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Health and Sport Science Program

Department Mission

McPherson College students in the Department of Health and Sport Science will develop an understanding of the multiple dimensions associated with the human body, which encompass physical, psychological, social, environmental, emotional, spiritual, and occupational realms.

By embracing this multi-dimensional approach, the department captures the essence of a liberal arts education: developing the whole person. Furthermore, the department will contribute to the fulfillment of the college’s mission as follows:

  • Scholarship – Achieving academic excellence by elevating the scholastic expectations of our students and exceeding the accreditation standards of the allied health and sport professions. The department will offer strategically designed, career-oriented degree programs to prepare students for a future beyond the McPherson College campus.
  • Participation – Utilizing the Enterprising McPherson College Student model to provide students the opportunity to explore, experience, and engage all the facets associated with our degree programs. In addition to the academic preparation, students will interact with, and be mentored by, experts in the allied health and sport professions.
  • Service – Promoting and emphasizing the importance of serving others. Instilling this altruistic nature will contribute to the development of the whole person and prepare our students to be positive, active, and responsible members of society. They will be ready to embrace inclusivity, equality, and equity to encourage diversity in the allied health and sport professions and society.

Department Goals

  1. Scholarship – Ensure students will gain the necessary content knowledge, application competence, and communication aptitude to excel in the allied health and sport professions.
  2. Practice – Connect students with pertinent and fruitful experiential learning opportunities to gain occupational skills from experts within the allied health and sport professions.
  3. Critical Thinking – Provide the techniques and skills to question, evaluate, and create positive and progressive solutions for challenging obstacles within the allied health and sport professions.
  4. Diversity – Increase students’ awareness of the value of a diverse society, the essentials to promoting a diverse community, and enhance their abilities to function in diverse allied health and sport occupational environments.
  5. Service – Develop leadership skills and sympathetic character traits to be active leaders in their allied health, sport, and personal communities.

B.S. in Health Science (73 credit hours)

Since this degree in Health Science was introduced in the 2020-21 academic year, some of the courses required for graduation will not be offered until the 2022-2023 academic year. Thus, this program is open to students who intend to graduate, at the earliest, in Spring 2024. As such, transfers desiring to enter this program in Fall 2021 should expect no fewer than three years to complete the program. Transfers desiring to graduate by Spring 2023 may want to consider the Interdisciplinary Health Science major in the Department of Natural Science.

Requirements 

G-BI 111 College Biology I (4 credit hours)
G-CH 111 College Chemistry I (5 credit hours)
BI 112 College Biology II (4 credit hours)
CH 112 College Chemistry II (5 credit hours)
G-PE 150 Concepts in Holistic Health (3 credit hours)
HS 175 Health Systems (3 credit hours)
PE 180 First Aid and Personal Safety (2 credit hours)
G-HS/PE 190 Social and Behavioral Determinants of Health (3 credit hours)
HS 200 Public and Community Health (3 credit hours)
PY 204 Child & Adolescent Development (3 credit hours)
HS 207 Medical Terminology (2 credit hours)
G-BI 210 Principles of Nutrition (3 credit hours)
G-CM 218 Business and Professional Communication (3 credit hours)
BI 225 Human Anatomy (4 credit hours)
HS 275 Career Exploration in Health Science/Healthcare Management (2 credit hours)
HS 290 Health Policy (3 credit hours)
BI 315 Human Physiology (4 credit hours)
HS 325 Healthcare Finance (3 credit hours)
PE 330 Physiology of Exercise (3 credit hours)
HS 375 Junior Seminar in Health Science/Healthcare Management (2 credit hours)
HS 395 Healthcare Administration, Leadership, and Management (3 credit hours)
HS 475 Senior Capstone in Health Science/Healthcare Management (6 credit hours)

B.S. in Healthcare Management ( 66 credit hours)

Since this degree in Healthcare Management was introduced in the 2020-21 academic year, some of the courses required for graduation will not be offered until the 2022-2023 academic year 2022-23. Thus, this program is open to students who intend to graduate, at the earliest, in Spring 2024. As such, transfers desiring to enter this program in Fall 2021 should expect no fewer than three years to complete the program.

Requirements

G-BI 101 Principles of Biology (4 credit hours)
G-CH 101 Principles of Chemistry (4 credit hours)
G-BA 130 Principles of Business Management (3 credit hours)
G-PE 150 Concepts in Holistic Health (3 credit hours)
HS 175 Health Systems (3 credit hours)
G-HS/PE 190 Social and Behavioral Determinants of Health (3 credit hours)
HS 200 Public and Community Health (3 credit hours)
EC 202 Survey of Economics (3 credit hours)
AC 205 Financial Accounting (3 credit hours)
AC 206 Managerial Accounting (3 credit hours)
G-CM 218 Business and Professional Communication (3 credit hours)
BA 221 Marketing (3 credit hours)
HS 275 Career Exploration in Health Science/Healthcare Management (2 credit hours)
HS 290 Health Policy (3 credit hours)
BA 315 Business Law (3 credit hours)
HS 325 Healthcare Finance (3 credit hours)
BA 325 Financial Management (3 credit hours)
BA 339 Human Resource Management (3 credit hours)
HS 375 Junior Seminar in Health Science/Healthcare Management (2 credit hours)
HS 395 Healthcare Administration, Leadership, and Management (3 credit hours)
HS 475 Senior Capstone in Health Science/Healthcare Management (6 credit hours)

B.S. in Sport Studies (46 credit hours)

This degree in Sport Studies is new in the 2021-2022 academic catalog. As such, some of the courses required for graduation will not be offered until the 2023-2024 academic year. Thus, this program is open only to first-time freshmen or to transfers intending to graduate in Spring 2024 or later. Transfers desiring to graduate by Spring 2023 may want to consider the B.S. in Physical Education and Health as presented in the 2020-2021 academic catalog.

Requirements

PE 100 Introduction to Physical Education and Sport (3 credit hours)
G-BI 101 Principles of Biology (4 credit hours)
PE 105 Introduction to Sport Management (3 credit hours)
G-PE 150 Concepts in Holistic Health (3 credit hours)
G-BI 210 Principles of Nutrition (3 credit hours)
PE 220 Human Anatomy and Physiology (3 credit hours)
CI 220 Principles and Strategies of Teaching (3 credit hours)
PE 244 Sport and Society (3 credit hours)
PE 289 Sport and Exercise Psychology (3 credit hours)
PE 301 Human Growth and Motor Behavior (3 credit hours)
PE 304 Theories, Principles, and Leadership of Coaching (3 credit hours)
PE 330 Exercise Physiology (3 credit hours)
PE 385 Care and Treatment of Athletic Injuries (3 credit hours)
PE 400 Skill Development, Physical Training, and Tactics in Coaching (3 credit hours)
PE 475 Senior Capstone (3 credit hours)

Additional Requirements for Teacher Education Majors, PK-12 (46 credit  hours)

G-PY 101 Introduction to Psychology (3 credit hours)
G-CI 150 Introduction to Education (3 credit hours)
PY 204 Child and Adolescent Development (3 credit hours)
SE 210 Introduction to Infant, Child, Youth with Special Needs (3 credit hours)
CI 232 Educational Technology (2 credit hours)
CI 251 Introduction to Education Practicum (1 credit hour)
CI 315 Reading in the Content Field (2 credit hours)
CI 333  Intercultural Education (2 credit hours)
CI 351 Secondary Education Practicum (1 credit hour)
EE 375 
Elementary Education Practicum (1 credit hour)
PE 409/CI 409
 Methods for Teaching Physical Education and Health in Elementary Schools (4 credit hours)
PE 410/CI 410 Methods for Teaching Physical Education and Health in Secondary Schools (4 credit hours)
CI 455 The Teaching-Learning Process (3 credit hours)
EE 465 Student Teaching in the Elementary School (6 credit hours)
CI 475 Student Teaching in the Secondary School (6 credit hours)
CI 476 Professional Seminar in Education (2 credit hours)

B.S. in Sport Management (58 credit hours)

This degree in Sport Management is new in the 2021-2022 academic catalog. As such, some of the courses required for graduation will not be offered until the 2023-2024 academic year. Thus, this program is open only to first-time freshmen or to transfers intending to graduate in Spring 2024 or later. Transfers desiring to graduate by Spring 2023 may want to consider the B.S. in Physical Education and Health with Sport Management Emphasis as presented in the 2020-2021 academic catalog.

Requirements

PE 100 Introduction to Physical Education and Sport (3 credit hours)
PE 105 Introduction to Sport Management (3 credit hours)
G-BA 130 Principles in Business Management (3 credit hours)
EC 202 Survey of Economics (3 credit hours)
AC 202 Survey in Accounting (3 credit hours)
CM 218 Business and Personal Communication (3 credit hours)
G-BA 220 Business Applied Statistics or G-MA 221, Elementary Applied Statistics (4 credit hours)
BA 221 Marketing (3 credit hours)
PE 244 Sport and Society (3 credit hours)
PE 289 Sport and Exercise Psychology (3 credit hours)
BA 315 Business Law (3 credit hours)
BA 324 Organizational Behavior (3 credit hours)
BA 325 Financial Management (3 credit hours)
BA 339 Human Resource Management (3 credit hours)
PE 415 Sport Management (3 credit hours)
PE 420 Sport Marketing (3 credit hours)
PE 425 Sport Finance (3 credit hours)
PE 430 Governance and Policy in Sport (3 credit hours)
PE 475 Senior Capstone (3 credit hours)

2021|Catalog 21-22, Health and Sport Science|

Health and Sport Science Course Descriptions

Health Science Course Descriptions

HS 175 Health Systems

3 hours
This course provides an overview of how healthcare is organized and how healthcare services are delivered in the U.S.  It explores issues such as healthcare access, cost, and quality. It will cover the roles of government, patients, health professionals, hospitals, insurers and pharmaceutical companies, as well as the interactions of these stakeholders. The course aims to provide skills in critical and analytical thinking and decision-making related to the U.S. healthcare system and the people in it. (Fall)

G-HS/PE 190 Social and Behavioral Determinants of Health

3 hours
This course considers health and health behaviors within the context of social, cultural, and environmental influences on individual behaviors. Students explore the ways social factors affect individual health and well-being, including high-risk behaviors and health inequities. Health behavior programs and interventions and theories of health promotion, health behavioral change, and health education will be examined. (Spring)

HS 200 Public and Community Health

3 hours
This course offers a basic introduction to the issues of public health, major public health problems, and public health systems. The class examines core principles of public health, focusing on a community perspective. Student learn about public health approaches to health assessment, health promotion, disease prevention, and the outcomes of public health initiatives at the local, state, and national levels. Prerequisites: G-PE 150 and HS 175. (Fall)

HS 207 Medical Terminology

2 hours
An introduction to the study of medical terms that brings to life the language of medicine. This course will help students develop an understanding of how to communicate fluently in a healthcare setting. This course will explain medical terms in the context of the anatomy and physiology of different body systems as well as how the body works in health and disease. This course does not include a laboratory. (Interterm, even years) 

HS 275 Career Exploration in Health Science/Healthcare Management

2 hours
This course educates students about the wide range of careers available in the healthcare industry. A minimum of 20 total hours of observation in one or more healthcare settings is required. The desired student outcome is enhanced clarity about career directions through deeper understanding of personal strengths, values, aptitude, and interest. G-BI 101 or G-BI 111 and BI 112, G-EN 110, G-EN 111, and HS 175. (Spring)

HS 290 Health Policy

3 hours
Students explore key health policy concepts in the U.S. health care system. They examine governmental and non-governmental policy-making processes and learn to analyze policies and evaluate policy outcomes. Students will learn how U.S. policy-making processes interact with the structure of the U.S. healthcare system and the implications of changes to these processes and the system. The effect of health policy on the health of rural communities, in particular, is analyzed along with the intersection of U.S. health policy with infectious diseases, bioethics, and globalization. Prerequisites: G-EN 110, G-EN 111, HS 175 and HS 190. (Spring)

HS 325 Healthcare Finance

3 hours
This course focuses on the critical issues in financing healthcare in the U.S., from supply costs to third-party reimbursement. The course addresses determinants of demand for healthcare, such as population demographics and health status, insurance coverage and out-of-pocket costs, and public expectations of health professionals and technology. The course will explore the role of health professionals in guiding and shaping the allocation of resources in healthcare markets and the roles of competition in U.S. healthcare. A focus of the course is how healthcare managers use financial data to manage their organizations and inform decision-making processes. The course also introduces students to the basic principles and tools of budget and resource management. Prerequisites: HS 290. (Fall)

HS 375 Junior Seminar in Health Science/Healthcare Management

2 hours
This course builds on the foundation of personal development and career exploration achieved in HS 275 Career Exploration in Health Science/Healthcare Management. Students will work with experienced healthcare practitioners a minimum of 40 hours. The course also takes students through the steps of developing, writing, and submitting the proposal for their senior capstone project. Capstone proposals are reviewed by the appropriate health science/healthcare management faculty and must be approved before capstone experiences begin. Prerequisites: G-CM 218, HS 207, and HS 275. (Interterm)

HS 395 Healthcare Administration, Leadership, and Management

3 hours
This course connects an overview of healthcare delivery systems with in-depth explorations of organizational theory and traditional managerial and executive leadership roles found in healthcare facilities. Leadership competencies and skills are developed through the examination of topics such as team building, strategic planning, compliance with professional standards and governmental regulations, management and development of human resources, managerial problem solving, and organizational communication, among others. Prerequisites: HS 200 and HS 325. (Spring)

HS 475 Senior Capstone in Health Science/Healthcare Management

6 hours
Students will complete their capstone hours over their final two semesters at McPherson College. Students will develop, write and submit their capstone proposal in consultation with a proctoring faculty member. Capstones are designed based on unique personal and professional goals. Students will record their experience and observations and reflect on their personal and professional growth throughout their capstone experience and, in their final semester, present their capstone portfolio in a pubic presentation. Prerequisites: HS 375 and HS 395. (Fall, Spring)

 

Sport Science Course Descriptions

PE 100 Introduction to Physical Education and Sport

3 hours
Students will explore the historical and philosophical origins of physical education and sport, which have influenced the development of these institutions in American society. Antirequisite: PE 380. (Fall, Spring)

PE 105 Introduction to Sport Management

3 hours
Students will be introduced to the intricate nature of the sport industry. This course will provide an overview of the historical aspects, managing and leading techniques, various sporting environments, functions, and challenges related to sport management. Antirequisite: PE 450. (Fall, Spring)

G-PE 150 Concepts in Holistic Health

3 hours
This course is designed to present the student with health and wellness principles and offer suggestions for their application. These principles will be examined using a traditional approach with a variety of cultural influences. Major areas of study include mind-body interrelatedness and control, stress management, individual fitness, health and health related topics, and lifestyle management. (Fall, Spring)

PE 220 Human Anatomy and Physiology

3 hours
This course is designed to introduce the student to the science of the body structure and function. Content is presented in a simple to complex pattern which includes the design and function of cells, body systems, and the interdependence of systems. Prerequisites: PE 100, G-BI 101, G-PE 150, and a minimum of Sophomore standing. (Fall)

PE 244 Sport and Society

3 hours
This course will provide students with an opportunity to learn about the sociological and cultural aspects of sport. Students will acquire a broad understanding of social settings and cultural issues as they relate to sport and physical activity. Prerequisite: PE 100 and a minimum of Sophomore standing. Antirequisite: PE 288. (Fall)

PE 289 Sport and Exercise Psychology

3 hours
This course will provide insight into the theories, subject matter, and latest empirical research concerning the cognitive processes and emotional states that regulate and influence performance in sport, exercise, and other physical activities. Prerequisite: PE 100 and a minimum of Sophomore standing. Antirequisite: PE 288. (Spring)

PE 301 Human Growth and Motor Behavior

3 hours
Students will examine how the human body grows and develops and the relationships with motor control, learning, and development. Prerequisites: G-BI 210, PE 220, and a minimum of Junior standing. (Fall)

PE 304 Theories, Principles, and Leadership of Coaching

3 hours (Language Intensive)
This course will provide students the knowledge and tools to develop a philosophical and practical foundation to their coaching styles. Students will learn how to make sound decisions that will lead to success in the coaching profession. Prerequisites: PE 105, CI 220, PE 244, PE 289, and a minimum of Junior standing. (Fall)

PE 330 Exercise Physiology

3 hours
Students will study the relationship between exercise and human physiology. Prerequisites: PE 100, G-BI 210, PE 220, and a minimum of Junior standing. (Fall)

PE 385 Care and Treatment of Athletic Injuries

3 hours
The purpose of this course is to provide students with a wide spectrum of information on the care and treatment of athletes and their injuries. It is designed to provide an overview of emergency procedures and immediate assessment of injured athletes. The importance of preventative measures and an overview of the responsibilities of an athletic trainer and coach will be addressed. Prerequisites: PE 301, PE 330, and a minimum of Junior standing. (Spring)

PE 400 Skill Development, Physical Training, and Tactics in Coaching

3 hours
Students will learn the proper teaching and analytical techniques and methods to develop healthy and successful athletes and teams. Some of the topics covered include athlete performance assessment and evaluation, skill acquisition, athletic conditioning techniques, development, practice and conditioning programming, and the social-psychological aspects of training and coaching. Prerequisites: PE 304, PE 385, and Senior standing. (Fall)

PE 409/CI 409 Methods for Teaching Physical Education and Health in Elementary Schools

4 hours
This course is designed to introduce prospective elementary school physical education, health, and classroom teachers to the fundamentals, principles, and practices of physical education and health at the elementary school level. Movement exploration and methods, including adaptive physical education, will be learned in the variety of play and sport activities. Further, the methods and modalities for teaching school health will be explored while examining the potential health problems of the individual school child associated with school and home environments. This course includes a practical laboratory component. Prerequisites for Elementary Education majors: G-PE 150 and CI 220. Prerequisites for Sport Science majors: G-CI 150, CI 220, and PE 304. Corequisite for Sport Science Majors: PE 385. (Spring)

PE 410/CI 410 Methods for Teaching Physical Education and Health in Secondary Schools

4 hours
This course is designed to acquaint the student with a variety of teaching techniques, methods, and modalities for teaching physical education and health at the secondary school level. Proper movement skills and development, and healthy habits will be stressed to encourage lifelong physical activity and a healthy lifestyle. Adaptive physical education and the impact of sociocultural and socioeconomic factors will be integrated in the course. There is a practical laboratory component. Prerequisites: G-CI 150, CI 220, PE 304, and PE 385. (Fall)

PE 415 Sport Management

3 hours
Students will develop an advanced understanding of the planning, organizing, leading, and controlling aspects of a sport organization. Prerequisites: PE 105, G-CM 218, PE 244, PE 289, BA 324, BA 339, and a minimum of Junior standing. (Fall)

PE 420 Sport Marketing

3 hours
Students will explore the historical, contemporary, and future issues and trends in sport marketing. Further, students will learn and apply the marketing concepts and strategies utilized in the sport industry. Prerequisites: PE 105, G-CM 218, BA 221, PE 244, PE 289, BA 324, and a minimum of Junior standing. (Spring)

PE 425 Sport Finance

3 hours
Students will extend their financial management knowledge within the sport realm by focusing on topics such as time value of money, debt and equity financing, capital budgeting and spending earnings in the sport industry. Prerequisites: PE 105, G-BA 130, G-BA 220 or G-MA 221, PE 244, BA 325 and a minimum of Junior standing. (Spring)

PE 430 Governance and Policy in Sport

3 hours
Students will explore governance structures and processes related to policy within public, private, not-for-profit, and non-profit sport sectors in the United States. Through this examination, students will learn effective governance systems and the challenges and obstacles encountered by sport organizations. Further, it will be highlighted how sports issues revolved around specific topics such as ethnicity, national identity, sex, gender, diversity, disability, violence, deviance, health and event hosting can impact policy and governance structures. Prerequisites: PE 105, PE 244, BA 315, BA 324, and a minimum of Junior standing. (Spring)

PE 475 Senior Capstone

3 hours
This is the culminating or “capstone” course for Sport Science and Sport Management majors who do not participate in student teaching. Students are paired with a mentor in their chosen field to gain practical experience that will enhance their understanding of a potential career in the sport industry. Prerequisites for Sport Studies majors: PE 304, PE 385, and Senior standing. Prerequisites for Sport Management majors: PE 425, at least one of PE 420 or PE 430, and Senior standing. (Fall, Spring)

Special Course Options

PE 295/PE 495 Field Experience (1-4 credit hours for each course)
PE 297 Study Abroad (12-16 credit hours)
PE 299/PE 499 Independent Study (1-4 credit hours for each course)
PE 388 Career Connections (3-10 credit hours)
PE 445 Readings and Research (1 credit hour–Language Intensive)

Intercollegiate Competition Credit Hours

After completing one year of intercollegiate athletic competition, students may enroll in intercollegiate competition (PE 211-21 and PE 311-21) for 1 credit hour; however, a maximum of 2 credit hours for intercollegiate competition will count toward graduation. Students who transfer credits are limited to 2 credit hours for intercollegiate competition.

PE 209/PE 309 Intercollegiate Cheerleading (1 credit hour each)
PE 211/PE 311 Intercollegiate Softball–Women (1 credit hour each)
PE 212/PE 312 Intercollegiate Tennis (1 credit hour each)
PE 213/PE 313 Intercollegiate Football–Men (1 credit hour each)
PE 214/PE 314 Intercollegiate Basketball (1 credit hour each)
PE 215/PE 315 Intercollegiate Cross Country (1 credit hour each)
PE 216/PE 316 Intercollegiate Track and Field (1 credit hour each)
PE 217/PE 317 Intercollegiate Volleyball–Women (1 credit hour each)
PE 219/PE 319 Intercollegiate Soccer (1 credit hour each)
PE 221/PE 321 Intercollegiate Baseball (1 credit hour each)

2021|Catalog 21-22, Health and Sport Science|

Health and Sport Studies Program

Department Mission

McPherson College students in the Department of Health and Sport Studies will develop an understanding of the multiple dimensions associated with the human body, which encompass physical, psychological, social, environmental, emotional, spiritual, and occupational realms.

By embracing this multi-dimensional approach, the department captures the essence of a liberal arts education: developing the whole person. Furthermore, the department will contribute to the fulfillment of the college’s mission as follows:

  • Scholarship – Achieving academic excellence by elevating the scholastic expectations of our students and exceeding the accreditation standards of the allied health and sport professions. The department will offer strategically designed, career-oriented degree programs to prepare students for a future beyond the McPherson College campus.
  • Participation – Utilizing the Enterprising McPherson College Student model to provide students the opportunity to explore, experience, and engage all the facets associated with our degree programs. In addition to the academic preparation, students will interact with, and be mentored by, experts in the allied health and sport professions.
  • Service – Promoting and emphasizing the importance of serving others. Instilling this altruistic nature will contribute to the development of the whole person and prepare our students to be positive, active, and responsible members of society. They will be ready to embrace inclusivity, equality, and equity to encourage diversity in the allied health and sport professions and society.

Department Goals

  1. Scholarship – Ensure students will gain the necessary content knowledge, application competence, and communication aptitude to excel in the allied health and sport professions.
  2. Practice – Connect students with pertinent and fruitful experiential learning opportunities to gain occupational skills from experts within the allied health and sport professions.
  3. Critical Thinking – Provide the techniques and skills to question, evaluate, and create positive and progressive solutions for challenging obstacles within the allied health and sport professions.
  4. Diversity – Increase students’ awareness of the value of a diverse society, the essentials to promoting a diverse community, and enhance their abilities to function in diverse allied health and sport occupational environments.
  5. Service – Develop leadership skills and sympathetic character traits to be active leaders in their allied health, sport, and personal communities.

B.S. in Health Science with Movement Emphasis

Core Requirements (43 hours)

G-BI 111 College Biology I (4 hours)
G-CH 111 College Chemistry I (5 hours)
BI 112 College Biology II (4 hours)
HS 175 Health Systems (3 hours)
HS 275 Career Exploration in Health Science/Healthcare Management (2 hours)
G-HS/PE 190 Social and Behavioral Determinants of Health (3 hours)
G-PY 101 Introduction to Psychology (3 hours)
G-CM 218 Business and Professional Communication (3 hours)
G-MA 221 Elementary Applied Statistics (4 hours)
PE 330 Physiology of Exercise (3 hours)
HS 375 Junior Seminar in Health Science/Healthcare Management (3 hours)
HS 395 Healthcare Administration, Leadership, and Management (3 hours)
HS 475 Senior Capstone in Health Science/Healthcare Management (6 hours)

Movement Emphasis Requirements (27 hours)

CH 112 College Chemistry II (5 hours)
G-BI 210 Principles of Nutrition (3 hours)
G-PH 215 General Physics I (4 hours)
PH 216 General Physics II (4 hours)
BI 225 Human Anatomy (4 hours)
BI 315 Human Physiology (4 hours)
PE 411 Kinesiology (3 hours)

Total: 70 hours

Recommended Courses

PY 204 Child and Adolescent Development (3 hours)
G-PR 104 Ethics (3 hours)
HS 207 Medical Terminology (2 hours)
PE 301 Human Growth and Motor Development (3 hours)
PY 305 Abnormal Psychology (3 hours)
PE 385 Care and Treatment of Athletic Injury (3 hours)
HS 388 Internship (1-4 hours)

Orthotics and Prosthetics Specific Course:

BI 310 Statistical Data Analysis (4 hours)

 

B.S. in Health Science with Allied Health Emphasis

Core Requirements (43 hours)

G-BI 111 College Biology I (4 hours)
G-CH 111 College Chemistry I (5 hours)
BI 112 College Biology II (4 hours)
HS 175 Health Systems (3 hours)
HS 275 Career Exploration in Health Science/Healthcare Management (2 hours)
G-HS/PE 190 Social and Behavioral Determinants of Health (3 hours)
G-PY 101 Introduction to Psychology (3 hours)
G-CM 218 Business and Professional Communication (3 hours)
G-MA 221 Elementary Applied Statistics (4 hours)
PE 330 Physiology of Exercise (3 hours)
HS 375 Junior Seminar in Health Science/Healthcare Management (3 hours)
HS 395 Healthcare Administration, Leadership, and Management (3 hours)
HS 475 Senior Capstone in Health Science/Healthcare Management (6 hours)

Allied Health Emphasis Requirements (25 hours)

PY 204 Child and Adolescent Development (3 hours)
PY 305 Abnormal Psychology (3 hours)
BI 225 Human Anatomy (4 hours)
BI 315 Human Physiology (4 hours)
HS 207 Medical Terminology (2 hours)
G-SO 101 Introduction to Sociology (3 hours)
G-PR 104 Ethics (3 hours)
PE 301 Human Growth and Motor Development (3 hours)

Total: 68 hours

Recommended Courses

G-PH 215 General Physics I (4 hours)
PE 411 Kinesiology (3 hours)
HS 388 Internship (1-4 hours)

Nursing School Preparation Specific Courses:

G-BI 210 Principles of Nutrition (3 hours)
BI 234 Microbiology (5 hours)
BI 283 Genetics (4 hours)

 

B.S. in Health Science with Public and Community Health Emphasis

Core Requirements (43 hours)

G-BI 111 College Biology I (4 hours)
G-CH 111 College Chemistry I (5 hours)
BI 112 College Biology II (4 hours)
HS 175 Health Systems (3 hours)
HS 275 Career Exploration in Health Science/Healthcare Management (2 hours)
G-HS/PE 190 Social and Behavioral Determinants of Health (3 hours)
G-PY 101 Introduction to Psychology (3 hours)
G-CM 218 Business and Professional Communication (3 hours)
G-MA 221 Elementary Applied Statistics (4 hours)
PE 330 Physiology of Exercise (3 hours)
HS 375 Junior Seminar in Health Science/Healthcare Management (3 hours)
HS 395 Healthcare Administration, Leadership, and Management (3 hours)
HS 475 Senior Capstone in Health Science/Healthcare Management (6 hours)

Public and Community Health Emphasis Requirements (23 hours)

G-SO 101 Introduction to Sociology (3 hours)
G-MA 111 Calculus (4 hours)
HS 200 Public and Community Health (3 hours)
G-BI 210 Principles of Nutrition (3 hours)
HS 290 Health Policy (3 hours)
BI 325 Human Ecology, Epidemiology, and Public Health (4 hours)
PY 305 Abnormal Psychology (3 hours)

Total: 66 hours

Recommended Courses

G-PR 104 Ethics (3 hours)
G-NS 141 Environmental Science (4 hours)
HS 207 Medical Terminology (2 hours)
HS 388 Internship (1-4 hours)

 

B.S. in Healthcare Management

Requirements

G-BI 101 Principles of Biology (4 hours)
G-CH 101 Principles of Chemistry (4 hours)
G-BA 130 Principles of Business Management (3 hours)
G-PE 150 Concepts in Holistic Health (3 hours)
HS 175 Health Systems (3 hours)
G-HS/PE 190 Social and Behavioral Determinants of Health (3 hours)
HS 200 Public and Community Health (3 hours)
EC 202 Survey of Economics (3 hours)
AC 205 Financial Accounting (3 hours)
AC 206 Managerial Accounting (3 hours)
G-CM 218 Business and Professional Communication (3 hours)
BA 221 Marketing (3 hours)
HS 275 Career Exploration in Health Science/Healthcare Management (2 hours)
HS 290 Health Policy (3 hours)
BA 215 Business Law (3 hours)
HS 325 Healthcare Finance (3 hours)
BA 325 Financial Management (3 hours)
BA 339 Human Resource Management (3 hours)
HS 375 Junior Seminar in Health Science/Healthcare Management (3 hours)
HS 395 Healthcare Administration, Leadership, and Management (3 hours)
HS 475 Senior Capstone in Health Science/Healthcare Management (3 hours)

Total: 64 hours

 

B.S. in Sport Studies

Requirements

PE 100 Introduction to Physical Education and Sport (3 hours)
G-BI 101 Principles of Biology (4 hours)
PE 105 Introduction to Sport Management (3 hours)
G-PE 150 Concepts in Holistic Health (3 hours)
G-BI 210 Principles of Nutrition (3 hours)
PE 220 Human Anatomy and Physiology (3 hours)
PE 244 Sport and Society (3 hours)
PE 289 Sport and Exercise Psychology (3 hours)
PE 301 Human Growth and Motor Behavior (3 hours)
PE 304 Theories, Principles, and Leadership of Coaching (3 hours)
PE 330 Exercise Physiology (3 hours)
PE 385 Care and Treatment of Athletic Injuries (3 hours)
PE 400 Skill Development, Physical Training, and Tactics in Coaching (3 hours)
PE 475 Senior Capstone (3 hours)

Total: 43 hours

 

Additional Requirements for Teacher Education Majors, PK-12 (46 credit  hours)

G-PY 101 Introduction to Psychology (3 hours)
G-CI 150 Introduction to Education (3 hours)
PY 204 Child and Adolescent Development (3 hours)
SE 210 Introduction to Infant, Child, Youth with Special Needs (3 hours)
CI 220 Principles and Strategies of Teaching (3 hours)
CI 232 Educational Technology (2 hours)
CI 251 Introduction to Education Practicum (1 hour)
CI 315 Reading in the Content Field (2 hours)
CI 333  Intercultural Education (2 hours)
CI 351 Secondary Education Practicum (1 hour)
EE 375 
Elementary Education Practicum (1 hour)
PE 409/CI 409
Methods for Teaching Physical Education and Health in Elementary Schools (4 hours)
PE 410/CI 410 Methods for Teaching Physical Education and Health in Secondary Schools (4 hours)
CI 455 The Teaching-Learning Process (3 hours)
EE 465 Student Teaching in the Elementary School (6 hours)
CI 475 Student Teaching in the Secondary School (6 hours)
CI 476 Professional Seminar in Education (2   hours)

Total: 92 hours

 

B.S. in Sport Management

Requirements

PE 100 Introduction to Physical Education and Sport (3 credit hours)
PE 105 Introduction to Sport Management (3 credit hours)
G-BA 130 Principles in Business Management (3 credit hours)
EC 202 Survey of Economics (3 credit hours)
AC 202 Survey in Accounting (3 credit hours)
G-CM 218 Business and Personal Communication (3 credit hours)
G-BA 220 Business Applied Statistics or G-MA 221, Elementary Applied Statistics (4 credit hours)
BA 221 Marketing (3 credit hours)
PE 244 Sport and Society (3 credit hours)
PE 289 Sport and Exercise Psychology (3 credit hours)
BA 215 Business Law (3 credit hours)
BA 324 Organizational Behavior (3 credit hours)
BA 325 Financial Management (3 credit hours)
BA 339 Human Resource Management (3 credit hours)
PE 415 Sport Management (3 credit hours)
PE 420 Sport Marketing (3 credit hours)
PE 425 Sport Finance (3 credit hours)
PE 430 Governance and Policy in Sport (3 credit hours)
PE 475 Senior Capstone (3 credit hours)

Total: 58 hours

2023|Catalog 23-24, Health and Sport Studies|

Health and Sport Studies Course Descriptions

Health Science Course Descriptions

HS 175 Health Systems

3 hours
This course provides an overview of how healthcare is organized and how healthcare services are delivered in the U.S.  It explores issues such as healthcare access, cost, and quality. It will cover the roles of government, patients, health professionals, hospitals, insurers and pharmaceutical companies, as well as the interactions of these stakeholders. The course aims to provide skills in critical and analytical thinking and decision-making related to the U.S. healthcare system and the people in it. (Fall)

G-HS/PE 190 Social and Behavioral Determinants of Health

3 hours
This course considers health and health behaviors within the context of social, cultural, and environmental influences on individual behaviors. The course will also explore motivation and self-esteem theories. Health behavior programs related to communities and athletics. Theories of health promotion, health behavior change, and health education will be explored. (Spring)

HS 200 Public and Community Health

3 hours
This course offers a basic introduction to the issues of public health, major public health problems, and public health systems. The class examines core principles of public health, focusing on a community perspective. Student learn about public health approaches to health assessment, health promotion, disease prevention, and the outcomes of public health initiatives at the local, state, and national levels. Prerequisites: G-PE 150 and HS 175. (Fall)

HS 207 Medical Terminology

2 hours
An introduction to the study of medical terms that brings to life the language of medicine. This course will help students develop an understanding of how to communicate fluently in a healthcare setting. This course will explain medical terms in the context of the anatomy and physiology of different body systems as well as how the body works in health and disease. This course does not include a laboratory. (Interterm) 

HS 275 Career Exploration in Health Science/Healthcare Management

2 hours
This course educates students about the wide range of careers available in the healthcare industry. A minimum of 20 total hours of observation in a hospital setting is required. Outcomes of this course include enhanced clarity about career directions through deeper understanding of personal strengths, values, aptitude, and interest. Prerequisites: G-EN 110, G-EN 111, and HS 175. (Spring)

HS 290 Health Policy

3 hours
Students explore key health policy concepts in the U.S. health care system. They examine governmental and non-governmental policy-making processes and learn to analyze policies and evaluate policy outcomes. Students will learn how U.S. policy-making processes interact with the structure of the U.S. healthcare system and the implications of changes to these processes and the system. The effect of health policy on the health of rural communities, in particular, is analyzed along with the intersection of U.S. health policy with infectious diseases, bioethics, and globalization. Prerequisites: G-EN 110, G-EN 111, HS 175 and G-HS 190. (Spring)

HS 325 Healthcare Finance

3 hours
This course focuses on the critical issues in financing healthcare in the U.S., from supply costs to third-party reimbursement. The course addresses determinants of demand for healthcare, such as population demographics and health status, insurance coverage and out-of-pocket costs, and public expectations of health professionals and technology. The course will explore the role of health professionals in guiding and shaping the allocation of resources in healthcare markets and the roles of competition in U.S. healthcare. A focus of the course is how healthcare managers use financial data to manage their organizations and inform decision-making processes. The course also introduces students to the basic principles and tools of budget and resource management. Prerequisites: HS 290. (Fall)

HS 375 Junior Seminar in Health Science/Healthcare Management

2-3 hours
This course builds on the foundation of personal development and career exploration achieved in HS 275 Career Exploration in Health Science/Healthcare Management. Students will work with experienced healthcare practitioners a minimum of 20 hours. The course also takes students through the steps of developing, writing, and submitting the proposal for their senior capstone project. Capstone proposals are reviewed by the appropriate health science/healthcare management faculty and must be approved before capstone experiences begin. Prerequisites: G-CM 218.  Fall/Spring (3 hours) Interterm (2 hours)

HS 395 Healthcare Administration, Leadership, and Management

3 hours
This course connects an overview of healthcare delivery systems with in-depth explorations of organizational theory and traditional managerial and executive leadership roles found in healthcare facilities. Leadership competencies and skills are developed through the examination of topics such as team building, strategic planning, compliance with professional standards and governmental regulations, management and development of human resources, managerial problem solving, and organizational communication, among others. Prerequisites: HS 200 and HS 325. (Spring)

HS 475 Senior Capstone in Health Science/Healthcare Management

3-6 hours
Students will complete their capstone hours over their final two semesters at McPherson College. Students will finalize their capstone proposal in consultation with a proctoring faculty member. Capstones are designed based on unique personal and professional goals. Students will record their experience and observations and reflect on their personal and professional growth throughout their capstone experience. In the final semester, students will present their capstone portfolio in a public presentation. Students seeking a degree from the 2022 or older catalog: 6 credit hours; students seeking a degree from the 2023 or newer catalog: 3 credit hours. Prerequisites: HS 375. (Fall, Spring)

 

Sport Studies Course Descriptions

PE 100 Introduction to Physical Education and Sport

3 hours
Students will explore the historical and philosophical origins of physical education and sport, which have influenced the development of these institutions in American society. (Fall, Spring)

PE 105 Introduction to Sport Management

3 hours
Students will be introduced to the intricate nature of the sport industry. This course will provide an overview of the historical aspects, managing and leading techniques, various sporting environments, functions, and challenges related to sport management. (Fall, Spring)

G-PE 150 Concepts in Holistic Health

3 hours
This course is designed to present the student with health and wellness principles and offer suggestions for their application. These principles will be examined using a traditional approach with a variety of cultural influences. Major areas of study include mind-body interrelatedness and control, stress management, individual fitness, health and health related topics, and lifestyle management. (Fall, Spring)

PE 220 Human Anatomy and Physiology

3 hours
This course is designed to introduce the student to the science of the body structure and function. Content is presented in a simple to complex pattern which includes the design and function of cells, body systems, and the interdependence of systems. Prerequisites: PE 100, G-BI 101. (Fall)

PE 244 Sport and Society

3 hours
This course will provide students with an opportunity to learn about the sociological and cultural aspects of sport. Students will acquire a broad understanding of social settings and cultural issues as they relate to sport and physical activity. Prerequisite: PE 100 and a minimum of Sophomore standing. (Fall)

PE 289 Sport and Exercise Psychology

3 hours
This course will provide insight into the theories, subject matter, and latest empirical research concerning the cognitive processes and emotional states that regulate and influence performance in sport, exercise, and other physical activities. Prerequisite: PE 100 and a minimum of Sophomore standing. (Spring)

PE 301 Human Growth and Motor Behavior

3 hours
Students will examine how the human body grows and develops and the relationships with motor control, learning, and development. Prerequisites: a minimum of Sophomore standing. (Fall)

PE 304 Theories, Principles, and Leadership of Coaching

3 hours (Language Intensive)
This course will provide students the knowledge and tools to develop a philosophical and practical foundation to their coaching styles. Students will learn how to make sound decisions that will lead to success in the coaching profession. Prerequisites: PE 100, PE 105, and a minimum of Junior standing. (Fall)

PE 330 Exercise Physiology

3 hours
Students will study the relationship between exercise and human physiology. Prerequisites: PE 100, G-BI 210, PE 220, and a minimum of Junior standing. (Fall)

PE 385 Care and Treatment of Athletic Injuries

3 hours
The purpose of this course is to provide students with a wide spectrum of information on the care and treatment of athletes and their injuries. It is designed to provide an overview of emergency procedures and immediate assessment of injured athletes. The importance of preventative measures and an overview of the responsibilities of an athletic trainer and coach will be addressed. Prerequisites: PE 301, PE 330, and a minimum of Junior standing. (Spring)

PE 400 Skill Development, Physical Training, and Tactics in Coaching

3 hours
Students will learn the proper teaching and analytical techniques and methods to develop healthy and successful athletes and teams. Some of the topics covered include athlete performance assessment and evaluation, skill acquisition, athletic conditioning techniques, development, practice and conditioning programming, and the social-psychological aspects of training and coaching. Prerequisites: PE 304, and Junior standing. (Fall)

PE 409/CI 409 Methods for Teaching Physical Education and Health in Elementary Schools

4 hours
This course is designed to introduce prospective elementary school physical education, health, and classroom teachers to the fundamentals, principles, and practices of physical education and health at the elementary school level. Movement exploration and methods, including adaptive physical education, will be learned in the variety of play and sport activities. Further, the methods and modalities for teaching school health will be explored while examining the potential health problems of the individual school child associated with school and home environments. This course includes a practical laboratory component. Prerequisites for Elementary Education majors: G-PE 150 and CI 220. Prerequisites for Sport Studies majors: G-CI 150, CI 220. (Spring)

PE 410/CI 410 Methods for Teaching Physical Education and Health in Secondary Schools

4 hours
This course is designed to acquaint the student with a variety of teaching techniques, methods, and modalities for teaching physical education and health at the secondary school level. Proper movement skills and development, and healthy habits will be stressed to encourage lifelong physical activity and a healthy lifestyle. Adaptive physical education and the impact of sociocultural and socioeconomic factors will be integrated in the course. There is a practical laboratory component. Prerequisites: G-CI 150, CI 220, and PE 385. (Fall)

PE 415 Sport Management

3 hours
Students will develop an advanced understanding of the planning, organizing, leading, and controlling aspects of a sport organization. Prerequisites: PE 105, G-CM 218, PE 244, PE 289, BA 324, BA 339, and a minimum of Junior standing. (Fall)

PE 420 Sport Marketing

3 hours
Students will explore the historical, contemporary, and future issues and trends in sport marketing. Further, students will learn and apply the marketing concepts and strategies utilized in the sport industry. Prerequisites: PE 105, G-CM 218, BA 221, PE 244, PE 289, BA 324, and a minimum of Junior standing. (Spring)

PE 425 Sport Finance

3 hours
Students will extend their financial management knowledge within the sport realm by focusing on topics such as time value of money, debt and equity financing, capital budgeting and spending earnings in the sport industry. Prerequisites: PE 105, G-BA 130, G-BA 220 or G-MA 221, PE 244, BA 325 and a minimum of Junior standing. (Spring)

PE 430 Governance and Policy in Sport

3 hours
Students will explore governance structures and processes related to policy within public, private, not-for-profit, and non-profit sport sectors in the United States. Through this examination, students will learn effective governance systems and the challenges and obstacles encountered by sport organizations. Further, it will be highlighted how sports issues revolved around specific topics such as ethnicity, national identity, sex, gender, diversity, disability, violence, deviance, health and event hosting can impact policy and governance structures. Prerequisites: PE 105, PE 244, BA 315, BA 324, and a minimum of Junior standing. (Spring)

PE 475 Senior Capstone

3 hours
This is the culminating or “capstone” course for Sport Science and Sport Management majors who do not participate in student teaching. Students are paired with a mentor in their chosen field to gain practical experience that will enhance their understanding of a potential career in the sport industry. Prerequisites for Sport Studies majors: PE 304, PE 385, and Senior standing. Prerequisites: Senior standing. (Fall, Spring)

Special Course Options

PE 295/PE 495 Field Experience (1-4 credit hours for each course)
PE 297 Study Abroad (12-16 credit hours)
PE 299/PE 499 Independent Study (1-4 credit hours for each course)
PE 388 Career Connections (3-10 credit hours)
PE 445 Readings and Research (1 credit hour–Language Intensive)

Intercollegiate Competition Credit Hours

After completing one year of intercollegiate athletic competition, students may enroll in intercollegiate competition (PE 211-21 and PE 311-21) for 1 credit hour; however, a maximum of 2 credit hours for intercollegiate competition will count toward graduation. Students who transfer credits are limited to 2 credit hours for intercollegiate competition.

