the licensure-only option for the SPED endorsement for candidates who do not desire the graduate courses or who already hold a master’s degree.

Student Responsibility

Students are ultimately responsible for following procedures and proper sequencing of events leading to professional development and licensure. It is important for students who plan to enter the Teacher Education Program at McPherson College to contat the chair of the program and/or the appropriate advisor.

Licensure in Kansas

In the state of Kansas, teaching is considered to be a profession. Therefore, the Kansas State Department of Education has a Professional Practices Commission to exercise disciplinary and advisory functions over those requesting licensure or working as a certified professional. Teacher licensure can be denied, suspended, or revoked for both felony and non-felony actions.

McPherson College is in compliance with the federal Title II reporting guidelines.

ESOL Licensure Program

The ESOL Licensure Program prepares students for KSDE ESOL endorsement at the k-6, 6-12, or pk-12 levels. This 15 credit hour program is geared to educators wishing to work with culturally and linguistically diverse students, but will also enhance the teaching skills for those in the regular classroom.

The ESOL licensure courses can be taken in conjunction with the core courses or, for those seeking licensure only, can be taken as a stand-alone program.

Although most candidates taking courses will be licensed teachers, the ESOL graduate courses have open enrollment for anyone wishing to learn more about this field, such as those working with adult English language learners.

Required courses:

  • CI 628 Methods for Teaching ESOL (3 hours)
  • CI 638 Language Assessment(3 hours)
  • CI 648 Applied Linguistics(3 hours)
  • CI 658 Cultural Diversity(3 hours)
  • CI 668 Practicum(3 hours)

To receive the KSDE ESOL endorsement, candidates must already hold an active Kansas teaching license and pass the English to Speakers of Other Languages Praxis exam 5361 with a minimum score of 138. See more information below under Licensure Requirements.

SPED Licensure Program

SPED Licensure Program prepares students for KSDE SPED endorsement at the k-6, 6-12, or pk-12 levels. This 15 credit hour program is geared to educators wishing to work with culturally and linguistically diverse students, but will also enhance the teaching skills for those in the regular classroom.

The SPED licensure courses can be taken in conjunction with the core courses or, for those seeking licensure only, can be taken as a stand-alone licensure program.

Required courses: K-6

  • CI 610 Foundations for Special Education Services (4 hours)
  • CI 615 General Methods for Special Education Services (4 hours)
  • CI 645 Behavior Management (2 hours)
  • CI 621/631 K-6 Methods for SPED and Field Experience (5 hours)
  • CI 731 K-6 Clinical Experience (6 hours) OR CI 733 Grades K-6 Internship (6 hours)

Required courses: 6-12

  • CI 610 Foundations for Special Education Services (4 hours)
  • CI 615 General Methods for Special Education Services (4 hours)
  • CI 645 Behavior Management (2 hours)
  • CI 661 Grades 6-12 Methods for Special Needs
  • CI 671 Grades 6-12 Field Experience
  • CI 771 Grades 6-12 Clinical Experience (6 hours) OR CI 773 Grades 6-12 Internship (4-6 hours)

Required Courses: Pk-12

  • CI 610 Foundations for Special Education Services (4 hours)
  • CI 615 General Methods for Special Education Services (4 hours)
  • CI 645 Behavior Management (2 hours)
  • CI 641 Grades PreK-3 Methods for Special Needs (4 hours)
  • CI 651 Grades Prek-3 Field Experience (1 hour)
  • CI 681 Grades 4-12 Methods for Special Needs (4 hours)
  • CI 691 Grades 4-12 Field Experience (1 hour)
  • CI 751 PreK-12 Clinical Experience (4-6 hours) OR CI 753 PreK-12 Internship (4-6 hours)

Graduate Courses

The core graduate courses are designed around a project-based model in which students identify an area of interest, explore possibilities for change, implement the change, and report the results. Students can focus on what they perceive to be a problem in their local environment or experiment with a new teaching technique. The courses are sequenced to walk students step-by-step through the project while simultaneously providing the theoretical and practical knowledge needed to make wise decisions.

A sub-thread running through the courses is that of the teacher as leader. Activities built into the courses help students gain confidence to become a better advocate for their students, colleagues, and district.

Required courses:

  • CI 615 Foundations in Education (3 hours)
  • CI 620 Fundamentals of Action Research (3 hours)
  • CI 625 Curriculum and Instruction (3 hours)
  • CI 640 Teacher as Leader (3 hours)
  • CI 675 Master’s Project and Capstone (3 hours)

The 15 credit hours of core courses along with the 15 credit hours in the ESOL graduate licensure program constitute the needed courses for the M.Ed.

Applicants for M.Ed. or Graduate Courses in Education

Students may choose any of the following options when applying to the graduate program: ESOL licensure courses, SPED licensure courses, or combine those courses with the core graduate courses to pursue a M.Ed. degree.

Applying for ESOL licensure and/or SPED licensure:

  • Application for Admission
  • Official college transcript showing bachelor’s degree earned

Applying to M.Ed. Program with ESOL or SPED licensure:

  • Application for Admission
  • Official transcripts for all colleges attended and showing bachelor’s degree earned
  • College GPA of 3.0
  • Essay stating professional goals (300 words) – please email to teachered@mcpherson.edu
  • Two letters of recommendation

All materials are reviewed by a subcommittee of the Teacher Education Board. The subcommittee’s recommendation is forwarded to Teacher Education Board for final approval.

Conditional Admission

Candidates not meeting the GPA requirement identified above may be admitted to the program on a conditional status assuming there is reasonable evidence of candidate success. Conditionally admitted candidates must earn a minimum GPA of 3.0 in their first six hours in order to remain in the program.

Transfer of Graduate Credits

After acceptance into the M.Ed. program, students who have previously completed graduate credit hours at another accredited institution may apply to have up to 15 graduate credit hours accepted toward the M.Ed. degree as long as those credits have been earned in the last 10 years at the time of entry into the master’s program.

