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Natural Science Program

Purpose Statement

The Department of Natural Science provides:

  • a career-oriented approach to pre-professional preparation in the health sciences
  • a liberal arts and sciences approach to environmental health and sustainability
  • a hands-on approach to education in the laboratory and through student research
  • preparation to meet the Kansas State Department of Education standards for licensure in biology and chemistry

General Education Student Learning Outcome: Students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of how the natural sciences construct knowledge of the world.

General Education Performance Indicators

Students should be able to:

  1. Summarize the current consensus of the scientific community with regards to the structure and function of some aspect of the physical or biological world.
  2. Illustrate their knowledge of the changing nature of the consensus of the scientific community with regards to the structure and function of some aspect of the physical or biological world, by outlining the historical changes in that consensus.
  3. Report on their experiences with those methods and processes of the natural sciences which they conducted in the laboratory.

Biochemistry Major (Recommended for Pre-Medical Students)

Requirements

G-CH 111  College Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 112  College Chemistry II (5 hours)
CH 251  Organic Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 252  Organic Chemistry II (5 hours)
CH 201  Quantitative Analysis (4 hours)
CH 370  Biochemistry (4 hours)
G-BI 111  College Biology I (4 hours)
BI 112  College Biology II (4 hours)
BI/CH 310  Statistical Data Analysis (4 hours)
BI/CH 373  Cell Physiology/Biochemistry II (4 hours)

Select one from the following:

BI 283  Genetics (4 hours)
BI 384  Advanced Genetics (4 hours)
CH 390  Instrumental Analysis (3 hours)

Required Supporting Courses

G-PH 215  General Physics I (4 hours)
PH 216  General Physics II (4 hours)
*NS 300  Research Methods (1 hour)
NS 375  Junior Seminar (1 hour)
*NS 475  Senior Research (2 hours)

Biology Major

Requirements

A minimum of 32 semester hours of biological science coursework, including

G-BI 111  College Biology I (4 hours)
BI 112  College Biology II (4 hours)
BI 283  Genetics (4 hours)
BI 310  Statistical Data Analysis (4 hours)

8 credit hours chosen from among the 300 Level BI Courses

Required Supporting Courses

G-CH 111  College Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 112  College Chemistry II (5 hours)
CH 251  Organic Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 252  Organic Chemistry II (5 hours)
G-PH 215  General Physics I (4 hours)
*NS 300  Research Methods (1 hour)
NS 375  Junior Seminar (1 hour)
*NS 475  Senior Research (2 hours)

Biology Major – Teaching Licensure in Biology (6-12)

Biology Major for Teacher Licensure

A minimum of 32 semester hours, including:

G-BI 111  College Biology I (4 hours)
BI 112  College Biology II (4 hours)
G-BI 201  Biodiversity (4 hours)
BI 283  Genetics (4 hours)
*NS 300  Research Methods (1 hour)
NS 375  Junior Seminar (1 hour)

12 credit hours chosen from among the remaining BI or NS courses numbered 200 of higher, including at least one organismal course and one population course.

Required Supporting Courses

G-CH 111  College Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 112  College Chemistry II (5 hours)
CH 251  Organic Chemistry I (5 hours)
CI 232  Educational Technology (2 hours)
G-MA 221  Elementary Applied Statistics (4 hours)
G-PE 170  Personal and Community Health (2 hours)
G-PH 215  General Physics I (4 hours)
G-PY 101  Introduction to Psychology (3 hours)

Students pursuing this major must also meet all professional requirements for teacher licensure in the Curriculum and Instruction Department.

Biology Minor

Requirements

A minimum of 20 semester hours, including

G-BI 111  College Biology I (4 hours)
BI 112  College Biology II (4 hours)
BI 283  Genetics (4 hours)

At least eight hours of additional biology courses

Required Supporting Courses

G-CH 111  College Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 251  Organic Chemistry I (5 hours)

Health Science Interdisciplinary Major

This interdisciplinary major is being phased out. Entering students planning to graduate in spring 2023 or later should enroll in the new Health Science major in the Health/P.E./Recreation department. Students transferring in 60 hours or more—including equivalents of College Biology I & II, College Chemistry I & II, Elementary Applied Statistics, and Human Anatomy and Human Physiology—may enroll in this major in academic year 2020-21 with prospects to graduate in spring 2022.