PE 209/PE 309 Intercollegiate Cheerleading (1 credit hour each)
PE 211/PE 311 Intercollegiate Softball–Women (1 credit hour each)
PE 212/PE 312 Intercollegiate Tennis (1 credit hour each)
PE 213/PE 313 Intercollegiate Football–Men (1 credit hour each)
PE 214/PE 314 Intercollegiate Basketball (1 credit hour each)
PE 215/PE 315 Intercollegiate Cross Country (1 credit hour each)
PE 216/PE 316 Intercollegiate Track and Field (1 credit hour each)
PE 217/PE 317 Intercollegiate Volleyball–Women (1 credit hour each)
PE 219/PE 319 Intercollegiate Soccer (1 credit hour each)
PE 221/PE 321 Intercollegiate Baseball (1 credit hour each)

2023|Catalog 23-24, Health and Sport Studies|

Health and Sport Studies Program

Department Mission

McPherson College students in the Department of Health and Sport Studies will develop an understanding of the multiple dimensions associated with the human body, which encompass physical, psychological, social, environmental, emotional, spiritual, and occupational realms.

By embracing this multi-dimensional approach, the department captures the essence of a liberal arts education: developing the whole person. Furthermore, the department will contribute to the fulfillment of the college’s mission as follows:

  • Scholarship – Achieving academic excellence by elevating the scholastic expectations of our students and exceeding the accreditation standards of the allied health and sport professions. The department will offer strategically designed, career-oriented degree programs to prepare students for a future beyond the McPherson College campus.
  • Participation – Utilizing the Enterprising McPherson College Student model to provide students the opportunity to explore, experience, and engage all the facets associated with our degree programs. In addition to the academic preparation, students will interact with, and be mentored by, experts in the allied health and sport professions.
  • Service – Promoting and emphasizing the importance of serving others. Instilling this altruistic nature will contribute to the development of the whole person and prepare our students to be positive, active, and responsible members of society. They will be ready to embrace inclusivity, equality, and equity to encourage diversity in the allied health and sport professions and society.

Department Goals

  1. Scholarship – Ensure students will gain the necessary content knowledge, application competence, and communication aptitude to excel in the allied health and sport professions.
  2. Practice – Connect students with pertinent and fruitful experiential learning opportunities to gain occupational skills from experts within the allied health and sport professions.
  3. Critical Thinking – Provide the techniques and skills to question, evaluate, and create positive and progressive solutions for challenging obstacles within the allied health and sport professions.
  4. Diversity – Increase students’ awareness of the value of a diverse society, the essentials to promoting a diverse community, and enhance their abilities to function in diverse allied health and sport occupational environments.
  5. Service – Develop leadership skills and sympathetic character traits to be active leaders in their allied health, sport, and personal communities.

B.S. in Health Science (71 credit hours)

Requirements 

G-BI 111 College Biology I (4 credit hours)
G-CH 111 College Chemistry I (5 credit hours)
BI 112 College Biology II (4 credit hours)
CH 112 College Chemistry II (5 credit hours)
G-PE 150 Concepts in Holistic Health (3 credit hours)
HS 175 Health Systems (3 credit hours)
G-HS/PE 190 Social and Behavioral Determinants of Health (3 credit hours)
HS 200 Public and Community Health (3 credit hours)
PY 204 Child & Adolescent Development (3 credit hours)
HS 207 Medical Terminology (2 credit hours)
G-BI 210 Principles of Nutrition (3 credit hours)
G-CM 218 Business and Professional Communication (3 credit hours)
BI 225 Human Anatomy (4 credit hours)
HS 275 Career Exploration in Health Science/Healthcare Management (2 credit hours)
HS 290 Health Policy (3 credit hours)
BI 315 Human Physiology (4 credit hours)
HS 325 Healthcare Finance (3 credit hours)
PE 330 Physiology of Exercise (3 credit hours)
HS 375 Junior Seminar in Health Science/Healthcare Management (2 credit hours)
HS 395 Healthcare Administration, Leadership, and Management (3 credit hours)
HS 475 Senior Capstone in Health Science/Healthcare Management (6 credit hours)

B.S. in Healthcare Management ( 66 credit hours)

Since this degree in Healthcare Management was introduced in the 2020-21 academic year, some of the courses required for graduation will not be offered until the 2022-2023 academic year 2022-23. Thus, this program is open to students who intend to graduate, at the earliest, in Spring 2024. As such, transfers desiring to enter this program in Fall 2021 should expect no fewer than three years to complete the program.

Requirements

G-BI 101 Principles of Biology (4 credit hours)
G-CH 101 Principles of Chemistry (4 credit hours)
G-BA 130 Principles of Business Management (3 credit hours)
G-PE 150 Concepts in Holistic Health (3 credit hours)
HS 175 Health Systems (3 credit hours)
G-HS/PE 190 Social and Behavioral Determinants of Health (3 credit hours)
HS 200 Public and Community Health (3 credit hours)
EC 202 Survey of Economics (3 credit hours)
AC 205 Financial Accounting (3 credit hours)
AC 206 Managerial Accounting (3 credit hours)
G-CM 218 Business and Professional Communication (3 credit hours)
BA 221 Marketing (3 credit hours)
HS 275 Career Exploration in Health Science/Healthcare Management (2 credit hours)
HS 290 Health Policy (3 credit hours)
BA 315 Business Law (3 credit hours)
HS 325 Healthcare Finance (3 credit hours)
BA 325 Financial Management (3 credit hours)
BA 339 Human Resource Management (3 credit hours)
HS 375 Junior Seminar in Health Science/Healthcare Management (2 credit hours)
HS 395 Healthcare Administration, Leadership, and Management (3 credit hours)
HS 475 Senior Capstone in Health Science/Healthcare Management (6 credit hours)

B.S. in Sport Studies (46 credit hours)

This degree in Sport Studies is new in the 2021-2022 academic catalog. As such, some of the courses required for graduation will not be offered until the 2023-2024 academic year. Thus, this program is open only to first-time freshmen or to transfers intending to graduate in Spring 2024 or later. Transfers desiring to graduate by Spring 2023 may want to consider the B.S. in Physical Education and Health as presented in the 2020-2021 academic catalog.

Requirements

PE 100 Introduction to Physical Education and Sport (3 credit hours)
G-BI 101 Principles of Biology (4 credit hours)
PE 105 Introduction to Sport Management (3 credit hours)
G-PE 150 Concepts in Holistic Health (3 credit hours)
G-BI 210 Principles of Nutrition (3 credit hours)
PE 220 Human Anatomy and Physiology (3 credit hours)
CI 220 Principles and Strategies of Teaching (3 credit hours)
PE 244 Sport and Society (3 credit hours)
PE 289 Sport and Exercise Psychology (3 credit hours)
PE 301 Human Growth and Motor Behavior (3 credit hours)
PE 304 Theories, Principles, and Leadership of Coaching (3 credit hours)
PE 330 Exercise Physiology (3 credit hours)
PE 385 Care and Treatment of Athletic Injuries (3 credit hours)
PE 400 Skill Development, Physical Training, and Tactics in Coaching (3 credit hours)
PE 475 Senior Capstone (3 credit hours)

Additional Requirements for Teacher Education Majors, PK-12 (46 credit  hours)

G-PY 101 Introduction to Psychology (3 credit hours)
G-CI 150 Introduction to Education (3 credit hours)
PY 204 Child and Adolescent Development (3 credit hours)
SE 210 Introduction to Infant, Child, Youth with Special Needs (3 credit hours)
CI 232 Educational Technology (2 credit hours)
CI 251 Introduction to Education Practicum (1 credit hour)
CI 315 Reading in the Content Field (2 credit hours)
CI 333  Intercultural Education (2 credit hours)
CI 351 Secondary Education Practicum (1 credit hour)
EE 375 
Elementary Education Practicum (1 credit hour)
PE 409/CI 409
 Methods for Teaching Physical Education and Health in Elementary Schools (4 credit hours)
PE 410/CI 410 Methods for Teaching Physical Education and Health in Secondary Schools (4 credit hours)
CI 455 The Teaching-Learning Process (3 credit hours)
EE 465 Student Teaching in the Elementary School (6 credit hours)
CI 475 Student Teaching in the Secondary School (6 credit hours)
CI 476 Professional Seminar in Education (2 credit hours)

B.S. in Sport Management (58 credit hours)

This degree in Sport Management is new in the 2021-2022 academic catalog. As such, some of the courses required for graduation will not be offered until the 2023-2024 academic year. Thus, this program is open only to first-time freshmen or to transfers intending to graduate in Spring 2024 or later. Transfers desiring to graduate by Spring 2023 may want to consider the B.S. in Physical Education and Health with Sport Management Emphasis as presented in the 2020-2021 academic catalog.

Requirements

PE 100 Introduction to Physical Education and Sport (3 credit hours)
PE 105 Introduction to Sport Management (3 credit hours)
G-BA 130 Principles in Business Management (3 credit hours)
EC 202 Survey of Economics (3 credit hours)
AC 202 Survey in Accounting (3 credit hours)
G-CM 218 Business and Personal Communication (3 credit hours)
G-BA 220 Business Applied Statistics or G-MA 221, Elementary Applied Statistics (4 credit hours)
BA 221 Marketing (3 credit hours)
PE 244 Sport and Society (3 credit hours)
PE 289 Sport and Exercise Psychology (3 credit hours)
BA 315 Business Law (3 credit hours)
BA 324 Organizational Behavior (3 credit hours)
BA 325 Financial Management (3 credit hours)
BA 339 Human Resource Management (3 credit hours)
PE 415 Sport Management (3 credit hours)
PE 420 Sport Marketing (3 credit hours)
PE 425 Sport Finance (3 credit hours)
PE 430 Governance and Policy in Sport (3 credit hours)
PE 475 Senior Capstone (3 credit hours)

2022|Catalog 22-23, Health and Sport Science|

Health and Sport Studies Course Descriptions

Health Science Course Descriptions

HS 175 Health Systems

3 hours
This course provides an overview of how healthcare is organized and how healthcare services are delivered in the U.S.  It explores issues such as healthcare access, cost, and quality. It will cover the roles of government, patients, health professionals, hospitals, insurers and pharmaceutical companies, as well as the interactions of these stakeholders. The course aims to provide skills in critical and analytical thinking and decision-making related to the U.S. healthcare system and the people in it. (Fall)

G-HS/PE 190 Social and Behavioral Determinants of Health

3 hours
This course considers health and health behaviors within the context of social, cultural, and environmental influences on individual behaviors. Students explore the ways social factors affect individual health and well-being, including high-risk behaviors and health inequities. Health behavior programs and interventions and theories of health promotion, health behavioral change, and health education will be examined. (Spring)

HS 200 Public and Community Health

3 hours
This course offers a basic introduction to the issues of public health, major public health problems, and public health systems. The class examines core principles of public health, focusing on a community perspective. Student learn about public health approaches to health assessment, health promotion, disease prevention, and the outcomes of public health initiatives at the local, state, and national levels. Prerequisites: G-PE 150 and HS 175. (Fall)

HS 207 Medical Terminology

2 hours
An introduction to the study of medical terms that brings to life the language of medicine. This course will help students develop an understanding of how to communicate fluently in a healthcare setting. This course will explain medical terms in the context of the anatomy and physiology of different body systems as well as how the body works in health and disease. This course does not include a laboratory. (Interterm, even years) 

HS 275 Career Exploration in Health Science/Healthcare Management

2 hours
This course educates students about the wide range of careers available in the healthcare industry. A minimum of 20 total hours of observation in one or more healthcare settings is required. The desired student outcome is enhanced clarity about career directions through deeper understanding of personal strengths, values, aptitude, and interest. G-BI 101 or G-BI 111 and BI 112, G-EN 110, G-EN 111, and HS 175. (Spring)

HS 290 Health Policy

3 hours
Students explore key health policy concepts in the U.S. health care system. They examine governmental and non-governmental policy-making processes and learn to analyze policies and evaluate policy outcomes. Students will learn how U.S. policy-making processes interact with the structure of the U.S. healthcare system and the implications of changes to these processes and the system. The effect of health policy on the health of rural communities, in particular, is analyzed along with the intersection of U.S. health policy with infectious diseases, bioethics, and globalization. Prerequisites: G-EN 110, G-EN 111, HS 175 and HS 190. (Spring)

HS 325 Healthcare Finance

3 hours
This course focuses on the critical issues in financing healthcare in the U.S., from supply costs to third-party reimbursement. The course addresses determinants of demand for healthcare, such as population demographics and health status, insurance coverage and out-of-pocket costs, and public expectations of health professionals and technology. The course will explore the role of health professionals in guiding and shaping the allocation of resources in healthcare markets and the roles of competition in U.S. healthcare. A focus of the course is how healthcare managers use financial data to manage their organizations and inform decision-making processes. The course also introduces students to the basic principles and tools of budget and resource management. Prerequisites: HS 290. (Fall)

HS 375 Junior Seminar in Health Science/Healthcare Management

2 hours
This course builds on the foundation of personal development and career exploration achieved in HS 275 Career Exploration in Health Science/Healthcare Management. Students will work with experienced healthcare practitioners a minimum of 40 hours. The course also takes students through the steps of developing, writing, and submitting the proposal for their senior capstone project. Capstone proposals are reviewed by the appropriate health science/healthcare management faculty and must be approved before capstone experiences begin. Prerequisites: G-CM 218, HS 207, and HS 275. (Interterm)

HS 395 Healthcare Administration, Leadership, and Management

3 hours
This course connects an overview of healthcare delivery systems with in-depth explorations of organizational theory and traditional managerial and executive leadership roles found in healthcare facilities. Leadership competencies and skills are developed through the examination of topics such as team building, strategic planning, compliance with professional standards and governmental regulations, management and development of human resources, managerial problem solving, and organizational communication, among others. Prerequisites: HS 200 and HS 325. (Spring)

HS 475 Senior Capstone in Health Science/Healthcare Management

6 hours
Students will complete their capstone hours over their final two semesters at McPherson College. Students will develop, write and submit their capstone proposal in consultation with a proctoring faculty member. Capstones are designed based on unique personal and professional goals. Students will record their experience and observations and reflect on their personal and professional growth throughout their capstone experience and, in their final semester, present their capstone portfolio in a pubic presentation. Prerequisites: HS 375 and HS 395. (Fall, Spring)

 

Sport Studies Course Descriptions

PE 100 Introduction to Physical Education and Sport

3 hours
Students will explore the historical and philosophical origins of physical education and sport, which have influenced the development of these institutions in American society. Antirequisite: PE 380. (Fall, Spring)

PE 105 Introduction to Sport Management

3 hours
Students will be introduced to the intricate nature of the sport industry. This course will provide an overview of the historical aspects, managing and leading techniques, various sporting environments, functions, and challenges related to sport management. Antirequisite: PE 450. (Fall, Spring)

G-PE 150 Concepts in Holistic Health

3 hours
This course is designed to present the student with health and wellness principles and offer suggestions for their application. These principles will be examined using a traditional approach with a variety of cultural influences. Major areas of study include mind-body interrelatedness and control, stress management, individual fitness, health and health related topics, and lifestyle management. (Fall, Spring)

PE 220 Human Anatomy and Physiology

3 hours
This course is designed to introduce the student to the science of the body structure and function. Content is presented in a simple to complex pattern which includes the design and function of cells, body systems, and the interdependence of systems. Prerequisites: PE 100, G-BI 101, G-PE 150, and a minimum of Sophomore standing. (Fall)

PE 244 Sport and Society

3 hours
This course will provide students with an opportunity to learn about the sociological and cultural aspects of sport. Students will acquire a broad understanding of social settings and cultural issues as they relate to sport and physical activity. Prerequisite: PE 100 and a minimum of Sophomore standing. Antirequisite: PE 288. (Fall)

PE 289 Sport and Exercise Psychology

3 hours
This course will provide insight into the theories, subject matter, and latest empirical research concerning the cognitive processes and emotional states that regulate and influence performance in sport, exercise, and other physical activities. Prerequisite: PE 100 and a minimum of Sophomore standing. Antirequisite: PE 288. (Spring)

PE 301 Human Growth and Motor Behavior

3 hours
Students will examine how the human body grows and develops and the relationships with motor control, learning, and development. Prerequisites: G-BI 210, PE 220, and a minimum of Junior standing. (Fall)

PE 304 Theories, Principles, and Leadership of Coaching

3 hours (Language Intensive)
This course will provide students the knowledge and tools to develop a philosophical and practical foundation to their coaching styles. Students will learn how to make sound decisions that will lead to success in the coaching profession. Prerequisites: PE 105, CI 220, PE 244, PE 289, and a minimum of Junior standing. (Fall)

PE 330 Exercise Physiology

3 hours
Students will study the relationship between exercise and human physiology. Prerequisites: PE 100, G-BI 210, PE 220, and a minimum of Junior standing. (Fall)

PE 385 Care and Treatment of Athletic Injuries

3 hours
The purpose of this course is to provide students with a wide spectrum of information on the care and treatment of athletes and their injuries. It is designed to provide an overview of emergency procedures and immediate assessment of injured athletes. The importance of preventative measures and an overview of the responsibilities of an athletic trainer and coach will be addressed. Prerequisites: PE 301, PE 330, and a minimum of Junior standing. (Spring)

PE 400 Skill Development, Physical Training, and Tactics in Coaching

3 hours
Students will learn the proper teaching and analytical techniques and methods to develop healthy and successful athletes and teams. Some of the topics covered include athlete performance assessment and evaluation, skill acquisition, athletic conditioning techniques, development, practice and conditioning programming, and the social-psychological aspects of training and coaching. Prerequisites: PE 304, PE 385, and Senior standing. (Fall)

PE 409/CI 409 Methods for Teaching Physical Education and Health in Elementary Schools

4 hours
This course is designed to introduce prospective elementary school physical education, health, and classroom teachers to the fundamentals, principles, and practices of physical education and health at the elementary school level. Movement exploration and methods, including adaptive physical education, will be learned in the variety of play and sport activities. Further, the methods and modalities for teaching school health will be explored while examining the potential health problems of the individual school child associated with school and home environments. This course includes a practical laboratory component. Prerequisites for Elementary Education majors: G-PE 150 and CI 220. Prerequisites for Sport Science majors: G-CI 150, CI 220, and PE 304. Corequisite for Sport Science Majors: PE 385. (Spring)

PE 410/CI 410 Methods for Teaching Physical Education and Health in Secondary Schools

4 hours
This course is designed to acquaint the student with a variety of teaching techniques, methods, and modalities for teaching physical education and health at the secondary school level. Proper movement skills and development, and healthy habits will be stressed to encourage lifelong physical activity and a healthy lifestyle. Adaptive physical education and the impact of sociocultural and socioeconomic factors will be integrated in the course. There is a practical laboratory component. Prerequisites: G-CI 150, CI 220, PE 304, and PE 385. (Fall)

PE 415 Sport Management

3 hours
Students will develop an advanced understanding of the planning, organizing, leading, and controlling aspects of a sport organization. Prerequisites: PE 105, G-CM 218, PE 244, PE 289, BA 324, BA 339, and a minimum of Junior standing. (Fall)

PE 420 Sport Marketing

3 hours
Students will explore the historical, contemporary, and future issues and trends in sport marketing. Further, students will learn and apply the marketing concepts and strategies utilized in the sport industry. Prerequisites: PE 105, G-CM 218, BA 221, PE 244, PE 289, BA 324, and a minimum of Junior standing. (Spring)

PE 425 Sport Finance

3 hours
Students will extend their financial management knowledge within the sport realm by focusing on topics such as time value of money, debt and equity financing, capital budgeting and spending earnings in the sport industry. Prerequisites: PE 105, G-BA 130, G-BA 220 or G-MA 221, PE 244, BA 325 and a minimum of Junior standing. (Spring)

PE 430 Governance and Policy in Sport

3 hours
Students will explore governance structures and processes related to policy within public, private, not-for-profit, and non-profit sport sectors in the United States. Through this examination, students will learn effective governance systems and the challenges and obstacles encountered by sport organizations. Further, it will be highlighted how sports issues revolved around specific topics such as ethnicity, national identity, sex, gender, diversity, disability, violence, deviance, health and event hosting can impact policy and governance structures. Prerequisites: PE 105, PE 244, BA 315, BA 324, and a minimum of Junior standing. (Spring)

PE 475 Senior Capstone

3 hours
This is the culminating or “capstone” course for Sport Science and Sport Management majors who do not participate in student teaching. Students are paired with a mentor in their chosen field to gain practical experience that will enhance their understanding of a potential career in the sport industry. Prerequisites for Sport Studies majors: PE 304, PE 385, and Senior standing. Prerequisites for Sport Management majors: PE 425, at least one of PE 420 or PE 430, and Senior standing. (Fall, Spring)

Special Course Options

PE 295/PE 495 Field Experience (1-4 credit hours for each course)
PE 297 Study Abroad (12-16 credit hours)
PE 299/PE 499 Independent Study (1-4 credit hours for each course)
PE 388 Career Connections (3-10 credit hours)
PE 445 Readings and Research (1 credit hour–Language Intensive)

Intercollegiate Competition Credit Hours

After completing one year of intercollegiate athletic competition, students may enroll in intercollegiate competition (PE 211-21 and PE 311-21) for 1 credit hour; however, a maximum of 2 credit hours for intercollegiate competition will count toward graduation. Students who transfer credits are limited to 2 credit hours for intercollegiate competition.

PE 209/PE 309 Intercollegiate Cheerleading (1 credit hour each)
PE 211/PE 311 Intercollegiate Softball–Women (1 credit hour each)
PE 212/PE 312 Intercollegiate Tennis (1 credit hour each)
PE 213/PE 313 Intercollegiate Football–Men (1 credit hour each)
PE 214/PE 314 Intercollegiate Basketball (1 credit hour each)
PE 215/PE 315 Intercollegiate Cross Country (1 credit hour each)
PE 216/PE 316 Intercollegiate Track and Field (1 credit hour each)
PE 217/PE 317 Intercollegiate Volleyball–Women (1 credit hour each)
PE 219/PE 319 Intercollegiate Soccer (1 credit hour each)
PE 221/PE 321 Intercollegiate Baseball (1 credit hour each)

2022|Catalog 22-23, Health and Sport Science|

Health and Physical Education Program

Purpose Statement

The department of health, physical education and recreation commits itself to developing graduates who embrace the liberal arts philosophy and who can demonstrate analytical and critical thinking skills, which contribute to the full understanding of the interrelationship of health, fitness, and wholeness in life.

The department offers programs designed for health-related professions, teaching physical education and health in the elementary and secondary schools, graduate preparation, and a related area of special emphasis in sports management.

B.S. in Health Science (72 credit hours)

This degree in Health Science is new in academic year 2020-21. As such, some of the courses required for graduation will not be offered until academic year 2022-23. Thus, this program is open only to first-time freshmen or to transfers intending to  graduate in spring 2023 or later and who have completed the equivalent of College Biology I & II. Transfers desiring to graduate by spring 2022 may want to consider the Interdisciplinary Health Science major in the Department of Natural Science.

Requirements

        G-BI 111 College Biology I (4 credit hours)
        G-CH 111 College Chemistry I (5 credit hours)
        BI 112 College Biology II (4 credit hours)
        CH 112 College Chemistry II (5 credit  hours)
        G-PE 150 Concepts in Holistic Health (2  credit hours)
        HS 175 Health Systems (3 credit hours)
        PE 180 First Aid and Personal Safety (2 credit hours)
        G-HS/PE 190 Social and Behavioral Determinants of Health (3 credit hours)
        HS 200 Public and Community Health (3 credit hour)
        PY 204 Child & Adolescent Development (3 credit hours)
        BI 207 Medical Terminology (2 credit hours)
        G-BI 210 Principles of Nutrition (3 credit hours)
        G-CM 218 Business and Professional Communication (3 credit hours)
        BI 225 Human Anatomy (4 credit hours)
        HS 275 Career Exploration in Health Science/Healthcare Management (2 credit hours)
        HS 290 Health Policy (3 credit hours)
        BI 315 Human Physiology (4 credit hours)
        HS 325 Healthcare Finance (3 credit hours)
        PE 330 Physiology of Exercise (3 credit hours)
        HS 375 Junior Seminar in Health Science/Healthcare Management (2 credit hours)
        HS 395 Healthcare Administration, Leadership, and Management (3 credit hours)
        HS 475 Senior Capstone in Health Science/Healthcare Management (6 credit hours)

B.S. in Healthcare Management ( 65 credit hours)

The degree in Healthcare Management is new in academic year 2020-21. As such, some of the courses required for graduation will not be offered until academic year 2022-23. As such, transfers desiring to enter this program in fall 2020 should expect no fewer than three years to complete the program.

Requirements

        G-BI 101 Principles of Biology (4 credit hours)
        G-CH 101 Principles of Chemistry (4 credit hours)
        G-BA 130 Principles of Business Management (3 credit hours)
        G-PE 150 Concepts in Holistic Health (2 credit hours)
        HS 175 Health Systems (3 credit hours)
        G-HS/PE 190 Social and Behavioral Determinants of Health (3 credit hours)
        HS 200 Public and Community Health (3 credit hours)
        EC 202 Survey of Economics (3 credit hours)
        AC 205 Financial Accounting (3 credit hours)
        AC 206 Managerial Accounting (3 credit hours)
        G-CM 218 Business and Professional Communication (3 credit hours)
        BA 221 Marketing (3 credit hours)
        HS 275 Career Exploration in Health Science/Healthcare Management (2 credit hours)
        HS 290 Health Policy (3 credit hours)
        BA 315 Business Law (3 credit hours)
        HS 325 Healthcare Finance (3 credit hours)
        BA 325 Financial Management (3 credit hours)
        BA 339 Human Resource Management (3 credit hours)
        HS 375 Junior Seminar in Health Science/Healthcare Management (2 credit hours)
        HS 395 Healthcare Administration, Leadership, and Management (3 credit hours)
         HS 475 Senior Capstone in Health Science/Healthcare Management (6 credit hours)

B.S. in Physical Education and Health (46 credit hours)

Requirements

G-BI 101 Principles of Biology (4 credit hours) or G-BI 111 College Biology (4 credit hours) or G-BI 106 Environmental Biology (4 credit hours)
G-CH 101
Principles of Chemistry (4 credit hours)
PE 110
  Introduction to Team Sports (2 credit hours)
G-PE 150  Concepts of Holistic Health (2 credit hours)
PE 160 Intro to Dual and Individual Sports I (2 credit hours)
PE 161 Intro to Dual and Individual Sports II (2 credit hours)
G-PE 170 Personal and Community Health (2 credit hours)
PE 180  First Aid and Personal Safety (2 credit hours)
PE 210  Human Sexuality (3 credit hours)
PE 220  Human Anatomy and Physiology for Physical Education (2 credit hours)
PE 244 Sport and Society (3 credit hours) or PE 289 Sport and Exercise Psychology (3 credit hours)
PE 280  Care and Treatment of Athletic Injuries (3 credit hours)
PE 330  Physiology of Exercise (3 credit hours)
PE 375  Junior Seminar (1 credit hour)
*PE 380  History and Philosophy of Sport and Physical Education (3 credit hours)
PE 411  Kinesiology (3 credit hours)
PE 450  Organization & Administration of Health, Physical Education, and Athletics (3 credit hours)
PE 475  Senior Seminar (2-6 credit hours)

Additional Requirements for Teacher Education Majors, PK-12 (47 credit  hours)

PY 101  Introduction to Psychology (3 credit hours)
CI 150 Introduction to Education (3 credit hours)
PY 204  Child and Adolescent Development (3 credit hours)
SE 210 Introduction to Infant, Child, Youth with Special Needs (3 credit hours)
CI 220 Principles and Strategies of Teaching (3 credit hours)
CI 232 Educational Technology (2 credit hours)
CI 251 Introduction to Education Practicum (1 credit hour)
PE/EE 305 Methods of Teaching PE in Elementary School (2 credit hours)
CI 315 Reading in the Content Field (2 credit hours)
CI 333  Intercultural Education (2 credit hours)
CI 351 Secondary Education Practicum (1 credit hour)
EE 375
Elementary Education Practicum (1 credit hour)
PE/CI 410
Methods of Teaching PE in Secondary School (2 credit hours)
PE/CI 426 Methods of Teaching School Health (2 credit hours)
CI 455  The Teaching-Learning Process (3 credit hours)
EE 465  Student Teaching in the Elementary School (6 credit hours)
CI 475  Student Teaching in the Secondary School (6 credit hours)
CI 476  Professional Seminar in Education (2 credit hours)

Additional Requirements for the Sport Management Emphasis (15 credit hours)

G-BA 130  Principles of Business Management (3 credit hours)
EC 202  Survey of Economics (3 credit hours)
AC 202  Survey of Accounting (3 credit hours)
BA 221  Marketing (3 credit hours)
*BA 339  Human Resource Management (3 credit hours)

Health and Physical Education Course Descriptions

Health Science Course Descriptions

HS 175 Health Systems

3 credit hours
This course provides an overview of how healthcare is organized and how healthcare services are delivered in the U.S.  It explores issues such as healthcare access, cost, and quality. It will cover the roles of government, patients,  health professionals, hospitals, insurers and pharmaceutical companies, as well as the interactions of these stakeholders. The course aims to provide skills in critical and analytical thinking and decision-making related to the U.S. healthcare system and the people in it. (Fall)

G-HS/PE 190 Social and Behavioral Determinants of Health

3 credit hours
This course considers health and health behaviors within the context of social, cultural, and environmental influences on individual behaviors. Students explore the ways social factors affect individual health and well-being, including high-risk behaviors and health inequities. Health behavior programs and interventions and theories of health promotion, health behavioral change, and health education will be examined. (Spring)

HS 200 Public and Community Health

3 credit hours
This course offers a basic introduction to the issues of public health, major public health problems, and public health systems. The class examines core principles of public health, focusing on a community perspective. Student learn about public health approaches to health assessment, health promotion, disease prevention, and the outcomes of public health initiatives at the local, state, and national levels. (Fall)

HS 275 Career Exploration in Health Science/Healthcare Management

2 credit hours
This course educates students about the wide range of careers available in the healthcare industry. A minimum of 20 total hours of observation in one or more healthcare settings is required. The desired student outcome is enhanced clarity about career directions through deeper understanding of personal strengths, values, aptitude, and interest. Prerequisites: HS 175 and G-HS/PE 190 (Spring)

HS 290 Health Policy

3 credit hours
Students explore key health policy concepts in the U.S. health care system. They examine governmental and non-governmental policy-making processes and learn to analyze policies and evaluate policy outcomes. Students will learn how U.S. policy-making processes interact with the structure of the U.S. healthcare system and the implications of changes to these processes and the system. The effect of health policy on the health of rural communities, in particular, is analyzed along with the intersection of U.S. health policy with infectious diseases, bioethics, and globalization. (Spring)

HS 325 Healthcare Finance

3 credit hours
This course focuses on the critical issues in financing healthcare in the U.S., from supply costs to third-party reimbursement. The course addresses determinants of demand for healthcare, such as population demographics and health status, insurance coverage and out-of-pocket costs, and public expectations of health professionals and technology. The course will explore the role of health professionals in guiding and shaping the allocation of resources in healthcare markets and the roles of competition in U.S. healthcare. A focus of the course is how healthcare managers use financial data to manage their organizations and inform decision-making processes. The course also introduces students to t he basic principles and tools of budget and resource management. (Fall)

HS 375 Junior Seminar in Health Science/Healthcare Management

2 credit hours
This course builds on the foundation of personal development and career exploration achieved in HS 275 Career Exploration in Health Science/Healthcare Management. Students will work with experienced healthcare practitioners a minimum of 40 hours. The course also takes students through the steps of developing, writing, and submitting the proposal for their senior capstone project. Capstone proposals are reviewed by the appropriate health science/healthcare management faculty and must be approved before capstone experiences begin. (Spring)

HS 395 Healthcare Administration, Leadership, and Management

3 credit hours
This course connects an overview of healthcare delivery systems with in-depth explorations of organizational theory and traditional managerial and executive leadership roles found in healthcare facilities. Leadership competencies and skills are developed through the examination of topics such as team building, strategic planning, compliance with professional standards and governmental regulations, management and development of human resources, managerial problem solving, and organizational communication, among others. (Spring)

HS 475 Senior Capstone in Health Science/Healthcare Management

6 credit hours
Students  may complete their capstone hours over their final two semesters at McPherson College.  Students write and submit their capstone proposal in HS 375 Junior Seminar in Health Science/Healthcare Management. Capstones are designed based on unique personal and professional goals. Components may include, but are not limited to: (1) Additional upper-division coursework in relevant disciplines, (2) Internships in a health science or healthcare management setting, (3) On-campus research with a McPherson College faculty member or off-campus research with a partner organization, (4) Advance work toward allied health certificates or graduate studies, (5) Community-based research, service, or work experience. Students will record their observations and reflect on their personal and professional growth throughout their capstone experience and, in their final semester, present their capstone portfolio in a pubic presentation. (Fall, Spring)

Physical Education Course Descriptions

PE 110 Introduction to Team Sports

2 credit hours
This course is an introduction to the organization, strategy, rules and practice of team sports. Team Sports covered in this course will include, but not be limited to, ultimate frisbee, team handball, field hockey, speedball, whiffleball, eclipse ball, cageball, volleytennis,  and mattball. Students will gain experience leading and officiating these events. (Fall, Spring)

G-PE/HS 150 Concepts in Holistic Health

2 credit hours
This course is designed to present the student with cognitive health and wellness principles and to offer suggestions for their application. These principles will be examined using a traditional approach with a variety of cultural influences. Major areas of study include mind-body interrelatedness and control, stress management, individual fitness, health and health related topics, and lifestyle management. (Fall, Spring)

PE 160 Introduction to Individual and Dual Sports I

2 credit hours
This course is comprised of an introduction to the fundamentals, organization, and practice of tennis, golf, bowling, badminton, dance-ballroom/swing, orienteering, disc golf, and blow guns. This course exists because a basic understanding of the physical and mental principles in individual and dual sports is essential for the fullest and richest enjoyment. (Fall, Spring)

PE 161 Introduction to Individual and Dual Sports II

2 credit hours
This course is comprised of an introduction to the organization and practice of racquetball, Pickleball, archery, ladderball, table tennis, billiards, dance–square/line–and fishing/camping. Individual and dual sports are an integral part of our society. This course exists because a basic understanding of the physical and mental principles in individual and dual sports is essential for the fullest and richest enjoyment. (Fall, Spring)