To request that previously-earned credits be considered for transfer, the student must submit a final official graduate transcript along with a formal request listing the credits from the transcript the student wants considered for transfer. The formal request should include descriptions of the coursework and how it meets the requirements of the M.Ed. program at McPherson College.

Only courses in which a grade of B or better has been earned will be accepted for credit toward the M.Ed. degree. Consequently, a student’s grade point average depends upon courses attempted at McPherson College only. The director of the M.Ed. program at McPherson College evaluates which courses qualify for transfer. The program director may request further information from the student, for example, course descriptions or syllabi, before making a recommendation to the registrar. With the programs director’s recommendation in hand, the registrar makes the final decision about the transfer credits. The registrar’s decision is final and cannot be appealed.

Master of Education Course Descriptions

CI 615 Foundations of Education

3 cr hrs
This course will explore issues, problems and solutions relevant to schooling in a pluralistic society by viewing schools as social institutions that reflect and influence both the values and the cultural dynamics of a society at large. Issues of race, social class, and gender will be explored as factors of inequity that shape students and teachers both in and out of the classroom. Starting with their own lives, students investigate education as an agent of social change.

Class work as well as experiential assignments will assist participants’ exploration of their own as well as their students’ identities in order to identify the effects of various factors on the teaching experience, educational culture, and school change efforts. Special attention will be given to considerations necessary to implement action research projects.

CI 620 Fundamentals of Action Research

3 cr hrs
This course provides a structured approach to the practice of action research. Educators learn how to identify relevant issues, become involved in collaborative inquiry, and use data and research to inform their practice, improve student academic success, and contribute to positive change in their schools. Students will begin to apply action-research methodologies in their own environments.

CI 625 Curriculum and Instruction

3 cr hrs
This course begins with a historical look at the development of the curriculum in American schools followed by a review of current curricular trends. After exploring what is taught, attention is turned to how it is taught. Multiple approaches of instructions will be explored; each based on a different philosophical theory.

CI 628 Methods for Teaching ESOL

3 cr hrs
This course is designed to prepare candidates to teach English to non-native speakers at either the K-6 level or the 6-12 level. Students will be exposed to ESOL specific teaching techniques and lesson and unit planning. Candidates will research current teaching trends and compile a resource file.

CI 638 Language Assessment

3 cr hrs
This graduate level course is designed to prepare candidates to assess and evaluate language focusing on English language learners. Candidates will select, design, and implement a variety of formal and informal assessments based on appropriate assessment theory (reliability, validity, and practicality). Legal issues, state testing protocol, evaluation of district level assessment systems, and the multiple purposes of assessment (placement, exit, etc.) will be reviewed.

CI 640 Teacher as Leader

3 cr hrs
Teacher as Leader is a graduate course designed to explore several roles that instructional leaders engage in, such as classroom leader, team leader, school leader, organization leader, and/or professional leader. Theoretical perspectives and research examining issues related to group dynamics, motivation, communication, and human relations are explored. Students will look at organizational change, ethical decision-making, team building and adult learning theory.

CI 648 Applied Linguistics

3 cr hrs
This graduate level course introduces candidates to language as a system with a focus on English language learners. Candidates will learn the branches of linguistics; phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics and review first- and second-language acquisition theory.

CI 658 Cultural Diversity

3 cr hrs
This graduate level course introduces candidates to the diverse racial, cultural and ethnic make-up of the country and region. Candidates will be challenged to explore and confront biases found in education and in their personal life. School policies and procedures, curriculum and activities will be analyzed. Candidates will draft a multicultural stance they could implement to promote change.

CI 668 ESOL Practicum

3 cr hrs
A field experience and seminar for those seeking licensure in ESOL as part of the advanced program. In this culminating course, candidates will have the opportunity to apply knowledge learned in previous courses.  Emphasis is placed on teaching, assessing, and evaluating English learners. Application to the teacher education program is required.

CI 675 M.Ed. Project and Capstone

3 cr hrs
In this course, educators will use collected data to enact change. At the end of the implementation period, students will engage in reflective assessment of themselves and their program.

SE 610 Foundations for Special Education Services

4 cr hrs
Our ultimate goal is to create classrooms in which future citizens can learn to respect individual differences, value diversity, and get along with one another. This course provides a safe environment in which to explore the history and philosophy of special education, policies and procedures in special education, and diversity in the classroom. (Fall & Spring)

SE 615 General Methods for Special Education Services

4 cr hrs
This course addresses assessments used for eligibility, placement and curricular decisions (Module A), the special education process from pre-identification through individual program implementation (Module B), and effective collaboration and communication skills with diverse learners, families, colleagues, and community stakeholders (Module C). The course includes a supervised field experience (Module D) including a mandatory observation of the SPED 615 student’s teaching completed by the ACCK instructor. Prerequisite:  SPED 610. (Fall & Spring)

SE 621 Grades K-6 Methods for Special Needs

4 cr hrs
This course addresses IEP implementation using evidence-based practices.  Emphasis is on collaborative teaching models.  Topics of study include lesson planning, basic skill and content area instruction, adapting methods and materials, and progress monitoring.  SPED 631:  Grades K-6 Field Experience must be taken concurrently.  SPED 631 will involve 15 to 20 contact hours with school aged children including 10+ intervention sessions with one student with high-incidence special education needs. Prerequisites: SPED 610 & 615 (Fall & Spring)

SE 631 Grades K-6 Field Experience

1 cr hr
This course is a supervised field experience with children in grades K-6 who have an identified disability. The course will emphasize evidence-based practices and techniques presented in SPED 621. Students will participate in IEP development, lesson planning, and instruction. (Fall & Spring)