Required Courses

G-BI 111 College Biology I (4 hours)
BI 112  College Biology II (4 hours)
G-CH 111 College Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 112 College Chemistry II (5 hours)
G-PH 215 General Physics I (4 hours)
PH 216 General Physics II (4 hours)
G-BI 210 Principles of Nutrition (3 hours)
BI 225 Human Anatomy (4 hours)
BI 315 Human Physiology (4 hours)
PE 180 First Aid and Personal Safety (2 hours)
PE 280 Care and Treatment of Athletic Injuries (3 hours)
PE 288 Psychology and Sociology of Sport (2 hours)
PE 330 Physiology of Exercise (3 hours)
PE 411 Kinesiology (3 hours)
PE/BI 445 Readings and Research: Research Methods in Health Science (1 hour)
PE 475 Senior Seminar – Kinesiology Internship (2 hours)
G-MA 221 Elementary Applied Statistics (4 hours)
G-PY 101 Introduction to Psychology

Recommended Supporting Courses

G-PE 150 Concepts in Holistic Health (2 hours)
G-PE 170 Personal and Community Health

Additional Requirements for Some Pre-professional Programs

PY 204 Child and Adolescent Development (3 hours) OR
PY 305 Abnormal Psychology (3 hours)
BI 207 Medical Terminology (2 hours)
BI 404 Biomedical Ethics (2 hours)
G-MA 105 College Algebra
Trigonometry (or above)
Communication course
Sociology course
Business course

Chemistry Major

Requirements

A minimum of 36 semester hours including

G-CH 111  Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 112  Chemistry II (5 hours)
CH 251  Organic Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 252  Organic Chemistry II (5 hours)
CH 201  Quantitative Analysis (4 hours)
CH 390  Instrumental Analysis (3 hours)
CH 385  Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (4 hours)
CH 400  General Physical Chemistry (5 hours)

Required Supporting Courses

G-PH 205  College Physics I (5 hour)
PH 206  College Physics II (5 hour)
*NS 300  Research Methods (1 hour)
NS 375  Junior Seminar (1 hour)
*NS 475  Senior Research (2 hours)
G-MA 111  Calculus I (4 hours)
MA 112  Calculus II (4 hours)

Recommended Supporting Courses

G-BI 111  College Biology I (4 hours)
BI 112  College Biology II (4 hours)

Chemistry Major – Teaching Licensure in Chemistry (6-12)

Chemistry Major for Teacher Licensure

A minimum of 32 hours including:

G- CH 111  College Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 112  College Chemistry II (5 hours)
CH 251  Organic Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 201  Quantitative Analysis (4 hours)
CH 310  Statistical Data Analysis (4 hours)
CH 385  Advanced Inorganic (4 hours)
CH 388  Lab Assisting Internship (2 hours)

Remaining hours must come from CH 252 Organic Chemistry II or CH courses 300 level or above.

Required Courses

G-BI 111  College Biology I (4 hours)
BI 112  College Biology II (4 hours)
CI 406 (ED 406) Methods for Teaching Natural Science in the Secondary School (3 hours)
G-PH 215  General Physics I (4 hours)
PH 216  General Physics II (4 hours)
*NS 300  Research Methods (1 hour)
NS 375  Junior Seminar (1 hours)

Suggested Courses

G-NS 141  Environmental Science (4 hours)
G-PC 251  Geology (4 hours)
G-PC 275  Astronomy (4 hours)
CH 252  Organic Chemistry II (5 hours)
G-MA 111  Calculus I (4 hours)
MA 112  Calculus II (4 hours)
PH 205  College Physics I (replace G-PH 215) (5 hours)
PH 206  College Physics II (replace G-PH 216) (5 hours)
*NS 475  Senior Research (2 hours)

Students pursuing this major must also meet all professional requirements for teacher licensure in the curriculum and instruction department.