G-PE 170 Personal and Community Health

2 credit hours
The purpose of this course is to provide students with a wide variety of information concerning personal and community health and wellness. It is designed to have an overview of the physical, mental, emotional, social, and spiritual components of health as they combine to influence the complete human being. Included within the course will be an introduction to the management of stress, physical fitness, nutrition and weight management, drug use and abuse, noninfectious and infectious diseases, sexuality and fertility, consumerism, environmental concerns and the maturing adult. Additionally, a practical approach to setting up a personal improvement plan for lifetime wellness will be stressed. (Fall, Spring)

PE 180 First Aid and Personal Safety

2 credit hours
This course is designed for all students to understand and prevent accident situations, to treat a wide variety of accident and emergency situations including use of supportive equipment and psychological first aid, and receive American Red Cross certification for CPR. (Interterm)

PE/PY/SO 210 Human Sexuality

3 credit hours
A study of female roles, male roles, values, life adjustments, sexual identities, religion, language, and behavior differences based on cultural, educational and socioeconomic factors related to human sexuality. Course uses lectures, audio- visuals, discussions, guest resource persons, assigned readings, and projects or papers to present information. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher, or instructor consent. (Spring)

PE 220 Human Anatomy and Physiology for Physical Education

2 hours
This course is designed to introduce the student to the science of the body structure and function. Content is presented in a simple to complex pattern which includes the design and function of cells, body systems, and the interdependence of systems. (Fall)

PE 244 Sport and Society

3 credit hours
This course will provide students with an opportunity to learn about the sociological and cultural aspects of sport. There will be a broad understanding of social settings and cultural issues as they relate to sport and physical activity.  Antirequisite: PE 288. (Fall)

PE 280 Care and Treatment of Athletic Injuries

3 credit hours
The purpose of this course is to provide students with a wide spectrum of information on the care and treatment of athletes and their injuries. It is designed to provide an overview of emergency procedures and on-court assessment of injured athletes. The importance of preventative measures and an overview of the responsibilities of an athletic trainer will be addressed. Preparation and taping for game day will be discussed theoretically and rehearsed practically. Prerequisite: PE 220. (Spring)

PE 289 Sport and Exercise Psychology

3 credit hours
This course will provide insight into the theories, subject matter, and latest empirical research concerning the cognitive processes and emotional states that regulate and influence performance in sport, exercise, and other physical activities.  Antirequisite: PE 288. (Spring)

PE/EE 305 Methods for Teaching Physical Education in the Elementary School

2 credit hours
This course is designed to introduce prospective elementary school physical education and classroom teachers to the fundamentals, principles, and practices of physical education at the elementary school level. Movement exploration and methods will be stressed in the variety of play activities introduced. Additionally, this course has been designed to integrate theory and concept learning with practical laboratory experiences. Prerequisites: G-CI 150 and CI 251. (Spring)

PE 330 Physiology of Exercise

3 credit hours
This course is designed for future educators, coaches, and a variety of other health professionals including physical therapists, occupational therapists, fitness programmers and other persons interested in his field. This course will provide concepts for safe and sensible conduct of sport and physical education programs as well as any other exercise-based programs. Prerequisites: G-BI 101 or G-BI 106 or G-BI 111, and PE 220. (Spring)

PE375 Junior Seminar

1 credit hour
This course is designed to help students foster relationships with colleagues and other professionals in the learning community for the promotion of health and physical education techniques for learning and teaching. (Fall)

PE 380 History & Philosophy of Sport & Physical Education

3 credit hours (Language Intensive)
A study of the development of sport and physical education throughout pivotal historical periods and philosophical movements. (Fall)

PE/EE 410 Methods for Teaching Physical Education in the Secondary Schools

2 credit hours
A study of various teaching techniques and analysis of fundamental skills of physical education activities in the secondary school setting. The course offers an opportunity to explore various teaching techniques in individual, dual, and team activities in the field of physical education for the secondary schools. Prerequisites: PE 110, PE 160, PE 161, G-CI 150, and CI 251. (Interterm)

PE 411 Kinesiology

3 credit hours
Kinesiology is the study of human motion based on anatomical, physiological and mechanical principles. The study of the human body as machine for the performance of work will be examined from three major areas, mechanics, anatomy and physiology. All students should have prerequisite courses of Principles of Biology and Introductory Chemistry. All students who have met the above requirements are welcome to participate in this course, but it will be taught from the perspective of those going into physical education and/or coaching. Prerequisites: G-BI 101 and G-CH 101. (Fall)

PE 426/CI 426 Methods for Teaching Health in Elementary and Secondary School

2 credit hours
A course designed to acquaint the student with a variety of methods and modalities for teaching school health. The health problems of the individual school child and his/her environment will also be studied. Students will be videotaped when teaching a lesson. Prerequisites: G-PE 150 or G-PE 170, G-CI 150, and CI 251. (Fall)

PE 445 Readings and Research–Health Science

1 credit hour (Language Intensive)
This course is designed for the enrichment of a student’s study in the discipline, either by research on a topic not covered in the regularly offered courses or by research done on or off campus.  Students will write an academic research paper on the topic of their choosing and then present this research in a formal setting. This course is only open to seniors in the physical education department or seniors in the health science major. (Spring)

PE 450 Organization and Administration of Health, Physical Education and Athletics

3 credit hours
It is the goal of this course to introduce students to a variety of situations involving organization and administrative skills, and through this process, provide students with a broad range of organizational and administrative alternatives useful in the successful administration of school health, physical education and athletic programs. (Spring)

PE 475 Senior Seminar

2 credit hours
This is the culminating or “capstone” course for physical education majors who do not participate in student teaching. Discussion of current topics in physical education and the allied health fields will be combined with field experience to give the student a practical understanding of the fields they have chosen to pursue. (Fall, Spring)

Special Course Options

PE 295/PE 495 Field Experience (1-4 credit hours for each course)
PE 297 Study Abroad (12-16 credit hours)
PE 299/PE 499 Independent Study (1-4 credit hours for each course)
PE 388 Career Connections (3-10 credit hours)
PE 445 Readings and Research (1 credit hour–Language Intensive)

Intercollegiate Competition Credit Hours

After completing one year of intercollegiate athletic competition, students may enroll in intercollegiate competition (PE 211-21 and PE 311-21) for 1 credit hour; however, a maximum of 2 credit hours for intercollegiate competition will count toward graduation. Students who transfer credits are limited to 2 credit hours for intercollegiate competition.

PE 209/PE 309 Intercollegiate Cheerleading (1 credit hour each)
PE 211/PE 311 Intercollegiate Softball–Women (1 credit hour each)
PE 212/PE 312 Intercollegiate Tennis (1 credit hour each)
PE 213/PE 313 Intercollegiate Football–Men (1 credit hour each)
PE 214/PE 314 Intercollegiate Basketball (1 credit hour each)
PE 215/PE 315 Intercollegiate Cross Country (1 credit hour each)
PE 216/PE 316 Intercollegiate Track and Field (1 credit hour each)
PE 217/PE 317 Intercollegiate Volleyball–Women (1 credit hour each)
PE 219/PE 319 Intercollegiate Soccer (1 credit hour each)
PE 221/PE 321 Intercollegiate Baseball (1 credit hour each)

Natural Science Program

Purpose Statement

The Department of Natural Science provides:

  • a career-oriented approach to pre-professional preparation in the health sciences
  • a liberal arts and sciences approach to environmental health and sustainability
  • a hands-on approach to education in the laboratory and through student research
  • preparation to meet the Kansas State Department of Education standards for licensure in biology and chemistry

General Education Student Learning Outcome: Students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of how the natural sciences construct knowledge of the world.

General Education Performance Indicators

Students should be able to:

  1. Summarize the current consensus of the scientific community with regards to the structure and function of some aspect of the physical or biological world.
  2. Illustrate their knowledge of the changing nature of the consensus of the scientific community with regards to the structure and function of some aspect of the physical or biological world, by outlining the historical changes in that consensus.
  3. Report on their experiences with those methods and processes of the natural sciences which they conducted in the laboratory.

Biochemistry Major (Recommended for Pre-Medical Students)

Requirements

G-CH 111  College Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 112  College Chemistry II (5 hours)
CH 251  Organic Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 252  Organic Chemistry II (5 hours)
CH 201  Quantitative Analysis (4 hours)
CH 370  Biochemistry (4 hours)
G-BI 111  College Biology I (4 hours)
BI 112  College Biology II (4 hours)
BI/CH 310  Statistical Data Analysis (4 hours)
BI/CH 373  Cell Physiology/Biochemistry II (4 hours)

Select one from the following:

BI 283  Genetics (4 hours)
BI 384  Advanced Genetics (4 hours)
CH 390  Instrumental Analysis (3 hours)

Required Supporting Courses

G-PH 215  General Physics I (4 hours)
PH 216  General Physics II (4 hours)
*NS 300  Research Methods (1 hour)
NS 375  Junior Seminar (1 hour)
*NS 475  Senior Research (2 hours)

Biology Major

Requirements

A minimum of 32 semester hours of biological science coursework, including

G-BI 111  College Biology I (4 hours)
BI 112  College Biology II (4 hours)
BI 283  Genetics (4 hours)
BI 310  Statistical Data Analysis (4 hours)

8 credit hours chosen from among the 300 Level BI Courses

Required Supporting Courses

G-CH 111  College Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 112  College Chemistry II (5 hours)
CH 251  Organic Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 252  Organic Chemistry II (5 hours)
G-PH 215  General Physics I (4 hours)
*NS 300  Research Methods (1 hour)
NS 375  Junior Seminar (1 hour)
*NS 475  Senior Research (2 hours)

Biology Major – Teaching Licensure in Biology (6-12)

Biology Major for Teacher Licensure

A minimum of 32 semester hours, including:

G-BI 111  College Biology I (4 hours)
BI 112  College Biology II (4 hours)
G-BI 201  Biodiversity (4 hours)
BI 283  Genetics (4 hours)
*NS 300  Research Methods (1 hour)
NS 375  Junior Seminar (1 hour)

12 credit hours chosen from among the remaining BI or NS courses numbered 200 of higher, including at least one organismal course and one population course.

Required Supporting Courses

G-CH 111  College Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 112  College Chemistry II (5 hours)
CH 251  Organic Chemistry I (5 hours)
CI 232  Educational Technology (2 hours)
G-MA 221  Elementary Applied Statistics (4 hours)
G-PE 170  Personal and Community Health (2 hours)
G-PH 215  General Physics I (4 hours)
G-PY 101  Introduction to Psychology (3 hours)

Students pursuing this major must also meet all professional requirements for teacher licensure in the Curriculum and Instruction Department.

Biology Minor

Requirements

A minimum of 20 semester hours, including

G-BI 111  College Biology I (4 hours)
BI 112  College Biology II (4 hours)
BI 283  Genetics (4 hours)

At least eight hours of additional biology courses

Required Supporting Courses

G-CH 111  College Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 251  Organic Chemistry I (5 hours)

Health Science Interdisciplinary Major

This interdisciplinary major is being phased out. Entering students planning to graduate in spring 2023 or later should enroll in the new Health Science major in the Health/P.E./Recreation department. Students transferring in 60 hours or more—including equivalents of College Biology I & II, College Chemistry I & II, Elementary Applied Statistics, and Human Anatomy and Human Physiology—may enroll in this major in academic year 2020-21 with prospects to graduate in spring 2022.

Required Courses

G-BI 111 College Biology I (4 hours)
BI 112  College Biology II (4 hours)
G-CH 111 College Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 112 College Chemistry II (5 hours)
G-PH 215 General Physics I (4 hours)
PH 216 General Physics II (4 hours)
G-BI 210 Principles of Nutrition (3 hours)
BI 225 Human Anatomy (4 hours)
BI 315 Human Physiology (4 hours)
PE 180 First Aid and Personal Safety (2 hours)
PE 280 Care and Treatment of Athletic Injuries (3 hours)
PE 288 Psychology and Sociology of Sport (2 hours)
PE 330 Physiology of Exercise (3 hours)
PE 411 Kinesiology (3 hours)
PE/BI 445 Readings and Research: Research Methods in Health Science (1 hour)
PE 475 Senior Seminar – Kinesiology Internship (2 hours)
G-MA 221 Elementary Applied Statistics (4 hours)
G-PY 101 Introduction to Psychology

Recommended Supporting Courses

G-PE 150 Concepts in Holistic Health (2 hours)
G-PE 170 Personal and Community Health

Additional Requirements for Some Pre-professional Programs

PY 204 Child and Adolescent Development (3 hours) OR
PY 305 Abnormal Psychology (3 hours)
BI 207 Medical Terminology (2 hours)
BI 404 Biomedical Ethics (2 hours)
G-MA 105 College Algebra
Trigonometry (or above)
Communication course
Sociology course
Business course

Chemistry Major

Requirements

A minimum of 36 semester hours including

G-CH 111  Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 112  Chemistry II (5 hours)
CH 251  Organic Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 252  Organic Chemistry II (5 hours)
CH 201  Quantitative Analysis (4 hours)
CH 390  Instrumental Analysis (3 hours)
CH 385  Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (4 hours)
CH 400  General Physical Chemistry (5 hours)

Required Supporting Courses

G-PH 205  College Physics I (5 hour)
PH 206  College Physics II (5 hour)
*NS 300  Research Methods (1 hour)
NS 375  Junior Seminar (1 hour)
*NS 475  Senior Research (2 hours)
G-MA 111  Calculus I (4 hours)
MA 112  Calculus II (4 hours)

Recommended Supporting Courses

G-BI 111  College Biology I (4 hours)
BI 112  College Biology II (4 hours)

Chemistry Major – Teaching Licensure in Chemistry (6-12)

Chemistry Major for Teacher Licensure

A minimum of 32 hours including:

G- CH 111  College Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 112  College Chemistry II (5 hours)
CH 251  Organic Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 201  Quantitative Analysis (4 hours)
CH 310  Statistical Data Analysis (4 hours)
CH 385  Advanced Inorganic (4 hours)
CH 388  Lab Assisting Internship (2 hours)

Remaining hours must come from CH 252 Organic Chemistry II or CH courses 300 level or above.

Required Courses

G-BI 111  College Biology I (4 hours)
BI 112  College Biology II (4 hours)
CI 406 (ED 406) Methods for Teaching Natural Science in the Secondary School (3 hours)
G-PH 215  General Physics I (4 hours)
PH 216  General Physics II (4 hours)
*NS 300  Research Methods (1 hour)
NS 375  Junior Seminar (1 hours)

Suggested Courses

G-NS 141  Environmental Science (4 hours)
G-PC 251  Geology (4 hours)
G-PC 275  Astronomy (4 hours)
CH 252  Organic Chemistry II (5 hours)
G-MA 111  Calculus I (4 hours)
MA 112  Calculus II (4 hours)
PH 205  College Physics I (replace G-PH 215) (5 hours)
PH 206  College Physics II (replace G-PH 216) (5 hours)
*NS 475  Senior Research (2 hours)

Students pursuing this major must also meet all professional requirements for teacher licensure in the curriculum and instruction department.

Chemistry Minor

Requirements

A minimum of 24 hours including

G-CH 111  College Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 112  College Chemistry II (5 hours)
CH 251  Organic Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 252  Organic Chemistry II (5 hours)
CH 201  Quantitative Analysis (4 hours)

Environmental Stewardship Major

This program achieves its purposes when its graduates:

  • demonstrate knowledge of contemporary theories in the natural sciences
  • demonstrate skill in the application of laboratory and field experimental techniques
  • demonstrate knowledge of contemporary theories of human social systems and behavior
  • demonstrate a critical understanding of their personal roles in history, culture, and community
  • evaluate the impacts of human society and Earth’s natural systems on one another
  • differentiate between their personal belief system and societal belief systems
  • express a personal environmental ethic

Required Natural Science Courses

G-BI 101 Principles of Biology (4 hours) or G-BI 111 College Biology I (4 hours)
G-BI 201  Biodiversity (4 hours)
G-CH 101 Principles of Chemistry (4 hours)
G-NS 141  Environmental Science (4 hours)
G-PH 215  General Physics I (4 hours)
G-PC 251  Geology (4 hours)
G-NS 245  Climatology (4 hours)
BI 325  Human Ecology, Epidemiology and Public Health (4 hours)
NS 404  Environmental Ethics (2 hours)
NS 495  Field Experience (4 hours)

Electives from Humanities, Social Science, and Technology

Select at least 27 hours from the following:

CM 325  Conflict Communication (3 hours)
EC 202  Survey of Economics (3 hours)
G-ET 201 Social Entrepreneurship (3 hours)
Up to 2 courses (G-HI or HI200+) (6 hours)
G-PE 170  Personal/Community Health (2 hours)
G-PR 104 Ethics (3 hours)
G-PR 107 Critical Thinking (3 hours)
G-PR 203 Science and Religion (3 hours)
G-PR 206 Religion and Environmental Stewardship (3 hours)
G-PS 125  International Relations (3 hours)
G-PS 130  Principles of Geography (3 hours)
G-PS 215  Global Peace Studies (3 hours)
PY/SO 303  Social Psychology (3-4 hours)
G-SO 101  Introduction to Sociology (3 hours)
SO 206  Social Problems (3-4 hours)
SO 320  Urban Sociology (3 hours)
*G-TE 333  Technology and Society (3-4 hours)

Other courses as approved by both the advisor and co-advisor.

Other Course Requirements

NS 350 Stewardship Seminar1/semester (4 required)
*NS 300  Research Methods (1 hour)
NS 375  Junior Seminar (1 hour)
*NS 475  Senior Research (2 hours)

Environmental Science Minor

Requirements

G-BI 101 Principles of Biology or G-BI 111 College Biology I or G-CH 101 Principles of Chemistry (4 hours)
G-NS 141  Environmental Science (4 hours)
G-PC 251  Geology (4 hours)
G-NS 245  Climatology (4 hours)
NS 495  Field Experience (4 hours)

Environmental Stewardship Minor

Requirements

G-NS 141 Environmental Science (4 hours)
G-PC 251  Geology or
G-PC 245  Climatology (4 hours)
NS 495  Field Experience (4 hours)
NS 350  Stewardship Seminar (2 hours)

Electives from Environmental Stewardship Major Electives list (6 hours)

2020|Catalog 20-21, Natural Science|

Health, Physical Education and Recreation Program

Purpose Statement

The department of health, physical education and recreation commits itself to developing graduates who embrace the liberal arts philosophy and who can demonstrate a variety of skills efficiently and effectively, analyze and critique movement, and understand the interrelationship of health, fitness, and wholeness in life.

The department achieves this purpose when its graduates

  • develop a personal strategy for health and fitness, emphasizing the physical domain, understanding that behaviors learned are a lifelong process.
  • understand the concepts of physical education and health content and apply these concepts for the development of a physically educated individual.
  • demonstrate a heightened awareness of the impact of play on the quality of life.
  • meet State Department of Education standards and NCATE standards for licensure in the area of physical education and health (applies to those seeking teaching certification in physical education and health).

The department offers programs designed for teaching physical education and health in the elementary and secondary schools, graduate preparation, and a related area of special emphasis in sports management. In cooperation with the department of natural sciences, it also hosts an interdisciplinary degree in health science.

Physical Education and Health Major

Completion of the required and supporting courses listed below, plus courses and/or a selected emphasis area of professional preparation should total a minimum of 37 semester hours in the department of physical education and 11 semester hours of required related courses.

Requirements

PE 110  Introduction to Team Sports (2 hours)
G-PE 150  Concepts of Holistic Health (2 hours)
PE 160  Intro to Dual and Individual Sports I (2 hours)
PE 161  Intro to Dual and Individual Sports II (2 hours)
G-PE 170   Personal and Community Health (2 hours)
PE 180  First Aid and Personal Safety (2 hours)
PE 210  Human Sexuality (3 hours)
PE 220  Human Anatomy and Physiology for Physical Education (2 hours)
PE 280  Care and Treatment of Athletic Injuries (3 hours)
PE 288  Psychology and Sociology of Sport (2 hours)
PE 330  Physiology of Exercise (3 hours)
PE 375  Junior Seminar (1 hour)
*PE 380  History and Philosophy of Sport and Physical Education (3 hours)
PE 411  Kinesiology (3 hours)
PE 450  Organization & Administration of Health, Physical Education, and Athletics (3 hours)
PE 475  Senior Seminar (2-6 hours)

Required Supporting Courses

G-BI 101 Principles of Biology 4 hours) or
G-BI 111 College Biology (4 hours) or
G-BI 106 Environmental Biology (4 hours)

Additional Requirements for Teacher Education Majors, PK-12

Professional Education Requirements

Related Courses:

PY 101  Introduction to Psychology (3 hours)
PY 204  Child and Adolescent Development (3 hours)
CI 232  Educational Technology (2 hours)
CI 333  Intercultural Education (2 hours)

Education Courses:

CI 150  Introduction to Education (3 hours)
CI 251  Introduction to Education Practicum (1 hour)
SE 210  Intro to Infant, Child, Youth with Special Needs (3 hours)
CI 220  Principles & Strategies of Teaching (3 hours)
CI 315  Reading in the Content Field (2 hours)
CI 455  The Teaching-Learning Process (3 hours)

Methods Courses:

PE/CI 426  Methods of Teaching School Health (2 hours)
PE/EE 305  Methods of Teaching PE in Elementary School (2 hours)
PE/CI 410  Methods of Teaching PE in Secondary School (2 hours)

Observations & Student Teaching:

CI 351  Secondary Education Practicum (1 hour)
EE 375  Elementary Education Practicum (1 hour)
EE 465  Student Teaching in the Elementary School (6 hours)
CI 475  Student Teaching in the Secondary School (6 hours)
CI 476  Professional Seminar in Education (2 hours)

Total Hours 45 hours

Additional Requirements for Sports Management Emphasis

G-BA 130  Principles of Business Management (3 hours)
EC 202  Survey of Economics (3 hours)
AC 202  Survey of Accounting (3 hours)
BA 221  Marketing (3 hours)
*BA 339  Human Resource Management (3 hours)

Health Science Interdisciplinary Major

Required Courses

G-BI 111 College Biology I (4 hours)
BI 112  College Biology II (4 hours)
G-CH 111 College Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 112 College Chemistry II (5 hours)
G-PH 215 General Physics I (4 hours)
PH 216 General Physics II (4 hours)
G-BI 210 Principles of Nutrition (3 hours)
BI 225 Human Anatomy (4 hours)
BI 315 Human Physiology (4 hours)
PE 180 First Aid and Personal Safety (2 hours)
PE 280 Care and Treatment of Athletic Injuries (3 hours)
PE 288 Psychology and Sociology of Sport (2 hours)
PE 330 Physiology of Exercise (3 hours)
PE 411 Kinesiology (3 hours)
PE/BI 445 Readings and Research: Research Methods in Health Science (1 hour)
PE 475 Senior Seminar – Kinesiology Internship (2 hours)
G-MA 221 Elementary Applied Statistics (4 hours)
G-PY 101 Introduction to Psychology

Recommended Supporting Courses

G-PE 150 Concepts in Holistic Health (2 hours)
G-PE 170 Personal and Community Health

Additional Requirements for Some Pre-professional Programs

PY 204 Child and Adolescent Development (3 hours) OR
PY 305 Abnormal Psychology (3 hours)
BI 207 Medical Terminology (2 hours)
BI 404 Biomedical Ethics (2 hours)
G-MA 105 College Algebra
Trigonometry (or above)
Communication course
Sociology course
Business course

Health, Physical Education & Recreation Course Descriptions

PE 110 Introduction to Team Sports

2 hours
This course is an introduction to the organization, strategy, rules and practice of team sports. Team Sports covered in this course will include, but not be limited to ultimate frisbee, team handball, field hockey, speedball, whiffleball, eclipse ball, cageball, volleytennis,  and mattball. Students will gain experience leading and officiating these events. (Fall )

PE 140 Introduction to Rhythms and Dance

2 hours
The purpose of this course is to provide students with a wide spectrum of information on rhythmic activities and dance. Students will learn body movements and how to perform them to music. Students will also choreograph and teach developmentally appropriate rhythmic activities and dance to others. (On Demand)

G-PE 150 Concepts in Holistic Health

2 hours
This course is designed to present the student with cognitive health and wellness principles and to offer suggestions for their application. These principles will be examined using a traditional approach with a variety of cultural influences. Major areas of study include mind-body interrelatedness and control, stress management, individual fitness, health and health related topics, and lifestyle management (including play). (Fall, Spring)

PE 160 Introduction to Individual and Dual Sports I

2 hours
This course is comprised of an introduction to the fundamentals, organization, and practice of tennis, golf, bowling, badminton, dance-ballroom/swing, orienteering, disc golf, and blow guns. This course exists because a basic understanding of the physical and mental principles in individual and dual sports is essential for the fullest and richest enjoyment. (Fall)

PE 161 Introduction to Individual and Dual Sports II

2 hours
This course is comprised of an introduction to the organization and practice of racquetball, Pickleball, archery, ladderball, table tennis, billiards, dance – square/ line and fishing/camping. Individual and dual sports are an integral part of our society. This course exists because a basic understanding of the physical and mental principles in individual and dual sports is essential for the fullest and richest enjoyment. (Spring)

G-PE 170 Personal and Community Health

2 hours
The purpose of this course is to provide students with a wide variety of information concerning personal and community health and wellness. It is designed to have an overview of the physical, mental, emotional, social, and spiritual components of health as they combine to influence the complete human being. Included within the course will be an introduction to the management of stress, physical fitness, nutrition and weight management, drug use and abuse, noninfectious and infectious diseases, sexuality and fertility, consumerism, environmental concerns and the maturing adult. Additionally, a practical approach to setting up a personal improvement plan for lifetime wellness will be stressed. (Fall, Spring)

PE 180 First Aid and Personal Safety

2 hours
This course is designed for all students to understand and prevent accident situations, to treat a wide variety of accident and emergency situations including use of supportive equipment and psychological first aid, and receive American Red Cross certification for CPR. (Interterm)

PE/PY/SO 210 Human Sexuality

3 hours
A study of female roles, male roles, values, life adjustments, sexual identities, religion, language, and behavior differences based on cultural, educational and socioeconomic factors related to human sexuality. Course uses lectures, audio- visuals, discussions, guest resource persons, assigned readings, and projects or papers to present information. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or higher or instructor consent. (Spring)

PE 220 Human Anatomy and Physiology for Physical Education

2 hours
Anatomy and physiology is designed to introduce the student to the science of the body structure and function. Content is presented in a simple to complex pattern which includes the design and function of cells, body systems, and the interdependence of systems. (Fall)

PE 280 Care and Treatment of Athletic Injuries

3 hours
The purpose of this course is to provide students with a wide spectrum of information on the care and treatment of athletes and their injuries. It is designed to provide an overview of emergency procedures and on-court assessment of injured athletes. The importance of preventative measures and an overview of the responsibilities of an athletic trainer will be addressed. Preparation and taping for game day will be discussed theoretically and rehearsed practically.Prerequisite: PE 220. (Spring)

PE 288 Psychology and Sociology of Sport

2 hours
This course is designed to expose the student to the principles of psychology and sociology as applied to a sports setting. The purpose being performance enhancement for both players and coaches with the ultimate goal of individual/human enrichment. (Spring)

PE/EE 305 Methods for Teaching Physical Education in the Elementary School

2 hours
This course is designed to introduce prospective elementary school physical education and classroom teachers to the fundamentals, principles, and practices of physical education at the elementary school level. Movement exploration and methods will be stressed in the variety of play activities introduced. Additionally, this course has been designed to integrate theory and concept learning with practical laboratory experiences. Prerequisites: G-CI 150, CI 151. (Spring)

PE 426/CI 426 Methods for Teaching Health in Elementary and Secondary School

2 hours
A course designed to acquaint the student with a variety of methods and modalities for teaching school health. The health problems of the individual school child and his/her environment will also be studied. Students will be videotaped when teaching a lesson. Prerequisites: G-PE 150 or G-PE 170, G-CI 150, CI 151. (Fall)

PE 327 Personal Training I

3hours
This course is designed to be a two course series which will enable the successful student the tools to pass the ACSM exam in order to become a certified personal trainer (ACSM – American College of Sports Medicine). The first (Fall) course will be primarily theoretical, emphasizing the science of personal training and behavior modification.

PE 329 Personal Training II

1 hour
This course is designed to be a two course series which will enable the successful student the tools to pass the ACSM exam in order to become a certified personal trainer (ACSM – American College of Sports Medicine). This second (Spring) course will incorporate a more practical approach, focusing on client screening and developing exercise programs. Prerequisite: PE 327.

PE 330 Physiology of Exercise

3 hours
This course is designed for future educators, coaches, and a variety of other health professionals including physical therapists, occupational therapists, fitness programmers and other persons interested in his field. This course will provide concepts for safe and sensible conduct of sport and physical education programs as well as any other exercise-based programs. Prerequisites: G-BI 101 or G-BI 106 or G-BI 111, PE 220. (Spring)

PE 340 Leadership in Camping/Recreation

3 hours
This course introduces students to the knowledge and skills necessary for leading safe, successful camping and recreation programs. The class will camp at different sites around Kansas. A fee (in addition to tuition) is required to cover the cost of food and transportation. (On Demand)

PE375 Junior Seminar

1 hour
This course is designed to help students foster relationships with colleagues and other professionals in the learning community for the promotion of health and physical education techniques for learning and teaching. (Fall)

PE 380 History & Philosophy of Sport & Physical Education

3 hours (Language Intensive)
A study of the development of sport and physical education as affected by major historical periods and events. (Fall)

PE/EE 410 Methods for Teaching Physical Education in the Secondary Schools

2 hours
A study of various teaching techniques and analysis of fundamental skills of physical education activities in the secondary school setting. The course offers an opportunity to explore various teaching techniques in individual, dual, and team activities in the field of physical education for the secondary schools. Prerequisites: PE 110, PE 160, PE 161, G-CI 150, CI 251. (Interterm)

PE 411 Kinesiology

3 hours
Kinesiology is the study of human motion based on anatomical, physiological and mechanical principles. The study of the human body as machine for the performance of work will be examined from three major areas, mechanics, anatomy and physiology. All students should have prerequisite courses of Principles of Biology and Introductory Chemistry. All students who have met the above requirements are welcome to participate in this course, but it will be taught from the perspective of those going into physical education and/or coaching. Prerequisites: G-BI 101, G-CH 101. (Fall)

PE 450 Organization and Administration of Health, Physical Education and Athletics

3 hours
It is the goal of this course to introduce students to a variety of situations involving organization and administrative skills, and through this process, provide students with a broad range of organizational and administrative alternatives useful in the successful administration of school health, physical education and athletic programs. (Spring)

PE 445 Readings and Research – Health Science

1 hour Language Intensive
This course is designed for the enrichment of a student’s study in the discipline either by research on a topic not covered in the regularly offered courses or by research done on or off campus. Students will write an academic research paper on the topic of their choosing and then present this research in a formal setting. This course is only open to seniors in the Physcial Education department or seniors in the Health Science major. (Spring)

PE 475 Senior Seminar

2 hours
This is the culminating or “capstone” course for Physical Education majors that do not participate in student teaching. Discussion of current topics in Physical Education and the Allied Health fields would be combined with field experience to give the student a practical understanding of the fields they have chosen to pursue.

Intercollegiate Competition:

PE 209 & 309 Intercollegiate Cheerleading (1 hour)
PE 211 & 311 Intercollegiate Softball – Women (1 hour)
PE 212 & 312 Intercollegiate Tennis (1 hour)
PE 213 & 313 Intercollegiate Football-Men (1 hour )
PE 214 & 314 Intercollegiate Basketball (1 hour)
PE 215 & 315 Intercollegiate Cross Country (1 hour)
PE 216 & 316 Intercollegiate Track and Field (1 hour)
PE 217 & 317 Intercollegiate Volleyball-Women (1 hour)
PE 219 & 319 Intercollegiate Soccer (1 hour)
PE 221 & 321 Intercollegiate Baseball (1 hour)

After completing one year of intercollegiate athletic competition, students may enroll in intercollegiate competition (PE 211-21 and PE 311-21) for 1 credit hour, but a maximum of 2 credit hours for intercollegiate competition will count toward graduation. Students who transfer credits are limited to 2 credit hours for intercollegiate competition.

 

Special Course Options
295/495 Field Experience (1-4 hours)
297 Study Abroad (12-16)
299/499 Independent Study (1-4 hours)
388 Career Connections (3-10 hours)
445 Readings and Research (1-4 hours)

Natural Science Program

 

Purpose Statement

The Department of Natural Science provides:

  • a career-oriented approach to pre-professional preparation in the health sciences
  • a liberal arts and sciences approach to environmental health and sustainability
  • a hands-on approach to education in the laboratory and through student research
  • preparation to meet the Kansas State Department of Education standards for licensure in biology and chemistry

Student Learning Outcome: Students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of how the natural sciences construct knowledge of the world.

Performance Indicators

Students should be able to:

  1. Summarize the current consensus of the scientific community with regards to the structure and function of some aspect of the physical or biological world.
  2. Illustrate their knowledge of the changing nature of the consensus of the scientific community with regards to the structure and function of some aspect of the physical or biological world, by outlining the historical changes in that consensus.
  3. Report on their experiences with those methods and processes of the natural sciences which they conducted in the laboratory.

Biochemistry Major (Recommended for Pre-Medical Students)

Requirements

G-CH 111  College Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 112  College Chemistry II (5 hours)
CH 251  Organic Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 252  Organic Chemistry II (5 hours)
CH 201  Quantitative Analysis (4 hours)
CH 370  Biochemistry (4 hours)
G-BI 111  College Biology I (4 hours)
BI 112  College Biology II (4 hours)
BI/CH 310  Statistical Data Analysis (4 hours)
BI/CH 373  Cell Physiology/Biochemistry II (4 hours)

Select one from the following:

BI 283  Genetics (4 hours)
BI 384  Advanced Genetics (4 hours)
CH 390  Instrumental Analysis (3 hours)

Required Supporting Courses

G-PH 215  General Physics I (4 hours)
PH 216  General Physics II (4 hours)
*NS 300  Research Methods (1 hour)
NS 375  Junior Seminar (1 hour)
*NS 475  Senior Research (2 hours)

Biology Major

Requirements

A minimum of 32 semester hours of biological science coursework, including

G-BI 111  College Biology I (4 hours)
BI 112  College Biology II (4 hours)
BI 283  Genetics (4 hours)
BI 310  Statistical Data Analysis (4 hours)

8 credit hours chosen from among the 300 Level BI Courses

Required Supporting courses

G-CH 111  College Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 112  College Chemistry II (5 hours)
CH 251  Organic Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 252  Organic Chemistry II (5 hours)
G-PH 215  General Physics I (4 hours)
*NS 300  Research Methods (1 hour)
NS 375  Junior Seminar (1 hour)
*NS 475  Senior Research (2 hours)

Biology Major – Teaching Licensure in Biology (6-12)

Biology Major for Teacher Licensure

A minimum of 32 semester hours, including:

G-BI 111  College Biology I (4 hours)
BI 112  College Biology II (4 hours)
G-BI 201  Biodiversity (4 hours)
BI 283  Genetics (4 hours)
*NS 300  Research Methods (1 hour)
NS 375  Junior Seminar (1 hour)

12 credit hours chosen from among the remaining BI or NS courses numbered 200 of higher, including at least one organismal course and one population course.

Required Supporting Courses

G-CH 111  College Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 112  College Chemistry II (5 hours)
CH 251  Organic Chemistry I (5 hours)
CI 232  Educational Technology (2 hours)
G-MA 221  Elementary Applied Statistics (4 hours)
G-PE 170  Personal and Community Health (2 hours)
G-PH 215  General Physics I (4 hours)
G-PY 101  Introduction to Psychology (3 hours)

Students pursuing this major must also meet all professional requirements for teacher licensure in the Curriculum and Instruction Department.

Biology Minor

Requirements

A minimum of 20 semester hours, including

G-BI 111  College Biology I (4 hours)
BI 112  College Biology II (4 hours)
BI 283  Genetics (4 hours)

At least eight hours of additional biology courses

Required supporting courses

G-CH 111  College Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 251  Organic Chemistry I (5 hours)

Health Science Interdisciplinary Major

Required Courses

G-BI 111 College Biology I (4 hours)
BI 112  College Biology II (4 hours)
G-CH 111 College Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 112 College Chemistry II (5 hours)
G-PH 215 General Physics I (4 hours)
PH 216 General Physics II (4 hours)
G-BI 210 Principles of Nutrition (3 hours)
BI 225 Human Anatomy (4 hours)
BI 315 Human Physiology (4 hours)
PE 180 First Aid and Personal Safety (2 hours)
PE 280 Care and Treatment of Athletic Injuries (3 hours)
PE 288 Psychology and Sociology of Sport (2 hours)
PE 330 Physiology of Exercise (3 hours)
PE 411 Kinesiology (3 hours)
PE/BI 445 Readings and Research: Research Methods in Health Science (1 hour)
PE 475 Senior Seminar – Kinesiology Internship (2 hours)
G-MA 221 Elementary Applied Statistics (4 hours)
G-PY 101 Introduction to Psychology

Recommended Supporting Courses

G-PE 150 Concepts in Holistic Health (2 hours)
G-PE 170 Personal and Community Health

Additional Requirements for Some Pre-professional Programs

PY 204 Child and Adolescent Development (3 hours) OR
PY 305 Abnormal Psychology (3 hours)
BI 207 Medical Terminology (2 hours)
BI 404 Biomedical Ethics (2 hours)
G-MA 105 College Algebra
Trigonometry (or above)
Communication course
Sociology course
Business course

Chemistry Major

Requirements

A minimum of 36 semester hours including

G-CH 111  Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 112  Chemistry II (5 hours)
CH 251  Organic Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 252  Organic Chemistry II (5 hours)
CH 201  Quantitative Analysis (4 hours)
CH 390  Instrumental Analysis (3 hours)
CH 385  Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (4 hours)
CH 400  General Physical Chemistry (5 hours)

Required supporting courses

PH 205  College Physics I (5 hour)
PH 206  College Physics II (5 hour)
*NS 300  Research Methods (1 hour)
NS 375  Junior Seminar (1 hour)
*NS 475  Senior Research (2 hours)
G-MA 111  Calculus I (4 hours)
MA 112  Calculus II (4 hours)

Recommended supporting courses

G-BI 111  College Biology I (4 hours)
BI 112  College Biology II (4 hours)

Chemistry Major – Teaching Licensure in Chemistry (6-12)

Chemistry Major for Teacher Licensure:

A minimum of 32 hours including:

G- CH 111  College Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 112  College Chemistry II (5 hours)
CH 251  Organic Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 201  Quantitative Analysis (4 hours)
CH 310  Statistical Data Analysis (4 hours)
CH 385  Advanced Inorganic (4 hours)
CH 388  Lab Assisting Internship (2 hours)

Remaining hours must come from CH 252 Organic Chemistry II or CH courses 300 level or above.

