05 Special Programs

//05 Special Programs
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Transformative Entrepreneurship Minor

As a career-orient liberal arts college, McPherson College integrates the entrepreneurial spirit and mindset throughout its curriculum. Students who want to more intentionally develop their own entrepreneurial skills and thought processes can complete the minor in Transformative Entrepreneurship.

The Transformative Entrepreneurship minor helps students better understand the risks and processes involved in beginning an entrepreneurial venture. McPherson College’s minor is transformative in the sense that students who engage in future entrepreneurial ventures will make an impact and transform the world in some way.

McPherson College faculty have defined entrepreneurship as follows:

Entrepreneurship is the creative process of developing sustainable, innovative ventures that solve problems and meet the needs of the greater community. Balancing opportunity and risk, the entrepreneur manages resources and constructs solutions that benefit both self and society.
(Approved by faculty 2/3/11)

Students who complete a minor in transformative entrepreneurship will be able to:

  • Articulate the definition of transformative entrepreneurship
  • Articulate the roles that entrepreneurs have played in history
  • Identify and analyze opportunities and their related risks
  • Demonstrate creative processes required to develop entrepreneurial ventures
  • Determine their talents and role in effective teamwork
  • Demonstrate skill in project management and resource utilization
  • Demonstrate the process of resource acquisition through networking
  • Illustrate the interplay of economics and social change
  • Illustrate responsibility to a greater society

Transformative Entrepreneurship Curriculum

To complete the minor, students will complete the following four courses:

  • ET101 Creativity and Innovation for Transformation – 3 credit hours
  • G-ET201 Social Entrepreneurship – 3 credit hours
  • ET301/BA235 The Entrepreneur at Work – 3 credit hours
  • ET475 Entrepreneurship in Action – 2 credit hours

Additionally, students will select nine hours from the following courses. Students may choose one class from within her/his major coursework area. One class must be selected from outside the division where her/his major is housed.

Humanities

  • G-AR220 Graphic Design for Non-Art Majors
  • AR340 Web-based Design or CM350 Web Design for Effective Communication
  • G-CM130 Interpersonal Communication
  • G-PA160 Performing for the Stage
  • CM135 Media Writing
  • CM210 Multimedia Storytelling
  • G-CM218 Business & Professional Communication
  • G-CM221 Intercultural Communication
  • CM310 Public Relations
  • CM325 Conflict Communication
  • CM330 Persuasion
  • EN313 Adv. Expository Writing
  • G-PA160 Performing for the Stage
  • PA215 Seminar & Practica in Performance & Production
  • G-PR104 Ethics

Science & Technology

  • BI325 Human Ecology, Epidemiology, and Public Health
  • G-NS141 Environmental Science
  • NS415 Environmental Ethics
  • TE301 Materials and Processes
  • G-TE333 Technology & Society

Social Sciences

  • PY405 Personality Theories
  • SO206 Social Problems
  • SO260 Intro to Human Services
  • BA315 Business Law
  • BA224 Principles of Management

Additional Requirements: Students must submit a Horizon Fund grant at some point during their career. The focus of the venture proposal is open, but should reflect the student’s interests.

Transformative Entrepreneurship Course Descriptions

ET101 Creativity & Innovation for Transformative Entrepreneurship

3 hours
Interactive seminar introduces students to readings and processes from various disciplines that elucidate the interdisciplinary nature of creativity and enable students to create conditions that stimulate it. Projects and assignments are designed to encourage a “critical creativity” that challenges participants through inquiry, multi-faceted exploration and strategic development. Topics examined through writing and design assignments, group projects, and discussions include consciousness, receptivity, risk, ethics, self agency, and social engagement with the express objective of fostering creative potential and its application in all areas of experience.

G-ET201 Social Entrepreneurship

3 hours
Addresses the challenges of creating and sustaining organizations in today’s global environment. Provides an overview of the role and importance of entrepreneurship in the global economy and in society. Examines how individuals use entrepreneurial skills to craft innovative responses to societal needs.

ET301 The Entrepreneur at Work

3 hours
Explores the process of managing and growing the entrepreneurial venture. The course is designed to provide exposure to topics critical to the success of the venture in startup and early growth: business planning; growth management and strategic planning; marketing and financial strategies; exit strategies; and different modes of venturing, such as franchising, venture acquisition, and technology licensing. Prerequisite: G-ET201 or consent of the instructor.

ET475 Entrepreneurship in Action

2 hours
This capstone experience allows students to pursue their own venture or explore how an entrepreneurial mindset will serve them well in whatever career they choose. Regular discussions with entrepreneurial faculty, mentors, and entrepreneurs from the community will help students identify components of an entrepreneurial mindset and discover their use in society and their career. (Prerequisites: ET101, ET201, ET301)

2020|05 Special Programs, Catalog 20-21|

Pre-Professional Programs

 

Law

Although the pre-law student may choose a major in any field, a strong knowledge of either history/politics, philosophy/religion, or sociology proves very helpful. Hence one of the three majors is recommended for the pre-law student:

  • B.S. in Politics and History
  • B.A. in Religion, Politics, and Law
  • B.S. in Sociology (Criminal Justice emphasis)

Students interested in law should counsel with the pre-law advisor or with the chair of the department of history/politics, philosophy/religion, or sociology. If you are considering law school, then the following courses (if not already required by your major) are excellent elective options.