SE 641 Grades PreK-3 Methods for Special Needs

4 cr hrs
Grades PreK-3 Methods addresses matching strategies to individual and group needs using evidence-based practices.  Topics of study include learning plans, embedded instruction within a tiered framework, setting up the environment, adapting methods and materials, positive behavior supports, and progress monitoring. (Fall & Spring)

SE 645 Behavior Management

2 cr hrs
This course addresses culturally sensitive methods for preventing and intervening with problem behavior. Topics include positive behavior intervention and supports, classroom management, social skills instruction, student support meetings, and functional behavioral analysis, non-averse intervention, and behavior intervention plans. (Fall, Interterm, & Spring)

SE 651 Grades PreK-3 Field Experience

1 cr hr
This is a supervised field experience with children in grades PreK-3 who have an identified disability. The course will emphasize evidence-based practices and techniques presented in SPED 641. Students will participate in IEP development, lesson planning, and instruction. (Fall & Spring)

SE 661 Grades 6 – 12 Methods for Special Needs

4 cr hrs
This course covers both general and specific methods used by special educators to teach students with disabilities.  The course includes transition planning and IEP development, instructional planning, and selection of instructional methods to meet the needs of students with high-incidence special education needs. Approaches for selecting methods and materials, for delivering instruction, and for evaluating instructional outcomes based on assessment information will also be demonstrated. (Fall)

SE 671 Grades 6 – 12 Field Experience

1 cr hr
This field experience course requires the learner to be assigned to work with a cooperating special education teacher for 15 hours and to work in the same setting(s) as the cooperating teacher. The learner may function in programs described as self-contained, interrelated, categorical, resource, itinerant, special day school, or some combination of these. This one-hour credit placement is made by arrangement through ACCK.  Outside preparation time will be required (six to nine hours per week outside preparation) beyond attendance at field experience meetings and required field-based hours. The grade for this class is contingent upon successful completion of the SPED 661 Methods course. (Fall)

SE 681  Grades 4-12 Methods for Special Needs

4 cr hrs
This course covers both general and specific methods used by special educators to teach students with disabilities.  The course includes transition planning and IEP development, instructional planning, and selection of instructional methods to meet the needs of students with high-incidence special education needs. Approaches for selecting methods and materials, for delivering instruction, and for evaluating instructional outcomes based on assessment information will also be demonstrated. (Fall & Spring)

SE 691 Grades 4-12 Field Experience

1 cr hr
This field experience course requires the learner to be assigned to work with a cooperating special education teacher for 15 hours and to work in the same setting(s) as the cooperating teacher. The learner may function in programs described as self-contained, interrelated, categorical, resource, itinerant, special day school, or some combination of these. This one-hour credit placement is made by arrangement through ACCK.  Outside preparation time will be required (six to nine hours per week outside preparation) beyond attendance at field experience meetings and required field-based hours. The grade for this class is contingent upon successful completion of the SPED 681 Methods course. This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) an an added expense. (Fall & Spring)

SE 731 Grades K-6 Clinical Experience

4 – 6 cr hrs
This course is a supervised teaching experience with a special educator who provides services for elementary level students with high-incidence learning needs. The pre-service teacher will work collaboratively with the cooperating special educator, families, and school team members to apply research-based knowledge of assessment, instruction aligned to IEP goals, and positive behavioral supports. Emphasis is on reflective, culturally sensitive practice. This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) an an added expense. (Fall & Spring)

SE 733  Grades K-6 Internship

4 – 6 cr hrs
This course is a supervised teaching experience with a special educator who provides services for elementary level students with high-incidence learning needs.  The pre-service teacher will work collaboratively with the cooperating special educator, families, and school team members to apply research-based knowledge of assessment, instruction aligned to IEP goals, and positive behavioral supports.  Emphasis is on reflective, culturally sensitive practice. This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) an an added expense. (Fall & Spring)

SE 771 Grades 6-12 Clinical Experience

4 – 6 cr hrs
This course is a supervised teaching experience with a special educator who provides services for secondary level students with high-incidence learning needs.  The pre-service teacher will work collaboratively with the cooperating special educator, families, and school team members to apply research-based knowledge of assessment, instruction aligned to IEP goals, and positive behavioral supports.  Emphasis is on reflective, culturally sensitive practice. This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) an an added expense.  (Fall & Spring)

SE 773 Grades 6-12 Internship

4 – 6 cr hrs
This course is a supervised teaching experience with a special educator who provides services for secondary level students with high-incidence learning needs.  The pre-service teacher will work collaboratively with the cooperating special educator, families, and school team members to apply research-based knowledge of assessment, instruction aligned to IEP goals, and positive behavioral supports.  Emphasis is on reflective, culturally sensitive practice.This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) an an added expense.  (Fall & Spring)

SE 751 PreK-12 Clinical Experience

4 – 6 cr hrs
This course is a supervised teaching experience with a special educator who provides services for elementary level students with high-incidence learning needs.  The pre-service teacher will work collaboratively with the cooperating special educator, families, and school team members to apply research-based knowledge of assessment, instruction aligned to IEP goals, and positive behavioral supports.  Emphasis is on reflective, culturally sensitive practice. This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) an an added expense. (Fall & Spring)

SE 753 PreK-12 Internship

4 – 6 cr hrs
This course is a supervised teaching experience with a special educator who provides services for elementary level students with high-incidence learning needs.  The pre-service teacher will work collaboratively with the cooperating special educator, families, and school team members to apply research-based knowledge of assessment, instruction aligned to IEP goals, and positive behavioral supports.  Emphasis is on reflective, culturally sensitive practice. This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) an an added expense.  (Fall & Spring)

Personnel List

President of McPherson College

Michael P. Schneider, Ed.D., McPherson, Kansas

Faculty

Photo directory of current Faculty

Allan Ayella, B.S., M.S., Ph.D. (2007)
Associate Professor of Biology (2013)
B.S., Makerere Uni, Kla-Uganda; M.S., Ph.D., Kansas State University.

