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General Education Foundation Courses

 

A. Oral Communication:

Student Learning Outcome: Students should be able to deliver messages appropriate to their audience, purpose, and context.

Performance Indicators – Students should be able to:

  1. Perform verbal and nonverbal communication behaviors that illustrate the competency of an effective communicator.
  2. Support and organize their ideas in a coherent manner.

Required: 1 Course
G-CM 130 Interpersonal Communication
G-CM 140 Public Speaking
G-CM 218 Business and Professional Communication

B. Written Communication & Information Literacy

Student Learning Outcome for Written Communication: Students should be able to write with skill and clarity.

Performance Indicators – Students should be able to:

  1. Produce writing that shows an awareness of audience.
  2. Support their ideas with appropriate details and examples.
  3. Coherently organize their writing.
  4. Produce writing that shows careful attention to craft.

Student Learning Outcome for Information Literacy: Students should be able to demonstrate ethical and efficient use of information.

Performance Indicators – Students should be able to:

  1. Show that they can find appropriate sources.
  2. Show that they can evaluate the reliability of sources.
  3. Use information from sources appropriately in their work.

Required: 4 Courses
G-EN 110 College Composition I
G-EN 111 College Composition II
and:
Students pursuing a Bachelor of Arts are required to take Spanish and one Language Intensive (LI) course in their major department.  Students pursuing a Bachelor of Science are required to take two Language Intensive courses with at least one LI course in the student’s major department.

Language Intensive – Oral and Written Communication

Student Learning Outcome for Oral Communication: Students should be able to clearly voice a coherent message.

Performance Indicators – Students should be able to:

  1. Show that they can speak clearly and audibly.
  2. Support their ideas with appropriate research.

Speaking Component

(1) Informal oral communication exercises should be used frequently in the LI classroom. Most often, these will consist of required participation in small-group and class discussions. LI instructors can make even routine student participation in class discussions and activities into helpful oral communication exercises simply by (a) raising students’ consciousness about the variety of signals they send when they speak informally in class, and (b) helping students eliminate their careless habits in speech and delivery.

(2) At least one formal oral presentation should be included in the LI course. The presentation, probably brief, may be delivered to part or all of the class, or some other audience. It may derive from a formal writing assignment, recast for oral delivery.

Student Learning Outcome for Written Communication: Students should be able to write with skill and clarity.

Performance Indicators – Students should be able to:

  1. Produce writing that shows an awareness of audience.
  2. Demonstrate effective participation in the writing process.
  3. Coherently organize their writing.
  4. Produce writing that shows careful attention to craft.

Writing Component

(1) Informal writing assignments should be frequent, perhaps one per class session, but certainly one per week. Most informal writing activities are in the “writing to learn” mode; that is, they are intended to push students to read, think about, and interpret course material more carefully and deeply than they otherwise might do. From a handful of basic, informal writing models, such as journals and microthemes, LI instructors can improvise an almost endless array of specific informal writing activities.

(2) Formal writing assignments should be substantial (but the meaning of “substantial” depends upon the course and the exact nature of the assignment). There should be at least one formal, polished piece of writing. Whenever possible, LI instructors should give formal assignments in stages, confer with students over drafts, and allow ample time for revision(s).

Courses designated as Language Intensive:

G-AR 310 Art History I
G-AR 311 Art History II
BA 475 Business Strategy & Policy
BI 391 Evolution
CI 455 Teaching-Learning Process
G-CM 130 Interpersonal Communication
G-CM 218 Business & Professional Communication
G-CM 221 Intercultural Communication
CM 220 Special Topics in Popular Culture
CM 475A Senior Seminar in Communication Research
CM 475B Senior Project in Communication
G-EE 210 Children’s Literature
EE 303 Reading/Language Arts I
G-EN 210L Masterpieces of World Literature (4 hours)
G-EN 220L Contemporary World Literature (4 hours)
G-EN 255L American Literature II (4 hours)
G-EN 270L Fiction (4 hours)
EN 313 Expository Writing
G-EN 370L Poetry (4 hours)
EN 475B  Senior Project in English
G-HI 333 Technology & Society
HI 475  Senior Thesis
G-MA 290 History of Mathematics
MA 475 Senior Project in Mathematics
ML 385 Advanced Level Composition and Conversation
NS 300 Research Methods
NS 475 Senior Research
G-TH 265 Topics in Dramatic Literature
G-TH 385 Theatre History & Dramatic Literature I
TH 475 Senior Theatre Capstone
PE 380 History & Philosophy of Health, PE, Sport
PE 445  Readings and Research for Health Science
G-PR 104L Ethics (4 hours)
G-PR 106L Spiritual Pathways
G-PS 215  Global Peace Studies
PS 475  Senior Thesis
PY 450 History and Systems of Psychology
PY 475 Senior Thesis
SO 475 Senior Thesis
G-TE 333 Technology & Society
TE 475 Senior Project

C. Mathematics

Student Learning Outcome: Students should be able to use mathematical concepts.