BA 315 Business Law  3 hours
G-CM 130  Interpersonal Communication  3 hours
G-CM 140  Public Speaking  3 hours
EC 201 Principles of Economics: Macro  3 hours
EC 204 Principles of Economics: Micro  3 hours
G-HI 201  U.S. History to 1877  3 hours
G-HI 202  U.S. History since 1877  3 hours
G-PR 104  or G-PR 104L Ethics (3 hours if G-PR 104; 4 hours and language intensive if G-PR 104L
G-PR 201  Introduction to Philosophy  3 hours
PR432 Topics in Philosophy  3 hours
G-PS 102  U.S Government  3 hours
PS 356  American Diplomacy  3 hours
PY/SO 308  Counseling  3 hours
SO 206  Social Problems  3 hours

Medicine, Osteopathy, or Dentistry

Students who prepare for application to medical, osteopathic or dental school should complete a baccalaureate degree in any field. The recommended degrees are biology or biochemistry, which provides the best collection of courses suggested by most medical or health professional schools. The required courses include a minimum of the following:

G-BI 111   College Biology I 4 hours
BI 112     College Biology II 4 hours
G-CH 111 College Chemistry I 5 hours
CH 112     College Chemistry II 5 hours
CH 251     Organic Chemistry I 5 hours
CH 252     Organic Chemistry II 5 hours
BI 310     Statistical Data Analysis 4 hours
G-PH 215 General Physics I 4 hours
PH 216     General Physics II  4 hours

Other advanced courses recommended include:

BI 225     Human Anatomy
BI 315     Human Physiology
BI 325     Human Ecology, Epidemiology and Public Health
BI 360     Cell Physiology
CH 370     Biochemistry
BI/CH 373 Cell Physiology/Biochemistry II

A faculty member of the natural science department serves as pre-health advisor and should be consulted when planning a program to meet a specific school’s admission requirements.

Physical Therapy, Physician Assistant

A transition is under way in the physical therapy and physician assistant fields from training that culminates in a master’s degree to programs that grant the master’s or doctoral degree. Therefore, pre-physical therapy and pre-physician assistant students should first complete a baccalaureate degree at McPherson College. The recommended majors are biology or health science. The recommended courses include a minimum of the following:

G-BI 111   College Biology I    4 hours
BI 112     College Biology II    4 hours
BI 225     Human Anatomy    4 hours
BI 315     Human Physiology  4 hours
G-CH 111 College Chemistry I  5 hours
CH 112     College Chemistry II  5 hours
G-PH 215 General Physics I  4 hours
PH 216     General Physics II  4 hours
BI 310     Statistical Data Analysis  4 hours

A faculty member of the natural science department serves as pre-health advisor for biology majors. The director of the health care initiatives serves as advisor for health science majors. These advisors should be consulted when planning a program to meet a specific school’s admission requirements.

Optometry, Podiatry

Three years of college are the minimum requirement to be considered for admission to optometry or podiatry school; however, the vast majority of students admitted have completed a college degree, majoring in one of the sciences. The recommended degree at McPherson College is biology, which provides the best collection of courses suggested by most health professional schools. The basic admission requirements in the sciences may usually be met with the following courses:

G-BI 111   College Biology I   4 hours
BI 112     College Biology II   4 hours
G-CH 111 College Chemistry I  5 hours
CH 112     College Chemistry II  5 hours
CH 251     Organic Chemistry I   5 hours
CH 252     Organic Chemistry II 5 hours
BI 310     Statistical Data Analysis 4 hours
G-PH 215 General Physics I  4 hours
PH 216     General Physics II 4 hours

Other advanced courses recommended include:

BI 225     Human Anatomy
BI 234     Microbiology
BI 315     Human Physiology
CH 370     Biochemistry

A faculty member of the natural science department serves as pre-health advisor and should be consulted when planning a program to meet a specific school’s admission requirements.

Pharmacy

Students preparing for a career in pharmacy may attend McPherson College for at least two years during which the following courses must be taken: 20 hours chemistry, 16 hours biology, four hours mathematics, four hours physics, and 16 hours English, economics, and other electives in the social sciences and humanities. A faculty member of the natural science department serves as pre-health advisor and should be consulted when planning a program to meet a specific school’s admission requirements.

Social Work

McPherson College has well prepared its students majoring in the Behavioral Sciences for entrance into Master of Social Work (M.S.W.) degree programs. The pre-professional program at McPherson College commits itself to fostering student learning in career-oriented liberal arts so that students are prepared for community service and/or graduate study in social work. Students who have acquired knowledge and skills requisite for entry into the field of social services and graduate social work education demonstrate proficient knowledge, understanding, and application of psychological and sociological theories and concepts.

All accredited graduate programs in social work require a four year bachelor’s degree for admission. The pre-social work student should plan the liberal arts program to include courses in arts and humanities, social and behavioral sciences, and biological sciences. Although the pre-social work student may choose a major in any field, a strong knowledge of human services, personality theory, counseling, and social problems is strongly recommended. The B.S. in psychology or sociology, with the health and human services emphasis is recommended.