Chemistry Minor

Requirements

A minimum of 24 hours including

G-CH 111  College Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 112  College Chemistry II (5 hours)
CH 251  Organic Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 252  Organic Chemistry II (5 hours)
CH 201  Quantitative Analysis (4 hours)

Environmental Stewardship Major

This program achieves its purposes when its graduates:

  • demonstrate knowledge of contemporary theories in the natural sciences
  • demonstrate skill in the application of laboratory and field experimental techniques
  • demonstrate knowledge of contemporary theories of human social systems and behavior
  • demonstrate a critical understanding of their personal roles in history, culture, and community
  • evaluate the impacts of human society and Earth’s natural systems on one another
  • differentiate between their personal belief system and societal belief systems
  • express a personal environmental ethic

Required Natural Science Courses

G-BI 101 Principles of Biology (4 hours) or G-BI 111 College Biology I (4 hours)
G-BI 201  Biodiversity (4 hours)
G-CH 101 Principles of Chemistry (4 hours)
G-NS 141  Environmental Science (4 hours)
G-PH 215  General Physics I (4 hours)
G-PC 251  Geology (4 hours)
G-NS 245  Climatology (4 hours)
BI 325  Human Ecology, Epidemiology and Public Health (4 hours)
NS 404  Environmental Ethics (2 hours)
NS 495  Field Experience (4 hours)

Electives from Humanities, Social Science, and Technology

Select at least 27 hours from the following:

CM 325  Conflict Communication (3 hours)
EC 202  Survey of Economics (3 hours)
G-ET 201 Social Entrepreneurship (3 hours)
Up to 2 courses (G-HI or HI200+) (6 hours)
G-PE 170  Personal/Community Health (2 hours)
G-PR 104 Ethics (3 hours)
G-PR 107 Critical Thinking (3 hours)
G-PR 203 Science and Religion (3 hours)
G-PR 206 Religion and Environmental Stewardship (3 hours)
G-PS 125  International Relations (3 hours)
G-PS 130  Principles of Geography (3 hours)
G-PS 215  Global Peace Studies (3 hours)
PY/SO 303  Social Psychology (3-4 hours)
G-SO 101  Introduction to Sociology (3 hours)
SO 206  Social Problems (3-4 hours)
SO 320  Urban Sociology (3 hours)
*G-TE 333  Technology and Society (3-4 hours)

Other courses as approved by both the advisor and co-advisor.

Other Course Requirements

NS 350 Stewardship Seminar1/semester (4 required)
*NS 300  Research Methods (1 hour)
NS 375  Junior Seminar (1 hour)
*NS 475  Senior Research (2 hours)

Environmental Science Minor

Requirements

G-BI 101 Principles of Biology or G-BI 111 College Biology I or G-CH 101 Principles of Chemistry (4 hours)
G-NS 141  Environmental Science (4 hours)
G-PC 251  Geology (4 hours)
G-NS 245  Climatology (4 hours)
NS 495  Field Experience (4 hours)

Environmental Stewardship Minor

Requirements

G-NS 141 Environmental Science (4 hours)
G-PC 251  Geology or
G-PC 245  Climatology (4 hours)
NS 495  Field Experience (4 hours)
NS 350  Stewardship Seminar (2 hours)

Electives from Environmental Stewardship Major Electives list (6 hours)




Natural Science Course Descriptions

 

Biology Course Descriptions

G-BI 101 Principles of Biology

4 hours
An introduction to the principles of biology, with an emphasis on the biology of humans and the sustainability of our environmental interactions. This course does not apply toward a major in biology. Laboratory is included. (Fall and Spring)

G-BI 111 College Biology I

4 hours
A rigorous introduction to the unity and diversity of life. This course focuses on the contributions of genetics, ecology and evolution to the biodiversity of the planet. The laboratory exercises are designed to provide a variety of practical experiences, as well as to illustrate the principles discussed in lecture. (Fall)

BI 112 College Biology II

4 hours
A continuation of G-BI 111 with a rigorous introduction to organismal structure and function. Explores the organization and processes of living systems at the levels of biomolecules, organelles, cells, organ systems, and organisms. Lab work includes studies of enzyme action, cellular respiration, organismal development and anatomy. Prerequisite: G-BI 111 with a grade of C or better. (Spring)