Required courses:

G-BI 111  College Biology I (4 hours)
BI 112  College Biology II (4 hours)
CI 406 (ED 406) Methods for Teaching Natural Science in the Secondary School (3 hours)
G-PH 215  General Physics I (4 hours)
PH 216  General Physics II (4 hours)
*NS 300  Research Methods (1 hour)
NS 375  Junior Seminar (1 hours)

Suggested Courses:

G-NS 141  Environmental Science (4 hours)
G-PC 251  Geology (4 hours)
G-PC 275  Astronomy (4 hours)
CH 252  Organic Chemistry II (5 hours)
G-MA 111  Calculus I (4 hours)
MA 112  Calculus II (4 hours)
PH 205  College Physics I (replace G-PH 215) (5 hours)
PH 206  College Physics II (replace G-PH 216) (5 hours)
*NS 475  Senior Research (2 hours)

Students pursuing this major must also meet all professional requirements for teacher licensure in the curriculum and instruction department.

Chemistry Minor

Requirements

A minimum of 24 hours including

G-CH 111  College Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 112  College Chemistry II (5 hours)
CH 251  Organic Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 252  Organic Chemistry II (5 hours)
CH 201  Quantitative Analysis (4 hours)

Environmental Stewardship Major

This program achieves its purposes when its graduates:

  • demonstrate knowledge of contemporary theories in the natural sciences
  • demonstrate skill in the application of laboratory and field experimental techniques
  • demonstrate knowledge of contemporary theories of human social systems and behavior
  • demonstrate a critical understanding of their personal roles in history, culture, and community
  • evaluate the impacts of human society and Earth’s natural systems on one another
  • differentiate between their personal belief system and societal belief systems
  • express a personal environmental ethic

Required Natural Science Courses:

G-BI 101 Principles of Biology (4 hours) or G-BI 111 College Biology I (4 hours)
G-BI 201  Biodiversity (4 hours)
G-CH 101 Principles of Chemistry (4 hours)
G-NS 141  Environmental Science (4 hours)
G-PH 215  General Physics I (4 hours)
G-PC 251  Geology (4 hours)
G-NS 245  Climatology (4 hours)
BI 325  Human Ecology, Epidemiology and Public Health (4 hours)
NS 404  Environmental Ethics (2 hours)
NS 495  Field Experience (4 hours)

Electives from Humanities, Social Science, and Technology:

Select at least 27 hours from the following:

CM 325  Conflict Communication (3 hours)
EC 202  Survey of Economics (3 hours)
G-ET 201 Social Entrepreneurship (3 hours)
Up to 2 courses (G-HI or HI200+) (6 hours)
G-PE 170  Personal/Community Health (2 hours)
G-PR 104 Ethics (3 hours)
G-PR 107 Critical Thinking (3 hours)
G-PR 203 Science and Religion (3 hours)
G-PR 206 Religion and Environmental Stewardship (3 hours)
G-PS 125  International Relations (3 hours)
G-PS 130  Principles of Geography (3 hours)
G-PS 215  Global Peace Studies (3 hours)
PY/SO 303  Social Psychology (3-4 hours)
G-SO 101  Introduction to Sociology (3 hours)
SO 206  Social Problems (3-4 hours)
SO 320  Urban Sociology (3 hours)
*G-TE 333  Technology and Society (3-4 hours)

Other courses as approved by both the advisor and co-advisor.

Other Course Requirements:

NS 350 Stewardship Seminar1/semester (4 required)
*NS 300  Research Methods (1 hour)
NS 375  Junior Seminar (1 hour)
*NS 475  Senior Research (2 hours)

Environmental Science Minor

Requirements

G-BI101 Principles of Biology or G-BI 111 College Biology I or G-CH 101 Principles of Chemistry (4 hours)
G-NS 141  Environmental Science (4 hours)
G-PC251  Geology (4 hours)
G-NS 245  Climatology (4 hours)
NS 493  Field Experience (4 hours)

Environmental Stewardship Minor

Requirements

G-NS 141 Environmental Science (4 hours)
G-PC 251  Geology or
G-PC245  Climatology (4 hours)
NS495  Field Experience (4 hours)
NS350  Stewardship Seminar (2 hours)

Electives from Environmental Stewardship Major Electives list (6 hours)

2019|Catalog 19-20, Natural Science|

Health, Physical Education and Recreation Program

Purpose Statement

The department of health, physical education and recreation commits itself to developing graduates who embrace the liberal arts philosophy and who can demonstrate a variety of skills efficiently and effectively, analyze and critique movement, and understand the interrelationship of health, fitness, and wholeness in life.

The department achieves this purpose when its graduates

  • develop a personal strategy for health and fitness, emphasizing the physical domain, understanding that behaviors learned are a lifelong process.
  • understand the concepts of physical education and health content and apply these concepts for the development of a physically educated individual.
  • demonstrate a heightened awareness of the impact of play on the quality of life.
  • meet State Department of Education standards and NCATE standards for licensure in the area of physical education and health (applies to those seeking teaching certification in physical education and health).

The department offers programs designed for teaching physical education and health in the elementary and secondary schools, graduate preparation, and a related area of special emphasis in sports management. In cooperation with the department of natural sciences, it also hosts an interdisciplinary degree in health science.

Physical Education and Health Major

Completion of the required and supporting courses listed below, plus courses and/or a selected emphasis area of professional preparation should total a minimum of 37 semester hours in the department of physical education and 11 semester hours of required related courses.

Requirements

PE 110  Introduction to Team Sports (2 hours)
G-PE 150  Concepts of Holistic Health (2 hours)
PE 160  Intro to Dual and Individual Sports I (2 hours)
PE 161  Intro to Dual and Individual Sports II (2 hours)
G-PE 170   Personal and Community Health (2 hours)
PE 180  First Aid and Personal Safety (2 hours)
PE 210  Human Sexuality (3 hours)
PE 220  Human Anatomy and Physiology for Physical Education (2 hours)
PE 280  Care and Treatment of Athletic Injuries (3 hours)
PE 288  Psychology and Sociology of Sport (2 hours)
PE 330  Physiology of Exercise (3 hours)
PE 375  Junior Seminar (1 hour)
*PE 380  History and Philosophy of Sport and Physical Education (3 hours)
PE 411  Kinesiology (3 hours)
PE 450  Organization & Administration of Health, Physical Education, and Athletics (3 hours)
PE 475  Senior Seminar (2-6 hours)

Required Supporting Courses

G-BI 101 Principles of Biology 4 hours) or
G-BI 111 College Biology (4 hours) or
G-BI 106 Environmental Biology (4 hours)

Additional Requirements for Teacher Education Majors, PK-12

Professional Education Requirements

Related Courses:

PY 101  Introduction to Psychology (3 hours)
PY 204  Child and Adolescent Development (3 hours)
CI 232  Educational Technology (2 hours)
CI 333  Intercultural Education (2 hours)

Education Courses:

CI 150  Introduction to Education (3 hours)
CI 251  Introduction to Education Practicum (1 hour)
SE 210  Intro to Infant, Child, Youth with Special Needs (3 hours)
CI 220  Principles & Strategies of Teaching (3 hours)
CI 315  Reading in the Content Field (2 hours)
CI 455  The Teaching-Learning Process (3 hours)

Methods Courses:

PE/CI 426  Methods of Teaching School Health (2 hours)
PE/EE 305  Methods of Teaching PE in Elementary School (2 hours)
PE/CI 410  Methods of Teaching PE in Secondary School (2 hours)

Observations & Student Teaching:

CI 351  Secondary Education Practicum (1 hour)
EE 375  Elementary Education Practicum (1 hour)
EE 465  Student Teaching in the Elementary School (6 hours)
CI 475  Student Teaching in the Secondary School (6 hours)
CI 476  Professional Seminar in Education (2 hours)

Total Hours 45 hours

Additional Requirements for Sports Management Emphasis

G-BA 130  Principles of Business Management (3 hours)
EC 202  Survey of Economics (3 hours)
AC 202  Survey of Accounting (3 hours)
BA 221  Marketing (3 hours)
*BA 339  Human Resource Management (3 hours)

Health Science Interdisciplinary Major

Required Courses

G-BI 111 College Biology I (4 hours)
BI 112  College Biology II (4 hours)
G-CH 111 College Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 112 College Chemistry II (5 hours)
G-PH 215 General Physics I (4 hours)
PH 216 General Physics II (4 hours)
G-BI 210 Principles of Nutrition (3 hours)
BI 225 Human Anatomy (4 hours)
BI 315 Human Physiology (4 hours)
PE 180 First Aid and Personal Safety (2 hours)
PE 280 Care and Treatment of Athletic Injuries (3 hours)
PE 288 Psychology and Sociology of Sport (2 hours)
PE 330 Physiology of Exercise (3 hours)
PE 411 Kinesiology (3 hours)
PE/BI 445 Readings and Research: Research Methods in Health Science (1 hour)
PE 475 Senior Seminar – Kinesiology Internship (2 hours)
G-MA 221 Elementary Applied Statistics (4 hours)
G-PY 101 Introduction to Psychology

Recommended Supporting Courses

G-PE 150 Concepts in Holistic Health (2 hours)
G-PE 170 Personal and Community Health

Additional Requirements for Some Pre-professional Programs

PY 204 Child and Adolescent Development (3 hours) OR
PY 305 Abnormal Psychology (3 hours)
BI 207 Medical Terminology (2 hours)
BI 404 Biomedical Ethics (2 hours)
G-MA 105 College Algebra
Trigonometry (or above)
Communication course
Sociology course
Business course

Health, Physical Education & Recreation Course Descriptions

PE 110 Introduction to Team Sports

2 hours
This course is an introduction to the organization, strategy, rules and practice of team sports. Team Sports covered in this course will include, but not be limited to ultimate frisbee, team handball, field hockey, speedball, whiffleball, eclipse ball, cageball, volleytennis,  and mattball. Students will gain experience leading and officiating these events. (Fall )

PE 140 Introduction to Rhythms and Dance

2 hours
The purpose of this course is to provide students with a wide spectrum of information on rhythmic activities and dance. Students will learn body movements and how to perform them to music. Students will also choreograph and teach developmentally appropriate rhythmic activities and dance to others. (On Demand)

G-PE 150 Concepts in Holistic Health

2 hours
This course is designed to present the student with cognitive health and wellness principles and to offer suggestions for their application. These principles will be examined using a traditional approach with a variety of cultural influences. Major areas of study include mind-body interrelatedness and control, stress management, individual fitness, health and health related topics, and lifestyle management (including play). (Fall, Spring)

PE 160 Introduction to Individual and Dual Sports I

2 hours
This course is comprised of an introduction to the fundamentals, organization, and practice of tennis, golf, bowling, badminton, dance-ballroom/swing, orienteering, disc golf, and blow guns. This course exists because a basic understanding of the physical and mental principles in individual and dual sports is essential for the fullest and richest enjoyment. (Fall)

PE 161 Introduction to Individual and Dual Sports II

2 hours
This course is comprised of an introduction to the organization and practice of racquetball, Pickleball, archery, ladderball, table tennis, billiards, dance – square/ line and fishing/camping. Individual and dual sports are an integral part of our society. This course exists because a basic understanding of the physical and mental principles in individual and dual sports is essential for the fullest and richest enjoyment. (Spring)

G-PE 170 Personal and Community Health

2 hours
The purpose of this course is to provide students with a wide variety of information concerning personal and community health and wellness. It is designed to have an overview of the physical, mental, emotional, social, and spiritual components of health as they combine to influence the complete human being. Included within the course will be an introduction to the management of stress, physical fitness, nutrition and weight management, drug use and abuse, noninfectious and infectious diseases, sexuality and fertility, consumerism, environmental concerns and the maturing adult. Additionally, a practical approach to setting up a personal improvement plan for lifetime wellness will be stressed. (Fall, Spring)

PE 180 First Aid and Personal Safety

2 hours
This course is designed for all students to understand and prevent accident situations, to treat a wide variety of accident and emergency situations including use of supportive equipment and psychological first aid, and receive American Red Cross certification for CPR. (Interterm)

PE/PY/SO 210 Human Sexuality

3 hours
A study of female roles, male roles, values, life adjustments, sexual identities, religion, language, and behavior differences based on cultural, educational and socioeconomic factors related to human sexuality. Course uses lectures, audio- visuals, discussions, guest resource persons, assigned readings, and projects or papers to present information. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or higher or instructor consent. (Spring)

PE 220 Human Anatomy and Physiology for Physical Education

2 hours
Anatomy and physiology is designed to introduce the student to the science of the body structure and function. Content is presented in a simple to complex pattern which includes the design and function of cells, body systems, and the interdependence of systems. (Fall)

PE 280 Care and Treatment of Athletic Injuries

3 hours
The purpose of this course is to provide students with a wide spectrum of information on the care and treatment of athletes and their injuries. It is designed to provide an overview of emergency procedures and on-court assessment of injured athletes. The importance of preventative measures and an overview of the responsibilities of an athletic trainer will be addressed. Preparation and taping for game day will be discussed theoretically and rehearsed practically.Prerequisite: PE 220. (Spring)

PE 288 Psychology and Sociology of Sport

2 hours
This course is designed to expose the student to the principles of psychology and sociology as applied to a sports setting. The purpose being performance enhancement for both players and coaches with the ultimate goal of individual/human enrichment. (Spring)

PE/EE 305 Methods for Teaching Physical Education in the Elementary School

2 hours
This course is designed to introduce prospective elementary school physical education and classroom teachers to the fundamentals, principles, and practices of physical education at the elementary school level. Movement exploration and methods will be stressed in the variety of play activities introduced. Additionally, this course has been designed to integrate theory and concept learning with practical laboratory experiences. Prerequisites: G-CI 150, CI 151. (Spring)

PE 426/CI 426 Methods for Teaching Health in Elementary and Secondary School

2 hours
A course designed to acquaint the student with a variety of methods and modalities for teaching school health. The health problems of the individual school child and his/her environment will also be studied. Students will be videotaped when teaching a lesson. Prerequisites: G-PE 150 or G-PE 170, G-CI 150, CI 151. (Fall)

PE 327 Personal Training I

3hours
This course is designed to be a two course series which will enable the successful student the tools to pass the ACSM exam in order to become a certified personal trainer (ACSM – American College of Sports Medicine). The first (Fall) course will be primarily theoretical, emphasizing the science of personal training and behavior modification.

PE 329 Personal Training II

1 hour
This course is designed to be a two course series which will enable the successful student the tools to pass the ACSM exam in order to become a certified personal trainer (ACSM – American College of Sports Medicine). This second (Spring) course will incorporate a more practical approach, focusing on client screening and developing exercise programs. Prerequisite: PE 327.

PE 330 Physiology of Exercise

3 hours
This course is designed for future educators, coaches, and a variety of other health professionals including physical therapists, occupational therapists, fitness programmers and other persons interested in his field. This course will provide concepts for safe and sensible conduct of sport and physical education programs as well as any other exercise-based programs. Prerequisites: G-BI 101 or G-BI 106 or G-BI 111, PE 220. (Spring)

PE 340 Leadership in Camping/Recreation

3 hours
This course introduces students to the knowledge and skills necessary for leading safe, successful camping and recreation programs. The class will camp at different sites around Kansas. A fee (in addition to tuition) is required to cover the cost of food and transportation. (On Demand)

PE375 Junior Seminar

1 hour
This course is designed to help students foster relationships with colleagues and other professionals in the learning community for the promotion of health and physical education techniques for learning and teaching. (Fall)

PE 380 History & Philosophy of Sport & Physical Education

3 hours (Language Intensive)
A study of the development of sport and physical education as affected by major historical periods and events. (Fall)

PE/EE 410 Methods for Teaching Physical Education in the Secondary Schools

2 hours
A study of various teaching techniques and analysis of fundamental skills of physical education activities in the secondary school setting. The course offers an opportunity to explore various teaching techniques in individual, dual, and team activities in the field of physical education for the secondary schools. Prerequisites: PE 110, PE 160, PE 161, G-CI 150, CI 251. (Interterm,)

PE 411 Kinesiology

3 hours
Kinesiology is the study of human motion based on anatomical, physiological and mechanical principles. The study of the human body as machine for the performance of work will be examined from three major areas, mechanics, anatomy and physiology. All students should have prerequisite courses of Principles of Biology and Introductory Chemistry. All students who have met the above requirements are welcome to participate in this course, but it will be taught from the perspective of those going into physical education and/or coaching. Prerequisites: G-BI 101, G-CH 101. (Fall, odd)

PE 450 Organization and Administration of Health, Physical Education and Athletics

3 hours
It is the goal of this course to introduce students to a variety of situations involving organization and administrative skills, and through this process, provide students with a broad range of organizational and administrative alternatives useful in the successful administration of school health, physical education and athletic programs. (Fall, odd)

PE 445 Readings and Research – Health Science

1 hour Language Intensive
This course is designed for the enrichment of a student’s study in the discipline either by research on a topic not covered in the regularly offered courses or by research done on or off campus. Students will write an academic research paper on the topic of their choosing and then present this research in a formal setting. This course is only open to seniors in the Physcial Education department or seniors in the Health Science major. (Spring)

PE 475 Senior Seminar

2 hours
This is the culminating or “capstone” course for Physical Education majors that do not participate in student teaching. Discussion of current topics in Physical Education and the Allied Health fields would be combined with field experience to give the student a practical understanding of the fields they have chosen to pursue.

Intercollegiate Competition:

PE 209 & 309 Intercollegiate Cheerleading (1 hour)
PE 211 & 311 Intercollegiate Softball – Women (1 hour)
PE 212 & 312 Intercollegiate Tennis (1 hour)
PE 213 & 313 Intercollegiate Football-Men (1 hour )
PE 214 & 314 Intercollegiate Basketball (1 hour)
PE 215 & 315 Intercollegiate Cross Country (1 hour)
PE 216 & 316 Intercollegiate Track and Field (1 hour)
PE 217 & 317 Intercollegiate Volleyball-Women (1 hour)
PE 219 & 319 Intercollegiate Soccer (1 hour)
PE 221 & 321 Intercollegiate Baseball (1 hour)

After completing one year of intercollegiate athletic competition, students may enroll in intercollegiate competition (PE 211-21 and PE 311-21) for 1 credit hour, but a maximum of 2 credit hours for intercollegiate competition will count toward graduation. Students who transfer credits are limited to 2 credit hours for intercollegiate competition.

 

Special Course Options
295/495 Field Experience (1-4 hours)
297 Study Abroad (12-16)
299/499 Independent Study (1-4 hours)
388 Career Connections (3-10 hours)
445 Readings and Research (1-4 hours)

Natural Science Program

Purpose Statement

The Department of Natural Science provides:

  • a career-oriented approach to pre-professional preparation in the health sciences
  • a liberal arts and sciences approach to environmental health and sustainability
  • a hands-on approach to education in the laboratory and through student research
  • preparation to meet the Kansas State Department of Education standards for licensure in biology and chemistry

Student Learning Outcome: Students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of how the natural sciences construct knowledge of the world.

Performance Indicators

Students should be able to:

  1. Summarize the current consensus of the scientific community with regards to the structure and function of some aspect of the physical or biological world.
  2. Illustrate their knowledge of the changing nature of the consensus of the scientific community with regards to the structure and function of some aspect of the physical or biological world, by outlining the historical changes in that consensus.
  3. Report on their experiences with those methods and processes of the natural sciences which they conducted in the laboratory.

Biochemistry Major (Recommended for Pre-Medical Students)

Requirements

G-CH 111  College Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 112  College Chemistry II (5 hours)
CH 251  Organic Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 252  Organic Chemistry II (5 hours)
CH 201  Quantitative Analysis (4 hours)
CH 370  Biochemistry (4 hours)
G-BI 111  College Biology I (4 hours)
BI 112  College Biology II (4 hours)
BI/CH 310  Statistical Data Analysis (4 hours)
BI/CH 373  Cell Physiology/Biochemistry II (4 hours)

Select one from the following:

BI 283  Genetics (4 hours)
BI 345 Plant Ecophysiology (4 hours)
BI 354  Microbial Ecophysiology (5 hours)
BI 364  Cell and Molecular Biology (4 hours)
BI 384  Advanced Genetics (4 hours)
CH 390  Instrumental Analysis (3 hours)

Required Supporting Courses

G-PH 215  General Physics I (4 hours)
PH 216  General Physics II (4 hours)
*NS 300  Research Methods (1 hour)
NS 375  Junior Seminar (1 hour)
*NS 475  Senior Research (2 hours)

Biology Major

Requirements

A minimum of 32 semester hours of biological science coursework, including

G-BI 111  College Biology I (4 hours)
BI 112  College Biology II (4 hours)
BI 283  Genetics (4 hours)
BI 310  Statistical Data Analysis (4 hours)

8 credit hours chosen from among the 300 Level BI Courses

Required Supporting courses

G-CH 111  College Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 112  College Chemistry II (5 hours)
CH 251  Organic Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 252  Organic Chemistry II (5 hours)
G-PH 215  General Physics I (4 hours)
*NS 300  Research Methods (1 hour)
NS 375  Junior Seminar (1 hour)
*NS 475  Senior Research (2 hours)

Biology Major – Teaching Licensure in Biology (6-12)

Biology Major for Teacher Licensure

A minimum of 32 semester hours, including:

G-BI 111  College Biology I (4 hours)
BI 112  College Biology II (4 hours)
G-BI 201  Biodiversity (4 hours)
BI 283  Genetics (4 hours)
*NS 300  Research Methods (1 hour)
NS 375  Junior Seminar (1 hour)

12 credit hours chosen from among the remaining BI or NS courses numbered 200 of higher, including at least one organismal course and one population course.

Required Supporting Courses

G-CH 111  College Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 112  College Chemistry II (5 hours)
CH 251  Organic Chemistry I (5 hours)
CI 232  Educational Technology (2 hours)
G-MA 221  Elementary Applied Statistics (4 hours)
G-PE 170  Personal and Community Health (2 hours)
G-PH 215  General Physics I (4 hours)
G-PY 101  Introduction to Psychology (3 hours)

Students pursuing this major must also meet all professional requirements for teacher licensure in the Curriculum and Instruction Department.

Biology Minor

Requirements

A minimum of 20 semester hours, including

G-BI 111  College Biology I (4 hours)
BI 112  College Biology II (4 hours)
BI 283  Genetics (4 hours)

At least eight hours of additional biology courses

Required supporting courses

G-CH 111  College Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 251  Organic Chemistry I (5 hours)

Health Science Interdisciplinary Major

Required Courses

G-BI 111 College Biology I (4 hours)
BI 112  College Biology II (4 hours)
G-CH 111 College Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 112 College Chemistry II (5 hours)
G-PH 215 General Physics I (4 hours)
PH 216 General Physics II (4 hours)
G-BI 210 Principles of Nutrition (3 hours)
BI 225 Human Anatomy (4 hours)
BI 315 Human Physiology (4 hours)
PE 180 First Aid and Personal Safety (2 hours)
PE 280 Care and Treatment of Athletic Injuries (3 hours)
PE 288 Psychology and Sociology of Sport (2 hours)
PE 330 Physiology of Exercise (3 hours)
PE 411 Kinesiology (3 hours)
PE/BI 445 Readings and Research: Research Methods in Health Science (1 hour)
PE 475 Senior Seminar – Kinesiology Internship (2 hours)
G-MA 221 Elementary Applied Statistics (4 hours)
G-PY 101 Introduction to Psychology

Recommended Supporting Courses

G-PE 150 Concepts in Holistic Health (2 hours)
G-PE 170 Personal and Community Health

Additional Requirements for Some Pre-professional Programs

PY 204 Child and Adolescent Development (3 hours) OR
PY 305 Abnormal Psychology (3 hours)
BI 207 Medical Terminology (2 hours)
BI 404 Biomedical Ethics (2 hours)
G-MA 105 College Algebra
Trigonometry (or above)
Communication course
Sociology course
Business course

Chemistry Major

Requirements

A minimum of 36 semester hours including

G-CH 111  Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 112  Chemistry II (5 hours)
CH 251  Organic Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 252  Organic Chemistry II (5 hours)
CH 201  Quantitative Analysis (4 hours)
CH 390  Instrumental Analysis (3 hours)
CH 385  Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (4 hours)
CH 400  General Physical Chemistry (5 hours)

Required supporting courses

PH 205  College Physics I (5 hour)
PH 206  College Physics II (5 hour)
*NS 300  Research Methods (1 hour)
NS 375  Junior Seminar (1 hour)
*NS 475  Senior Research (2 hours)
G-MA 111  Calculus I (4 hours)
MA 112  Calculus II (4 hours)

Recommended supporting courses

G-BI 111  College Biology I (4 hours)
BI 112  College Biology II (4 hours)

Chemistry Major – Teaching Licensure in Chemistry (6-12)

Chemistry Major for Teacher Licensure:

A minimum of 32 hours including:

G- CH 111  College Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 112  College Chemistry II (5 hours)
CH 251  Organic Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 201  Quantitative Analysis (4 hours)
CH 310  Statistical Data Analysis (4 hours)
CH 385  Advanced Inorganic (4 hours)
CH 388  Lab Assisting Internship (2 hours)

Remaining hours must come from CH 252 Organic Chemistry II or CH courses 300 level or above.

Required courses:

G-BI 111  College Biology I (4 hours)
BI 112  College Biology II (4 hours)
CI 406 (ED 406) Methods for Teaching Natural Science in the Secondary School (3 hours)
G-PH 215  General Physics I (4 hours)
PH 216  General Physics II (4 hours)
*NS 300  Research Methods (1 hour)
NS 375  Junior Seminar (1 hours)

Suggested Courses:

G-NS 141  Environmental Science (4 hours)
G-PC 251  Geology (4 hours)
G-PC 275  Astronomy (4 hours)
CH 252  Organic Chemistry II (5 hours)
G-MA 111  Calculus I (4 hours)
MA 112  Calculus II (4 hours)
PH 205  College Physics I (replace G-PH 215) (5 hours)
PH 206  College Physics II (replace G-PH 216) (5 hours)
*NS 475  Senior Research (2 hours)

Students pursuing this major must also meet all professional requirements for teacher licensure in the curriculum and instruction department.

Chemistry Minor

Requirements

A minimum of 24 hours including

G-CH 111  College Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 112  College Chemistry II (5 hours)
CH 251  Organic Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 252  Organic Chemistry II (5 hours)
CH 201  Quantitative Analysis (4 hours)

Environmental Stewardship Major

This program achieves its purposes when its graduates:

  • demonstrate knowledge of contemporary theories in the natural sciences
  • demonstrate skill in the application of laboratory and field experimental techniques
  • demonstrate knowledge of contemporary theories of human social systems and behavior
  • demonstrate a critical understanding of their personal rôles in history, culture, and community
  • evaluate the impacts of human society and Earth’s natural systems on one another
  • differentiate between their personal belief system and societal belief systems
  • express a personal environmental ethic

Required Natural Science Courses:

G-BI 106  Environmental Biology or
G-BI 201  Biodiversity (4 hours)
G-CH 106  Environmental Chemistry (4 hours)
G-NS 141  Environmental Science (4 hours)
G-PH 215  General Physics I (4 hours)
G-PC 251  Geology (4 hours)
G-NS 245  Climatology (4 hours)
BI 316  Ecology (4 hours) or
BI 325  Human Ecology, Epidemiology and Public Health (4 hours)
BI 334  Microbial Ecophysiology (5 hours) or
BI 345  Plant Ecophysiology (4 hours)
NS 404  Environmental Ethics (2 hours)
BI/EC 416  Ecological Economics (2 hours)
NS 495  Field Experience (4 hours)

Electives from Humanities, Social Science, and Technology:

Select at least 24 hours from the following:

CM 325  Conflict Communication (3 hours)
EC 202  Survey of Economics (3 hours)
Up to 2 courses (G-HI or HI200+) (6 hours)
G-PE 170  Personal/Community Health (2 hours)
G-PS 125  International Relations (3 hours)
G-PS 130  Principles of Geography (3 hours)
G-PS 215  Global Peace Studies (3 hours)
PY/SO 303  Social Psychology (3-4 hours)
G-SO 101  Introduction to Sociology (3 hours)
SO 206  Social Problems (3-4 hours)
SO 320  Urban Sociology (3 hours)
*G-TE 333  Technology and Society (3-4 hours)

Other courses as approved by both the advisor and co-advisor.

Other Course Requirements:

NS 350 Stewardship Seminar1/semester (4 required)
*NS 300  Research Methods (1 hour)
NS 375  Junior Seminar (1 hour)
*NS 475  Senior Research (2 hours)

Environmental Science Minor

Requirements

G-BI 106  Environmental Biology or
G-CH106  Environmental Chemistry (4 hours)
G-NS 141  Environmental Science (4 hours)
G-PC251  Geology (4 hours)
G-NS 245  Climatology (4 hours)
NS 493  Field Experience (4 hours)

Environmental Stewardship Minor

Requirements

G-NS 141  Environmental Science (4 hours)
G-PC 251  Geology or
G-PC245  Climatology (4 hours)
NS495  Field Experience (4 hours)
NS350  Stewardship Seminar (2 hours)

Electives from Environmental Stewardship Major Electives list (6 hours)

2018|Catalog 18-19, Natural Science|

Natural Science Course Descriptions

Biology Course Descriptions

G-BI 101 Principles of Biology

4 hours
An introduction to the principles of biology, with an emphasis on the biology of humans. This course does not apply toward a major in biology. Laboratory is included. (Fall)

G-BI 105 Concepts in Biology Now

3 hours
This course introduces students to key concepts in biology, including the cellular basis of life, genetics, evolution and ecology. Students will also explore the historical and contemporary scientific issues around these topics. This course does not include a laboratory. (Interterm, odd years)

G-BI 106 Environmental Biology

4 hours
A one-semester introduction to the principles of biology, with an emphasis on biological interactions in the environment. This course does not apply toward a major in biology or biochemistry. Laboratory is included.

G-BI 111 College Biology I

4 hours
A rigorous introduction to the unity and diversity of life. This course focuses on the contributions of genetics, ecology and evolution to the biodiversity of the planet. The laboratory exercises are designed to provide a variety of practical experiences, as well as to illustrate the principles discussed in lecture. (Fall)

BI 112 College Biology II

4 hours
A continuation of G-BI 111 with a rigorous introduction to organismal structure and function. Explores the organization and processes of living systems at the levels of biomolecules, organelles, cells, organ systems, and organisms. Lab work includes studies of enzyme action, cellular respiration, organismal development and anatomy. Prerequisite: G-BI 111 with a grade of C or better. (Spring)

G-BI 201 Biodiversity

4 hours
A fundamental study of biological diversity as an assessment of life on earth. This will progress from the individual to the community, focusing on biodiversity and ecology from an evolutionary perspective and also on applied environmental research. The course includes laboratory work as an option for the 4th credit hour. (Spring)

BI 207 Medical Terminology

2 hours
An introduction to the study of medical terms that brings to life the language of medicine. This course will help students develop an understanding of how to communicate fluently in a healthcare setting. This course will explain medical terms in the context of the anatomy and physiology of different body systems as well as how the body works in health and disease. This course does not include a laboratory. (Spring, even years)

G-BI 210 Principles of Nutrition

3 hours
Physiology and chemistry of digestion, absorption, and metabolism of nutrients; nutrient functions; requirements; and effects of nutrient deficiencies and toxicities.  This course does not include a laboratory. Prerequisites: G-CH 101 or G-CH 111 with a grade of C or better or with consent of instructor (Interterm, even years)

BI 225 Human Anatomy

4 hours
A lecture/laboratory course in the fundamentals of human anatomy, with emphasis on macroscopic structures at the tissue, organ and organ system levels of organization. Some attention will be given to the perspectives of histology and developmental biology. The course includes laboratory work, primarily dissection of a comparative mammal, the domestic cat. (Fall, even years)

BI 234 Microbiology

5 hours
A study of microorganisms, with emphasis on the bacteria. A consideration of their structure, metabolism, classification, identification, and human and ecological relationships. Laboratory is included. Prerequisites: BI 112, CH 251 with grades of C or better or consent of instructor. (Spring, even years)

BI 283 Genetics

4 hours
Basic genetic concepts including classical Mendelian inheritance, cytogenetics, population genetics, and the molecular basis of gene action. Laboratory experiences coordinated with lecture topics. Pre-requisites: BI 112, with a grade of C or better. (Fall)

BI 310 Statistical Data Analysis (also cross-listed as CH 310 Statistical Data Analysis)

4 hours
A study of fundamental concepts including data types, distributions, and hypothesis testing; and of the applications of spreadsheets and other software for data manipulation and statistical analysis. This course does not include a laboratory. Prerequisite: G-MA221 or consent of instructor. (Spring, odd years; Interterm, even years)

BI 315 Human Physiology

4 hours
A rigorous introduction to the fundamentals of human neurophysiology, cardiac-physiology, muscular & circulatory physiology and excretory & respiratory physiology. Laboratory experiences include case studies of human physiological problems. Prerequisite: BI 112, with a grade of C or better. (Spring, odd years)

BI 316 Ecology

4 hours
A study of relationships between organisms and their environments, including both physical and biotic environments. The course includes both laboratory and field work. Prerequisites: BI 112 with a grade of C or better. (Spring, even years)

BI 325 Human Ecology, Epidemiology, and Public Health

4 hours
A study of the relationships between humans and their environments, including both physical and biotic environments, with special emphasis on understanding the nature of healthy relationships in comparison to the disease state. This course does not include a laboratory. Prerequisites: BI 112 with a grade of C or better. (Fall, odd years)

BI 345 Plant Ecophysiology

4 hours
This course will explore the physiological processes that influence the growth, reproduction, survival, adaptation and evolution of plants. The physiological processes to be explored include water relations, mineral nutrition, solute transport, and energetics (photosynthesis and respiration). The influence of biotic and abiotic factors will be included to provide a context in which to discuss stress physiology and its ecological consequences. Laboratory is included. (Fall, even year, or Microbial Ecophysiology)

BI 354 Microbial Ecophysiology

5 hours
A study of the ecophysiology of microorganisms (with emphasis on Bacteria and Archaea), focusing on the diversity and utility of their metabolic pathways. This course includes both lecture and laboratory work. (Fall, even years;, or Plant Ecophysiology)

BI 364 Cell and Molecular Biology

4 hours
The molecular organization, function and evolution of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Lab work includes chromosome analysis, cellular fractionation, cell culture, and electrophoretic studies. Prerequisites: BI 112, CH 252 with grades of C or better. (Fall, odd years)

BI 370 Biochemistry (also cross-listed as CH 370 Biochemistry)

4 hours
A basic study of the chemistry and metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids. The course provides an understanding of the structural and functional relationships of chemical constituents of cells and the role that they play in the processes of life. Laboratory is included. Prerequisite: CH 252 or consent of instructor with concurrent enrollment. Laboratory is included (Fall, odd years)

BI 373 Cell Physiology (also cross-listed as CH 373 Biochemistry II)

4 hours
A rigorous study of the fundamentals of cell physiology, concentrating on intermediary metabolism and its regulation. Lab work includes computational biology and shadowing physicians. Laboratory is included. Prerequisites: BI 112, CH252 and BI/CH 370 with grades of C or better or consent of instructor. (Spring, even years)

BI 384 Advanced Genetics

4 hours
This upper-level course will extend on topics presented in Genetics (B1283). The course will delve deeper into genetics with a specific focus on the molecular- scale processes responsible for producing our phenotype and their relationships to evolutionary change. The lab component focuses on various current lab techniques used in the field of genetics. (Spring, odd years)

BI 391 Evolution 

4 hours (Language Intensive)
A study of the history, philosophical underpinnings, and implications of Charles Darwin’s Theory of Evolution by Natural Selection. This course does not include a laboratory. Prerequisites: BI 112 with a grade of C or better. (Interterm, odd years)

BI 393 Topics in Biology

1-4 hours
One specific topic will be covered each time this course is offered. Possible topics include (but are not limited to) molecular genetics, vertebrate zoology, functional morphology, quantitative biology, and advanced ecology. Prerequisite: BI 112 with a grade of C or better and consent of the instructor.

BI 404 Biomedical Ethics

2 hours
This seminar examines both the factual and ethical dimensions of decisions regarding healthcare. Students will use a case study approach to apply the ethical principles of autonomy, non-maleficence, beneficence, and justice to diverse situations. Alternative ethical systems and ethics in research are considered. This course does not include a laboratory. (Spring, even years)

BI 445 Readings and Research in Biology

1-4 hours
Enrichment of a student’s study in the discipline either by readings on a topic not covered in the above courses or by research done on or off campus. Prerequisites: 12 semester hours in the department or program with an average of C or better, and consent of the instructor. Open only to students majoring in the department or program.

BI 495 Field Experience in Biology

1-4 hours
A planned experience in one of the field-oriented or professionally related phases of biological science. The specific area and content must be agreed upon in advance by the student, faculty advisor, and Vice President for Academic Affairs. Specific examples that are offered periodically, especially during Interterm are Field Experience in Puerto Rico and observations of various health careers with practicing professionals.

Special Course Options
295/495 Field Experience (1-4 hours)
297  Study Abroad (12-16 hours)
299/499 Independent Study (1-4 hours)
388 Career Connections (3-10 hours)
445 Readings and Research (1-4 hours)

 

Chemistry Course Descriptions

G-CH 101 Principles of General Chemistry

4 hours
A one semester ‘preparatory’ general chemistry course for those who have not had high school chemistry. The course introduces basic chemical concepts of atoms, molecules, chemical reactions, chemical equations and a review of mathematics pertaining to problem solving in Chemistry. This course does not apply toward a major in biology, biochemistry, or chemistry but satisfies the general education ‘Physical Science’ requirement. Laboratory is included. (Fall)

G-CH 106 Environmental Chemistry

4 hours
A one-semester introduction to the principles of chemistry, with an emphasis on chemical interactions in the environment and sustainability. This course does not apply toward a major in biology, biochemistry, or chemistry. Laboratory is included.

G-CH 111 College Chemistry I

5 hours
A study of the principles, laws, and concepts of chemistry as they relate to the periodic table and systematic study of the properties of the elements. A study of modern atomic and molecular structure. Laboratory is included. Prerequisite: High School Chemistry or G-CH101 with a C or above. (Fall)

CH 112 College Chemistry II

5 hours
A continuation of CH 111. Includes study of the chemistry of metals and nonmetals, chemistry of solutions, chemical equilibrium and qualitative analysis. Laboratory is included. Prerequisite: G-CH 111. (Spring)

CH 201 Quantitative Analysis

4 hours
A study of the principles and methods of analytical chemistry by the methods of volumetric and gravimetric analysis, precipitimetry, acidimetry and oxidation- reduction titrations. Laboratory is included. Prerequisite: CH 112, or consent of the instructor. (Fall, even years)

CH 251 Organic Chemistry I

5 hours
A study of the principles of organic chemistry, the physical and chemical properties of carbon compounds with emphasis on the mechanisms of organic reactions, the nomenclature of the compounds, and methods of organic synthesis. The carbon compounds discussed include some of the common alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, cycloalkanes, alkylhalides, ethers and alcohols. Laboratory is included. Prerequisite: G-CH 112 with a grade of C or above, or consent of instructor. (Fall)

CH 252 Organic Chemistry II

5 hours
A continuation of CH 251. Includes study of basic spectroscopy as a basic tool for structural analysis and the chemistry of aromatic compounds, aldehydes, ketones, amines, carboxylic acids and their functional derivatives. Laboratory is included. Prerequisite: CH 251 with a grade of C or above. (Spring)

CH 310 Statistical Data Analysis (also cross-listed as BI 310 Statistical Data Analysis)

4 hours
A study of fundamental concepts including data types, distributions, and hypothesis testing; and of the applications of spreadsheets and other software for data manipulation and statistical analysis. This course does not include a laboratory. Prerequisite: G-MA221 or consent of instructor. (Spring, odd years; Interterm, even years)

CH 370 Biochemistry (also cross-listed as Bi 370 Biochemistry)

4 hours
A basic study of the chemistry and metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and nucleic acids. The course provides an understanding of the structural and functional relationships of chemical constituents of cells and the role that they play in the processes of life. Prerequisite: CH 252 or consent of instructor with concurrent enrollment. Laboratory is included. (Fall, odd years)

CH 373 Biochemistry II (also cross-listed as BI 373 Cell Physiology)

4 hours
A rigorous study of the fundamentals of cell physiology, concentrating on intermediary metabolism and its regulation. Laboratory is included. Prerequisites: BI 112, CH252 and BI/CH 370 with grades of C or better or consent of instructor. (Spring, even years)

CH 385 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

4 hours
Further study of inorganic chemistry including structure and bonding, coordination chemistry, organometallic chemistry, the chemistry of transition metals and a more detailed systematic study of the families of the periodic table. Laboratory is included. Prerequisite: CH 112, CH 252. (Spring, even years)

CH 390 Instrumental Analysis

3 hours
Advanced work in quantitative analysis with emphasis on the principles and methods of electrochemical, spectroscopic and chromatographic analysis. Laboratory is included. Prerequisite: CH 201, PH 206 or PH216, or consent of the instructor. (Spring, odd years)

CH 393 Topics in Chemistry

1-4 hours
One specific topic will be covered each time this course is offered. Prerequisite: CH112 with a grade of C or better and consent of the instructor.