Edward Barr, B.A., B.S., M.A. (2010)
Associate Professor of Technology (2016)
B.A., University of the South; B.S., McPherson College; M.A., University of Kansas.

Becki Bowman, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (2006)
Professor of Communication (2018)
B.A., McPherson College; M.A., Wichita State University; Ph.D., Kent State University.

Jd. Bowman, B.A., M.A., M.F.A. (2005)
Professor of Theatre (2018)
B.A., McPherson College; M.A., M.F.A., Kent State University.

James Bowyer, B.S., M.S., M.M., M.M., D.M.A. (2017)
Associate Professor of Music and Director of Choral Activities
B.S., Manchester University; M.A., Bethany Theological Seminary; M.M., M.M., Westminster Choir College;
D.M.A., University of Washington.

Luke Chennell, A.T., B.A., M.A. (2015)
Assistant Professor of Technology (2003-2011, 2015)
A.T., B.A., McPherson College; M.A., Wichita State University.

Ku-Sup Chin, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (2003)
Associate Professor of Behavioral Science: Sociology (2009)
B.A., Korea University; M.A., Ph.D., University of California-Irvine.

Christopher Clark, B.S., B.S. (2016)
Assistant Professor of Technology
B.S., MidAmerica Nazarene University; B.S., McPherson College.

Bruce Clary, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (1983)
Vice President for Academic Affairs (2014)
Professor of English (2014); Maurice Hess Chair in English (2000)
B.A., McPherson College; M.A., Wichita State University; Ph.D., Kansas State University.

April Counts, B.S., M.A.Ed. (2017)
Assistant Professor of Education
B.S., University of Central Missouri; M.A.Ed., Baker University; ESOL Endorsement.

Joe Dickhudt, B.S., M.B.A. (2005)
Professor of Technology (2018)
B.S., California State Polytechnic University; M.B.A., College of William and Mary, Virginia.

Amber Dittert, B.A., M.S. (2016)
Assistant Professor of Mathematics (2017)
B.A., St. Mary’s University; M.S., Texas Tech University.

Kerry Dobbins, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (2010)
Associate Professor of History (2016)
B.A., Skidmore College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Michael Dudley, B.S., B.S., M.S. (2014)
Assistant Professor of Technology
B.S., University of Nebraska-Lincoln; B.S., McPherson College;
M.S., Pittsburg State University.

Laura Workman Eells, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (1996)
Professor of Behavioral Science: Sociology (2015)
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

Jodi Ehling, B.S., M.A.T. (2011)
Assistant Professor of Physical Education (2013)
B.S., M.A.T., University of Central Missouri; ATC.

Dee Erway-Sherwood, B.F.A., M.F.A. (2003)
Professor  of Art (2016)
Executive Director of Visual Arts (2017)
B.F.A., M.F.A., Fort Hays State University.

Jonathan Frye, B.S., M.S., Ph.D. (1993)
Professor of Natural Science (2011)
B.S., Lebanon Valley College; M.S., Ph.D., University of Virginia.

Rodney Gieselman, B.S., M.B.A. (2003)
Professor of Business (2016)
Director of Program Development (2003)
B.S., University of Nebraska-Kearney; M.B.A., Bellarmine University.

Lindsey Godfrey, B.S., M.B.A. (2017)
Assistant Professor of Business, Marketing & Management
B.S., McPherson College; M.B.A., Columbia Southern University.

Curtis Goodwin, A.S., B.S., M.S. (2014)
Associate Professor of Technology
A.S., Colby Community College;, B.S., M.S., Pittsburg State University.

Garrick Green, A.T., B.A., M.S. (2001)
Associate Professor of Technology (2013)
A.T., B.A., McPherson College; M.S., Pittsburg State University.

Michaela Groeblacher, B.A., M.F.A. (2014)
Assistant Professor of Art
B.A., McPherson College ; M.F.A., Fort Hays State University.

Daniel J. Hoffman, B.S., M.Ed. (1982)
Associate Professor of Physical Education (1993)
B.S., Manchester College; M.Ed., Wichita State University.

Kyle Hopkins, B.A., B.M.E., M.M. (2013)
Associate Professor of Music
Band Director
B.A., University of Kansas; B.M.E., Washburn University; M.M., Kansas State University.

Stephen Hoyer, B.S., M.S.Ed., Ph.D. (2016)
Assistant Professor of Behavorial Science: Psychology 
B.S., M.S.Ed., University of Nebraska-Kearney; Ph.D., Oklahoma State University.

Shane Kirchner, B.A., M.Ed., Ph.D. (2004)
Professor of Education (2018)
B.A., McPherson College; M.Ed., Wichita State University;
ESL Licensure, Emporia State University; Ph.D., Kansas State University.

Manjula Koralegedara, B.S., M.S., Ph.D. (2010)
Associate Professor of Chemistry (2016)
B.S., University of Peradeniya, Sri Lanka; M.S., Ph.D., Wichita State University.

Julia Largent, B.S., M.A., Ph.D. (2017)
Assistant Professor of Communication
B.S., Manchester University; M.A., Ball State University; Ph.D., Bowling Green State University.

Kirk MacGregor, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. (2016)
Assistant Professor of Philosophy & Religion
A.B., Miami University; M.A., Biola University; Ph.D., University of Iowa.

Ami Martinez, B.A., M.Ed. (2012)
Assistant Professor of English
B.A., M.Ed., Wichita State University.

Lorena Medrano, B.A., M.S., M.S., M.A. (2013)
Assistant Professor of Spanish
B.A., Universidad Rafael Urdaneta; M.S., Universidad del Zulia; M.S., M.A., University of Missouri-Columbia.