G-BI 201 Biodiversity

3-4 hours
A fundamental study of biological diversity as an assessment of life on earth. This will progress from the individual to the community, focusing on biodiversity and ecology from an evolutionary perspective and also on applied environmental research. The course includes laboratory work as an option for the 4th credit hour. (Spring, even years)

G-BI 210 Principles of Nutrition

3 hours
Physiology and chemistry of digestion, absorption, and metabolism of nutrients; nutrient functions; requirements; and effects of nutrient deficiencies and toxicities.  This course does not include a laboratory. Prerequisites: G-CH 101 or G-CH 111 with a grade of C or better or with consent of instructor (Interterm)

BI 225 Human Anatomy

4 hours
A lecture/laboratory course in the fundamentals of human anatomy, with emphasis on macroscopic structures at the tissue, organ and organ system levels of organization. Some attention will be given to the perspectives of histology and developmental biology. The course includes laboratory work, primarily dissection of a comparative mammal, the domestic cat. (Fall, even years)

BI 234 Microbiology

5 hours
A study of microorganisms, with emphasis on the bacteria. A consideration of their structure, metabolism, classification, identification, and human and ecological relationships. Laboratory is included. Prerequisites: BI 112, CH 251 with grades of C or better or consent of instructor. (Spring, even years)

BI 283 Genetics

4 hours
Basic genetic concepts including classical Mendelian inheritance, cytogenetics, population genetics, and the molecular basis of gene action. Laboratory experiences coordinated with lecture topics. Pre-requisites: BI 112, with a grade of C or better. (Fall)

BI 310 Statistical Data Analysis (also cross-listed as CH 310 Statistical Data Analysis)

4 hours
A study of fundamental concepts including data types, distributions, and hypothesis testing; and of the applications of spreadsheets and other software for data manipulation and statistical analysis. This course does not include a laboratory. Prerequisite: G-MA221 or consent of instructor. (Spring, odd years; Interterm, even years)

BI 315 Human Physiology

4 hours
A rigorous introduction to the fundamentals of human neurophysiology, cardiac-physiology, muscular & circulatory physiology and excretory & respiratory physiology. Laboratory experiences include case studies of human physiological problems. Prerequisite: BI 112, with a grade of C or better. (Spring, odd years)

BI 325 Human Ecology, Epidemiology, and Public Health

4 hours
A study of the relationships between humans and their environments, including both physical and biotic environments, with special emphasis on understanding the nature of healthy relationships in comparison to the disease state. This course does not include a laboratory. Prerequisites: BI 112 with a grade of C or better. (Fall, odd years)

BI 370 Biochemistry (also cross-listed as CH 370 Biochemistry)

4 hours
A basic study of the chemistry and metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids. The course provides an understanding of the structural and functional relationships of chemical constituents of cells and the role that they play in the processes of life. Laboratory is included. Prerequisite: CH 252 with grade C or better. Laboratory is included. (Fall, odd years)

BI 373 Cell Physiology (also cross-listed as CH 373 Biochemistry II)

4 hours
A rigorous study of the fundamentals of cell physiology, concentrating on intermediary metabolism and its regulation. Laboratory is included. Prerequisites: BI 112 and CH252 with grades of C or better. (Spring, even years)

BI 380 Green Chemistry

3 hours
This upper-level chemistry course explores the 12 principles of Green Chemistry and the application of those principles in various industries through several case studies. It explores and explains how chemistry can help address global human health and environmental issues and develop  appropriate solutions. Prerequisites: G-CH 111 and CH 112. (Spring, odd years)

BI 384 Advanced Genetics

4 hours
This upper-level course will extend on topics presented in Genetics (B1283). The course will delve deeper into genetics with a specific focus on the molecular-scale processes responsible for producing our phenotype and their relationships to evolutionary change. The lab component focuses on various current lab techniques used in the field of genetics. (Spring, odd years)

BI 391 Evolution 

4 hours (Language Intensive)
A study of the history, philosophical underpinnings, and implications of Charles Darwin’s Theory of Evolution by Natural Selection. This course does not include a laboratory. Prerequisites: BI 112 with a grade of C or better. (Interterm, even years)

BI 393 Topics in Biology

1-4 hours
One specific topic will be covered each time this course is offered. Possible topics include (but are not limited to) molecular genetics, vertebrate zoology, functional morphology, quantitative biology, and advanced ecology. Prerequisite: BI 112 with a grade of C or better and consent of the instructor.