CH 400 General Physical Chemistry

5 hours
A study of the physical-chemical properties of matter. Topics covered include thermodynamics, the kinetic theory of gases, chemical kinetics, quantum mechanics, and statistical mechanics. Laboratory is included. Prerequisite: CH 252, G-MA 111, PH 206 (or concurrent enrollment). (on demand)

CH 445 Readings and Research in Chemistry

1-4 hours
Enrichment of a student’s study in the discipline either by reading on the topic not covered in the above courses or by research done on or off campus. Prerequisite: 12 semester hours in the department or program with an average of C or better, and consent of instructor. Open only to students majoring in the department or program.

Special Course Options
295/495 Field Experience (1-4 hours)
297  Study Abroad (12-16 hours)
299/499 Independent Study (1-4 hours)
388 Career Connections (3-10 hours)
445 Readings and Research (1-4 hours)

 

Natural Science Course Descriptions

G-NS 100 Science in Society

3 hours
The goals of this course are to build scientific literacy and to increase awareness of what Science has to offer to individuals and to Society. Classes will include lectures, faculty-led discussions of assigned readings, student-led discussions of “Science in the News” topics, and student presentations of semester projects/term papers. This course does not include a laboratory. (Spring, even years)

G-NS 141 Environmental Science

4 hours
A study of the environmental issues that arise from the complex relationships between humans and the earth. Emphasis will be placed on a scientific understanding and a search for solutions to environmental problems. Laboratory is included. (Fall)

G-NS 245 Climatology

3 hours
This study of the Earth’s climate system will emphasize the physical and biological processes that determine climate: e.g. radiative transfer, atmospheric and oceanic energy transfer, energy balance, the hydrologic cycle, and related geological, biological, and anthropogenic influences; and will consider their interactive effects on climate change. This course does not include a laboratory. (Spring, even years)

NS 300 Research Methods

1 hour (Language Intensive)
Preparation for participation in an independent laboratory research project in the natural sciences. Topics covered include scientific literature searches, research design, data handling, research evaluation, scientific writing, and reporting. To be taken during the sophomore or junior year. (Fall)

NS 350 Stewardship Seminar

1 hour
A weekly discussion of the interrelationships among the current contents of the student’s other courses, in light of their relationships to the goals of the Environmental Stewardship major.

NS 375 Junior Seminar

1 hour
Preparation for participation in an independent laboratory research project in the natural sciences. Topics covered include literature searches, research design, data handling, research evaluation, scientific writing and reporting, career exploration, and scientific ethics. (Spring)

NS 404 Environmental Ethics

2 hours
This seminar examines both the factual and ethical dimensions of our current and possible future environments. Students will use a case study approach to apply different ethical frameworks to choices that arise from human interaction with the natural order. This course does not include a laboratory. (on demand)

NS 416 Ecological Economics

2 hours
This seminar will provide an historical overview of various schools of ecological and economic thought, and present the principles uniting ecology with economics. Students will use a case study approach to analyze economic policies constrained by ecological reality, including economic growth theory and policy as it pertains to issues of societal and ecological sustainability. This course does not include a laboratory. (on demand)

NS 475 Senior Research

2 hours (Language Intensive)
Experience in the planning, conducting, and reporting of scientific research. The student research works in continual consultation with the research advisor. Selection of the research topic and consent of the advisor must be obtained in advance of enrollment. Prerequisite: NS 375 and consent of research advisor.

NS 495 Field experience in the Natural Sciences

1-4 hours
A planned experience in a field-oriented aspect of both the biological and physical sciences.

Special Course Options
295/495 Field Experience (1-4 hours)
297  Study Abroad (12-16 hours)
299/499 Independent Study (1-4 hours)
388 Career Connections (3-10 hours)
445 Readings and Research (1-4 hours)

 

Physical Science Course Descriptions

G-PC 251 Geology

4 hours
An introductory course that focuses on the scientific study of the earth. The course emphasizes the study of earth materials, changes in the surface and interior of the earth, and the dynamic forces that cause those changes. Laboratory is included. (Interterm, odd years)

G-PC 275 Astronomy

4 hours
The structure and evolution of the universe, from nearby planets to distant quasars, are examined. Topics include recent discoveries concerning planets, stars, galaxies, pulsars, and black holes as well as their evolution, the structure of the universe today and how it will be in the future. The emphasis is descriptive rather than mathematical. Laboratory is included. (Interterm, even years)

PC 445 Readings and Research in Physical Science

1-4 hours
Enrichment of a student’s study in the discipline either by reading on a topic not covered in the above courses or by research done on or off campus. Prerequisite: 12 semester hours in the department or program and the consent of the instructor. Open only to students majoring in the department or program.

Special Course Options
295/495 Field Experience (1-4 hours)
297  Study Abroad (12-16 hours)
299/499 Independent Study (1-4 hours)
388 Career Connections (3-10 hours)
445 Readings and Research (1-4 hours)

 

Physics Course Descriptions

PH 205 College Physics I

5 hours
A first course for chemistry and mathematics majors with a calculus background. Topics covered are mechanics, wave motion, and thermodynamics with emphasis placed on the use of mathematics to formulate problems and to explain physical phenomena. Prerequisite: G-MA 111. Laboratory is included. (Fall, odd years)

PH 206 College Physics II

5 hours
A continuation of PH 205. Topics covered are electricity, magnetism, and optics. Prerequisite: PH 205. Laboratory is included. (Spring, even years)

G-PH 215 General Physics I

4 hours
A first course for premed, biology, and other science majors with a college algebra background. Topics covered are mechanics, wave motion, and thermodynamics with emphasis placed on the understanding of physical concepts to formulate problems and to explain physical phenomena. Lab is included. Prerequisite: MA 105 College Algebra. (Fall)

PH 216 General Physics II

4 hours
A continuation of G-PH 215. Topics covered are electricity, magnetism, and optics. Lab is included. Prerequisite: PH 215. (Spring)

 

Special Course Options
295/495 Field Experience (1-4 hours)
297  Study Abroad (12-16 hours)
299/499 Independent Study (1-4 hours)
388 Career Connections (3-10 hours)
445 Readings and Research (1-4 hours)

2018|Catalog 18-19, Natural Science|

Health, Physical Education & Recreation Program

Purpose Statement

The department of health, physical education and recreation commits itself to developing graduates who embrace the liberal arts philosophy and who can demonstrate a variety of skills efficiently and effectively, analyze and critique movement, and understand the interrelationship of health, fitness, and wholeness in life.

The department achieves this purpose when its graduates

  • develop a personal strategy for health and fitness, emphasizing the physical domain, understanding that behaviors learned are a lifelong process.
  • understand the concepts of physical education and health content and apply these concepts for the development of a physically educated individual.
  • demonstrate a heightened awareness of the impact of play on the quality of life.
  • meet State Department of Education standards and NCATE standards for licensure in the area of physical education and health (applies to those seeking teaching certification in physical education and health).

The department offers programs designed for teaching physical education and health in the elementary and secondary schools, graduate preparation, and a related area of special emphasis in sports management. In cooperation with the department of natural sciences, it also hosts an interdisciplinary degree in health science.

Physical Education and Health Major

Completion of the required and supporting courses listed below, plus courses and/or a selected emphasis area of professional preparation should total a minimum of 37 semester hours in the department of physical education and 11 semester hours of required related courses.

Requirements

PE 110  Introduction to Team Sports (2 hours)
G-PE 150  Concepts of Holistic Health (2 hours)
PE 160  Intro to Dual and Individual Sports I (2 hours)
PE 161  Intro to Dual and Individual Sports II (2 hours)
G-PE 170   Personal and Community Health (2 hours)
PE 180  First Aid and Personal Safety (2 hours)
PE 210  Human Sexuality (3 hours)
PE 220  Human Anatomy and Physiology for Physical Education (2 hours)
PE 280  Care and Treatment of Athletic Injuries (3 hours)
PE 288  Psychology and Sociology of Sport (2 hours)
PE 330  Physiology of Exercise (3 hours)
PE 375  Junior Seminar (1 hour)
*PE 380  History and Philosophy of Sport and Physical Education (3 hours)
PE 411  Kinesiology (3 hours)
PE 450  Organization & Administration of Health, Physical Education, and Athletics (3 hours)
PE 475  Senior Seminar (2-6 hours)

Required Supporting Courses

G-BI 101 Principles of Biology 4 hours) or
G-BI 111 College Biology (4 hours) or
G-BI 106 Environmental Biology (4 hours)
PE/SO 210 Human Sexuality (3 hours)

Additional Requirements for Teacher Education Majors, PK-12

Professional Education Requirements

Related Courses:

PY 101  Introduction to Psychology (3 hours)
PY 204  Child and Adolescent Development (3 hours)
CI 232  Educational Technology (2 hours)
CI 333  Intercultural Education (2 hours)

Education Courses:

CI 150  Introduction to Education (3 hours)
CI 251  Introduction to Education Practicum (1 hour)
SE 210  Intro to Infant, Child, Youth with Special Needs (3 hours)
CI 220  Principles & Strategies of Teaching (3 hours)
CI 315  Reading in the Content Field (2 hours)
CI 455  The Teaching-Learning Process (3 hours)

Methods Courses:

PE/CI 426  Methods of Teaching School Health (2 hours)
PE/EE 305  Methods of Teaching PE in Elementary School (2 hours)
PE/CI 410  Methods of Teaching PE in Secondary School (2 hours)

Observations & Student Teaching:

CI 351  Secondary Education Practicum (1 hour)
EE 375  Elementary Education Practicum (1 hour)
EE 465  Student Teaching in the Elementary School (6 hours)
CI 475  Student Teaching in the Secondary School (6 hours)
CI 476  Professional Seminar in Education (2 hours)

Total Hours 45 hours

Additional Requirements for Sports Management Emphasis

G-BA 101  Introduction to Business (3 hours)
EC 202  Survey of Economics (3 hours)
AC 205  Financial Accounting (3 hours)
BA 224  Principles of Management (3 hours)
BA 321  Marketing (3 hours)
*BA 339  Human Resource Management (3 hours)

Health Science Interdisciplinary Major

Required Courses

G-BI 111 College Biology I (4 hours)
BI 112  College Biology II (4 hours)
G-CH 111 College Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 112 College Chemistry II (5 hours)
G-PH 215 General Physics I (4 hours)
PH 216 General Physics II (4 hours)
G-BI 210 Principles of Nutrition (3 hours)
BI 225 Human Anatomy (4 hours)
BI 315 Human Physiology (4 hours)
PE 180 First Aid and Personal Safety (2 hours)
PE 280 Care and Treatment of Athletic Injuries (3 hours)
PE 288 Psychology and Sociology of Sport (2 hours)
PE 330 Physiology of Exercise (3 hours)
PE 411 Kinesiology (3 hours)
PE/BI 445 Readings and Research: Research Methods in Health Science (1 hour)
PE 475 Senior Seminar – Kinesiology Internship (2 hours)
G-MA 221 Elementary Applied Statistics (4 hours)
G-PY 101 Introduction to Psychology

Recommended Supporting Courses

G-PE 150 Concepts in Holistic Health (2 hours)
G-PE 170 Personal and Community Health

Additional Requirements for Some Pre-professional Programs

PY 204 Child and Adolescent Development (3 hours) OR
PY 305 Abnormal Psychology (3 hours)
BI 207 Medical Terminology (2 hours)
BI 404 Biomedical Ethics (2 hours)
G-MA 105 College Algebra
Trigonometry (or above)
Communication course
Sociology course
Business course

Health, Physical Education & Recreation Course Descriptions

PE 110 Introduction to Team Sports

2 hours
This course is an introduction to the organization, strategy, rules and practice of team sports. Team Sports covered in this course will include, but not be limited to ultimate frisbee, team handball, floor/field hockey, speedball, continuous whiffleball/ kickball, volleyball, cageball soccer/basketball, and mattball. This course is an introduction to the organization and practice of soccer, speedball, field hockey, softball, team handball, and volleyball. (Fall )

PE 140 Introduction to Rhythms and Dance

2 hours
The purpose of this course is to provide students with a wide spectrum of information on rhythmic activities and dance. Students will learn body movements and how to perform them to music. Students will also choreograph and teach developmentally appropriate rhythmic activities and dance to others. (On Demand)

G-PE 150 Concepts in Holistic Health

2 hours
This course is designed to present the student with cognitive health and wellness principles and to offer suggestions for their application. These principles will be examined using a traditional approach with a variety of cultural influences. Major areas of study include mind-body interrelatedness and control, stress management, individual fitness, health and health related topics, and lifestyle management (including play). (Fall, Spring)

PE 160 Introduction to Individual and Dual Sports I

2 hours
This course is comprised of an introduction to the fundamentals, organization, and practice of tennis, golf, bowling, badminton, dance-ballroom/swing, orienteering, disc golf, and blow guns. This course exists because a basic understanding of the physical and mental principles in individual and dual sports is essential for the fullest and richest enjoyment. (Fall)

PE 161 Introduction to Individual and Dual Sports II

2 hours
This course is comprised of an introduction to the organization and practice of racquetball, Pickleball, archery, ladderball, table tennis, billiards, dance – square/ line and fishing/camping. Individual and dual sports are an integral part of our society. This course exists because a basic understanding of the physical and mental principles in individual and dual sports is essential for the fullest and richest enjoyment. (Spring)

G-PE 170 Personal and Community Health

2 hours
The purpose of this course is to provide students with a wide variety of information concerning personal and community health and wellness. It is designed to have an overview of the physical, mental, emotional, social, and spiritual components of health as they combine to influence the complete human being. Included within the course will be an introduction to the management of stress, physical fitness, nutrition and weight management, drug use and abuse, noninfectious and infectious diseases, sexuality and fertility, consumerism, environmental concerns and the maturing adult. Additionally, a practical approach to setting up a personal improvement plan for lifetime wellness will be stressed. (Fall, Spring)

PE 180 First Aid and Personal Safety

2 hours
This course is designed for all students to understand and prevent accident situations, to treat a wide variety of accident and emergency situations including use of supportive equipment and psychological first aid, and receive American Red Cross certification for CPR. (Fall)

PE/PY/SO 210 Human Sexuality

3 hours
A study of female roles, male roles, values, life adjustments, sexual identities, religion, language, and behavior differences based on cultural, educational and socioeconomic factors related to human sexuality. Course uses lectures, audio- visuals, discussions, guest resource persons, assigned readings, and projects or papers to present information. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or higher or instructor consent. (Spring)

PE 220 Human Anatomy and Physiology for Physical Education

2 hours
Anatomy and physiology is designed to introduce the student to the science of the body structure and function. Content is presented in a simple to complex pattern which includes the design and function of cells, body systems, and the interdependence of systems. (Fall)

PE 280 Care and Treatment of Athletic Injuries

3 hours
The purpose of this course is to provide students with a wide spectrum of information on the care and treatment of athletes and their injuries. It is designed to provide an overview of emergency procedures and on-court assessment of injured athletes. The importance of preventative measures and an overview of the responsibilities of an athletic trainer will be addressed. Preparation and taping for game day will be discussed theoretically and rehearsed practically. (Fall)

PE 288 Psychology and Sociology of Sport

2 hours
This course is designed to expose the student to the principles of psychology and sociology as applied to a sports setting. The purpose being performance enhancement with the ultimate goal of individual/human enrichment. (Spring)

PE/EE 305 Methods for Teaching Physical Education in the Elementary School

2 hours
This course is designed to introduce prospective elementary school physical education and classroom teachers to the fundamentals, principles, and practices of physical education at the elementary school level. Movement exploration and methods will be stressed in the variety of play activities introduced. Additionally, this course has been designed to integrate theory and concept learning with practical laboratory experiences. Prerequisites: G-CI 150, CI 151. (Spring)

PE 426/CI 426 Methods for Teaching Health in Elementary and Secondary School

2 hours
A course designed to acquaint the student with a variety of methods and modalities for teaching school health. The health problems of the individual school child and his/her environment will also be studied. Students will be videotaped when teaching a lesson. Prerequisites: G-PE 150 or G-PE 170, G-CI 150, CI 151. (Interterm)

PE 327 Personal Training I

3hours
This course is designed to be a two course series which will enable the successful student the tools to pass the ACSM exam in order to become a certified personal trainer (ACSM – American College of Sports Medicine). The first (Fall) course will be primarily theoretical, emphasizing the science of personal training and behavior modification.

PE 329 Personal Training II

1 hour
This course is designed to be a two course series which will enable the successful student the tools to pass the ACSM exam in order to become a certified personal trainer (ACSM – American College of Sports Medicine). This second (Spring) course will incorporate a more practical approach, focusing on client screening and developing exercise programs.

PE 330 Physiology of Exercise

3 hours
This course is designed for future educators, coaches, and a variety of other health professionals including physical therapists, occupational therapists, fitness programmers and other persons interested in his field. This course will provide concepts for safe and sensible conduct of sport and physical education programs as well as any other exercise-based programs. Prerequisites: G-BI 101, PE 220. (Spring, odd)

PE 340 Leadership in Camping/Recreation

3 hours
This course introduces students to the knowledge and skills necessary for leading safe, successful camping and recreation programs. The class will camp at different sites around Kansas. A $350 fee (in addition to tuition) is required to cover the cost of food and transportation. (May Session)

PE375 Junior Seminar

1 hour
This course is designed to help students foster relationships with colleagues and other professionals in the learning community for the promotion of health and physical education techniques for learning and teaching.

PE 380 History & Philosophy of Sport & Physical Education

3 hours (Language Intensive)
A study of the development of sport and physical education as affected by major historical periods and events. (Fall, even)

PE/EE 410 Methods for Teaching Physical Education in the Secondary Schools

2 hours
A study of various teaching techniques and analysis of fundamental skills of physical education activities in the secondary school setting. The course offers an opportunity to explore various teaching techniques in individual, dual, and team activities in the field of physical education for the secondary schools. Prerequisites: PE 110, PE 160, PE 161, G-CI 150, CI 251. (Interterm,)

PE 411 Kinesiology

3 hours
Kinesiology is the study of human motion based on anatomical, physiological and mechanical principles. The study of the human body as machine for the performance of work will be examined from three major areas, mechanics, anatomy and physiology. All students should have prerequisite courses of Principles of Biology and Introductory Chemistry. All students who have met the above requirements are welcome to participate in this course, but it will be taught from the perspective of those going into physical education and/or coaching. Prerequisites: G-BI 101, G-CH 101. (Fall, odd)

PE 450 Organization and Administration of Health, Physical Education and Athletics

3 hours
It is the goal of this course to introduce students to a variety of situations involving organization and administrative skills, and through this process, provide students with a broad range of organizational and administrative alternatives useful in the successful administration of school health, physical education and athletic programs. (Fall, odd)

PE 445 Readings and Research – Health Science

1 hour Language Intensive
(Spring)

PE 475 Senior Seminar

2 hours
This is the culminating or “capstone” course for Physical Education majors that do not participate in student teaching. Discussion of current topics in Physical Education and the Allied Health fields would be combined with field experience to give the student a practical understanding of the fields they have chosen to pursue.

Intercollegiate Competition:

PE 211 & 311 Intercollegiate Softball – Women (1 hour)
PE 212 & 312 Intercollegiate Tennis (1 hour)
PE 213 & 313 Intercollegiate Football-Men (1 hour )
PE 214 & 314 Intercollegiate Basketball (1 hour)
PE 215 & 315 Intercollegiate Cross Country (1 hour)
PE 216 & 316 Intercollegiate Track and Field (1 hour)
PE 217 & 317 Intercollegiate Volleyball-Women (1 hour)
PE 219 & 319 Intercollegiate Soccer (1 hour)
PE 221 & 321 Intercollegiate Baseball (1 hour)

After completing one year of intercollegiate athletic competition, students may enroll in intercollegiate competition (PE 211-21 and PE 311-21) for 1 credit hour, but a maximum of 2 credit hours for intercollegiate competition will count toward graduation. Students who transfer credits are limited to 2 credit hours for intercollegiate competition.

Individualized Courses Available:

295/495 Field Experience (1-4 hours)
299/499 Independent Study (1-4 hours)
388 Career Connections (1-12 hours)
445 Readings and Research (1-4 hours)

Natural Science Program

Purpose Statement

The Department of Natural Science provides:

  • a career-oriented approach to pre-professional preparation in the health sciences
  • a liberal arts and sciences approach to environmental health and sustainability
  • a hands-on approach to education in the laboratory and through student research
  • preparation to meet the Kansas State Department of Education standards for licensure in biology and chemistry

Student Learning Outcome: Students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of how the natural sciences construct knowledge of the world.

Performance Indicators

Students should be able to:

  1. Summarize the current consensus of the scientific community with regards to the structure and function of some aspect of the physical or biological world.
  2. Illustrate their knowledge of the changing nature of the consensus of the scientific community with regards to the structure and function of some aspect of the physical or biological world, by outlining the historical changes in that consensus.
  3. Report on their experiences with those methods and processes of the natural sciences which they conducted in the laboratory.

Biochemistry Major (Recommended for Pre-Medical Students)

Requirements

G-CH 111  College Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 112  College Chemistry II (5 hours)
CH 251  Organic Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 252  Organic Chemistry II (5 hours)
CH 201  Quantitative Analysis (4 hours)
CH 370  Biochemistry (4 hours)
G-BI 111  College Biology I (4 hours)
BI 112  College Biology II (4 hours)
BI/CH 310  Statistical Data Analysis (4 hours)
BI/CH 360  Cell Physiology/Biochemistry II (4 hours)

Select one from the following:

BI 283  Genetics (4 hours)
BI 334  Microbial Ecophysiology (5 hours)
BI 364  Cell and Molecular Biology (4 hours)
BI 384  Molecular Genetics (4 hours)
CH 390  Instrumental Analysis (3 hours)

Required Supporting Courses

G-PH 215  General Physics I (4 hours)
PH 216  General Physics II (4 hours)
*NS 300  Research Methods (1 hour)
NS 375  Junior Seminar (1 hour)
*NS 475  Senior Research (2 hours)

Biology Major

Requirements

A minimum of 32 semester hours of biological science coursework, including

G-BI 111  College Biology I (4 hours)
BI 112  College Biology II (4 hours)
BI 283  Genetics (4 hours)
BI 310  Statistical Data Analysis (4 hours)

8 credit hours chosen from among the 300 Level BI Courses

Required Supporting courses

G-CH 111  College Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 112  College Chemistry II (5 hours)
CH 251  Organic Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 252  Organic Chemistry II (5 hours)
G-PH 215  General Physics I (4 hours)
*NS 300  Research Methods (1 hour)
NS 375  Junior Seminar (1 hour)
*NS 475  Senior Research (2 hours)

Biology Major – Teaching Licensure in Biology (6-12)

Biology Major for Teacher Licensure

A minimum of 32 semester hours, including:

G-BI 111  College Biology I (4 hours)
BI 112  College Biology II (4 hours)
G-BI 201  Biodiversity (4 hours)
BI 283  Genetics (4 hours)
*NS 300  Research Methods (1 hour)
NS 375  Junior Seminar (1 hour)

12 credit hours chosen from among the remaining BI or NS courses numbered 200 of higher, including at least one organismal course and one population course.

Required Supporting Courses

G-CH 111  College Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 112  College Chemistry II (5 hours)
CH 251  Organic Chemistry I (5 hours)
CI 232  Educational Technology (2 hours)
G-MA 221  Elementary Applied Statistics (4 hours)
G-PE 170  Personal and Community Health (2 hours)
G-PH 215  General Physics I (4 hours)
G-PY 101  Introduction to Psychology (3 hours)

Students pursuing this major must also meet all professional requirements for teacher licensure in the Curriculum and Instruction Department.

Biology Minor

Requirements

A minimum of 20 semester hours, including

G-BI 111  College Biology I (4 hours)
BI 112  College Biology II (4 hours)
BI 283  Genetics (4 hours)

At least eight hours of additional biology courses

Required supporting courses

G-CH 111  College Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 251  Organic Chemistry I (5 hours)

Health Science Interdisciplinary Major

Required Courses

G-BI 111 College Biology I (4 hours)
BI 112  College Biology II (4 hours)
G-CH 111 College Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 112 College Chemistry II (5 hours)
G-PH 215 General Physics I (4 hours)
PH 216 General Physics II (4 hours)
G-BI 210 Principles of Nutrition (3 hours)
BI 225 Human Anatomy (4 hours)
BI 315 Human Physiology (4 hours)
PE 180 First Aid and Personal Safety (2 hours)
PE 280 Care and Treatment of Athletic Injuries (3 hours)
PE 288 Psychology and Sociology of Sport (2 hours)
PE 330 Physiology of Exercise (3 hours)
PE 411 Kinesiology (3 hours)
PE/BI 445 Readings and Research: Research Methods in Health Science (1 hour)
PE 475 Senior Seminar – Kinesiology Internship (2 hours)
G-MA 221 Elementary Applied Statistics (4 hours)
G-PY 101 Introduction to Psychology

Recommended Supporting Courses

G-PE 150 Concepts in Holistic Health (2 hours)
G-PE 170 Personal and Community Health

Additional Requirements for Some Pre-professional Programs

PY 204 Child and Adolescent Development (3 hours) OR
PY 305 Abnormal Psychology (3 hours)
BI 207 Medical Terminology (2 hours)
BI 404 Biomedical Ethics (2 hours)
G-MA 105 College Algebra
Trigonometry (or above)
Communication course
Sociology course
Business course

Chemistry Major

Requirements

A minimum of 36 semester hours including

G-CH 111  Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 112  Chemistry II (5 hours)
CH 251  Organic Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 252  Organic Chemistry II (5 hours)
CH 201  Quantitative Analysis (4 hours)
CH 390  Instrumental Analysis (3 hours)
CH 385  Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (4 hours)
CH 400  General Physical Chemistry (5 hours)

Required supporting courses

PH 205  College Physics I (5 hour)
PH 206  College Physics II (5 hour)
*NS 300  Research Methods (1 hour)
NS 375  Junior Seminar (1 hour)
*NS 475  Senior Research (2 hours)
G-MA 111  Calculus I (4 hours)
MA 112  Calculus II (4 hours)

Recommended supporting courses

G-BI 111  College Biology I (4 hours)
BI 112  College Biology II (4 hours)

Chemistry Major – Teaching Licensure in Chemistry (6-12)

Chemistry Major for Teacher Licensure:

A minimum of 32 hours including:

G- CH 111  College Chemistry I (5 hours)
G- CH 112  College Chemistry II (5 hours)
CH 251  Organic Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 201  Quantitative Analysis (4 hours)
CH 310  Statistical Data Analysis (4 hours)
CH 385  Advanced Inorganic (4 hours)
CH 388  Lab Assisting Internship (2 hours)

Remaining hours must come from CH 252 Organic Chemistry II or CH courses 300 level or above.

Required courses:

G-BI 111  College Biology I (4 hours)
BI 112  College Biology II (4 hours)
PH 215  General Physics I (4 hours)
PH 216  General Physics II (4 hours)
NS 375  Junior Seminar (1 hours)

Suggested Courses:

G-NS 141  Environmental Science (4 hours)
G-PC 251  Geology (4 hours)
G-PC 275  Astronomy (4 hours)
CH 252  Organic Chemistry II (5 hours)
G-MA 111  Calculus I (4 hours)
MA 112  Calculus II (4 hours)
PH 205  College Physics I (replace G-PH 215) (5 hours)
PH 206  College Physics II (replace G-PH 216) (5 hours)
*NS 475  Senior Research (2 hours)

Students pursuing this major must also meet all professional requirements for teacher licensure in the curriculum and instruction department.

Chemistry Minor

Requirements

A minimum of 24 hours including

G-CH 111  College Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 112  College Chemistry II (5 hours)
CH 251  Organic Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 252  Organic Chemistry II (5 hours)
CH 201  Quantitative Analysis (4 hours)

Environmental Stewardship Major

This program achieves its purposes when its graduates:

  • demonstrate knowledge of contemporary theories in the natural sciences
  • demonstrate skill in the application of laboratory and field experimental techniques
  • demonstrate knowledge of contemporary theories of human social systems and behavior
  • demonstrate a critical understanding of their personal rôles in history, culture, and community
  • evaluate the impacts of human society and Earth’s natural systems on one another
  • differentiate between their personal belief system and societal belief systems
  • express a personal environmental ethic

Required Natural Science Courses:

G-BI 106  Environmental Biology or
G-BI 201  Biodiversity (4 hours)
G-CH 106  Environmental Chemistry (4 hours)
G-NS 141  Environmental Science (4 hours)
G-PH 215  General Physics I (4 hours)
G-PC 251  Geology (4 hours)
G-NS 245  Climatology (4 hours)
BI 316  Ecology (4 hours) or
BI 325  Human Ecology, Epidemiology and Public Health (4 hours)
BI 334  Microbial Ecophysiology (5 hours) or
BI 345  Plant Ecophysiology (4 hours)
NS 404  Environmental Ethics (2 hours)
BI/EC 416  Ecological Economics (2 hours)
NS 495  Field Experience (4 hours)

Electives from Humanities, Social Science, and Technology:

Select at least 24 hours from the following:

CM 325  Conflict Communication (3 hours)
EC 202  Survey of Economics (3 hours)
Up to 2 courses (G-HI or HI200+) (6 hours)
G-PE 170  Personal/Community Health (2 hours)
G-PS 125  International Relations (3 hours)
G-PS 130  Principles of Geography (3 hours)
G-PS 215  Global Peace Studies (3 hours)
PY/SO 303  Social Psychology (3-4 hours)
G-SO 101  Introduction to Sociology (3 hours)
SO 206  Social Problems (3-4 hours)
SO 320  Urban Sociology (3 hours)
*G-TE 333  Technology and Society (3-4 hours)

Other courses as approved by both the advisor and co-advisor.

Other Course Requirements:

NS 350 Stewardship Seminar1/semester (4 required)
*NS 300  Research Methods (1 hour)
NS 375  Junior Seminar (1 hour)
*NS 475  Senior Research (2 hours)

Environmental Science Minor

Requirements

G-BI 106  Environmental Biology or
G-CH106  Environmental Chemistry (4 hours)
G-NS 141  Environmental Science (4 hours)
G-PC251  Geology (4 hours)
G-NS 245  Climatology (4 hours)
NS 493  Field Experience (4 hours)

Environmental Stewardship Minor

Requirements

G-NS 141  Environmental Science (4 hours)
G-PC 251  Geology or
G-PC245  Climatology (4 hours)
NS495  Field Experience (4 hours)
NS350  Stewardship Seminar (2 hours)

Electives from Environmental Stewardship Major Electives list (6 hours)

2017|Catalog 17-18, Natural Science|

Natural Science Course Descriptions

Biology Course Descriptions

G-BI 101 Principles of Biology

4 hours
An introduction to the principles of biology, with an emphasis on the biology of humans. This course does not apply toward a major in biology. Laboratory is included. (Fall)

G-BI 105 Concepts in Biology Now

3 hours
This course introduces students to key concepts in biology, including the cellular basis of life, genetics, evolution and ecology. Students will also explore the historical and contemporary scientific issues around these topics. This course does not include a laboratory. (Interterm, odd years)

G-BI 106 Environmental Biology

4 hours
A one-semester introduction to the principles of biology, with an emphasis on biological interactions in the environment. This course does not apply toward a major in biology or biochemistry. Laboratory is included. (Spring, odd years)

G-BI 111 College Biology I

4 hours
A rigorous introduction to the unity and diversity of life. This course focuses on the contributions of genetics, ecology and evolution to the biodiversity of the planet. The laboratory exercises are designed to provide a variety of practical experiences, as well as to illustrate the principles discussed in lecture. (Fall)

BI 112 College Biology II

4 hours
A continuation of G-BI 111 with a rigorous introduction to organismal structure and function. Explores the organization and processes of living systems at the levels of biomolecules, organelles, cells, organ systems, and organisms. Lab work includes studies of enzyme action, cellular respiration, organismal development and anatomy. Prerequisite: G-BI 111 with a grade of C or better. (Spring)

G-BI 201 Biodiversity

3-4 hours
A fundamental study of biological diversity as an assessment of life on earth. This will progress from the individual to the community, focusing on biodiversity and ecology from an evolutionary perspective and also on applied environmental research. The course includes laboratory work as an option for the 4th credit hour. (Spring, even years)

BI 207 Medical Terminology

2 hours
An introduction to the study of medical terms that brings to life the language of medicine. This course will help students develop an understanding of how to communicate fluently in a healthcare setting. This course will explain medical terms in the context of the anatomy and physiology of different body systems as well as how the body works in health and disease. This course does not include a laboratory. (Spring, even years)

G-BI 210 Principles of Nutrition

3 hours
Physiology and chemistry of digestion, absorption, and metabolism of nutrients; nutrient functions; requirements; and effects of nutrient deficiencies and toxicities.  This course does not include a laboratory. Prerequisites: G-CH 101 or G-CH 111 with a grade of C or better or with consent of instructor (Interterm, even years)

BI 225 Human Anatomy

4 hours
A lecture/laboratory course in the fundamentals of human anatomy, with emphasis on macroscopic structures at the tissue, organ and organ system levels of organization. Some attention will be given to the perspectives of histology and developmental biology. The course includes laboratory work, primarily dissection of a comparative mammal, the domestic cat. (Spring, odd years)

BI 234 Microbiology

4 hours
A study of microorganisms, with emphasis on the bacteria. A consideration of their structure, metabolism, classification, identification, and human and ecological relationships. Laboratory is included. Prerequisites: BI 112, CH 251 with grades of C or better or consent of instructor. (Spring, even years)

BI 283 Genetics

4 hours
Basic genetic concepts including classical Mendelian inheritance, cytogenetics, population genetics, and the molecular basis of gene action. Laboratory experiences coordinated with lecture topics. Pre-requisites: BI 112, with a grade of C or better. (Fall)

BI 310 Statistical Data Analysis (also cross-listed as CH 310 Statistical Data Analysis)

4 hours
A study of fundamental concepts including data types, distributions, and hypothesis testing; and of the applications of spreadsheets and other software for data manipulation and statistical analysis. This course does not include a laboratory. Prerequisite: G-MA221 or consent of instructor. (Spring, odd years; Interterm, even years)

BI 315 Human Physiology

4 hours
A rigorous introduction to the fundamentals of human neurophysiology, cardiac-physiology, muscular & circulatory physiology and excretory & respiratory physiology. Laboratory experiences include case studies of human physiological problems. Prerequisite: BI 112, with a grade of C or better. (Fall, even years)

BI 316 Ecology

4 hours
A study of relationships between organisms and their environments, including both physical and biotic environments. The course includes both laboratory and field work. Prerequisites: BI 112 with a grade of C or better. (Spring, even years)

BI 325 Human Ecology, Epidemiology, and Public Health

4 hours
A study of the relationships between humans and their environments, including both physical and biotic environments, with special emphasis on understanding the nature of healthy relationships in comparison to the disease state. This course does not include a laboratory. Prerequisites: BI 112 with a grade of C or better. (Fall, odd years)

BI 334 Microbial Ecophysiology

5 hours
A study of the ecophysiology of microorganisms (with emphasis on Bacteria and Archaea), focusing on the diversity and utility of their metabolic pathways. This course includes both lecture and laboratory work. (Fall, even years)

BI 345 Plant Ecophysiology

4 hours
This course will explore the physiological processes that influence the growth, reproduction, survival, adaptation and evolution of plants. The physiological processes to be explored include water relations, mineral nutrition, solute transport, and energetics (photosynthesis and respiration). The influence of biotic and abiotic factors will be included to provide a context in which to discuss stress physiology and its ecological consequences. Laboratory is included.

BI 364 Cell and Molecular Biology

4 hours
The molecular organization, function and evolution of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Lab work includes chromosome analysis, cellular fractionation, cell culture, and electrophoretic studies. Prerequisites: BI 112, CH 252 with grades of C or better. (Fall, odd years)

BI 370 Biochemistry (also cross-listed as CH 370 Biochemistry)

4 hours
A basic study of the chemistry and metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids. The course provides an understanding of the structural and functional relationships of chemical constituents of cells and the role that they play in the processes of life. Laboratory is included. Prerequisite: CH 252 or consent of instructor with concurrent enrollment. Laboratory is included (Fall, odd years)

BI 373 Cell Physiology (also cross-listed as CH 373 Biochemistry II)

4 hours
A rigorous study of the fundamentals of cell physiology, concentrating on intermediary metabolism and its regulation. Lab work includes computational biology and shadowing physicians. Laboratory is included. Prerequisites: BI 112, CH252 and BI/CH 370 with grades of C or better or consent of instructor. (Spring, even years)

BI 384 Molecular Genetics

4 hours
This upper-level course will extend on topics presented in Genetics (B1283). The course will delve deeper into genetics with a specific focus on the molecular- scale processes responsible for producing our phenotype and their relationships to evolutionary change. The lab component focuses on various current lab techniques used in the field of genetics. (Spring, odd years)

BI 391 Evolution (also cross-listed as G-PR391)

4 hours (Language Intensive)
A study of the history, philosophical underpinnings, and implications of Charles Darwin’s Theory of Evolution by Natural Selection. This course does not include a laboratory. Prerequisites: BI 112 with a grade of C or better. (Interterm, odd years)

BI 393 Topics in Biology

1-4 hours
One specific topic will be covered each time this course is offered. Possible topics include (but are not limited to) molecular genetics, vertebrate zoology, functional morphology, quantitative biology, and advanced ecology. Prerequisite: BI 112 with a grade of C or better and consent of the instructor.

BI 404 Biomedical Ethics

2 hours
This seminar examines both the factual and ethical dimensions of decisions regarding healthcare. Students will use a case study approach to apply the ethical principles of autonomy, non-maleficence, beneficence, and justice to diverse situations. Alternative ethical systems and ethics in research are considered. This course does not include a laboratory. (Spring, even years)

BI 445 Readings and Research in Biology

1-4 hours
Enrichment of a student’s study in the discipline either by readings on a topic not covered in the above courses or by research done on or off campus. Prerequisites: 12 semester hours in the department or program with an average of C or better, and consent of the instructor. Open only to students majoring in the department or program.