Bryan D. Midgley, B.S., M.A., Ph.D. (2000)
Associate Professor of Behavioral Science: Psychology (2006)
B.S., Eastern Michigan University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Kansas.

David O’Dell, B.S., M.B.A. (1979)
Professor of Accounting (2003)
B.S., McPherson College; M.B.A., Emporia State University.

Christopher Paulsen, A.T., B.S., M.S. (2004)
Associate Professor of Technology (2018)
A.T., B.S., McPherson College; M.S., Pittsburg State University.

Jennifer Pollard, B.A., M.A. (2018)
Visiting Assistant Professor of Theatre
B.A., McPherson College; M.A., Michigan State University.

Nathan Pollard, B.A. (2016)
Visiting Assistant Professor of Communication
B.A., Ravensbourne College-U.K.; BTEC National Diploma in Graphic Design, Plymouth College-U.K.

Matthew Porter, B.A., M.B.A. (2016)
Assistant Professor of Business
B.A., McPherson College; M.B.A., Colorado State University.

Ricardo Rodriguez, B.S., B.S., M.S., Ph.D. (2018)
Assistant Professor of Physics
B.S., B.S., University of Los Andes-Bogota, Colombia; M.S., Ph.D., Iowa State University.

Vicki Schmidt, A.A.S., B.S., M.S. (2015)
Assistant Professor of Education
A.A.S., Kansas State University; B.S., Fort Hays State University; M.S., Baker University.

Herbert Smith, B.A., M. Div., Ph.D. (1982)
Professor of Philosophy and Religion (1994)
Burton Metzler Chair in Philosophy and Religion (1999)
B.A., Elizabethtown College; M.Div., Bethany Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Claremont Graduate School.

Kerri Snell, B.A., M.F.A. (2016)
Assistant Professor of English
B.A., McPherson College; M.F.A., Ashland University.

Kimberly Diane Stanley, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (1988)
Professor of English (1997)
B.A., Trinity University; M.A., St. John’s College at Santa Fe; Ph.D., University of Texas.

Tim Swartzendruber, B.A., M.Ed. (2008)
Head Coach, Men’s Basketball
Assistant Professor of Physical Education (2009)
B.A., Bethel College; M.Ed., Wichita State University.

Allan van Asselt, B.S., Ph.D. (2000)
Professor of Chemistry
B.A., McPherson College; Ph.D., California Institute of Technology.

Dustin Wilgers, B.S., M.S., Ph.D. (2011)
Associate Professor of Biology (2017)
B.S., Southwestern College; M.S., Kansas State University; Ph.D., University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

Kenneth Yohn, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (1999)
Professor of History (2005)
B.A., Manchester College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Iowa.

Rebecca Ann Zerger, B.S., M.F.A. (2004)
Professor of Art (2018)
B.S., University of Kentucky-Lexington; M.F.A., Wichita State University.

Special Education Faculty (KICA)

Lynette Cross, B.S., M.S.
Instructor of Special Education
B.S., Tabor College; M.S., Wichita State University.

Beverly Schottler, B.S., M.S., Ed.D. (2005)
Program Director; Instructor of Special Education
B.S., M.S., Fort Hays State University; Ed.D., Kansas State University.

Kristi Weiss, B.S., M.S.
Instructor of Special Education
B.S., M.S., Kansas State University.

Faculty Emeriti

Doris E. Coppock, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. (1950)
Professor Emerita of Health, Physical Education and Recreation (1992)
A.B., McPherson College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Iowa.

Alfred Dutrow, B.S., M.S. (1973)
Professor Emeritus of Agriculture (2009)
B.S., McPherson College; M.S., Michigan State University.

Dale C. Goldsmith, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. (1969)
Professor Emeritus of Philosophy and Religion (2017)
A.B., Princeton University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago.

Bob R. Green, A.A., B.A., M.A. (1967)
Professor Emeritus of English (1993)
A.A., Central College; B.A., Seattle Pacific University; M.A., Emporia State University.

Steven C. Gustafson, B.M., M.M., D.M.A. (1980)
Planned Giving Officer (2016)
Professor Emeritus of Music (2014)

B.M., Bethany College; M.M., D.M.A., University of Colorado-Boulder.

Paul W. Hoffman, B.S., M.Div., M.A., Ph.D. (1976)
President Emeritus (1996)
Professor Emeritus of Psychology (1996)
B.S., Manchester College; M.Div., Bethany Theological Seminary; M.A., University of Michigan;
Ph.D., Purdue University; Certificate, Harvard Institute for Educational Management.

Corinne Neubauer Hughbanks, B.A., M.S., Ph.D. (1966)
Professor Emerita of Languages (1993)
B.A., Asbury College; M.S., Emporia State University; Ph.D., University of Nebraska.

Monroe Hughbanks, B.A., M.S., Ed.D. (1964)
Professor Emeritus of Education (1993)
B.A., Asbury College; M.S., Emporia State University; Ed.D., University of Nebraska.

Gilford J. Ikenberry, Jr., B.S., M.S., Ph.D. (1961)
Professor Emeritus of Biology (1993)
B.S., McPherson College; M.S., Oklahoma State University; Ph.D., Iowa State University.

Shingo Kajinami, B.S., Ph.D. (1986)
Professor Emeritus of Chemistry (2003)
B.S., Bethel College; Ph.D., University of Oklahoma.

Larry Kitzel, B.S., M.M., D.M.A. (1970)
Professor Emeritus of Music (2004)
B.S., McPherson College; M.M., Wichita State University; D.M.A., University of Oklahoma.

Robert W. Neufeld, B.A., M.A., M.S., Ph.D. (1991)
Professor Emeritus of Computer Science (2004)
B.A., Bethel College; M.A., M.S., Wichita State University; Ph.D., Iowa State University.

Jeanne Jacoby Smith, B.A., M.A., Ed.D. (1982)
Professor Emerita of Education (2009)
B.A., Elizabethtown College; M.A., James Madison University; Ed.D., Kansas State University.