BI 404 Biomedical Ethics

2 hours
This seminar examines both the factual and ethical dimensions of decisions regarding healthcare. Students will use a case study approach to apply the ethical principles of autonomy, non-maleficence, beneficence, and justice to diverse situations. Alternative ethical systems and ethics in research are considered. This course does not include a laboratory.

BI 445 Readings and Research in Biology

1-4 hours
Enrichment of a student’s study in the discipline either by readings on a topic not covered in the above courses or by research done on or off campus. Prerequisites: 12 semester hours in the department or program with an average of C or better, and consent of the instructor. Open only to students majoring in the department or program.

BI 495 Field Experience in Biology

1-4 hours
A planned experience in one of the field-oriented or professionally related phases of biological science. The specific area and content must be agreed upon in advance by the student, faculty advisor, and Vice President for Academic Affairs. Specific examples that are offered periodically, especially during Interterm are Field Experience in Puerto Rico and observations of various health careers with practicing professionals.

Special Course Options
295/495 Field Experience (1-4 hours)
297  Study Abroad (12-16 hours)
299/499 Independent Study (1-4 hours)
388 Career Connections (3-10 hours)
445 Readings and Research (1-4 hours)

 

Chemistry Course Descriptions

G-CH 101 Principles of Chemistry

3-4 hours
A one-semester introduction to the principles of chemistry, with an emphasis on chemical interactions in the environment and sustainability.  This course does not apply toward a major in biology, biochemistry, or chemistry. This course includes laboratory work for the 4th credit hour during Spring offerings. (Interterm, even years; Fall, even years)

G-CH 111 College Chemistry I

5 hours
A study of the principles, laws, and concepts of chemistry as they relate to the periodic table and systematic study of the properties of the elements. A study of modern atomic and molecular structure. Laboratory is included. Prerequisite: High School Chemistry or G-CH101 with a C or above. (Fall)

CH 112 College Chemistry II

5 hours
A continuation of CH 111. Includes study of the chemistry of metals and nonmetals, chemistry of solutions, chemical equilibrium and qualitative analysis. Laboratory is included. Prerequisite: G-CH 111 with a grade of C or above. (Spring)

CH 201 Quantitative Analysis

4 hours
A study of the principles and methods of analytical chemistry by the methods of volumetric and gravimetric analysis, precipitimetry, acidimetry and oxidation- reduction titrations. Laboratory is included. Prerequisite: CH 112 with a grade of C or above, or consent of the instructor. (Fall, even years)

CH 251 Organic Chemistry I

5 hours
A study of the principles of organic chemistry, the physical and chemical properties of carbon compounds with emphasis on the mechanisms of organic reactions, the nomenclature of the compounds, and methods of organic synthesis. The carbon compounds discussed include some of the common alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, cycloalkanes, alkyl halides, ethers and alcohols. Laboratory is included. Prerequisite: G-CH 112 with a grade of C or above, or consent of instructor. (Fall)

CH 252 Organic Chemistry II

5 hours
A continuation of CH 251. Includes study of basic spectroscopy as a basic tool for structural analysis and the chemistry of aromatic compounds, aldehydes, ketones, amines, carboxylic acids and their functional derivatives. Laboratory is included. Prerequisite: CH 251 with a grade of C or above. (Spring)

CH 310 Statistical Data Analysis (also cross-listed as BI 310 Statistical Data Analysis)

4 hours
A study of fundamental concepts including data types, distributions, and hypothesis testing; and of the applications of spreadsheets and other software for data manipulation and statistical analysis. This course does not include a laboratory. Prerequisite: G-MA221 or consent of instructor. (Spring, odd years; Interterm, even years)