BI 495 Field Experience in Biology

1-4 hours
A planned experience in one of the field-oriented or professionally related phases of biological science. The specific area and content must be agreed upon in advance by the student, faculty advisor, and Vice President for Academic Affairs. Specific examples that are offered periodically, especially during Interterm are Field Experience in Puerto Rico and observations of various health careers with practicing professionals.

Individualized Courses Available

295/495 Field Experience (1-4 hours)
299/499 Independent Study (1-4 hours)
388 Career Connections (1-12 hours)
445 Readings and Research (1-4 hours)

Chemistry Course Descriptions

G-CH 101 Principles of General Chemistry

3 hours
A one-semester course in the fundamental principles of chemistry, including the properties of matter, the chemical properties of the elements, their compounds and reactions, with an emphasis on environmental chemistry and sustainability. This course is for those who have had no previous background in chemistry or need only one-semester of chemistry. This course does not include a laboratory. (Interterm)

G-CH 106 Environmental Chemistry

4 hours
A one-semester introduction to the principles of chemistry, with an emphasis on chemical interactions in the environment. This course does not apply toward a major in biology, biochemistry, or chemistry. Laboratory is included. (Interterm, even years)

G-CH 111 College Chemistry I

5 hours
A study of the principles, laws, and concepts of chemistry as they relate to the periodic table and systematic study of the properties of the elements. A study of modern atomic and molecular structure. Laboratory is included. (Fall)

CH 112 College Chemistry II

5 hours
A continuation of CH 111. Includes study of the chemistry of metals and nonmetals, chemistry of solutions, chemical equilibrium and qualitative analysis. Laboratory is included. Prerequisite: G-CH 111. (Spring)

CH 201 Quantitative Analysis

4 hours
A study of the principles and methods of analytical chemistry by the methods of volumetric and gravimetric analysis, precipitimetry, acidimetry and oxidation- reduction titrations. Laboratory is included. Prerequisite: CH 112, or consent of the instructor. (Fall, even years)

CH 251 Organic Chemistry I

5 hours
A study of the principles of organic chemistry, the physical and chemical properties of carbon compounds with emphasis on the mechanisms of organic reactions, the nomenclature of the compounds, and methods of organic synthesis. The carbon compounds discussed include some of the common alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, cycloalkanes, alkylhalides, ethers and alcohols. Laboratory is included. Prerequisite: G-CH 111 or consent of instructor. (Spring)

CH 252 Organic Chemistry II

5 hours
A continuation of CH 251. Includes study of basic spectroscopy as a basic tool for structural analysis and the chemistry of aromatic compounds, aldehydes, ketones, amines, carboxylic acids and their functional derivatives. Laboratory is included. Prerequisite: CH 251. (Fall)

CH 310 Statistical Data Analysis (also cross-listed as BI 310 Statistical Data Analysis)

4 hours
A study of fundamental concepts including data types, distributions, and hypothesis testing; and of the applications of spreadsheets and other software for data manipulation and statistical analysis. This course does not include a laboratory. Prerequisite: G-MA221 or consent of instructor. (Spring, odd years; Interterm, even years)

CH 370 Biochemistry (also cross-listed as Bi 370 Biochemistry)

4 hours
A basic study of the chemistry and metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and nucleic acids. The course provides an understanding of the structural and functional relationships of chemical constituents of cells and the role that they play in the processes of life. Prerequisite: CH 252 or consent of instructor with concurrent enrollment. Laboratory is included. (Fall, odd years)

CH 373 Biochemistry II (also cross-listed as Bi 373 cell Physiology)

4 hours
A rigorous study of the fundamentals of cell physiology, concentrating on intermediary metabolism and its regulation. Laboratory is included. Prerequisites: BI 112, CH252 and BI/CH 370 with grades of C or better or consent of instructor. (Spring, even years)

CH 385 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

4 hours
Further study of inorganic chemistry including structure and bonding, coordination chemistry, organometallic chemistry, the chemistry of transition metals and a more detailed systematic study of the families of the periodic table. Laboratory is included. Prerequisite: CH 112, CH 252. (Spring, even years)

CH 390 Instrumental Analysis

3 hours
Advanced work in quantitative analysis with emphasis on the principles and methods of electrochemical, spectroscopic and chromatographic analysis. Laboratory is included. Prerequisite: CH 201, PH 206 or PH216, or consent of the instructor. (Spring, odd years)

CH 400 General Physical Chemistry

5 hours
A study of the physical-chemical properties of matter. Topics covered include thermodynamics, the kinetic theory of gases, chemical kinetics, quantum mechanics, and statistical mechanics. Laboratory is included. Prerequisite: CH 252, G-MA 111, PH 206 (or concurrent enrollment). (on demand)

CH 445 Readings and Research in Chemistry

1-4 hours
Enrichment of a student’s study in the discipline either by reading on the topic not covered in the above courses or by research done on or off campus. Prerequisite: 12 semester hours in the department or program with an average of C or better, and consent of instructor. Open only to students majoring in the department or program.

Individualized Courses Available

295/495 Field Experience (1-4 hours)
299/499 Independent Study (1-4 hours)
388 Career Connections (1-12 hours)
445 Readings and Research (1-4 hours)

Natural Science Course Descriptions

G-NS 100 Science in Society

3-4 hours (Language Intensive, if taken for 4 hours)
The goals of this course are to build scientific literacy and to increase awareness of what Science has to offer to individuals and to Society. Classes will include lectures, faculty-led discussions of assigned readings, student-led discussions of “Science in the News” topics, and student presentations of semester projects/term papers. This course does not include a laboratory. (Interterm, odd years; Spring, even years)

G-NS 141 Environmental Science

4 hours
A study of the environmental issues that arise from the complex relationships between humans and the earth. Emphasis will be placed on a scientific understanding and a search for solutions to environmental problems. Laboratory is included. (Fall)

NS 245 Climatology

3 hours
This study of the Earth’s climate system will emphasize the physical and biological processes that determine climate: e.g. radiative transfer, atmospheric and oceanic energy transfer, energy balance, the hydrologic cycle, and related geological, biological, and anthropogenic influences; and will consider their interactive effects on climate change. This course does not include a laboratory. (Spring, odd years)

NS 300 Research Methods

1 hour (Language Intensive)
Preparation for participation in an independent laboratory research project in the natural sciences. Topics covered include scientific literature searches, research design, data handling, research evaluation, scientific writing, and reporting. To be taken during the sophomore or junior year. (Fall)

NS 350 Stewardship Seminar

1 hour
A weekly discussion of the interrelationships among the current contents of the student’s other courses, in light of their relationships to the goals of the Environmental Stewardship major.

NS 375 Junior Seminar

1 hour
Preparation for participation in an independent laboratory research project in the natural sciences. Topics covered include literature searches, research design, data handling, research evaluation, scientific writing and reporting, career exploration, and scientific ethics. (Spring)

NS 404 Environmental Ethics

2 hours
This seminar examines both the factual and ethical dimensions of our current and possible future environments. Students will use a case study approach to apply different ethical frameworks to choices that arise from human interaction with the natural order. This course does not include a laboratory. (on demand)

NS 416 Ecological Economics

2 hours
This seminar will provide an historical overview of various schools of ecological and economic thought, and present the principles uniting ecology with economics. Students will use a case study approach to analyze economic policies constrained by ecological reality, including economic growth theory and policy as it pertains to issues of societal and ecological sustainability. This course does not include a laboratory. (on demand)

NS 475 Senior Research

2 hours (Language Intensive)
Experience in the planning, conducting, and reporting of scientific research. The student research works in continual consultation with the research advisor. Selection of the research topic and consent of the advisor must be obtained in advance of enrollment. Prerequisite: NS 375 and consent of research advisor.

NS 495 Field experience in the Natural Sciences

1-4 hours
A planned experience in a field-oriented aspect of both the biological and physical sciences.

Individualized Courses Available

295/495 Field Experience (1-4 hours)
299/499 Independent Study (1-4 hours)
388 Career Connections (1-12 hours)
445 Readings and Research (1-4 hours)

Physical Science Course Descriptions

G-PC 251 Geology

4 hours
An introductory course that focuses on the scientific study of the earth. The course emphasizes the study of earth materials, changes in the surface and interior of the earth, and the dynamic forces that cause those changes. Laboratory is included. (Interterm, odd years)

G-PC 275 Astronomy

4 hours
The structure and evolution of the universe, from nearby planets to distant quasars, are examined. Topics include recent discoveries concerning planets, stars, galaxies, pulsars, and black holes as well as their evolution, the structure of the universe today and how it will be in the future. The emphasis is descriptive rather than mathematical. Laboratory is included. (Interterm, even years)

PC 445 Readings and Research in Physical Science

1-4 hours
Enrichment of a student’s study in the discipline either by reading on a topic not covered in the above courses or by research done on or off campus. Prerequisite: 12 semester hours in the department or program and the consent of the instructor. Open only to students majoring in the department or program.

Individualized Courses Available

295/495 Field Experience (1-4 hours)
299/499 Independent Study (1-4 hours)
388 Career Connections (1-12 hours)
445 Readings and Research (1-4 hours)

Physics Course Descriptions

PH 205 College Physics I

5 hours
A first course for chemistry and mathematics majors with a calculus background. Topics covered are mechanics, wave motion, and thermodynamics with emphasis placed on the use of mathematics to formulate problems and to explain physical phenomena. Prerequisite: G-MA 111. Laboratory is included. (Fall, odd years)

PH 206 College Physics II

5 hours
A continuation of PH 205. Topics covered are electricity, magnetism, and optics. Prerequisite: PH 205. Laboratory is included. (Spring, even years)

G-PH 215 General Physics I

4 hours
A first course for premed, biology, and other science majors with a college algebra background. Topics covered are mechanics, wave motion, and thermodynamics with emphasis placed on the understanding of physical concepts to formulate problems and to explain physical phenomena. Lab is included. Prerequisite: MA 105 College Algebra. (Fall)

PH 216 General Physics II

4 hours
A continuation of G-PH 215. Topics covered are electricity, magnetism, and optics. Lab is included. Prerequisite: PH 215. (Spring)

Individualized Courses Available

295/495 Field Experience (1-4 hours)
299/499 Independent Study (1-4 hours)
388 Career Connections (1-12 hours)
445 Readings and Research (1-4 hours)

2017|Catalog 17-18, Natural Science|

Health, Physical Education & Recreation Program

Purpose Statement

The department of health, physical education and recreation commits itself to developing graduates who embrace the liberal arts philosophy and who can demonstrate a variety of skills efficiently and effectively, analyze and critique movement, and understand the interrelationship of health, fitness, and wholeness in life.

The department achieves this purpose when its graduates

  • develop a personal strategy for health and fitness, emphasizing the physical domain, understanding that behaviors learned are a lifelong process.
  • understand the concepts of physical education and health content and apply these concepts for the development of a physically educated individual.
  • demonstrate a heightened awareness of the impact of play on the quality of life.
  • meet State Department of Education standards and NCATE standards for licensure in the area of physical education and health (applies to those seeking teaching certification in physical education and health).

The department offers programs designed for teaching physical education and health in the elementary and secondary schools, graduate preparation, and a related area of special emphasis in sports management. In cooperation with the department of natural sciences, it also hosts an interdisciplinary degree in health science.

Physical Education and Health Major

Completion of the required and supporting courses listed below, plus courses and/or a selected emphasis area of professional preparation should total a minimum of 37 semester hours in the department of physical education and 11 semester hours of required related courses.

Requirements

PE 110  Introduction to Team Sports (2 hours)
G-PE 150  Concepts of Holistic Health (2 hours)
PE 160  Intro to Dual and Individual Sports I (2 hours)
PE 161  Intro to Dual and Individual Sports II (2 hours)
G-PE 170   Personal and Community Health (2 hours)
PE 180  First Aid and Personal Safety (2 hours)
PE 210  Human Sexuality (3 hours)
PE 220  Human Anatomy and Physiology for Physical Education (2 hours)
PE 280  Care and Treatment of Athletic Injuries (3 hours)
PE 288  Psychology and Sociology of Sport (2 hours)
PE 330  Physiology of Exercise (3 hours)
PE 375  Junior Seminar (1 hour)
*PE 380  History and Philosophy of Sport and Physical Education (3 hours)
PE 411  Kinesiology (3 hours)
PE 450  Organization & Administration of Health, Physical Education, and Athletics (3 hours)
PE 475  Senior Seminar (2-6 hours)

Required Supporting Courses

G-BI 101 Principles of Biology 4 hours) or
G-BI 111 College Biology (4 hours) or
G-BI 106 Environmental Biology (4 hours)
PE/SO 210 Human Sexuality (3 hours)

Additional Requirements for Teacher Education Majors, PK-12

Professional Education Requirements

Related Courses:

PY 101  Introduction to Psychology (3 hours)
PY 204  Child and Adolescent Development (3 hours)
CI 232  Educational Technology (2 hours)
CI 333  Intercultural Education (2 hours)

Education Courses:

CI 150  Introduction to Education (3 hours)
CI 251  Introduction to Education Practicum (1 hour)
SE 210  Intro to Infant, Child, Youth with Special Needs (3 hours)
CI 220  Principles & Strategies of Teaching (3 hours)
CI 315  Reading in the Content Field (2 hours)
CI 455  The Teaching-Learning Process (3 hours)

Methods Courses:

PE/CI 426  Methods of Teaching School Health (2 hours)
PE/EE 305  Methods of Teaching PE in Elementary School (2 hours)
PE/CI 410  Methods of Teaching PE in Secondary School (2 hours)

Observations & Student Teaching:

CI 351  Secondary Education Practicum (1 hour)
EE 375  Elementary Education Practicum (1 hour)
EE 465  Student Teaching in the Elementary School (6 hours)
CI 475  Student Teaching in the Secondary School (6 hours)
CI 476  Professional Seminar in Education (2 hours)

Total Hours 45 hours

Additional Requirements for Sports Management Emphasis

G-BA 101  Introduction to Business (3 hours)
EC 202  Survey of Economics (3 hours)
AC 205  Financial Accounting (3 hours)
BA 224  Principles of Management (3 hours)
BA 321  Marketing (3 hours)
*BA 339  Human Resource Management (3 hours)

Health Science Interdisciplinary Major

Required Courses

G-BI 111 College Biology I (4 hours)
BI 112  College Biology II (4 hours)
G-CH 111 College Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 112 College Chemistry II (5 hours)
G-PH 215 General Physics I (4 hours)
PH 216 General Physics II (4 hours)
G-BI 210 Principles of Nutrition (3 hours)
BI 225 Human Anatomy (4 hours)
BI 315 Human Physiology (4 hours)
PE 180 First Aid and Personal Safety (2 hours)
PE 280 Care and Treatment of Athletic Injuries (3 hours)
PE 288 Psychology and Sociology of Sport (2 hours)
PE 330 Physiology of Exercise (3 hours)
PE 411 Kinesiology (3 hours)
PE/BI 445 Readings and Research: Research Methods in Health Science (1 hour)
PE 475 Senior Seminar – Kinesiology Internship (2 hours)
G-MA 221 Elementary Applied Statistics (4 hours)
G-PY 101 Introduction to Psychology

Recommended Supporting Courses

G-PE 150 Concepts in Holistic Health (2 hours)
G-PE 170 Personal and Community Health

Additional Requirements for Some Pre-professional Programs

PY 204 Child and Adolescent Development (3 hours) OR
PY 305 Abnormal Psychology (3 hours)
BI 207 Medical Terminology (2 hours)
BI 404 Biomedical Ethics (2 hours)
G-MA 105 College Algebra
Trigonometry (or above)
Communication course
Sociology course
Business course

Health, Physical Education & Recreation Course Descriptions

PE 110 Introduction to Team Sports

2 hours
This course is an introduction to the organization, strategy, rules and practice of team sports. Team Sports covered in this course will include, but not be limited to ultimate frisbee, team handball, floor/field hockey, speedball, continuous whiffleball/ kickball, volleyball, cageball soccer/basketball, and mattball. This course is an introduction to the organization and practice of soccer, speedball, field hockey, softball, team handball, and volleyball. (Fall )

PE 140 Introduction to Rhythms and Dance

2 hours
The purpose of this course is to provide students with a wide spectrum of information on rhythmic activities and dance. Students will learn body movements and how to perform them to music. Students will also choreograph and teach developmentally appropriate rhythmic activities and dance to others. (On Demand)

G-PE 150 Concepts in Holistic Health

2 hours
This course is designed to present the student with cognitive health and wellness principles and to offer suggestions for their application. These principles will be examined using a traditional approach with a variety of cultural influences. Major areas of study include mind-body interrelatedness and control, stress management, individual fitness, health and health related topics, and lifestyle management (including play). (Fall, Spring)

PE 160 Introduction to Individual and Dual Sports I

2 hours
This course is comprised of an introduction to the fundamentals, organization, and practice of tennis, golf, bowling, badminton, dance-ballroom/swing, orienteering, disc golf, and blow guns. This course exists because a basic understanding of the physical and mental principles in individual and dual sports is essential for the fullest and richest enjoyment. (Fall)

PE 161 Introduction to Individual and Dual Sports II

2 hours
This course is comprised of an introduction to the organization and practice of racquetball, Pickleball, archery, ladderball, table tennis, billiards, dance – square/ line and fishing/camping. Individual and dual sports are an integral part of our society. This course exists because a basic understanding of the physical and mental principles in individual and dual sports is essential for the fullest and richest enjoyment. (Spring)

G-PE 170 Personal and Community Health

2 hours
The purpose of this course is to provide students with a wide variety of information concerning personal and community health and wellness. It is designed to have an overview of the physical, mental, emotional, social, and spiritual components of health as they combine to influence the complete human being. Included within the course will be an introduction to the management of stress, physical fitness, nutrition and weight management, drug use and abuse, noninfectious and infectious diseases, sexuality and fertility, consumerism, environmental concerns and the maturing adult. Additionally, a practical approach to setting up a personal improvement plan for lifetime wellness will be stressed. (Fall, Spring)

PE 180 First Aid and Personal Safety

2 hours
This course is designed for all students to understand and prevent accident situations, to treat a wide variety of accident and emergency situations including use of supportive equipment and psychological first aid, and receive American Red Cross certification for CPR. (Fall)

PE/PY/SO 210 Human Sexuality

3 hours
A study of female roles, male roles, values, life adjustments, sexual identities, religion, language, and behavior differences based on cultural, educational and socioeconomic factors related to human sexuality. Course uses lectures, audio- visuals, discussions, guest resource persons, assigned readings, and projects or papers to present information. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or higher or instructor consent. (Spring)

PE 220 Human Anatomy and Physiology for Physical Education

2 hours
Anatomy and physiology is designed to introduce the student to the science of the body structure and function. Content is presented in a simple to complex pattern which includes the design and function of cells, body systems, and the interdependence of systems. (Fall)

PE 280 Care and Treatment of Athletic Injuries

3 hours
The purpose of this course is to provide students with a wide spectrum of information on the care and treatment of athletes and their injuries. It is designed to provide an overview of emergency procedures and on-court assessment of injured athletes. The importance of preventative measures and an overview of the responsibilities of an athletic trainer will be addressed. Preparation and taping for game day will be discussed theoretically and rehearsed practically. (Fall)

PE 288 Psychology and Sociology of Sport

2 hours
This course is designed to expose the student to the principles of psychology and sociology as applied to a sports setting. The purpose being performance enhancement with the ultimate goal of individual/human enrichment. (Spring)

PE/EE 305 Methods for Teaching Physical Education in the Elementary School

2 hours
This course is designed to introduce prospective elementary school physical education and classroom teachers to the fundamentals, principles, and practices of physical education at the elementary school level. Movement exploration and methods will be stressed in the variety of play activities introduced. Additionally, this course has been designed to integrate theory and concept learning with practical laboratory experiences. Prerequisites: G-CI 150, CI 151. (Spring)

PE 426/CI 426 Methods for Teaching Health in Elementary and Secondary School

2 hours
A course designed to acquaint the student with a variety of methods and modalities for teaching school health. The health problems of the individual school child and his/her environment will also be studied. Students will be videotaped when teaching a lesson. Prerequisites: G-PE 150 or G-PE 170, G-CI 150, CI 151. (Interterm)

PE 327 Personal Training I

3hours
This course is designed to be a two course series which will enable the successful student the tools to pass the ACSM exam in order to become a certified personal trainer (ACSM – American College of Sports Medicine). The first (Fall) course will be primarily theoretical, emphasizing the science of personal training and behavior modification.

PE 329 Personal Training II

1 hour
This course is designed to be a two course series which will enable the successful student the tools to pass the ACSM exam in order to become a certified personal trainer (ACSM – American College of Sports Medicine). This second (Spring) course will incorporate a more practical approach, focusing on client screening and developing exercise programs.

PE 330 Physiology of Exercise

3 hours
This course is designed for future educators, coaches, and a variety of other health professionals including physical therapists, occupational therapists, fitness programmers and other persons interested in his field. This course will provide concepts for safe and sensible conduct of sport and physical education programs as well as any other exercise-based programs. Prerequisites: G-BI 101, PE 220. (Spring, odd)

PE375 Junior Seminar

1 hour
This course is designed to help students foster relationships with colleagues and other professionals in the learning community for the promotion of health and physical education techniques for learning and teaching.

PE 380 History & Philosophy of Sport & Physical Education

3 hours (Language Intensive)
A study of the development of sport and physical education as affected by major historical periods and events. (Fall, even)

PE/EE 410 Methods for Teaching Physical Education in the Secondary Schools

2 hours
A study of various teaching techniques and analysis of fundamental skills of physical education activities in the secondary school setting. The course offers an opportunity to explore various teaching techniques in individual, dual, and team activities in the field of physical education for the secondary schools. Prerequisites: PE 110, PE 160, PE 161, G-CI 150, CI 251. (Interterm,)

PE 411 Kinesiology

3 hours
Kinesiology is the study of human motion based on anatomical, physiological and mechanical principles. The study of the human body as machine for the performance of work will be examined from three major areas, mechanics, anatomy and physiology. All students should have prerequisite courses of Principles of Biology and Introductory Chemistry. All students who have met the above requirements are welcome to participate in this course, but it will be taught from the perspective of those going into physical education and/or coaching. Prerequisites: G-BI 101, G-CH 101. (Fall, odd)

PE 450 Organization and Administration of Health, Physical Education and Athletics

3 hours
It is the goal of this course to introduce students to a variety of situations involving organization and administrative skills, and through this process, provide students with a broad range of organizational and administrative alternatives useful in the successful administration of school health, physical education and athletic programs. (Fall, odd)

PE 475 Senior Seminar

2 hours
This is the culminating or “capstone” course for Physical Education majors that do not participate in student teaching. Discussion of current topics in Physical Education and the Allied Health fields would be combined with field experience to give the student a practical understanding of the fields they have chosen to pursue.

Intercollegiate Competition:

PE 211 & 311 Intercollegiate Softball – Women (1 hour)
PE 212 & 312 Intercollegiate Tennis (1 hour)
PE 213 & 313 Intercollegiate Football-Men (1 hour )
PE 214 & 314 Intercollegiate Basketball (1 hour)
PE 215 & 315 Intercollegiate Cross Country (1 hour)
PE 216 & 316 Intercollegiate Track and Field (1 hour)
PE 217 & 317 Intercollegiate Volleyball-Women (1 hour)
PE 219 & 319 Intercollegiate Soccer (1 hour)

Prerequisite: One season of intercollegiate competition.

Individualized Courses Available:

295/495 Field Experience (1-4 hours)
299/499 Independent Study (1-4 hours)
388 Career Connections (1-12 hours)
445 Readings and Research (1-4 hours)

Natural Science Program

Purpose Statement

The Department of Natural Science provides:

  • a career-oriented approach to pre-professional preparation in the health sciences
  • a liberal arts and sciences approach to environmental health and sustainability
  • a hands-on approach to education in the laboratory and through student research
  • preparation to meet the Kansas State Department of Education standards for licensure in biology and chemistry

Biochemistry Major (Recommended for Pre-Medical Students)

Requirements

G-CH 111  College Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 112  College Chemistry II (5 hours)
CH 251  Organic Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 252  Organic Chemistry II (5 hours)
CH 201  Quantitative Analysis (4 hours)
CH 370  Biochemistry (4 hours)
G-BI 111  College Biology I (4 hours)
BI 112  College Biology II (4 hours)
BI/CH 310  Statistical Data Analysis (4 hours)
BI/CH 360  Cell Physiology/Biochemistry II (4 hours)

Select one from the following:

BI 283  Genetics (4 hours)
BI 334  Microbial Ecophysiology (5 hours)
BI 364  Cell and Molecular Biology (4 hours)
BI 384  Molecular Genetics (4 hours)
CH 390  Instrumental Analysis (3 hours)

Required Supporting Courses

G-PH 215  General Physics I (4 hours)
PH 216  General Physics II (4 hours)
*NS 300  Research Methods (1 hour)
NS 375  Junior Seminar (1 hour)
*NS 475  Senior Research (2 hours)

Biology Major

Requirements

A minimum of 32 semester hours of biological science coursework, including

G-BI 111  College Biology I (4 hours)
BI 112  College Biology II (4 hours)
BI 283  Genetics (4 hours)
BI 310  Statistical Data Analysis (4 hours)

8 credit hours chosen from among the 300 Level BI Courses

Required Supporting courses

G-CH 111  College Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 112  College Chemistry II (5 hours)
CH 251  Organic Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 252  Organic Chemistry II (5 hours)
G-PH 215  General Physics I (4 hours)
*NS 300  Research Methods (1 hour)
NS 375  Junior Seminar (1 hour)
*NS 475  Senior Research (2 hours)

Biology Major – Teaching Licensure in Biology (6-12)

Biology Major for Teacher Licensure

A minimum of 32 semester hours, including:

G-BI 111  College Biology I (4 hours)
BI 112  College Biology II (4 hours)
G-BI 201  Biodiversity (4 hours)
BI 283  Genetics (4 hours)
*NS 300  Research Methods (1 hour)
NS 375  Junior Seminar (1 hour)

12 credit hours chosen from among the remaining BI or NS courses numbered 200 of higher, including at least one organismal course and one population course.

Required Supporting Courses

G-CH 111  College Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 112  College Chemistry II (5 hours)
CH 251  Organic Chemistry I (5 hours)
CI 232  Educational Technology (2 hours)
G-MA 221  Elementary Applied Statistics (4 hours)
G-PE 170  Personal and Community Health (2 hours)
G-PH 215  General Physics I (4 hours)
G-PY 101  Introduction to Psychology (3 hours)

Students pursuing this major must also meet all professional requirements for teacher licensure in the Curriculum and Instruction Department.

Biology Minor

Requirements

A minimum of 20 semester hours, including

G-BI 111  College Biology I (4 hours)
BI 112  College Biology II (4 hours)
BI 283  Genetics (4 hours)

At least eight hours of additional biology courses

Required supporting courses

G-CH 111  College Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 251  Organic Chemistry I (5 hours)

Health Science Interdisciplinary Major

Required Courses

G-BI 111 College Biology I (4 hours)
BI 112  College Biology II (4 hours)
G-CH 111 College Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 112 College Chemistry II (5 hours)
G-PH 215 General Physics I (4 hours)
PH 216 General Physics II (4 hours)
G-BI 210 Principles of Nutrition (3 hours)
BI 225 Human Anatomy (4 hours)
BI 315 Human Physiology (4 hours)
PE 180 First Aid and Personal Safety (2 hours)
PE 280 Care and Treatment of Athletic Injuries (3 hours)
PE 288 Psychology and Sociology of Sport (2 hours)
PE 330 Physiology of Exercise (3 hours)
PE 411 Kinesiology (3 hours)
PE/BI 445 Readings and Research: Research Methods in Health Science (1 hour)
PE 475 Senior Seminar – Kinesiology Internship (2 hours)
G-MA 221 Elementary Applied Statistics (4 hours)
G-PY 101 Introduction to Psychology

Recommended Supporting Courses

G-PE 150 Concepts in Holistic Health (2 hours)
G-PE 170 Personal and Community Health

Additional Requirements for Some Pre-professional Programs

PY 204 Child and Adolescent Development (3 hours) OR
PY 305 Abnormal Psychology (3 hours)
BI 207 Medical Terminology (2 hours)
BI 404 Biomedical Ethics (2 hours)
G-MA 105 College Algebra
Trigonometry (or above)
Communication course
Sociology course
Business course

Chemistry Major

Requirements

A minimum of 36 semester hours including

G-CH 111  Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 112  Chemistry II (5 hours)
CH 251  Organic Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 252  Organic Chemistry II (5 hours)
CH 201  Quantitative Analysis (4 hours)
CH 390  Instrumental Analysis (3 hours)
CH 385  Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (4 hours)
CH 400  General Physical Chemistry (5 hours)

Required supporting courses

PH 205  College Physics I (5 hour)
PH 206  College Physics II (5 hour)
*NS 300  Research Methods (1 hour)
NS 375  Junior Seminar (1 hour)
*NS 475  Senior Research (2 hours)
G-MA 111  Calculus I (4 hours)
MA 112  Calculus II (4 hours)

Recommended supporting courses

G-BI 111  College Biology I (4 hours)
BI 112  College Biology II (4 hours)

Chemistry Major – Teaching Licensure in Chemistry (6-12)

Chemistry Major for Teacher Licensure:

A minimum of 32 hours including:

G- CH 111  College Chemistry I (5 hours)
G- CH 112  College Chemistry II (5 hours)
CH 251  Organic Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 201  Quantitative Analysis (4 hours)
CH 310  Statistical Data Analysis (4 hours)
CH 385  Advanced Inorganic (4 hours)
CH 388  Lab Assisting Internship (2 hours)

Remaining hours must come from CH 252 Organic Chemistry II or CH courses 300 level or above.

Required courses:

G-BI 111  College Biology I (4 hours)
BI 112  College Biology II (4 hours)
PH 215  General Physics I (4 hours)
PH 216  General Physics II (4 hours)
NS 375  Junior Seminar (1 hours)

Suggested Courses:

G-NS 141  Environmental Science (4 hours)
G-PC 251  Geology (4 hours)
G-PC 275  Astronomy (4 hours)
CH 252  Organic Chemistry II (5 hours)
G-MA 111  Calculus I (4 hours)
MA 112  Calculus II (4 hours)
PH 205  College Physics I (replace G-PH 215) (5 hours)
PH 206  College Physics II (replace G-PH 216) (5 hours)
*NS 475  Senior Research (2 hours)

Students pursuing this major must also meet all professional requirements for teacher licensure in the curriculum and instruction department.

Chemistry Minor

Requirements

A minimum of 24 hours including

G-CH 111  College Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 112  College Chemistry II (5 hours)
CH 251  Organic Chemistry I (5 hours)
CH 252  Organic Chemistry II (5 hours)
CH 201  Quantitative Analysis (4 hours)

Environmental Stewardship Major

This program achieves its purposes when its graduates:

  • demonstrate knowledge of contemporary theories in the natural sciences
  • demonstrate skill in the application of laboratory and field experimental techniques
  • demonstrate knowledge of contemporary theories of human social systems and behavior
  • demonstrate a critical understanding of their personal rôles in history, culture, and community
  • evaluate the impacts of human society and Earth’s natural systems on one another
  • differentiate between their personal belief system and societal belief systems
  • express a personal environmental ethic

Required Natural Science Courses:

G-BI 106  Environmental Biology or
G-BI 201  Biodiversity (4 hours)
G-CH 106  Environmental Chemistry (4 hours)
G-NS 141  Environmental Science (4 hours)
G-PH 215  General Physics I (4 hours)
G-PC 251  Geology (4 hours)
G-NS 245  Climatology (4 hours)
BI 316  Ecology (4 hours) or
BI 325  Human Ecology, Epidemiology and Public Health (4 hours)
BI 334  Microbial Ecophysiology (5 hours) or
BI 345  Plant Ecophysiology (4 hours)
NS 404  Environmental Ethics (2 hours)
BI/EC 416  Ecological Economics (2 hours)
NS 495  Field Experience (4 hours)

Electives from Humanities, Social Science, and Technology:

Select at least 24 hours from the following:

CM 325  Conflict Communication (3 hours)
EC 202  Survey of Economics (3 hours)
Up to 2 courses (G-HI or HI200+) (6 hours)
G-PE 170  Personal/Community Health (2 hours)
G-PS 125  International Relations (3 hours)
G-PS 130  Principles of Geography (3 hours)
G-PS 215  Global Peace Studies (3 hours)
PY/SO 303  Social Psychology (3-4 hours)
G-SO 101  Introduction to Sociology (3 hours)
SO 206  Social Problems (3-4 hours)
SO 320  Urban Sociology (3 hours)
*G-TE 333  Technology and Society (3-4 hours)

Other courses as approved by both the advisor and co-advisor.

Other Course Requirements:

NS 350 Stewardship Seminar1/semester (4 required)
*NS 300  Research Methods (1 hour)
NS 375  Junior Seminar (1 hour)
*NS 475  Senior Research (2 hours)

Environmental Science Minor

Requirements

G-BI 106  Environmental Biology or
G-CH106  Environmental Chemistry (4 hours)
G-NS 141  Environmental Science (4 hours)
G-PC251  Geology (4 hours)
G-NS 245  Climatology (4 hours)
NS 493  Field Experience (4 hours)

Environmental Stewardship Minor

Requirements

G-NS 141  Environmental Science (4 hours)
G-PC 251  Geology or
G-PC245  Climatology (4 hours)
NS495  Field Experience (4 hours)
NS350  Stewardship Seminar (2 hours)

Electives from Environmental Stewardship Major Electives list (6 hours)

2016|Catalog 16-17, Natural Science|

Natural Science Course Descriptions

Biology Course Descriptions

G-BI 101 Principles of Biology

4 hours
An introduction to the principles of biology, with an emphasis on the biology of humans. This course does not apply toward a major in biology. Laboratory is included. (Fall)

G-BI 105 Concepts in Biology Now

3 hours
This course introduces students to key concepts in biology, including the cellular basis of life, genetics, evolution and ecology. Students will also explore the historical and contemporary scientific issues around these topics. This course does not include a laboratory. (Interterm, odd years)

G-BI 106 Environmental Biology

4 hours
A one-semester introduction to the principles of biology, with an emphasis on biological interactions in the environment. This course does not apply toward a major in biology or biochemistry. Laboratory is included. (Spring, odd years)

G-BI 111 College Biology I

4 hours
A rigorous introduction to the unity and diversity of life. This course focuses on the contributions of genetics, ecology and evolution to the biodiversity of the planet. The laboratory exercises are designed to provide a variety of practical experiences, as well as to illustrate the principles discussed in lecture. (Fall)

BI 112 College Biology II

4 hours
A continuation of G-BI 111 with a rigorous introduction to organismal structure and function. Explores the organization and processes of living systems at the levels of biomolecules, organelles, cells, organ systems, and organisms. Lab work includes studies of enzyme action, cellular respiration, organismal development and anatomy. Prerequisite: G-BI 111 with a grade of C or better. (Spring)

G-BI 201 Biodiversity

3-4 hours
A fundamental study of biological diversity as an assessment of life on earth. This will progress from the individual to the community, focusing on biodiversity and ecology from an evolutionary perspective and also on applied environmental research. The course includes laboratory work as an option for the 4th credit hour. (Spring, even years)

BI 207 Medical Terminology

2 hours
An introduction to the study of medical terms that brings to life the language of medicine. This course will help students develop an understanding of how to communicate fluently in a healthcare setting. This course will explain medical terms in the context of the anatomy and physiology of different body systems as well as how the body works in health and disease. This course does not include a laboratory. (Spring, even years)

G-BI 210 Principles of Nutrition

3 hours
Physiology and chemistry of digestion, absorption, and metabolism of nutrients; nutrient functions; requirements; and effects of nutrient deficiencies and toxicities.  This course does not include a laboratory. Prerequisites: G-CH 101 or G-CH 111 with a grade of C or better or with consent of instructor (Interterm, even years)

BI 225 Human Anatomy

4 hours
A lecture/laboratory course in the fundamentals of human anatomy, with emphasis on macroscopic structures at the tissue, organ and organ system levels of organization. Some attention will be given to the perspectives of histology and developmental biology. The course includes laboratory work, primarily dissection of a comparative mammal, the domestic cat. (Spring, odd years)

BI 234 Microbiology

4 hours
A study of microorganisms, with emphasis on the bacteria. A consideration of their structure, metabolism, classification, identification, and human and ecological relationships. Laboratory is included. Prerequisites: BI 112, CH 251 with grades of C or better or consent of instructor. (Spring, even years)

BI 283 Genetics

4 hours
Basic genetic concepts including classical Mendelian inheritance, cytogenetics, population genetics, and the molecular basis of gene action. Laboratory experiences coordinated with lecture topics. Pre-requisites: BI 112, with a grade of C or better. (Fall)

BI 310 Statistical Data Analysis (also cross-listed as CH 310 Statistical Data Analysis)

4 hours
A study of fundamental concepts including data types, distributions, and hypothesis testing; and of the applications of spreadsheets and other software for data manipulation and statistical analysis. This course does not include a laboratory. Prerequisite: G-MA221 or consent of instructor. (Spring, odd years; Interterm, even years)

BI 315 Human Physiology

4 hours
A rigorous introduction to the fundamentals of human neurophysiology, cardiac-physiology, muscular & circulatory physiology and excretory & respiratory physiology. Laboratory experiences include case studies of human physiological problems. Prerequisite: BI 112, with a grade of C or better. (Fall, even years)

BI 316 Ecology

4 hours
A study of relationships between organisms and their environments, including both physical and biotic environments. The course includes both laboratory and field work. Prerequisites: BI 112 with a grade of C or better. (Spring, even years)

BI 325 Human Ecology, Epidemiology, and Public Health

4 hours
A study of the relationships between humans and their environments, including both physical and biotic environments, with special emphasis on understanding the nature of healthy relationships in comparison to the disease state. This course does not include a laboratory. Prerequisites: BI 112 with a grade of C or better. (Fall, odd years)

BI 334 Microbial Ecophysiology

5 hours
A study of the ecophysiology of microorganisms (with emphasis on Bacteria and Archaea), focusing on the diversity and utility of their metabolic pathways. This course includes both lecture and laboratory work. (Fall, even years)

BI 345 Plant Ecophysiology

4 hours
This course will explore the physiological processes that influence the growth, reproduction, survival, adaptation and evolution of plants. The physiological processes to be explored include water relations, mineral nutrition, solute transport, and energetics (photosynthesis and respiration). The influence of biotic and abiotic factors will be included to provide a context in which to discuss stress physiology and its ecological consequences. Laboratory is included.