Susan Krehbiel Taylor, B.A., M.L.S., Ph.D. (1979)
Professor Emerita of Journalism (2010); College Librarian Emerita (2010)
B.A., McPherson College; M.L.S., Emporia State University; Ph.D., Kansas State University.

Roger Trimmell, B.S., M.Ed. (1982)
Professor Emeritus of Physical Education (2011)
B.S., McPherson College; M.Ed., Wichita State University.

Karlene Morphew Tyler, B.A., M.A. (1975)
Professor Emerita of Theatre (2018)
B.A., McPherson College; M.A., Emporia State University.

Jan van Asselt, B.S., M.A., Ph.D. (1965)
Professor Emeritus of German and Linguistics (2000)
B.S., McPherson College; M.A., University of Colorado, Boulder; Ph.D., University of California.

Full-time Administrative and General

Photo directory of current Staff

Matthew Abbott, B.A. (2018)
Assistant Coach: Men’s Soccer
B.A., Ottawa University.

Stephanie Albert, B.S.Ed. (2018)
Admissions Associate
B.S.Ed., Emporia State University.

Steve Anderson (2002)
Facilities Management: Custodian

Ashley Annis, B.A. (2018)
Spirit Squad Director
B.A., Tabor College.

Abbey Archer-Rierson, B.S., M.Ed. (2008)
Chief of Staff (2011)
B.S., University of Kansas; M.Ed., McPherson College.

Dave Auman (2011)
Facilities Management: Maintenance Technician

Carole Barr, B.A., M.A. (2010)
Director of Academic Development (2014)
B.A., M.A., University of Kansas.

David Barrett, B.S., M.S.S. (1991)
Advancement Officer (2014)
B.S., McPherson College, M.S.S., United States Sports Academy.

Linda Barrett, B.S. (1996)
Coordinator of Student Success and Engagement (2017)
B.S., McPherson College.

Roger Brimmerman, B.A. (2016)
Vice President for Advancement
B.A., Midland University.

Sara Brubaker, B.S., M.S. (2002)
Director of Financial Aid and Admissions Operations (2012)
B.S., McPherson College: M.S., Friends University.

Timothy Bruton, B.S., M.Ed. (2002)
Assistant Director of Facilities Management (2017)
B.S., M.Ed., McPherson College.

Renee Carlson (1995)
Facilities Management: Custodian

Bruce Clary, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (1983)
Vice President for Academic Affairs (2014)
Professor of English (2014)
Maurice Hess Chair in English (2000)
B.A., McPherson College; M.A., Wichita State University; Ph.D., Kansas State University.

Jessica Cleveland, A.S., B.S., M.Ed. (2016)
Head Coach: Volleyball
A.S., Hesston College; B.S., Friends University; M.Ed., Wichita State University.

Ben Coffey, B.A., M.A.Ed. (2016)
Associate Dean of Students
Director of Residence Life & Student Conduct (2018)
B.A., McPherson College; M.A.Ed., Baker University.

Doug Cooke (2005)
Facilities Management: Maintenance Technician (2006)

Dara Dix (2013)
Accounting Specialist
Diploma, Spencer School of Business.

Khalilah Doss, B.B.A., M.P.A., Ph.D. (2017)
Vice President for Student Life and Dean of Students
B.B.A., McKendree University; M.P.A., Southern Illinois University-Edwardsville;
Ph.D., Southern Illinois University-Carbondale.

Sydney Doster, B.A. (2017)
Assistant Director of Admissions
B.A., Baker University.

Andrew Ehling, A.A., B.A., M.S. (2011)
Athletic Director (2015)
A.A., Butler Community College; B.A., Kansas State University; M.S., University of Central Missouri.

T. J. Eskildsen, B.S., M.S. (2010)
Resident Director: Baer and Harter Apartments (2014)
Assistant Coach: Men’s Basketball
B.S., Iowa Wesleyan College; M.S., William Woods University.

Kendra Flory, B.A., M.Div. (2017)
Advancement and Alumni Assistant
B.A., Bridgewater College; M.Div., Bethany Theological Seminary.

Tammy Gamache (2015)
Accounting Specialist

Lisa Goering, A.S., B.A. (2018)
Student Success Specialist
A.S., Hutchinson Community College; B.A., McPherson College.

Tina Goodwin, B.A. (2017)
Director of Public Relations
B.A., Creighton University.

Danna Gordon, B.S. (2014)
Assistant Director of Admissions (2017)
B.S. McPherson College.

James Grinde, B.S., M.Ed. (2018)
Assistant Coach: Football
B.S., University of Central Missouri; M.Ed., Southwestern Oklahoma State University.

Andrew Gustafson, B.A. (2007)
Facilities Management: Athletic Facilities & Grounds Supervisor (2012)
B.A., McPherson College.

Colleen Gustafson, B.A., M.Ed. (2008)
Promotions & New Media Manager (2015)
B.A., M.Ed., McPherson College.

Amanda Gutierrez, B.S., M.B.A. (2009)
Vice President for Historic Automotive Restoration (2012)
B.A., Kansas Wesleyan University; M.B.A., Friends University.

Cheryl Hammarlund, B.A. (2002)
Facilities Management: Co-Lead Custodian
B.A., McPherson College.

Kenyatta Harden, B.A. (2017)
Admissions & Financial Aid Counselor
B.A., McPherson College.

Patricia Hartshorn, B.A. (2014)
Registrar (2014)
B.A., Bethany College.

Bob Hein (2012)
Facilities Management: Custodian

Samantha Henning, B.S. (2016)
Library Services Assistant
B.S., McPherson College.

Mary Hester, B.S., M.Ed., M.L.S. (2011)
Director of Library Services
B.S., M.Ed., Fort Hays State University; M.L.S., Emporia State University.