CH 370 Biochemistry (also cross-listed as Bi 370 Biochemistry)

4 hours
A basic study of the chemistry and metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and nucleic acids. The course provides an understanding of the structural and functional relationships of chemical constituents of cells and the role that they play in the processes of life. Prerequisite: CH 252 or consent of instructor with concurrent enrollment. Laboratory is included. (Fall, odd years)

CH 373 Biochemistry II (also cross-listed as BI 373 Cell Physiology)

4 hours
A rigorous study of the fundamentals of cell physiology, concentrating on intermediary metabolism and its regulation. Laboratory is included. Prerequisites: BI 112, CH252 and BI/CH 370 with grades of C or better or consent of instructor. (Spring, even years)

CH 380 Green Chemistry

3 hours
This upper-level chemistry course explores the 12 principles of Green Chemistry and the application of those principles in various industries through several case studies. It explores and explains how chemistry can help address global human health and environmental issues and develop  appropriate solutions. Prerequisites: G-CH 111 and CH 112. (Spring, odd years)

CH 385 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

4 hours
Further study of inorganic chemistry including structure and bonding, coordination chemistry, organometallic chemistry, the chemistry of transition metals and a more detailed systematic study of the families of the periodic table. Laboratory is included. Prerequisite: CH 112, CH 252. (Spring, even years)

CH 390 Instrumental Analysis

3 hours
Advanced work in quantitative analysis with emphasis on the principles and methods of electrochemical, spectroscopic and chromatographic analysis. Laboratory is included. Prerequisite: CH 201, PH 206 or PH216, or consent of the instructor. (Spring, odd years)

CH 393 Topics in Chemistry

1-4 hours
One specific topic will be covered each time this course is offered. Prerequisite: CH112 with a grade of C or better and consent of the instructor.

CH 400 General Physical Chemistry

5 hours
A study of the physical-chemical properties of matter. Topics covered include thermodynamics, the kinetic theory of gases, chemical kinetics, quantum mechanics, and statistical mechanics. Laboratory is included. Prerequisite: CH 252, G-MA 111, PH 206 (Fall, odd years)

CH 445 Readings and Research in Chemistry

1-4 hours
Enrichment of a student’s study in the discipline either by reading on the topic not covered in the above courses or by research done on or off campus. Prerequisite: 12 semester hours in the department or program with an average of C or better, and consent of instructor. Open only to students majoring in the department or program.

Special Course Options
295/495 Field Experience (1-4 hours)
297  Study Abroad (12-16 hours)
299/499 Independent Study (1-4 hours)
388 Career Connections (3-10 hours)
445 Readings and Research (1-4 hours)

 

Natural Science Course Descriptions

G-NS 100 Science in Society

3 hours
The goals of this course are to build scientific literacy and to increase awareness of what Science has to offer to individuals and to Society. Classes will include lectures, faculty-led discussions of assigned readings, student-led discussions of “Science in the News” topics, and student presentations of semester projects/term papers. This course does not include a laboratory. (Interterm, odd years)

G-NS 141 Environmental Science

4 hours
A study of the environmental issues that arise from the complex relationships between humans and the earth. Emphasis will be placed on a scientific understanding and a search for solutions to environmental problems. Laboratory is included. (Fall)

G-NS 245 Climatology

3 hours
This study of the Earth’s climate system will emphasize the physical and biological processes that determine climate: e.g. radiative transfer, atmospheric and oceanic energy transfer, energy balance, the hydrologic cycle, and related geological, biological, and anthropogenic influences; and will consider their interactive effects on climate change. This course does not include a laboratory. (Spring, even years)

NS 300 Research Methods

1 hour (Language Intensive)
Preparation for participation in an independent laboratory research project in the natural sciences. Topics covered include scientific literature searches, research design, data handling, research evaluation, scientific writing, and reporting. To be taken during the sophomore or junior year. (Fall)

NS 350 Stewardship Seminar

1 hour
A weekly discussion of the interrelationships among the current contents of the student’s other courses, in light of their relationships to the goals of the Environmental Stewardship major.