BI 364 Cell and Molecular Biology

4 hours
The molecular organization, function and evolution of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Lab work includes chromosome analysis, cellular fractionation, cell culture, and electrophoretic studies. Prerequisites: BI 112, CH 252 with grades of C or better. (Fall, odd years)

BI 370 Biochemistry (also cross-listed as CH 370 Biochemistry)

4 hours
A basic study of the chemistry and metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids. The course provides an understanding of the structural and functional relationships of chemical constituents of cells and the role that they play in the processes of life. Laboratory is included. Prerequisite: CH 252 or consent of instructor with concurrent enrollment. Laboratory is included (Fall, odd years)

BI 373 Cell Physiology (also cross-listed as CH 373 Biochemistry II)

4 hours
A rigorous study of the fundamentals of cell physiology, concentrating on intermediary metabolism and its regulation. Lab work includes computational biology and shadowing physicians. Laboratory is included. Prerequisites: BI 112, CH252 and BI/CH 370 with grades of C or better or consent of instructor. (Spring, even years)

BI 384 Molecular Genetics

4 hours
This upper-level course will extend on topics presented in Genetics (B1283). The course will delve deeper into genetics with a specific focus on the molecular- scale processes responsible for producing our phenotype and their relationships to evolutionary change. The lab component focuses on various current lab techniques used in the field of genetics. (Spring, odd years)

BI 391 Evolution (also cross-listed as G-PR391)

4 hours (Language Intensive)
A study of the history, philosophical underpinnings, and implications of Charles Darwin’s Theory of Evolution by Natural Selection. This course does not include a laboratory. Prerequisites: BI 112 with a grade of C or better. (Interterm, odd years)

BI 393 Topics in Biology

1-4 hours
One specific topic will be covered each time this course is offered. Possible topics include (but are not limited to) molecular genetics, vertebrate zoology, functional morphology, quantitative biology, and advanced ecology. Prerequisite: BI 112 with a grade of C or better and consent of the instructor.

BI 404 Biomedical Ethics

2 hours
This seminar examines both the factual and ethical dimensions of decisions regarding healthcare. Students will use a case study approach to apply the ethical principles of autonomy, non-maleficence, beneficence, and justice to diverse situations. Alternative ethical systems and ethics in research are considered. This course does not include a laboratory. (Spring, even years)

BI 445 Readings and Research in Biology

1-4 hours
Enrichment of a student’s study in the discipline either by readings on a topic not covered in the above courses or by research done on or off campus. Prerequisites: 12 semester hours in the department or program with an average of C or better, and consent of the instructor. Open only to students majoring in the department or program.

BI 495 Field Experience in Biology

1-4 hours
A planned experience in one of the field-oriented or professionally related phases of biological science. The specific area and content must be agreed upon in advance by the student, faculty advisor, and Vice President for Academic Affairs. Specific examples that are offered periodically, especially during Interterm are Field Experience in Puerto Rico and observations of various health careers with practicing professionals.

Individualized Courses Available

295/495 Field Experience (1-4 hours)
299/499 Independent Study (1-4 hours)
388 Career Connections (1-12 hours)
445 Readings and Research (1-4 hours)

Chemistry Course Descriptions

G-CH 106 Environmental Chemistry

4 hours
A one-semester introduction to the principles of chemistry, with an emphasis on chemical interactions in the environment. This course does not apply toward a major in biology, biochemistry, or chemistry. Laboratory is included. (Interterm, even years)

G-CH 111 College Chemistry I

5 hours
A study of the principles, laws, and concepts of chemistry as they relate to the periodic table and systematic study of the properties of the elements. A study of modern atomic and molecular structure. Laboratory is included. (Fall)

CH 112 College Chemistry II

5 hours
A continuation of CH 111. Includes study of the chemistry of metals and nonmetals, chemistry of solutions, chemical equilibrium and qualitative analysis. Laboratory is included. Prerequisite: G-CH 111. (Spring)

CH 201 Quantitative Analysis

4 hours
A study of the principles and methods of analytical chemistry by the methods of volumetric and gravimetric analysis, precipitimetry, acidimetry and oxidation- reduction titrations. Laboratory is included. Prerequisite: CH 112, or consent of the instructor. (Fall, even years)

CH 251 Organic Chemistry I

5 hours
A study of the principles of organic chemistry, the physical and chemical properties of carbon compounds with emphasis on the mechanisms of organic reactions, the nomenclature of the compounds, and methods of organic synthesis. The carbon compounds discussed include some of the common alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, cycloalkanes, alkylhalides, ethers and alcohols. Laboratory is included. Prerequisite: G-CH 111 or consent of instructor. (Spring)

CH 252 Organic Chemistry II

5 hours
A continuation of CH 251. Includes study of basic spectroscopy as a basic tool for structural analysis and the chemistry of aromatic compounds, aldehydes, ketones, amines, carboxylic acids and their functional derivatives. Laboratory is included. Prerequisite: CH 251. (Fall)

CH 310 Statistical Data Analysis (also cross-listed as BI 310 Statistical Data Analysis)

4 hours
A study of fundamental concepts including data types, distributions, and hypothesis testing; and of the applications of spreadsheets and other software for data manipulation and statistical analysis. This course does not include a laboratory. Prerequisite: G-MA221 or consent of instructor. (Spring, odd years; Interterm, even years)

CH 370 Biochemistry (also cross-listed as Bi 370 Biochemistry)

4 hours
A basic study of the chemistry and metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and nucleic acids. The course provides an understanding of the structural and functional relationships of chemical constituents of cells and the role that they play in the processes of life. Prerequisite: CH 252 or consent of instructor with concurrent enrollment. Laboratory is included. (Fall, odd years)

CH 373 Biochemistry II (also cross-listed as Bi 373 cell Physiology)

4 hours
A rigorous study of the fundamentals of cell physiology, concentrating on intermediary metabolism and its regulation. Laboratory is included. Prerequisites: BI 112, CH252 and BI/CH 370 with grades of C or better or consent of instructor. (Spring, even years)

CH 385 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

4 hours
Further study of inorganic chemistry including structure and bonding, coordination chemistry, organometallic chemistry, the chemistry of transition metals and a more detailed systematic study of the families of the periodic table. Laboratory is included. Prerequisite: CH 112, CH 252. (Spring, even years)

CH 390 Instrumental Analysis

3 hours
Advanced work in quantitative analysis with emphasis on the principles and methods of electrochemical, spectroscopic and chromatographic analysis. Laboratory is included. Prerequisite: CH 201, PH 206 or PH216, or consent of the instructor. (Spring, odd years)

CH 400 General Physical Chemistry

5 hours
A study of the physical-chemical properties of matter. Topics covered include thermodynamics, the kinetic theory of gases, chemical kinetics, quantum mechanics, and statistical mechanics. Laboratory is included. Prerequisite: CH 252, G-MA 111, PH 206 (or concurrent enrollment). (on demand)

CH 445 Readings and Research in Chemistry

1-4 hours
Enrichment of a student’s study in the discipline either by reading on the topic not covered in the above courses or by research done on or off campus. Prerequisite: 12 semester hours in the department or program with an average of C or better, and consent of instructor. Open only to students majoring in the department or program.

Individualized Courses Available

295/495 Field Experience (1-4 hours)
299/499 Independent Study (1-4 hours)
388 Career Connections (1-12 hours)
445 Readings and Research (1-4 hours)

Natural Science Course Descriptions

G-NS 100 Science in Society

3-4 hours (Language Intensive, if taken for 4 hours)
The goals of this course are to build scientific literacy and to increase awareness of what Science has to offer to individuals and to Society. Classes will include lectures, faculty-led discussions of assigned readings, student-led discussions of “Science in the News” topics, and student presentations of semester projects/term papers. This course does not include a laboratory. (Interterm, odd years; Spring, even years)

G-NS 141 Environmental Science

4 hours
A study of the environmental issues that arise from the complex relationships between humans and the earth. Emphasis will be placed on a scientific understanding and a search for solutions to environmental problems. Laboratory is included. (Fall)

NS 245 Climatology

3 hours
This study of the Earth’s climate system will emphasize the physical and biological processes that determine climate: e.g. radiative transfer, atmospheric and oceanic energy transfer, energy balance, the hydrologic cycle, and related geological, biological, and anthropogenic influences; and will consider their interactive effects on climate change. This course does not include a laboratory. (Spring, odd years)

NS 300 Research Methods

1 hour (Language Intensive)
Preparation for participation in an independent laboratory research project in the natural sciences. Topics covered include scientific literature searches, research design, data handling, research evaluation, scientific writing, and reporting. To be taken during the sophomore or junior year. (Fall)

NS 350 Stewardship Seminar

1 hour
A weekly discussion of the interrelationships among the current contents of the student’s other courses, in light of their relationships to the goals of the Environmental Stewardship major.

NS 375 Junior Seminar

1 hour
Preparation for participation in an independent laboratory research project in the natural sciences. Topics covered include literature searches, research design, data handling, research evaluation, scientific writing and reporting, career exploration, and scientific ethics. (Spring)

NS 404 Environmental Ethics

2 hours
This seminar examines both the factual and ethical dimensions of our current and possible future environments. Students will use a case study approach to apply different ethical frameworks to choices that arise from human interaction with the natural order. This course does not include a laboratory. (on demand)

NS 416 Ecological Economics

2 hours
This seminar will provide an historical overview of various schools of ecological and economic thought, and present the principles uniting ecology with economics. Students will use a case study approach to analyze economic policies constrained by ecological reality, including economic growth theory and policy as it pertains to issues of societal and ecological sustainability. This course does not include a laboratory. (on demand)

NS 475 Senior Research

2 hours (Language Intensive)
Experience in the planning, conducting, and reporting of scientific research. The student research works in continual consultation with the research advisor. Selection of the research topic and consent of the advisor must be obtained in advance of enrollment. Prerequisite: NS 375 and consent of research advisor.

NS 495 Field experience in the Natural Sciences

1-4 hours
A planned experience in a field-oriented aspect of both the biological and physical sciences.

Individualized Courses Available

295/495 Field Experience (1-4 hours)
299/499 Independent Study (1-4 hours)
388 Career Connections (1-12 hours)
445 Readings and Research (1-4 hours)

Physical Science Course Descriptions

G-PC 251 Geology

4 hours
An introductory course that focuses on the scientific study of the earth. The course emphasizes the study of earth materials, changes in the surface and interior of the earth, and the dynamic forces that cause those changes. Laboratory is included. (Interterm, odd years)

G-PC 275 Astronomy

4 hours
The structure and evolution of the universe, from nearby planets to distant quasars, are examined. Topics include recent discoveries concerning planets, stars, galaxies, pulsars, and black holes as well as their evolution, the structure of the universe today and how it will be in the future. The emphasis is descriptive rather than mathematical. Laboratory is included. (Interterm, even years)

PC 445 Readings and Research in Physical Science

1-4 hours
Enrichment of a student’s study in the discipline either by reading on a topic not covered in the above courses or by research done on or off campus. Prerequisite: 12 semester hours in the department or program and the consent of the instructor. Open only to students majoring in the department or program.

Individualized Courses Available

295/495 Field Experience (1-4 hours)
299/499 Independent Study (1-4 hours)
388 Career Connections (1-12 hours)
445 Readings and Research (1-4 hours)

Physics Course Descriptions

PH 205 College Physics I

5 hours
A first course for chemistry and mathematics majors with a calculus background. Topics covered are mechanics, wave motion, and thermodynamics with emphasis placed on the use of mathematics to formulate problems and to explain physical phenomena. Prerequisite: G-MA 111. Laboratory is included. (Fall, odd years)

PH 206 College Physics II

5 hours
A continuation of PH 205. Topics covered are electricity, magnetism, and optics. Prerequisite: PH 205. Laboratory is included. (Spring, even years)

G-PH 215 General Physics I

4 hours
A first course for premed, biology, and other science majors with a college algebra background. Topics covered are mechanics, wave motion, and thermodynamics with emphasis placed on the understanding of physical concepts to formulate problems and to explain physical phenomena. Lab is included. Prerequisite: MA 105 College Algebra. (Fall)

PH 216 General Physics II

4 hours
A continuation of G-PH 215. Topics covered are electricity, magnetism, and optics. Lab is included. Prerequisite: PH 215. (Spring)

Individualized Courses Available

295/495 Field Experience (1-4 hours)
299/499 Independent Study (1-4 hours)
388 Career Connections (1-12 hours)
445 Readings and Research (1-4 hours)

2016|Catalog 16-17, Natural Science|

Health, Physical Education & Recreation Course Descriptions

PE 110 Introduction to Team Sports

2 hours
This course is an introduction to the organization, strategy, rules and practice of team sports. Team Sports covered in this course will include, but not be limited to ultimate frisbee, team handball, floor/field hockey, speedball, continuous whiffleball/ kickball, volleyball, cageball soccer/basketball, and mattball. This course is an introduction to the organization and practice of soccer, speedball, field hockey, softball, team handball, and volleyball. (Fall )

PE 140 Introduction to Rhythms and Dance

2 hours
The purpose of this course is to provide students with a wide spectrum of information on rhythmic activities and dance. Students will learn body movements and how to perform them to music. Students will also choreograph and teach developmentally appropriate rhythmic activities and dance to others. (On Demand)

G-PE 150 Concepts in Holistic Health

2 hours
This course is designed to present the student with cognitive health and wellness principles and to offer suggestions for their application. These principles will be examined using a traditional approach with a variety of cultural influences. Major areas of study include mind-body interrelatedness and control, stress management, individual fitness, health and health related topics, and lifestyle management (including play). (Fall, Spring)

PE 160 Introduction to Individual and Dual Sports I

2 hours
This course is comprised of an introduction to the fundamentals, organization, and practice of tennis, golf, bowling, badminton, dance-ballroom/swing, orienteering, disc golf, and blow guns. This course exists because a basic understanding of the physical and mental principles in individual and dual sports is essential for the fullest and richest enjoyment. (Fall)

PE 161 Introduction to Individual and Dual Sports II

2 hours
This course is comprised of an introduction to the organization and practice of racquetball, Pickleball, archery, ladderball, table tennis, billiards, dance – square/ line and fishing/camping. Individual and dual sports are an integral part of our society. This course exists because a basic understanding of the physical and mental principles in individual and dual sports is essential for the fullest and richest enjoyment. (Spring)

G-PE 170 Personal and Community Health

2 hours
The purpose of this course is to provide students with a wide variety of information concerning personal and community health and wellness. It is designed to have an overview of the physical, mental, emotional, social, and spiritual components of health as they combine to influence the complete human being. Included within the course will be an introduction to the management of stress, physical fitness, nutrition and weight management, drug use and abuse, noninfectious and infectious diseases, sexuality and fertility, consumerism, environmental concerns and the maturing adult. Additionally, a practical approach to setting up a personal improvement plan for lifetime wellness will be stressed. (Fall, Spring)

PE 180 First Aid and Personal Safety

2 hours
This course is designed for all students to understand and prevent accident situations, to treat a wide variety of accident and emergency situations including use of supportive equipment and psychological first aid, and receive American Red Cross certification for CPR. (Fall)

PE/PY/SO 210 Human Sexuality

3 hours
A study of female roles, male roles, values, life adjustments, sexual identities, religion, language, and behavior differences based on cultural, educational and socioeconomic factors related to human sexuality. Course uses lectures, audio- visuals, discussions, guest resource persons, assigned readings, and projects or papers to present information. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or higher or instructor consent. (Spring)

PE 220 Human Anatomy and Physiology for Physical Education

2 hours
Anatomy and physiology is designed to introduce the student to the science of the body structure and function. Content is presented in a simple to complex pattern which includes the design and function of cells, body systems, and the interdependence of systems. (Fall)

PE 280 Care and Treatment of Athletic Injuries

3 hours
The purpose of this course is to provide students with a wide spectrum of information on the care and treatment of athletes and their injuries. It is designed to provide an overview of emergency procedures and on-court assessment of injured athletes. The importance of preventative measures and an overview of the responsibilities of an athletic trainer will be addressed. Preparation and taping for game day will be discussed theoretically and rehearsed practically. (Fall)

PE 288 Psychology and Sociology of Sport

2 hours
This course is designed to expose the student to the principles of psychology and sociology as applied to a sports setting. The purpose being performance enhancement with the ultimate goal of individual/human enrichment. (Spring)

PE/EE 305 Methods for Teaching Physical Education in the Elementary School

2 hours
This course is designed to introduce prospective elementary school physical education and classroom teachers to the fundamentals, principles, and practices of physical education at the elementary school level. Movement exploration and methods will be stressed in the variety of play activities introduced. Additionally, this course has been designed to integrate theory and concept learning with practical laboratory experiences. Prerequisites: G-CI 150, CI 151. (Spring)

PE 426/CI 426 Methods for Teaching Health in Elementary and Secondary School

2 hours
A course designed to acquaint the student with a variety of methods and modalities for teaching school health. The health problems of the individual school child and his/her environment will also be studied. Students will be videotaped when teaching a lesson. Prerequisites: G-PE 150 or G-PE 170, G-CI 150, CI 151. (Interterm)

PE 330 Physiology of Exercise

3 hours
This course is designed for future educators, coaches, and a variety of other health professionals including physical therapists, occupational therapists, fitness programmers and other persons interested in his field. This course will provide concepts for safe and sensible conduct of sport and physical education programs as well as any other exercise-based programs. Prerequisites: G-BI 101, PE 220. (Spring, odd)

PE375 Junior Seminar

1 hour
This course is designed to help students foster relationships with colleagues and other professionals in the learning community for the promotion of health and physical education techniques for learning and teaching.

PE 380 History & Philosophy of Sport & Physical Education

3 hours (Language Intensive)
A study of the development of sport and physical education as affected by major historical periods and events. (Fall, even)

PE/EE 410 Methods for Teaching Physical Education in the Secondary Schools

2 hours
A study of various teaching techniques and analysis of fundamental skills of physical education activities in the secondary school setting. The course offers an opportunity to explore various teaching techniques in individual, dual, and team activities in the field of physical education for the secondary schools. Prerequisites: PE 110, PE 160, PE 161, G-CI 150, CI 251. (Interterm,)

PE 411 Kinesiology

3 hours
Kinesiology is the study of human motion based on anatomical, physiological and mechanical principles. The study of the human body as machine for the performance of work will be examined from three major areas, mechanics, anatomy and physiology. All students should have prerequisite courses of Principles of Biology and Introductory Chemistry. All students who have met the above requirements are welcome to participate in this course, but it will be taught from the perspective of those going into physical education and/or coaching. Prerequisites: G-BI 101, G-CH 101. (Fall, odd)

PE 450 Organization and Administration of Health, Physical Education and Athletics

3 hours
It is the goal of this course to introduce students to a variety of situations involving organization and administrative skills, and through this process, provide students with a broad range of organizational and administrative alternatives useful in the successful administration of school health, physical education and athletic programs. (Fall, odd)

Pe 475 Senior Seminar

2 hours
This is the culminating or “capstone” course for Physical Education majors that do not participate in student teaching. Discussion of current topics in Physical Education and the Allied Health fields would be combined with field experience to give the student a practical understanding of the fields they have chosen to pursue.

Intercollegiate Competition:

PE 211 & 311 Intercollegiate Softball – Women (1 hour)
PE 213 & 313 Intercollegiate Football-Men (1 hour )
PE 214 & 314 Intercollegiate Basketball (1 hour)
PE 215 & 315 Intercollegiate Cross Country (1 hour)
PE 216 & 316 Intercollegiate Track and Field (1 hour)
PE 217 & 317 Intercollegiate Volleyball-Women (1 hour)
PE 219 & 319 Intercollegiate Soccer (1 hour)

Prerequisite: One season of intercollegiate competition.

Individualized Courses Available:

295/495 Field Experience (1-4 hours)
299/499 Independent Study (1-4 hours)
388 Career Connections (1-12 hours)
445 Readings and Research (1-4 hours)

Natural Science Course Descriptions

Biology Course Descriptions

G-BI 101 Principles of Biology

4 hours
An introduction to the principles of biology, with an emphasis on the biology of humans. This course does not apply toward a major in biology. (Fall)

G-BI 106 Environmental Biology

4 hours
A one-semester introduction to the principles of biology, with an emphasis on biological interactions in the environment. This course does not apply toward a major in biology or biochemistry. Laboratory is included. (Fall, even years)

G-BI 111 College Biology I

4 hours
A rigorous introduction to the unity and diversity of life. This course focuses on the contributions of genetics, ecology and evolution to the biodiversity of the planet. The laboratory exercises are designed to provide a variety of practical experiences, as well as to illustrate the principles discussed in lecture. (Fall)

BI 112 College Biology II

4 hours
A continuation of G-BI 111 with a rigorous introduction to organismal structure and function. Explores the organization and processes of living systems at the levels of biomolecules, organelles, cells, organ systems, and organisms. Lab work includes studies of enzyme action, cellular respiration, organismal development and anatomy. Prerequisite: G-BI 111 with a grade of C or better. (Spring)

G-BI 201 Biodiversity

3-4 hours
A fundamental study of biological diversity as an assessment of life on earth. This will progress from the individual to the community, focusing on biodiversity and ecology from an evolutionary perspective and also on applied environmental research. The course includes laboratory work as an option for the 4th credit hour. (Spring, even years)

BI 207 Medical Terminology

2 hours
An introduction to the study of medical terms that brings to life the language of medicine. This course will help students develop an understanding of how to communicate fluently in a healthcare setting. This course will explain medical terms in the context of the anatomy and physiology of different body systems as well as how the body works in health and disease. (Spring, even years)

G-BI 210 Principles of Nutrition

3 hours
Physiology and chemistry of digestion, absorption, and metabolism of nutrients; nutrient functions; requirements; and effects of nutrient deficiencies and toxicities. Prerequisites: G-CH 101 or G-CH 111 with a grade of C or better or with consent of instructor (Interterm, odd years)

BI 225 Human Anatomy

4 hours
A lecture/laboratory course in the fundamentals of human anatomy, with emphasis on macroscopic structures at the tissue, organ and organ system levels of organization. Some attention will be given to the perspectives of histology and developmental biology. The course includes laboratory work, primarily dissection of a comparative mammal, the domestic cat. (Interterm, even years)

BI 234 Microbiology

4 hours
A study of microorganisms, with emphasis on the bacteria. A consideration of their structure, metabolism, classification, identification, and human and ecological relationships. Prerequisites: BI 112, CH 251 with grades of C or better or consent of instructor. (Spring, even years)

BI 283 Genetics

4 hours
Basic genetic concepts including classical Mendelian inheritance, cytogenetics, population genetics, and the molecular basis of gene action. Laboratory experiences coordinated with lecture topics. Pre-requisites: BI 112, with a grade of C or better. (Fall)

BI 310 Statistical Data Analysis (also cross-listed as CH 310 Statistical Data Analysis)

4 hours
A study of fundamental concepts including data types, distributions, and hypothesis testing; and of the applications of spreadsheets and other software for data manipulation and statistical analysis. Prerequisite: G-MA221 or consent of instructor. (Interterm)

BI 315 Human Physiology

4 hours
A rigorous introduction to the fundamentals of human neurophysiology, cardiac-physiology, muscular & circulatory physiology and excretory & respiratory physiology. Laboratory experiences include case studies of human physiological problems. Prerequisite: BI 112, with a grade of C or better. (Fall, even years)

BI 316 Ecology

4 hours
A study of relationships between organisms and their environments, including both physical and biotic environments. The course includes both laboratory and field work. Prerequisites: BI 112 with a grade of C or better. (Spring, every other even year)

BI 325 Human Ecology, Epidemiology, and Public Health

4 hours
A study of the relationships between humans and their environments, including both physical and biotic environments, with special emphasis on understanding the nature of healthy relationships in comparison to the disease state. Prerequisites: BI 112 with a grade of C or better. (Fall, odd years)

BI 334 Microbial Ecophysiology

5 hours
A study of the ecophysiology of microorganisms (with emphasis on Bacteria and Archaea), focusing on the diversity and utility of their metabolic pathways. This course includes both lecture and laboratory work. (Fall, even years)

BI 345 Plant Ecophysiology

4 hours
This course will explore the physiological processes that influence the growth, reproduction, survival, adaptation and evolution of plants. The physiological processes to be explored include water relations, mineral nutrition, solute transport, and energetics (photosynthesis and respiration). The influence of biotic and abiotic factors will be included to provide a context in which to discuss stress physiology and its ecological consequences. (Fall, even years)

BI 364 Cell and Molecular Biology

4 hours
The molecular organization, function and evolution of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Lab work includes chromosome analysis, cellular fractionation, cell culture, and electrophoretic studies. Prerequisites: BI 112, CH 252 with grades of C or better. (Spring, odd years)

BI 370 Biochemistry (also cross-listed as cH 370 Biochemistry)

4 hours
A basic study of the chemistry and metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids. The course provides an understanding of the structural and functional relationships of chemical constituents of cells and the role that they play in the processes of life. Prerequisite: CH 252 or consent of instructor with concurrent enrollment. Laboratory is included (Fall, odd years)

BI 373 Cell Physiology (also cross-listed as CH 373 Biochemistry ii)

4 hours
A rigorous study of the fundamentals of cell physiology, concentrating on intermediary metabolism and its regulation. Lab work includes computational biology and shadowing physicians . Prerequisites: BI 112, CH252 and BI/CH 370 with grades of C or better or consent of instructor. (Spring, even years)

BI 384 Molecular Genetics

4 hours
This upper-level course will extend on topics presented in Genetics (B1283). The course will delve deeper into genetics with a specific focus on the molecular- scale processes responsible for producing our phenotype and their relationships to evolutionary change. The lab component focuses on various current lab techniques used in the field of genetics. (Spring, even years)

BI 391 Evolution (also cross-listed as G-PR391)

4 hours (Language Intensive)
A study of the history, philosophical underpinnings, and implications of Charles Darwin’s Theory of Evolution by Natural Selection. Prerequisites: BI 112 with a grade of C or better. (Spring, odd years)

BI 393 Topics in Biology

1-4 hours
One specific topic will be covered each time this course is offered. Possible topics include (but are not limited to) molecular genetics, vertebrate zoology, functional morphology, quantitative biology, and advanced ecology. Prerequisite: BI 112 with a grade of C or better and consent of the instructor.

BI 404 Biomedical Ethics

2 hours
This seminar examines both the factual and ethical dimensions of decisions regarding healthcare. Students will use a case study approach to apply the ethical principles of autonomy, non-maleficence, beneficence, and justice to diverse situations. Alternative ethical systems and ethics in research are considered. (Spring, even years)

BI 445 Readings and Research in Biology

1-4 hours
Enrichment of a student’s study in the discipline either by readings on a topic not covered in the above courses or by research done on or off campus. Prerequisites: 12 semester hours in the department or program with an average of C or better, and consent of the instructor. Open only to students majoring in the department or program.

BI 495 Field Experience in Biology

1-4 hours
A planned experience in one of the field-oriented or professionally related phases of biological science. The specific area and content must be agreed upon in advance by the student, faculty advisor, and Vice President for Academic Affairs. Specific examples that are offered periodically, especially during Interterm are Field Experience in Puerto Rico and observations of various health careers with practicing professionals.

Individualized Courses Available

295/495 Field Experience (1-4 hours)
299/499 Independent Study (1-4 hours)
388 Career Connections (1-12 hours)
445 Readings and Research (1-4 hours)

Chemistry Course Descriptions

G-CH 106 Environmental Chemistry

4 hours
A one-semester introduction to the principles of chemistry, with an emphasis on chemical interactions in the environment. This course does not apply toward a major in biology, biochemistry, or chemistry. Laboratory is included. (Fall, odd years)

G-CH 111 College Chemistry I

5 hours
A study of the principles, laws, and concepts of chemistry as they relate to the periodic table and systematic study of the properties of the elements. A study of modern atomic and molecular structure. Laboratory is included. (Fall)

CH 112 College Chemistry II

5 hours
A continuation of CH 111. Includes study of the chemistry of metals and nonmetals, chemistry of solutions, chemical equilibrium and qualitative analysis. Prerequisite: G-CH 111. Laboratory is included. (Spring)

CH 201 Quantitative Analysis

4 hours
A study of the principles and methods of analytical chemistry by the methods of volumetric and gravimetric analysis, precipitimetry, acidimetry and oxidation- reduction titrations. Prerequisite: CH 112, or consent of the instructor. (Fall, even years)

CH 251 Organic Chemistry I

5 hours
A study of the principles of organic chemistry, the physical and chemical properties of carbon compounds with emphasis on the mechanisms of organic reactions, the nomenclature of the compounds, and methods of organic synthesis. The carbon compounds discussed include some of the common alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, cycloalkanes, alkylhalides, ethers and alcohols. Prerequisite: G-CH 111 or consent of instructor. Laboratory is included. (Spring)

CH 252 Organic Chemistry II

5 hours
A continuation of CH 251. Includes study of basic spectroscopy as a basic tool for structural analysis and the chemistry of aromatic compounds, aldehydes, ketones, amines, carboxylic acids and their functional derivatives. Prerequisite: CH 251. Laboratory is included. (Fall)

CH 310 Statistical Data Analysis (also cross-listed as BI 310 Statistical Data Analysis)

4 hours
A study of fundamental concepts including data types, distributions, and hypothesis testing; and of the applications of spreadsheets and other software for data manipulation and statistical analysis. Prerequisite: G-MA221 or consent of instructor. (Interterm)

CH 370 Biochemistry (also cross-listed as Bi 370 Biochemistry)

4 hours
A basic study of the chemistry and metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and nucleic acids. The course provides an understanding of the structural and functional relationships of chemical constituents of cells and the role that they play in the processes of life. Prerequisite: CH 252 or consent of instructor with concurrent enrollment. Laboratory is included. (Fall, odd years)

CH 373 Biochemistry II (also cross-listed as Bi 373 cell Physiology)

4 hours
A rigorous study of the fundamentals of cell physiology, concentrating on intermediary metabolism and its regulation. Lab work includes computational biology and shadowing physicians . Prerequisites: BI 112, CH252 and BI/CH 370 with grades of C or better or consent of instructor. (Spring, even years)

CH 385 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

4 hours
Further study of inorganic chemistry including structure and bonding, coordination chemistry, organometallic chemistry, the chemistry of transition metals and a more detailed systematic study of the families of the periodic table. Prerequisite: CH 112, CH 252. Laboratory is included. (Spring, even years)

CH 390 Instrumental Analysis

3 hours
Advanced work in quantitative analysis with emphasis on the principles and methods of electrochemical, spectroscopic and chromatographic analysis. Laboratory is included. Prerequisite: CH 201, PH 206 or PH216, or consent of the instructor. (Spring, odd years)

CH 400 General Physical Chemistry

5 hours
A study of the physical-chemical properties of matter. Topics covered include thermodynamics, the kinetic theory of gases, chemical kinetics, quantum mechanics, and statistical mechanics. Prerequisite: CH 252, G-MA 111, PH 206 (or concurrent enrollment). Laboratory is included. (on demand)

CH 445 Readings and Research in Chemistry

1-4 hours
Enrichment of a student’s study in the discipline either by reading on the topic not covered in the above courses or by research done on or off campus. Prerequisite: 12 semester hours in the department or program with an average of C or better, and consent of instructor. Open only to students majoring in the department or program.

Individualized Courses Available

295/495 Field Experience (1-4 hours)
299/499 Independent Study (1-4 hours)
388 Career Connections (1-12 hours)
445 Readings and Research (1-4 hours)

Natural Science Course Descriptions

G-NS 100 Science in Society

3-4 hours (Language Intensive, if taken for 4 hours)
The goals of this course are to build scientific literacy and to increase awareness of what Science has to offer to individuals and to Society. Classes will include lectures, faculty-led discussions of assigned readings, student-led discussions of “Science in the News” topics, and student presentations of semester projects/term papers. (Spring, odd years)

G-NS 141 Environmental Science

4 hours
A study of the environmental issues that arise from the complex relationships between humans and the earth. Emphasis will be placed on a scientific understanding and a search for solutions to environmental problems. Laboratory is included. (Spring)

NS 245 Climatology

4 hours
This study of the Earth’s climate system will emphasize the physical and biological processes that determine climate: e.g. radiative transfer, atmospheric and oceanic energy transfer, energy balance, the hydrologic cycle, and related geological, biological, and anthropogenic influences; and will consider their interactive effects on climate change. (Spring, even years)

NS 300 Research Methods

1 hour (Language Intensive)
Preparation for participation in an independent laboratory research project in the natural sciences. Topics covered include scientific literature searches, research design, data handling, research evaluation, scientific writing, and reporting. To be taken during the sophomore or junior year. (Fall)

NS 350 Stewardship Seminar

1 hour
A weekly discussion of the interrelationships among the current contents of the student’s other courses, in light of their relationships to the goals of the Environmental Stewardship major.

NS 375 Junior Seminar

1 hour
Preparation for participation in an independent laboratory research project in the natural sciences. Topics covered include literature searches, research design, data handling, research evaluation, scientific writing and reporting, career exploration, and scientific ethics. (Spring)

NS 404 Environmental Ethics

2 hours
This seminar examines both the factual and ethical dimensions of our current and possible future environments. Students will use a case study approach to apply different ethical frameworks to choices that arise from human interaction with the natural order. (Spring, odd years)

NS 416 Ecological Economics

2 hours
This seminar will provide an historical overview of various schools of ecological and economic thought, and present the principles uniting ecology with economics. Students will use a case study approach to analyze economic policies constrained by ecological reality, including economic growth theory and policy as it pertains to issues of societal and ecological sustainability. (Fall)

NS 475 Senior Research

2 hours (Language Intensive)
Experience in the planning, conducting, and reporting of scientific research. The student research works in continual consultation with the research advisor. Selection of the research topic and consent of the advisor must be obtained in advance of enrollment. Prerequisite: NS 375 and consent of research advisor.

NS 495 Field experience in the natural Sciences

1-4 hours
A planned experience in a field-oriented aspect of both the biological and physical sciences.

Individualized Courses Available

295/495 Field Experience (1-4 hours)
299/499 Independent Study (1-4 hours)
388 Career Connections (1-12 hours)
445 Readings and Research (1-4 hours)

Physical Science Course Descriptions

G-PC 251 Geology

4 hours
An introductory course that focuses on the scientific study of the earth. The course emphasizes the study of earth materials, changes in the surface and interior of the earth, and the dynamic forces that cause those changes. (Interterm, odd years)

G-PC 275 Astronomy

4 hours
The structure and evolution of the universe, from nearby planets to distant quasars, are examined. Topics include recent discoveries concerning planets, stars, galaxies, pulsars, and black holes as well as their evolution, the structure of the universe today and how it will be in the future. The emphasis is descriptive rather than mathematical. (Interterm, even years)

PC 445 Readings and Research in Physical Science

1-4 hours
Enrichment of a student’s study in the discipline either by reading on a topic not covered in the above courses or by research done on or off campus. Prerequisite: 12 semester hours in the department or program and the consent of the instructor. Open only to students majoring in the department or program.

Individualized Courses Available

295/495 Field Experience (1-4 hours)
299/499 Independent Study (1-4 hours)
388 Career Connections (1-12 hours)
445 Readings and Research (1-4 hours)

Physics Course Descriptions

PH 205 College Physics I

5 hours
A first course for chemistry and mathematics majors with a calculus background. Topics covered are mechanics, wave motion, and thermodynamics with emphasis placed on the use of mathematics to formulate problems and to explain physical phenomena. Prerequisite: G-MA 111. Laboratory is included. (Fall, odd years)

PH 206 College Physics II

5 hours
A continuation of PH 205. Topics covered are electricity, magnetism, and optics. Prerequisite: PH 205. Laboratory is included. (Spring, even years)

G-PH 215 General Physics I

4 hours
A first course for premed, biology, and other science majors with a college algebra background. Topics covered are mechanics, wave motion, and thermodynamics with emphasis placed on the understanding of physical concepts to formulate problems and to explain physical phenomena. Prerequisite: MA 105 College Algebra. Lab is included. (Fall)

PH 216 General Physics II

4 hours
A continuation of G-PH 215. Topics covered are electricity, magnetism, and optics. Prerequisite: PH 215. Lab is included. (Spring)

Individualized Courses Available

295/495 Field Experience (1-4 hours)
299/499 Independent Study (1-4 hours)
388 Career Connections (1-12 hours)
445 Readings and Research (1-4 hours)

2015|Catalog 15-16, Natural Science|

Catalog 2022-2023

About this Catalog

01 Institutional Profile

02 Admission to McPherson College

03 Financial Information

04 Degree Programs

05 Special Programs

06 Enrollment Procedures and Policies

07 Grades and Other Academic Policies

08 General Education

09 The Undergraduate Curriculum

10 The Graduate Curriculum

11 Personnel

2022|

Catalog 2021-2022

About this Catalog

01 Institutional Profile

02 Admission to McPherson College

03 Financial Information

04 Degree Programs

05 Special Programs

06 Enrollment Procedures and Policies

07 Grades and Other Academic Policies

08 General Education

09 The Undergraduate Curriculum

10 The Graduate Curriculum

11 Personnel

2021|

Catalog 2023-2024

About this Catalog

01 Institutional Profile

02 Admission to McPherson College

03 Financial Information

04 Degree Programs

05 Special Programs

06 Enrollment Procedures and Policies

07 Grades and Other Academic Policies

08 General Education

09 The Undergraduate Curriculum

10 The Graduate Curriculum

11 Personnel

2023|

Financial Aid Process

Over 99 percent of McPherson College students receive financial assistance each year from McPherson College scholarships and awards, federal and state programs, work-study programs, and educational loans.

McPherson College has a financial aid awarding policy that considers a variety of factors including academic achievement, participation in co-curricular activities, and financial need. The college’s goal is to award enough financial assistance to provide incentive, recognition, and access.

Financial Aid Application Process

To be considered for and receive financial aid, students should take the following steps:

  • Submit their Application for Admission and academic transcripts to McPherson College. Students must be admitted to McPherson College in order to be considered for aid.
  • Submit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). McPherson College’s priority deadline for FAFSA submissions is March 1 each year. McPherson College’s federal school code is 001933.
  • Review their Student Aid Report (SAR) and submit verification documentation to the Financial Aid Office. Students whose Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) is selected by the Department of Education for verification must complete the Verification Worksheet (Dependent, Independent) and submit official tax transcripts from the IRS for the student and/or parents/spouse. If supporting schedules are required, the college will ask for them separately.
  • Await receipt of their Financial Aid Award Notice, which the college prepares and mails/emails, usually within 3–5 working days after their financial aid record is complete.
  • Follow the instructions enclosed with the Financial Aid Award Notice by the date indicated to acknowledge acceptance of awards.
  • Complete the required application/promissory note if taking advantage of student loan opportunities.
  • Complete entrance interview if borrowing direct loans.

Financial Aid Calendar

October 1 – Application process begins. Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA).
November 1 – Financial aid award notification begins for admitted students.
March 1 – Priority deadline for financial aid. Offers of aid after this date will be extended only as funds remain available.
April 1 – FAFSA submission deadline for Kansas Comprehensive Grant.

Scholarships and Awards

Every student meeting McPherson College’s admission standards who is enrolled full time is eligible for institutional financial aid. Institutional financial aid may be based on academic achievement, co-curricular participation, demographic characteristics, leadership qualities, and major areas of interest. A financial aid calculator and additional information about institutional awards and scholarships are available at https://www.mcpherson.edu/admissions/scholarships/

Endowed Scholarship Funds

The endowed scholarships and loan funds listed below have been established through personal generosity and a desire on the part of the donors to assist future generations of students in attending McPherson College. The college is grateful for these endowed gifts, which provide a permanent expression of love and support for the college and for the students who will benefit from this kindness. These gifts fund the existing McPherson College Scholarship and Grant Program.