M.S.W. programs require evidence of relevant paid/volunteer work experience related to human services organizations. The pre-social work student should therefore be prepared to complete at least one one internship or field experience related to community/social services. (The College’s Career Connections program is highly recommended.)

The M.S.W. Degree prepares graduates for advances social work practices in one of three areas—clinical social practice with individuals, families, and groups; social work administration/community practice aimed at social service administration and social policy development; and school social work. With such diverse professional practice concentrations, it is difficult to outline a generic program to prepare all pre-social work students for admission to these practice areas. Students should counsel with the pre-social work advisor to help them identify the type of professional program they are considering, and to assist them in developing a plan for completing the graduate admission requirements of that program. internship or field.

Although M.S.W. programs differ in admissions requirements, the following courses, in addition to the major, are recommended for students interested in entering the social work profession at the graduate level:

PY 405 Personality Theories 3 hours
PY/SO 308 Counseling 3 hours
SO 206 Social Problems 3-4 hours

Courses in the Health & Human Services Emphasis:

SO 260 Introduction to Human Services  3 hours
SO 365 Social Work in American Society  3 hours
PY 430 Health Psychology  3 hours
SO 470 Social Gerontology  3 hours
PY/SO 388 Career Connections   1-12 hours
PY/SO 295/495 Field Experience 1-4 hours

Veterinary Medicine

At least two years of college are required to be considered for admission into a college of veterinary medicine; however, the vast majority of students admitted have completed a college degree, majoring in one of the sciences. The pre- veterinary medicine student will plan an appropriate course of study with the help of a faculty advisor. Courses are selected to meet requirements of the specific college of veterinary medicine to which the student plans to apply The following courses are representative of those required by colleges of veterinary medicine for students seeking admission:

G-BI 111   College Biology I 4 hours
BI 112     College Biology II 4 hours
BI 234     Microbiology 4 hours
BI 383     Genetics 4 hours
G-CH 111 College Chemistry I 5 hours
CH 112     College Chemistry II 5 hours
CH 251     Organic Chemistry I 5 hours
CH 252     Organic Chemistry II 5 hours
CH 370     Biochemistry 4 hours
G-EN 110, G-EN 111 College Composition 3 credit hours each
G-PH 215 General Physics I 4 hours
PH 216     General Physics II 4 hours

It is common for pre-veterinary medicine students to complete the bachelor of science degree before applying for admittance to veterinary school. A student electing to do so should pursue one of the programs at McPherson College that lead to a major in biology, chemistry, or biochemistry.

2020|05 Special Programs, Catalog 20-21|

The Chicago Center

McPherson College students interested in exploring the vital issues facing American cities have the opportunity to participate in The Chicago Center programs. Combining classroom study with action-based internships, The Chicago Center lives up to its motto: “Chicago is our classroom.” For an interterm or a semester, students receive McPherson College credit hours while they live, study and work in one of the United State’s most exciting urban environments.

The Chicago Center’s emphasis on “hands-on” experience helps students deepen their understanding of America’s economic and political structures, race and gender relations, and the role of the arts in community and social discourse. The direct link between the classroom and the internship increases student understanding of the practical work world outside the college campus. In addition to the academic coursework, the Center provides both housing and orientation training. The latter includes practical instruction in a variety of “city smart” skills ranging from basic street safety to using the city transit system.

The Chicago Center is open to students from any field of study and internships are available in a wide range of discipline areas.

2020|05 Special Programs, Catalog 20-21|

International Study

McPherson College students have exciting opportunities to live and study outside the United States. Options available include one-semester programs (both fall and spring), full-year programs, and summer programs. Programs include traditional classroom experiences, internships, and service-learning experiences.

McPherson is affiliated with two major international organizations that manage international study: BCA Study Abroad Powered by Amizade (bca.terradotta.com) and ISA International Studies Abroad (studiesabroad.com). Through these organizations, students have access to programming at more than 50 universities in over 30 different countries. The college’s director of international study can help students access programs beyond these two partner organizations at additional universities in other countries.

The study abroad experience begins by meeting with the director of international studies. Then students work with their academic and financial aid advisors to select the program that best matches their interests and career goals. Student athletes will also want to meet with their coaches and plan their study abroad to match their eligibility and team schedules.

Following the study abroad experience, student academic credits will be transferred to the college’s transcript and become part of the student’s permanent record, providing documentation of the student’s achievement. Please note: Study abroad official transcripts typically take longer to receive than domestic transcripts. If the student is also an athlete, he/she will want to work with the study abroad institution and their coach as to not impact athletic eligibility.

During their international study experience, students will retain enrollment at McPherson, using course code **297, where ** represents the major department’s course code prefix (BI for biology as an example). Once the official transcript arrives from the study abroad school, the registrar’s office will work with the student’s academic advisor for the coursework equivalencies.

Recent international study destinations for McPherson students have included: Spain, Thailand, Japan, Ireland, England, and Ecuador.

 

2020|05 Special Programs, Catalog 20-21|