NS 375 Junior Seminar

1 hour
Preparation for participation in an independent laboratory research project in the natural sciences. Topics covered include literature searches, research design, data handling, research evaluation, scientific writing and reporting, career exploration, and scientific ethics. (Spring)

NS 404 Environmental Ethics

2 hours
This seminar examines both the factual and ethical dimensions of our current and possible future environments. Students will use a case study approach to apply different ethical frameworks to choices that arise from human interaction with the natural order. This course does not include a laboratory.

NS 475 Senior Research

2 hours (Language Intensive)
Experience in the planning, conducting, and reporting of scientific research. The student research works in continual consultation with the research advisor. Selection of the research topic and consent of the advisor must be obtained in advance of enrollment. Prerequisite: NS 375 and consent of research advisor.

NS 495 Field experience in the Natural Sciences

1-4 hours
A planned experience in a field-oriented aspect of both the biological and physical sciences.

Special Course Options
295/495 Field Experience (1-4 hours)
297  Study Abroad (12-16 hours)
299/499 Independent Study (1-4 hours)
388 Career Connections (3-10 hours)
445 Readings and Research (1-4 hours)

 

Physical Science Course Descriptions

G-PC 251 Geology

4 hours
An introductory course that focuses on the scientific study of the earth. The course emphasizes the study of earth materials, changes in the surface and interior of the earth, and the dynamic forces that cause those changes. Laboratory is included. (Interterm, odd years)

G-PC 275 Astronomy

4 hours
The structure and evolution of the universe, from nearby planets to distant quasars, are examined. Topics include recent discoveries concerning planets, stars, galaxies, pulsars, and black holes as well as their evolution, the structure of the universe today and how it will be in the future. The emphasis is descriptive rather than mathematical. Laboratory is included. (Interterm, even years)

PC 445 Readings and Research in Physical Science

1-4 hours
Enrichment of a student’s study in the discipline either by reading on a topic not covered in the above courses or by research done on or off campus. Prerequisite: 12 semester hours in the department or program and the consent of the instructor. Open only to students majoring in the department or program.

Special Course Options
295/495 Field Experience (1-4 hours)
297  Study Abroad (12-16 hours)
299/499 Independent Study (1-4 hours)
388 Career Connections (3-10 hours)
445 Readings and Research (1-4 hours)

 

Physics Course Descriptions

G-PH 201 Principles of Physics

3 hours
A first course in physics designed for students with no previous background in physics and who can benefit from a one-semester introduction to basic principles. Physics topics will be treated more conceptually than mathematically, although basic algebra skills are required. This course does not include a laboratory. (Interterm, odd years)

G-PH 205 College Physics I

5 hours
A first course for chemistry and mathematics majors with a calculus background. Topics covered are Newton’s Laws, energy, momentum, gravity, torque and angular momentum with emphasis placed on the use of mathematics to formulate problems and to explain physical phenomena. Prerequisite: G-MA 111. Laboratory is included. (Fall, odd years)

PH 206 College Physics II

5 hours
A continuation of PH 205. Topics covered are electricity, magnetism, optics, fluids, waves, and thermodynamics. Prerequisite: PH 205. Laboratory is included. (Spring, even years)

G-PH 215 General Physics I

4 hours
A first course for premed, biology, and other science majors with a college algebra background. Topics covered are Newton’s Laws, energy, momentum, gravity, torque and angular momentum with emphasis placed on the understanding of physical concepts to formulate problems and to explain physical phenomena. Lab is included. Prerequisite: MA 105 College Algebra. (Fall)

PH 216 General Physics II

4 hours
A continuation of G-PH 215. Topics covered are electricity, magnetism, optics, fluids, waves, and thermodynamics. Lab is included. Prerequisite: G-PH 215. (Spring)

 

Special Course Options
295/495 Field Experience (1-4 hours)
297  Study Abroad (12-16 hours)
299/499 Independent Study (1-4 hours)
388 Career Connections (3-10 hours)
445 Readings and Research (1-4 hours)