Ashley Hickman, B.G.S., M.B.A. (2014)
Head Coach: Softball
B.G.S., University of Kansas; M.B.A., Tabor College.

Christi Hopkins, B.S., M.A. (2007)
Vice President for Enrollment (2014)
B.S., Southwest Baptist University; M.A., Baker University.

Josh Hubin, B.S., M.Ed. (2011)
Director of Admissions (2017)
B.S., M.Ed., McPherson College.

Travis Kincheloe, B.S., M.S. (2016)
Assistant Coach: Football
B.S., M.S., Southwestern Oklahoma State University.

Lorraine Lahdenpera, A.T., B.S., M.B.A. (1998)
Director, Milwaukee Center Continuing Education Program
A.T., Milwaukee Area Technical College; B.S., University of Texas at Dallas; M.B.A., Amber University-Dallas.

Joanna Loewen, A.A., B.A. (2018)
Admissions and Financial Aid Specialist
A.A., Fort Hays State University; B.A., Wichita State University.

Cari Lott, B.A., M.Ed., Ed.D. (2011)
Associate Dean for Institutional Research and Assessment (2014)
B.A., Kansas Wesleyan University; M.Ed., Ed.D., Kansas State University.

Brian Lundberg, A.A. (2003)
Director of Marketing (2015)
A.A., Art Institute of Dallas.

Cameron Magnall, B.A., M.S. (2011)
Head Coach: Cross Country and Distance (2015)
B.A., Concordia College; M.S., Adams State College.

Janelle Magnuson, B.S. (2007)
Controller (2012)
B.S., Bethany College.

Brian Martin, B.S. (2009)
Director of Automotive Restoration Projects (2014)
B.S., McPherson College.

Lacey Martinez, B.S. (2015)
Assistant Athletic Trainer
B.S., Sterling College; ATC, LAT.

Marylyn Matthaei, B.A. (1989)
Sr. Administrative Assistant to the Vice President for Academic Affairs
B.A., McPherson College.

Ruzell McCoy, Jr., B.S., M.Ed. (2018)
Assistant Coach: Football
B.S., M.Ed., Southwestern Oklahoma State University.

Heather Mierkiewicz (2016)
Admissions Associate

Paul Mierkiewicz, B.A., M.A. (2015)
Head Coach: Football
B.A., M.A., Loras College.

Janelle Miller (2000)
Facilities Management: Custodian (2001)

LeAnn Moore, B.S., M.S. (2017)
Assistant Controller
B.S., McPherson College; M.S., Grand Canyon University.

Kevin Morris, A.S., B.S. (2016)
Computer Services Assistant
A.S., B.S., Brown Mackie College.

Bryan Moses, B.A., M.S. (2016)
Head Coach: Baseball
B.A., Sonoma State University; M.S., Western Kentucky University.

Robert Mowat (2017)
Facilities Management: Maintenance Technician/HVAC

Joshua Nichols, A.A., B.S., M.A. (2018)
Head Coach: Women’s Basketball
A.A., Northern Oklahoma College; B.S., Oklahoma Wesleyan University; M.A., Baker University.

Andy Olsen, B.S.M. (2014)
Assistant Director of Financial Aid
B.S.M., Central Christian College.

Kelly Olson, B.S. (2018)
Admissions Associate
B.S., Northern State University.

Mark Olson, B.S. (2015)
Associate Coach: Women’s Soccer
B.S., Wichita State University.

David Penalva (2007)
Facilities Management: Custodian

Amanda Peterson, B.S. (2014)
Facilities Management: Grounds Assistant
B.S., Kansas State University.

Nicholas Petrone, B.A. (2018)
Director of Athletic Communications
B.A., Hanover College.

Jamie Pjesky, B.S. (2015)
Director of Student Life and Service (2018)
B.S., Pittsburg State University.

Doug Quint, A.A., B.S. (2003)
Head Coach, Men’s & Women’s Soccer (2010)
Director of Soccer Operations
A.A., Allen County Community College; B.S., Bethel College; USSF ‘C’ License; NSCAA Advanced National Diploma; NSCAA Levels I and II GK License.

Mariah Ramey, B.S. (2014)
Facilities Management: Grounds Assistant
B.S., University of California-Davis.

Victor Redd, B.S. (2018)
Assistant Coach: Football
B.S., Mayville State University.

Monica Rice, B.S., M.A. (2016)
Director of Alumni and Constituent Relations
B.S., Manchester College; M.A., Bethany Theological Seminary.

Kathryn Russell, (2008)
Facilities Management: Custodian

Sonja Sawatzky, A.A. (2008)
Assistant Registrar (2018)
A.A., Brown Mackie College.

Michael P. Schneider, B.S., M.B.A., Ed.D. (2002)
President (2009)
B.S., McPherson College; M.B.A., Denver University;
Ed.D., University of Pennsylvania.

Phillip Schoenwetter, B.S., M.S. (2008)
Head Athletic Trainer (2013)
B.S., MidAmerica Nazarene University; M.S., Kansas State University; ATC, LAT.

Chandler Short, B.S., M.Ed. (2017)
Athletics Assistant
B.S., McPherson College; M.Ed., University of Oklahoma.

Marty Sigwing, B.S., M.Ed. (2012)
Director of Facilities
B.S., Southwestern College; M.Ed., McPherson College.

Carry Smith, (2012)
Facilities Management: Lead Custodian

Ermelinda Spies, B.A., M.S. (2011)
Assistant Coach: Track & Field
B.A., Western State College; M.S., Fort Hays State University.

Robert Spies, B.S., M.S. (2014)
Head Coach: Track & Field
B.S., M.S., Pittsburg State University.

Brenda Stocklin-Smith, B.S.B.A., M.Ed. (2012)
Director of Human Resources
B.S.B.A., University of Missouri-Columbia; M.Ed., McPherson College; PHR, SHRM-CP.