Performance Indicators – Students should be able to:

  1. Demonstrate understanding by performing accurate computations.
  2. Apply algorithms to solve problems.

Required: 3-4 hours chosen from the following:
G-MA 105 College Algebra
G-MA 106 Pre-Calculus
G-MA 111 Calculus I
G-MA 123 Discrete Mathematics
G-MA 153 Principles of Geometry
G-MA 201 Survey of Mathematics
G-BA 220 Business Applied Statistics
G-MA 221 Elementary Applied Statistics

D. Religion/Beliefs/Values

Student Learning Outcome: Students should be able to answer fundamental religious or philosophical questions.

Performance Indicators – Students should be able to:

  1. Develop answers relative to alternative religious/philosophical perspectives.
  2. Explain their position on religious or philosophical issues.

Required: 3-4 hours chosen from the following:
G-PR 101 Old Testament-Hebrew Bible: God and People in Ancient Israel
G-PR 102 Jesus: New Testament Foundations
G-PR 104 Ethics
*G-PR 104L Ethics (LI if taken as G-PR104L for 4 hours)
*G-PR 106L Spiritual Pathways: Transformation, Compassion, and Vocation
G-PR 107 Critical Thinking
G-PR 201 Introduction to Philosophy
G-PR 202 Christian Traditions
G-PR 203 Science and Religion
G-PR 204 Peacemaking: Religious Perspectives
G-PR 206 Religion and Environmental Stewardship
G-PR 302 Religion and Politics
G-PR 304 The Church of the Brethren and Beyond: The Christian Church Serves Our World
G-PR 306 World Religions

E. Wholeness/Health/Fitness

Student Learning Outcome: Students should be able to identify optimal behaviors that promote lifelong personal health.

Performance Indicators – Students should be able to:

  1. Develop a personal strategy for health and fitness emphasizing the physical domain.
  2. Illustrate the relationship between personal behaviors and lifelong health and wellness.

Required: 1 course 
G-PE 150 Concepts in Holistic Health
G-PE 170 Personal & Community Health

F. Global/Intercultural Experience

Student Learning Outcome: Students should be able to understand they live in a world of diverse cultures.

Performance Indicators – Students should be able to:

  1. Identify social, cultural, religious, or linguistic differences.
  2. Explain how values and contributions of diverse societies affect individual experiences.

Required: 3 hours+ chosen from the following:
G-BA 342IT International Business (Travel required)
G-CI 251
Introduction to Education Practicum
G-CI 333 Intercultural Education
*G-CM 221 Intercultural Communication
G-EN 210 Masterpieces of World Literature
*G-EN 210L Masterpieces of World Literature (LI if taken as G-EN 210L for four hours)
G-EN 220 Contemporary World Literature
*G-EN 220L Contemporary World Literature (LI if taken as G-EN 220L for four hours)
*G-HI 333 Technology and Society
*G-MA 290 History of Mathematics
G-ML 108 Spanish Level I
G-ML 109 Spanish Level II
G-ML 208 Spanish Level III
G-ML 209 Spanish Level IV
G-ML 350 Junior Year Abroad
G-MU 210 Introduction to World Music
G-PR 306 World Religions
G-PS 130 Principles of Geography
*G-PS 215 Global Peace Studies
G-SO 202 Minorities in the U.S.
*G-TE 333 Technology and Society

+Students completing a Bachelor of Arts degree must take G-ML 108 Level I Spanish for three hours as well as three additional hours in the Global/Intercultural Experience Foundation. These students will be required to take only one Language Intensive (LI) course.

College Seminars

In the seminar series, students will demonstrate (1) that they have explored traditional Church of the Brethren values; (2) that they understand service-learning and can complete a service project; (3) that they can make informed ethical decisions in personal and professional situations; and (4) that they have investigated career options in the fields of study. In addition, the various seminars address the following goals.

  1. G-ID 101 Academic Community Essentials (ACE) Seminar: Students will show that they have learned about college life, create a degree plan, and practice good study skills, critical thinking, and conflict resolution.
  2. G-ID 201 Sophomore Seminar: Students will complete a service project, develop a career plan, and show that they have explored internship options.
  3. Senior Capstone Experience: Students will complete a senior project, as designed by department faculty.