Connie Stucky (1991)
Facilities Management: Office Manager (2001)

Danielle Sutter, B.S., M.S. (2018)
Assistant Director of Residence Life: Dotzour and Off-campus
B.S., M.S., Kansas State University.

Tim Swartzendruber, B.A., M.S. (2008)
Head Coach, Men’s Basketball
Assistant Professor of Physical Education (2009)
B.A., Bethel College; M.S., Wichita State University.

Richard (Rick) L. Tuxhorn, B.S., M.Ed., CPA (2012)
Vice President for Finance
B.S., Sterling College; M.Ed., McPherson College; CPA, CGMA.

Andrew Ullom, B.S. (1999)
Director of Computer Services (2015)
B.S., McPherson College.

Justin Van Houten, B.A., M.S. (2012)
Assistant Coach: Football; Offensive Coordinator
B.A., M.S., Grand View University.

Debra Wagoner (1995)
Donor Relations Coordinator (2014)

Bonnie Wall (2009)
Facilities Management: Custodian

Christopher Wallace, B.A. (2017)
Admissions & Financial Aid Counselor
B.A., Bethany College.

Dustin Wheeler (2016)
Head Coach: Tennis

Gabrielle Williams, B.S., M.S.Ed. (2018)
Assistant Director of Residence Life: Metzler, Bittinger & Morrison
B.S., Lincoln University; M.S.Ed., Southern Illinois University.

Jessy Wisdom, B.S. (2015)
Financial Aid Assistant
B.S., McPherson College.

Amanda Wright, B.S. (2018)
Assistant Coach: Softball
B.S., Averett University.

Part-time Faculty and Staff

Aaron Bachura, B.A. (2018)
Residence Life Housing & Operations Manager
B.A., McPherson College.

Josh Baldwin, B.S. (2017)
Assistant Coach: Men’s Soccer
B.S., John Brown University.

Jaelon Barnes, B.S. (2018)
Assistant Coach: Football
B.S., McPherson College.

Chrijaun Carter, B.B.A. (2018)
Assistant Coach: Women’s Basketball
B.B.A., Davenport University.

Thomas Feazell, B.S. (2018)
Assistant Coach: Football
B.S., Eastern Kentucky University.

Francis Fiemawhle, B.S. (2018)
Assistant Coach: Women’s Soccer
B.S., McPherson College.

Kasey Guinty, B.S. (2016)
Assistant Coach: Baseball
B.S., Manhattan Christian College.

Jill Hemenway, B.A. (2017)
Administrative Assistant for Teacher Education
B.A., Bethany College.

Nathan Howell, B.A. (2018)
Assistant Coach: Baseball
B.A., Colorado State University.

Kerryn McQuilliam, B.S., M.Ed. (2016)
Assistant Athletic Trainer
B.S., Fort Hays State University; M.Ed., Wichita State University.

Katie Neira, B.S. (2018)
Assistant Coach: Volleyball
B.S., Bethel College.

Michael Ramos, B.A. (2016)
Assistant Coach: Football
B.A., McPherson College.

Brad Stucky, B.A. (1978)
Facilities Management: Specialist (2017)
B.A., McPherson College.

2018|11 Personnel, Catalog 18-19|

Master of Education Course Descriptions

CI 610 Issues in Learning

3 cr hrs
This course will identify national and regional issues surrounding education and the ways these issues impact educators.

CI 615 Foundations of Education/ Cultures in Education

3 cr hrs
This course will explore issues, problems and solutions relevant to schooling in a pluralistic society by viewing schools as social institutions that reflect and influence both the values and the cultural dynamics of a society at large. Issues of race, social class, and gender will be explored as factors of inequity that shape students and teachers both in and out of the classroom. Starting with their own lives, students investigate education as an agent of social change.

Class work as well as experiential assignments will assist participants’ exploration of their own as well as their students’ identities in order to identify the effects of various factors on the teaching experience, educational culture, and school change efforts. Special attention will be given to considerations necessary to implement action research projects.

CI 620 Fundamentals of Action Research.

3 cr hrs
This course provides a structured approach to the practice of action research. Educators learn how to identify relevant issues, become involved in collaborative inquiry, and use data and research to inform their practice, improve student academic success, and contribute to positive change in their schools. Students will begin to apply action-research methodologies in their own environments.

CI 630 Changes in Education

3 cr hrs
This course will focus on systemic and structural change at the school and classroom levels. Case studies of school change models, both traditional and experimental, will be examined and discussed as possibilities and springboards for candidates’ own action research projects. Emphasis will be placed on the collaborative nature of successful school change as well as analysis of examples of failures. Guest speakers will also provide insight into dimensions of school change.

CI 645 Data Collection and Proposal Development

6 cr hrs
Educators will engage in reflective practices as they develop a plan for action research, collect and analyze appropriate data, and develop data-informed decisions/actions to improve student learning and enhance professional growth.

CI 665 School and Community Partnerships

3 cr hrs
The purpose of the School and Community Partnerships course is for students to connect business and community resources with school resources to enrich students’ educational experience and increase student achievement and/or knowledge. Real world examples will inform students’ inquiry into ways partnerships can be forged and sustained. Particular consideration will be paid to the schools and communities in which students work.

CI 670 Legal Issues: Litigation v. Advocacy

3 cr hrs
This course is designed to familiarize educators with the legal system as it pertains to the educational process in order to empower educators to employ educational law to students’ advantage.

CI 675 Project Implementation

6 cr hrs
In this course, educators will use collected data to enact change. At the end of the implementation period, students will engage in reflective assessment of themselves and their program.

CI 650 Elective: Mentoring the Researcher

min 5 cr hrs
Additional courses / directed studies can be requested at any time for students seeking to better understand specific issues related to their projects. Students are required to take two hours of elective courses during their coursework.