Unrestricted Endowed Scholarship Fund with no specifics for awarding:

  • Walter E. Beery Scholarship Fund
  • Virgil Meyers Berkebile Scholarship
  • Earl Bowman Scholarship Fund
  • R.S. Christensen Endowment Scholarship Fund
  • Earl E. Curtis Memorial Scholarship Fund
  • Samuel L. Elrod Scholarship Fund
  • Esther Eslinger Memorial Scholarship Fund
  • Leland and Pauline Flory Endowment Scholarship Fund
  • Oscar C. Frantz & Flora Gish Frantz Scholarship
  • Roy O. Frantz Endowed Scholarship Fund
  • Harry H. and Marguerite Gilbert Memorial Endowment Scholarship
  • Raenell Hall Endowed Scholarship Fund
  • Ira M. Hoover Endowed Scholarship Fund
  • Helen Jacobs Memorial Scholarship
  • Ralph F. Johnson & Irene Ramey Johnson Memorial Scholarship Fund
  • Edith Keller Scholarship Fund
  • John Giolin Pearson Scholarship
  • Ralph H. Rindt Endowed Scholarship Fund
  • Scott Robinson Memorial Scholarship Fund
  • Ray Simmons Endowed Scholarship Fund
  • Stucky Scholarship Fund
  • Dr. Galen M. Tice & Ruth Kilmer Tice Memorial Scholarship Fund
  • Robert George Wolfe Memorial Scholarship
  • Worthington Church Scholarship Fund
  • Una Yoder Memorial Scholarship

Restricted Endowed Scholarships:

  • African-American: Harrison African-American Academic Scholarship
  • Alumni: Alumni Legacy Scholarship—for children and grandchildren of alumni
  • Andes: John and Elrae Andes Performing Arts Scholarship—for performing arts &/or music majors
  • Appel: Appel Family Scholarshipsupports student with need in an internship experience
  • Austin: Charles & John Austin Memorial Scholarship Fund—no restrictions
  • Austin: Glen D. Austin Scholarship—western Colorado residents
  • Barrett-Jackson Auction Co.: Brian Jackson Scholarship—auto restoration students with financial need; 3.0 GPA
  • Barrett-Jackson Auction Co.: Russ Jackson Scholarship—auto restoration students with financial need; 3.0 GPA
  • Beach – Carolyn Beach Scholarship Fund – Full time students pursuing degree in health science fields; 3.0 GPA
  • Beam: Royce & Phyllis Bowman Beam Scholarship in Vocal Music—student(s) enrolled in Performing Arts with preference to vocal music students
  • Beech: Olive Ann Beech Scholarship—Wichita, Kansas residents
  • Beeghly: Milford & Dorothy Graham Beeghly Scholarship—Iowa or Northern Plains District Church of the Brethren; display leadership qualities
  • Bell: Pauline L. Bell Memorial Scholarship—junior or senior students majoring in music education or music
  • Bittinger: Desmond & Irene Bittinger Scholarship—institution acceptable academic standing
  • Bowman: J.L. & Elva Bowman Scholarship—science majors
  • Brammell: Ira N.H. & Freda E. Brammell Scholarship—excellent leadership ability
  • Breon: Earl & Margaret Breon Scholarship—financial need
  • Breon: Phil & Clara Breon Scholarship—financial need
  • Brown: Elizabeth & Ed Brown & Classic Thunderbird Club of S. Florida Scholarship—2nd-, 3rd-, or 4th-year auto restoration students
  • Brown: Larry Brown Scholarship—student athletes majoring in physical education
  • Brubaker: Earl Brubaker Scholarship—financial need
  • Burkholder: Kathy Burkholder Endowed Scholarship Fund- women students who are studying disciplines that include business, human rights, or equality, minimum 3.0 GPA.
  • Butler: Edward R. & Judith Brammell Butler Student Leadership Scholarship—students who demonstrate leadership potential in student services
  • Campbell: David V. Campbell Scholarship—orphaned, handicapped, and underprivileged students
  • Casebeer: John & George Casebeer Scholarship—financial need
  • Cassler: Winston Cassler Scholarship—students studying music
  • Chief: Chief Staph Page Salute Heroes Veteran Scholarship- AR Program students, primary consideration to combat-wounded post 911 veterans of the U.S. Armed Services, honorably discharged. Secondary consideration to post 911 veterans of the U.S. Armed Forces honorably discharged. Other considerations given for veteran category approved by President and CEO of CSAH. 3.0 GPA
  • Chisholm: Will Edwin & Olive M. Chisholm Scholarship—no restrictions
  • Class of 1953 Scholarship— freshman student with financial need
  • Class of 1967 Scholarship**—full-time student in any academic program; minimum GPA; financial need
  • Class of 1968 Scholarship—full-time student in any academic program; minimum GPA; financial need
  • Class of 1972 Scholarship: first generation college student, financial need, minimum 3.0 GPA
  • Cobb: Redell & Barbara Cobb Scholarship—former students of Canton-Galva High School; 3.0 GPA
  • Coppock: X.L. & Martha Coppock Scholarship **—financial need
  • Coughenour: Dean Coughenour Endowed Scholarship Fund- Kansas students, leadership abilities, financial need, 3.0 GPA
  • Crago: Crago Family Scholarship—financial need; exchange student; minimum GPA or students(s) pursuing math, science or business major
  • Dalke: Elmer O. & Velma L. Dalke Scholarship—financial need
  • Darby: Edith & Harry Darby Foundation Scholarship— juniors and seniors; minimum GPA
  • DeCoursey: Wesley & Verda DeCoursey Scholarship in Chemistry—full-time student majoring in chemistry; minimum GPA; without regard for financial need
  • Dell: Lois E. Dell Scholarship Fund for Women—women who have been absent from a college campus; business majors
  • Dell-Little: Dell-Little Scholarship- student at any grade level majoring in natural sciences, health sciences, or behavioral sciences. Minimum 3.0 GPA
  • Dennison: Nora Dennison Scholarship—financial need
  • Detrick: Herbert & Lula Detrick Scholarship— financial need
  • Dodson: Susan Wheeler Dodson Scholarship—visual arts major; minimum GPA; without regard for financial need
  • Doman: David T. Doman/Franklin Club Scholarship – freshmen or sophomore auto restoration major; priority to student with H.H. Franklin Club membership
  • Dotzour: Royer & Edna Dotzour Scholarship—freshman male & female; Kingman County (KS) high school graduates; preference to Norwich High School
  • Duesenberg: Fred Duesenberg Scholarship—auto restoration student
  • Edwards: James “Jim” Edwards Scholarship – automotive restoration student with financial aid; minimum GPA of 3.0
  • Ehling: Lucas Ehling eSports Scholarship Fund – student in E-Sports program, minimum 3.0 GPA; academic merit, financial need
  • Eisenbise: Bernette Eisenbise Scholarship—sophomore, junior, or senior teacher education major
  • Elliott: Elliott Family Scholarship—financial need
  • Evans: Franklin Evans & Roberta Brown Evans Scholarship—sophomores, juniors, seniors; minimum GPA; leadership/campus involvement
  • F & J: F&J Foundation Scholarship—auto restoration student
  • Fasnacht: Everett M. & Joy C. Fasnacht Scholarship—Church of the Brethren members seeking career in church service, peace studies, conflict resolution
  • Fike: Duane & Ruthita Fike Scholarship **—no restrictions
  • Flory: Glen & Esther Flory Family Scholarship—financial need
  • Forror: Elizabeth Wagoner Forror & Jo Wagoner Scholarship—Church of the Brethren members or student seeking service-oriented career in health services or dependents of missionary workers
  • Forsyth/Switzer: Lyle & Florence Forsyth & Merl & Ola Switzer Scholarship – financial need
  • Frankenbery/Werner: Frankenberry/Werner Family Scholarship—financial need; student(s) in natural science and education; minimum GPA
  • Frantz: Gary Frantz Endowed Scholarship Fund- full time student, minimum 2.8 GPA
  • Frantz: Ralph Samuel Frantz Endowed Scholarship Fund in Auto Restoration- automotive restoration students, 3.0 GPA
  • Frantz: Hazel Ratliff Frantz Endowed Scholarship Fund in Health Science- health science majors, 3.0 GPA
  • Frantz: Earl & Lela Frantz Scholarship —Church of the Brethren members; financial need
  • Frantz: Edward R. & Virginia L. Frantz Scholarship – students pursuing interest in Entrepreneurship and/or athletics; enrolled full-time; financial need
  • Frantz: Merlin & ImoJean Sheller Frantz Scholarship—financial need
  • Fries: Ramona R. Fries & Arthur H. Fries Scholarship—academic merit; financial need
  • Geisert: Fred J. & Martha E. Geisert Scholarship—Dickinson County (KS) high school graduate or resident; preference to New Basel United Church of Christ, Abilene, KS, members/children
  • Gish: Warren & Luella Gish Scholarship—no restrictions
  • Glaser: Adelaide Glaser Scholarship—sophomores, juniors, seniors; Kansas resident; B average; financial need; good leadership qualities
  • Global: Endowed Fund for Global Studies—no restrictions
  • Global: Global Studies Scholarship Fund- Demonstrate a genuine desire to live with and learn from international countries, Minimum 3.0 GPA. A recommendation will from the Study Abroad Advisor.
  • Goering: Raymond “Dutch” & Dorothy L. Goering Scholarship—financial need
  • Green: Bob and Gayla Green Scholarship – first generation members of their family to attend college, financial need, minimum GPA of 3.0
  • Greim: Mary Roop Greim Scholarship—Missouri residents
  • Groff: Forrest & Della Groff Scholarship—Church of the Brethren/Groff family members; minimum GPA
  • Grossnickle: J. Edgar & Willa Grossnickle Scholarship—Iowa Church of the Brethren members, COB students from Iowa, or students from Iowa; preference given to COB students
  • Grover: Mable Beyer Grover Scholarship—financial need
  • Haas: William W. Haas Scholarship—Dickinson County (KS) high school graduates
  • Hall: Henry & Nellie Krebbs Hall Scholarship—financial need
  • Hanzlik: Evan and Edward J Hanzlik Scholarship – auto restoration students, financial need, demonstrate service through involvement in activities and/or in the community, minimum GPA of 3.0
  • Harden: Len & Stella Harden & Joyce Harden Brown Scholarship—juniors & seniors; science, math, pre-med majors
  • Hart: Dorothy Bryant Hart Scholarship—financial need
  • Harvey: Andrew Harvey Memorial Endowed Scholarship- preference given to student with a declared major in Automotive Restoration or similar field, minimum 3.0 GPA
  • Hatcher: Eugenia D. Hatcher Scholarship—female students
  • Hatfield: Verlin L. & Florence M. Hatfield Scholarship—resident students; financial need
  • Haury: Kenneth Haury Scholarship—business or accounting majors
  • Hemken: Col. Daryl and Ann Hemken Endowed Scholarship Fund- 3rd and 4th year Automotive Restoration students, pursuing degree in automobile preservation and restoration, based on merit.
  • Hershey: Dr. J. Willard Hershey Scholarship—juniors & seniors; science majors
  • Hess: Dick & Beverly Hess Fine Arts Fund—fine arts students; leadership/service ability; financial need
  • Hess: Dick & Beverly Hess Science Fund—science students who have demonstrated talent; financial need
  • Hess: Lou Ann (Dyck) Hess Fine Arts Fund—music students; other fine arts students; financial need
  • Hess: Lou Ann (Dyck) Hess Science Fund—biology students; other science students; financial need
  • Hewitt: The David and Sharon Hewitt Fund for Internship Experiences- full time students, preference to automotive restoration students, juniors and seniors. Director of Career services recommendation.
  • Hewitt: Sharon & David Hewitt Scholarship—JR/SR students interested in auto or motorcycle restoration
  • Hodgson: Gayle (Tammel) Hodgson Scholarship – primary consideration given to Iowa students, good academic standing
  • Hoerner: Della Hoerner Scholarship—students seeking career in nursing, medicine, medical technology
  • Hofen: Phillip J. Hofen Scholarship—Iowa residents; financial need
  • Hoffert: John and Mary Hoffert Scholarship – auto restoration student, maintain 3.0 GPA, academic merit, financial need, recommended by AR faculty
  • Hoffman: Paul & Joanna Hoffman Scholarship—Church of the Brethren members (US)
  • Hoffman: Samuel Hoffman Scholarship**—financial need; high achievement
  • Holden: Holden Family Scholarship—student enrolled in automotive restoration program; financial need; show interest in restoration and preservation of vehicles or vintage cars of historic importance
  • Holl: Dennis A. Holl Scholarship—Church of the Brethren members; students with Brethren Volunteer Service experience; financial need
  • Hoover: Wilbur and Miriam Hoover Endowed Scholarship Fund- Preference given to students who are children of ministers currently serving or who have served in the Western Plains District of the Church of the Brethren, minimum 3.0 GPA, financial need.
  • Hornbaker: Royal & Norma Hornbaker Scholarship—financial need
  • Ikenberry: Alta Gross Ikenberry Scholarship—freshman Idaho or Kansas resident, female athletes or pursuing career in education, pre-med or pre-dental
  • Ikenberry: Ernest & Olivia Ikenberry Scholarship**— financial need and good academic standing
  • Ingalls: Grace Vaniman Ingalls & Roscoe Ingalls Scholarship—financial need and good academic standing
  • IMA: Insurance Management Association Scholarship – business majors; financial need
  • Insurance Management Association Scholarshipbusiness majors; financial need
  • Jackson: Nellie Jackson Endowed Scholarship Fund for Women in Automotive Restoration- full time female student in the AR program, 3.0 minimum GPA, financial need.
  • Jewell: J. Paul & Fern Watkins Jewell Scholarship – full-time business and economics major; preference to 2nd-, 3rd-, and 4th-year students; minimum 3.0 GPA
  • Johnson: Daniel Palmer Johnson Scholarship—students majoring in math or science
  • Keim: Howard Keim & Winifred O’Connor-Keim Scholarship—women who will have achieved 23rd birthday prior to award; financial need
  • Kindig: Ethel Ward Kindig Scholarship—Nebraska residents; students interested in Christian ministry or service; financial need; good academic standing
  • Kinzie: Kinzie Foundation Scholarship—juniors or seniors; Church of the Brethren members; financial need
  • Kough: John K. & Arlene Flory Kough Scholarship—Church of the Brethren members from Kansas, Iowa, Missouri, Nebraska, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Colorado, North Dakota, Texas, and Montana
  • Kreider: Roy Levi Kreider Scholarship—financial need
  • Kuhn: Walter & Ruby Kuhn Scholarship—business, computer science, auto restoration majors
  • Lee: William & Mary Lee Scholarship—financial need
  • Lehman: Harry & Minnie Lehman Scholarship—financial need
  • Lehman: Harvey & Ruth Kurtz Lehman Scholarship—financial need
  • Lehman: Henry L. Lehman & Anna Burkholder Lehman Scholarship—demonstrated academic and leadership ability; financial need
  • Lengel: Leland L. Lengel Scholarship in History—sophomores, juniors, seniors; top history majors in each class; minimum GPA
  • Lichty: Henry Lichty Lovett, Dorothy Lichty Vogel, Mr. & Mrs. Glenn A. Lichty, Lucile Lichty West Scholarship—financial need; students from Northeast quarter of Kansas
  • Lingenfelter: The Fern Lingenfelter Artist Series and the Fern Lingenfelter Scholarship of Music—full-time student majoring in music; minimum 3.0 GPA
  • Long: V. Allen Long Scholarship—physical or natural science major and good academic standing
  • Marchand: F.E. & Cora A. Marchand Scholarship—Church of the Brethren members; financial need
  • Martin: Alice B. Martin Scholarship—financial need
  • Martin: Martha Cecile Martin Endowed Scholarship—teacher education student; McPherson County origin; financial need
  • Maune: Louie Maune Scholarship—financial need
  • McCluggage: The Denise McCluggage Scholarship—female student demonstrating passions in the fields of auto restoration, journalism, photography, communication, media arts, and/or writing; minimum 3.0 GPA
  • McDaneld: Wallace & Nellie Wagner McDaneld Scholarship—Kansas residents; interested in Christian ministry or service; financial need
  • McGhee: Grace Brunk McGhee Scholarship— financial need
  • McGonigle: Josephine Shirar McGonigle Scholarship—financial need
  • McHugh: Ellen McHugh Scholarship— financial need
  • McIlwaine: Delia Chavez McIlwaine Scholarship—music education major
  • McKellip: Margaret Yost McKellip Endowed Scholarship Fund- financial need, 3.0 GPA.
  • McSpadden: Dwight McSpadden Scholarship—student athletes
  • Meguiar: Meguiar Family Scholarship in Automobile Restoration—auto restorations students
  • Melhorn: J. Mark & Katherine J. Ramsey Melhorn Scholarship—McPherson County student participating in at least one athletic program and intention to major in science field
  • Merkey: Samuel R. Merkey Scholarship—financial need
  • Metzler: Burton & Mabel Metzler Scholarship—financial need
  • Metzler: David & Doris Metzler Scholarship **—full-time student preparing for the ministry or Christian service or PreK-12 classroom teaching
  • Miller: Delma Miller Scholarship—Church of the Brethren members
  • Miller: Oscar & Vida Miller Scholarship— financial need
  • Mingenback: Mary Mingenback Scholarship—art or music students; financial need
  • Moats/Neher: Edgar & Marie Moats/Roy & Wava Neher/Edna Neher Scholarship—preference to Ivester (Grundy Center, IA) and Osage (McKune, KS) Church of the Brethren members
  • Moore: Alma Anderson Moore Scholarship—speech/theatre students
  • Morrison: Milton & Rebecca Morrison Scholarship—financial need
  • Moyers: David W. & Florence Smith Moyers Scholarship—Church of the Brethren members who demonstrate church leadership potential
  • Mugler: Carrie Mugler Scholarship—financial need
  • Murrey: Chester & Pearl Crumpacker Murrey Scholarship—freshmen, first-year transfer; financial need
  • Myers: Phil & Jean Myers Scholarship—priority consideration given to students who, due to unique opportunities, crisis situations, or extraordinary accomplishments and/or contributions to their community in the face of difficulties, deserve recognition and encouragement to complete their education; minimum 3.0 GPA; financial need
  • Negley: Negley Family Scholarship— Church of the Brethren members; financial need
  • Nichols: Connie Nichols /Ethel McClure Scholarship—interior design or art majors; participate in at least one extra-curricular or volunteer activity on campus or in McPherson
  • Nonken: Ray Nonken Scholarship—Kansas residents who reside in a rural area; athletes; minimum 3.0 GPA
  • Nordling: Barbara & Bernard Nordling /Leland E. Nordling Family ScholarshipKansas residents west of Highway 81, excluding Sedgwick County; academic achievement
  • Noyes: Pat Noyes Men’s Basketball Scholarship—juniors and seniors in previous year; exemplify character of Pat Noyes (leadership, positive attitude, team player, exert maximum effort, passion for the game of basketball); good academic standing
  • Page: Chief Staph Page Salute Heroes Veteran Scholarship – auto restoration major; primary consideration given to combat wounded post 911 veteran of the United States Uniformed Armed Services; secondary consideration to post 911 veterans of the United States Uniformed Armed Services; minimum 3.0 GPA
  • Pair: Paul & Pauline Vaniman Pair Scholarship for Computer Science—computer science majors
  • Pair: Pauline Vaniman Pair Scholarship for the Fine Arts—art, music, theatre majors; good academic standing
  • Paul: Paul Family Endowed Scholarship Fund- full time student, financial need, African-American descent, 2.6 GPA.
  • Pebble Beach: Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance Scholarship—auto restorations majors
  • Peckover: Lila Marie Peckover Scholarship—Hutchinson (KS) Community Church of the Brethren members
  • Penland: M.W. & Hallie Goforth Penland Scholarship—philosophy/religion, science, or education majors
  • Pepsi-Cola Scholarship—auto restorations majors
  • Peterson: Ernest & Inez Peterson Scholarship—juniors and seniors; business and accounting majors; minimum GPA
  • Phillips- Phillips Family Endowed Scholarship Fund- students pursuing a degree in automotive restoration, minimum 2.9 GPA.
  • Platts: Henry M Platts Endowed Scholarship Fund- automotive restoration students, minimum 3.0 GPA.
  • Porter: Irwin and Betty Porter Fund—no restrictions
  • Powell: Powell Family Scholarship in Science and Religion—science or religion/philosophy majors with preference to those studying both disciplines
  • Prather: A.B. & Vera Prather Scholarship—financial need
  • Quapaw: Benjamin Quapaw Scholarship—Native-American students
  • Quint: Don Quint Memorial Soccer Scholarship Fund—business majors who also are a member of the soccer team; minimum GPA
  • Railsback- Gene & Sheryl Railsback Family Scholarship Fund- Upperclassman majoring in elementary education, from a rural or small-town background.
  • Ray: Art Ray Track & Field /Cross Country Scholarship—students participating in track and field or cross country; minimum GPA
  • Reed: Don Reed Endowed Scholarship Fund: no restrictions
  • Reed: Blake Reed Mac2Mac Scholarship—graduated from McPherson High School and participated in high school football program as a senior and plans to attend McPherson College and participate in the college’s football program; current McPherson College football player with financial need
  • Rock: Kenneth M. Rock Scholarship—upper 25% of their high school class; financial need
  • Rolls-Royce: Rolls-Royce Foundation Scholarship—auto restorations students with demonstrated interest in Rolls-Royce and Bentley cars
  • Royer: Patricia A. .Royer Endowed Scholarship Fund—full-time students; affiliated with COB; majors in fine arts, business, sciences, or teacher education; minimum 3.0 GPA
  • Royer: William D. & Alice Nash Royer Scholarship—biology majors
  • Sahl: Bob Sahl Scholarship—2nd-, 3rd- and 4th-year auto restoration students who demonstrate interest in pre-’16 autos; recommendation from the auto restoration faculty; financial need
  • Sargent: Paul & Rowena Vaniman Sargent Scholarship in Business—priority given to business majors; minimum GPA; financial need; nominated by business faculty
  • Sargent: Paul & Rowena Vaniman Sargent Scholarship in Foreign Language – for majors in any field with a commitment to study abroad for a minimum of one (1) semester
  • Sell: Orlin N. Sell Scholarship—students interested in Christian education, ministry, teaching, or social work
  • Sheller: Arlene Barley Sheller Scholarship—Ivester Church of the Brethren members/friends
  • Shenefelt: Leslie M Shenefelt and Bonnie K Harwick Shenefelt Endowed Scholarship Fund- student majoring in teaching education or health science.
  • Smith: The A. Herbert and Jeanne Jacoby Smith Fund for International Service Learning- Experience inter-disciplinary cultural immersion in a developing part of the world, use their major to serve a need in the country they are in, full time students.
  • Smith- Zane Smith Endowed Scholarship Fund for Business- Business majors, 2.2. GPA minimum.
  • Smith: Delbert L. & Barbara J. Smith Cross Country and Track & Field Scholarship—Student who participates in cross country and/or track and field; financial need
  • Smith: Dwight Smith Scholarship—financial need
  • Smith: Paul E. “Gene” Smith Scholarship—junior; football player who excelled at athletic performance, attitude, sportsmanship, and team play during sophomore year; recommendation from athletic staff
  • Snavely: Paul & Edna Snavely Scholarship—financial need
  • Sneddon: Jack (Super Toe) Sneddon Endowed Scholarship – full time student participating in football, financial need, good character, minimum 3.0 GPA.
  • Sneddon: Jack [Super Toe] Sneddon Scholarship
  • Snell: Dale Snell Scholarship—junior or senior music major; good academic standing
  • Spear: Spear Brothers Scholarship—full-time student enrolled in the Auto Restoration program; financial need
  • Staats: Elmer B. Staats & Margaret Rich Staats Scholarship for Public Service—students seeking career in public service
  • Stahl- Foster “Buzz” Stahl Endowed Scholarship Fund – full time Auto Restoration student, demonstrates service through their involvement in college activities and/or in their community, minimum 3.0 GPA.
  • Strickler: Dale & Velma Strickler Scholarship—junior or senior students interested in social work, business or economics
  • Strickler: Lois Wood Strickler Secondary Teacher Education Scholarship – primary consideration given to students in secondary teacher ed program, students participating in student debt project, and then any student with financial need; minimum 3.0 GPA
  • Sutton: Charlie & Wilma Sutton Scholarship – full-time student; financial need
  • Trinity: Trinity Church of the Brethren Scholarship—students interested in ministry
  • Trostle: Bernice McClellan Trostle Scholarship—priority to history, English, humanities, or social science majors
  • Trostle: Raymond H. Trostle Scholarship—priority to chemistry or history majors
  • Turner/Harris: Turner/Harris Endowed Scholarship—full-time students in automotive restoration, graphic arts, or music programs; minimum 3.0 GPA; preference given to veterans
  • Ullom: Victor and Rosalie Ullom Scholarship—Colorado residents; financial need
  • van Asselt/Higgins: Peggy van Asselt/Pam Higgins Scholarship**—priority to biology/foreign language double majors; financial need may be considered
  • VanGoethem: James & Lori VanGoethem Family Scholarship—full-time student; financial need; minimum GPA
  • Vaniman: Elmer E. Vaniman Scholarship in Music—music students; priority to Church of the Brethren students
  • Voshell: LaVerne M. “Tony” Voshell Athletic Scholarship—students participating in football, basketball, or track
  • Wagoner: Paul and Mery Metzler Wagoner Scholarship – minimum 2.5 GPA
  • Wall: Ernest A. Wall & Eunice Almen Wall & Rollyn E. Wall Scholarship—freshmen students
  • Walton: Rob Walton Scholarship Fund- Automotive Restoration: students participating in the Restoration Technology program.
  • Ward: John Ward & Bonnie Martin Ward Scholarship—resident of McPherson, Kansas; planning to become a teacher; minimum GPA
  • Watkins-Gerhard: Watkins-Gerhard Scholarship—financial need
  • Weaver: Paul & Frances Weaver Scholarship—students pursuing career in Christian ministry; philosophy/religion students
  • Weinblatt- Henry “Hank” Weinblatt and Rita Goudy Weinblatt Endowed Scholarship Fund- students declaring major in automotive restoration, U.S. military serving or family is/was military, minimum 2.9 GPA
  • Will: W. Marvin & Doreen Will Scholarship—two annual scholarships to incoming freshmen majoring in political science, history or both
  • Will: W. Marvin & Doreen Will Scholarship—Internships of field experiences in foreign countries, for the study of history and/or political science
  • Wise: Jacob & Ruth Wise Scholarship—financial need
  • Witmore: Irma Cloe Witmore Scholarship—students of English, journalism, communication, theatre or library science who participate in at least one (1) extra-curricular or volunteer activity on campus each semester
  • Wittig: Randy & Sonya Wittig Scholarship—auto restoration students
  • Wittig: Roger & Rita Wittig Scholarship—auto restoration students
  • Yoder: Dayton & Hazel Yoder Scholarship—Church of the Brethren students with rural/agricultural background; academic achievement, leadership ability
  • York: H. Laverne & Evelyn Herr York Scholarship—student athlete majoring in physical education
  • Ziegler: Paul Ziegler Scholarship—priority given to member of the tennis team; demonstrate compassion, encouragement, and leadership; financial need

** not fully funded

Work Study and Employment

All students may apply for on-campus jobs, but students qualifying for the Federal College Work Study program are given priority. These jobs include clerical assistants, maintenance workers, housekeeping, resident assistants, admissions assistants, athletic event staff, etc.

Off-campus employment is usually available to students. The community of McPherson normally enjoys an unemployment rate far below the national average, and there are many requests for part-time student help. The Career Services Offices posts notices of available positions for both on- and off-campus jobs online at https://www.mcpherson.edu/career/.

Other Sources of Financial Assistance

Veteran’s Benefits may be used to attend McPherson College. For information on eligibility and to obtain application materials, students should contact the Veteran’s Administration by phone at 1-888-442-4551 or online at https://benefits.va.gov/gibill/ .

Local service agencies such as Kiwanis, Rotary, Lions, PEO, AAUW and others often have funding available for qualified students. Inquire with these agencies for scholarship forms.

Other forms of financial aid may also be available. Please contact the Financial Aid Office for further information.

2023|03 Financial Information, Catalog 23-24|

Bachelor’s Degrees

At the baccalaureate level, McPherson College offers the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science. Most majors include a variety of emphases from which to choose as well as licensure programs that qualify students for a career in education. Please see the departmental curricula later in this catalog for complete descriptions of the emphases and licensure available within each major.

Major Requirements

A major consists of no fewer than 32 and no more than 62 semester hours, including all required courses for the major, regardless of prefix. Interdisciplinary and student-designed majors (see guidelines below) are exempt from the 62-hour cap. Not all current majors may be used towards an interdisciplinary or student-designed major. Departmental or program requirements for specific courses, field experiences, or comprehensive tests must be met. Those requirements are specified along with the departmental curricula.

Minor Requirements

A minor typically consists of a minimum of 18 credit hours of study within a particular academic discipline. Minors are available in biology, business administration, chemistry, communication, English, environmental science, environmental stewardship, graphic design, history, mathematics, Spanish, storytelling, peace studies, music, philosophy and religion, psychology, sociology, theatre, transformative entrepreneurship, writing, and visual arts. Requirements for the minors in each of these areas are specified in the departmental sections of this catalog. For the minor to be recognized on the transcript, the student must achieve a minimal GPA of 2.0 in the minor coursework.

Teacher Education Program

The Teacher Education Program at McPherson College focuses on three major levels of licensure. The type of degree earned (BA or BS) mirrors the content area. The following are lists of the levels and the programs:

6-12 Licensure
Biology, Chemistry, English, English for Speakers of Other Languages, History and Government, Mathematics, High-Incidence Special Education, Theatre.

K-6 Licensure
Elementary Education, English for Speakers of Other Languages, High-Incidence Special Education

PK-12 Licensure
Art, Music, Spanish, Sport Studies

 

Bachelor of Arts Degrees

A minimum of one hundred twenty-four (124) academic credit hours are required for the B.A. degree. A Bachelor of Arts degree may be obtained for the following majors:

  • Art and Design
  • Communication
  • Digital Media
  • English
  • History
  • Music
  • Theatre
  • Philosophy and Religion
  • Social Justice and Advocacy
  • Spanish

Students completing one of the above majors who want a Bachelor of Science degree must take eight additional hours in a B.S. major beyond the general education requirements in that area.

Bachelor of Science Degrees

One hundred twenty-four (124) academic credit hours are required for the B.S. degree. A Bachelor of Science degree may be obtained for the following majors:

  • Automotive Restoration Technology
  • Biology
  • Biochemistry
  • Business Administration
  • Chemistry
  • Elementary Education (including Special Education licensure)
  • Environmental Stewardship
  • Health Science
  • Healthcare Management
  • Politics and History
  • Mathematics
  • Psychology
  • Secondary Education (see Teacher Education Program section above for options)
  • Sociology
  • Sport Studies (Health and P.E. licensure available)
  • Sport Management

Students completing one of the above majors who want a Bachelor of Arts degree must take two semesters of a single second human language.

Requirements for a Bachelor’s Degree

  • A minimum of 124 credit hours.
  • Fulfillment of the major program requirements.
  • Fulfillment of general education requirements, or completion of an Associate of Arts or Associate of Science degree at an accredited institution. (Note: Education majors must complete all of the general education requirements, even if they have earned an associate’s degree.)
  • A minimum, overall residential GPA of 2.0.
  • A minimum, residential GPA of 2.0 in the major.
  • A minimum of 32 credit hours completed at McPherson College.
  • 20 of the last 30 or 40 of the last 60 credit hours completed at McPherson College.
  • A minimum of 8 hours of the major completed at McPherson College.
  • The last 60 credit hours completed at a four-year college or university.
  • No more than 64 credit hours from two-year institutions counted toward the degree.
  • At least six hours outside the home department of the major, in addition to the major and general education requirements. (Students with more than one major automatically meet this requirement. Students with a student-designed major must complete at least six hours outside both home departments of the major.)
  • Approval by majority vote at Faculty Meeting.

Interdisciplinary Programs and Student-Designed Major Programs

Interdisciplinary programs and student-designed major programs allow faculty and students to combine courses from two or three departments into one major.

Interdisciplinary Programs

Interdisciplinary programs are typically initiated by faculty.  The following guidelines must be followed:

  • An interdisciplinary major shall consist of a minimum of 44 semester hours and a maximum of 75 semester hours.
  • The program of study shall consist of at least 20 semester hours from two different departments.
  • The instructors supervising the program must come from from the departments providing 20 or more semester hours to the program of study.

When faculty initiate an interdisciplinary major program, two or more instructors from the appropriate departments plan the interdisciplinary concentration and submit the proposal to the Educational Policies Committee following the guidelines available from the registrar’s office. Examples of faculty initiated interdisciplinary majors are Environmental Stewardship, Health Science and Digital Media.

Student-Designed Major Programs

Student-Designed Major programs are initiated by the student.

The following guidelines must be followed:

  • The student must complete the Student Designed Major form available in the registrar’s office or on Bulldog Connect.
  • An interdisciplinary major shall consist of a minimum of 44 semester hours and a maximum of 75 semester hours.
  • The program of study shall consist of at least 20 semester hours from two different departments.
  • The instructors supervising the program must come from the departments providing 20 or more semester hours to the program of study.
  • The student should strive for a balance of 18 credits at 300 level, with a minimum of one 400 level course.
  • The program must be approved by the Educational Policies Committee no later than the second semester of the junior year.

A student may, in consultation with faculty advisors, propose a previously unestablished student-designed major. The chairs of each department represented in the program must approve the proposal. The proposal is submitted to the Educational Policies Committee (EPC) according to the guidelines. The student and a faculty advisor must present the proposal to EPC in person to explain and defend its academic integrity.

The following are examples of student-designed majors that have been approved by Educational Policies Committee and completed by recent graduates of McPherson College. They are listed here to illustrate the possibilities students may explore.

  • Family Life and Human Development
  • Pre-Nursing and Human Behavior
  • Bioethics/International Studies/Political Science
  • Psychology and Music

2023|04 Degree Programs, Catalog 23-24|

Teacher Education Course Descriptions

(Course numbers listed in parentheses after McPherson College numbers are KICA course numbers.)

CI 101 (SPED 320) Beginning American Sign Language

2 hours
The purpose of this course is to learn the basics of sign language. It will provide the student with an opportunity to express and receive signed communication. (Fall and Spring)

G-CI 150 Introduction to Education

3 hours
This course provides an overview of the historical role of schools in our society, the current governance and finance structures, and the challenges schools face in this new century. It also addresses planning for a career in professional education, and becoming a successful teacher.(Fall and Spring)

CI 202 (SPED 322) Intermediate American Sign Language

2 hours
The purpose of this course is to increase conversational sign language and to introduce interpreting skills. It will provide the student with an opportunity to increase his/her ability to express and receive signed communication, expand his/ her vocabulary, and improve his/her fluency in signing.(Spring)

CI 220 Principles and Strategies of Teaching

3 hours
A general methods class required of all education students. This course must be taken before or concurrent with other EE or CI courses. If taking concurrent, must have permission from the instructor. The class provides an introduction to teaching, including defining the teaching act, developing classroom communities, classroom management, assessment and evaluation, models of teaching, integration of technology, and professional responsibilities. Pre-requisite/co-requisite: G-CI 150 with grade C or better. (Fall and Spring) A minimum grade of C in CI 220 is required as a prerequisite for ALL 300 & 400 level CI, EE or SE courses except G-CI 333.

CI 232 Educational Technology

2 hours
Educational Technology is designed to ensure that teacher education candidates understand the function of technology in schools and society, exhibit skills using instructional tools and technology to gather, analyze, and present information, improve instructional practices, facilitate professional productivity and communication, and help all students use instructional technology effectively. Pre-requisite/co-requisite: CI 220. (Fall and Spring)

G-CI 251 Introduction to Education Practicum

1 hour
This practicum is conducted in the Wichita Public Schools or another urban district. It must be completed before enrolling for EE375 or CI 351. Students are required to spend 30 contact hours in a classroom. This class is offered every semester; however, a block of time must be established to ensure a worthwhile and quality experience. Students will maintain a reflective journal with emphasis on recording observations of teaching and learning, management techniques, the diversity of the student population, and the use of technology. Prerequisite: G-CI 150 and consent of the Director of Field Experiences. To facilitate timely and efficient placements in area schools, the enrollment for this course will close on December 1. (Interterm; Fall or Spring by education department approval only) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense. Candidates are responsible for their own transportation.

CI 310 Topics in Education

2 hours
This course explores one topic relevant to education. As a general rule, students get to more deeply engage in a particular teaching strategy. Possible topics include (but are not limited to) cooperative learning, quantum learning, brain-based education, project-based learning, classroom management, education in the news, and teachers as portrayed in popular media. Prerequisite: G-CI 150 Introduction to Education or instructor’s consent. (Interterm)

CI 315 Reading in the Content Field

2 hours
This course provides students seeking licensure at the PK-12 and 6-12 level the strategies necessary for reading to learn. The strategies learned are appropriate for all content areas and all learners. Future educators will learn how to plan instruction based upon the knowledge of all students, community, subject matter, curriculum outcomes, and current methods of teaching reading. Prerequisite: CI 220. (Fall)

G-CI 333 Intercultural Education 

2 hours
A study of our diverse society and how it pertains to education and the educational setting. Students electing to participate in the related field study that adequately depicts intercultural relations in an educational setting must also enroll in CI 495 Field Experience in Education. Prerequisite: CI 220. (Fall and Spring)

CI 351 Secondary Education Practicum & Seminar

1-2 hours
A field experience and seminar for those seeking licensure at the secondary or PK-12 level. This course is offered for variable hour credit depending on the student’s past experience(s) and licensure area(s). Student should consult with her/his advisor and the chair of the Department of Curriculum & Instruction for appropriate registration. This practicum must occur between CI 251 and CI 475. It is recommended that students seeking license at the 6-12 level take this class in conjunction with the appropriate content methods class. Prerequisites: CI 220. Full acceptance to the Teacher Education Program required. If possible, concurrent with CI 455. Enrollment Deadlines–Fall: In order to facilitate efficient and timely placements at area schools, enrollment for this course will close May 1. Interterm: In order to facilitate efficient and timely placements at area schools, enrollment for this course will close December 1. Spring: In order to facilitate efficient and timely placements at area schools, enrollment for this course will close the first day of interterm.  (Fall and Spring) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

CI 370/MU 370 Methods for Teaching Instrumental Music

3 hours, by consent of Instructor
This course provides an overview of and practical applications in the basic technical aspects of organizing, administrating, teaching, and conducting instrumental ensembles at the public school level. This course is designed for music majors seeking music licensure. (Spring, even years)

CI 371/MU 371 Methods for Teaching Choral Music

3 hours, by consent of Instructor
Materials and procedures for teaching vocal music in grades 7-12. Emphasis is placed on voice production, choral literature and rehearsal, diction, and administration of the classroom. This course is designed for students seeking music licensure. (Spring, odd years)

CI 372/MU 372 Methods for Teaching General Music

3 hours, by consent of Instructor
Materials and procedures for teaching general music in grades PreK-6. Emphasis is placed on understanding the basic concepts of music as they relate to specific age levels, as well as studying the major approaches to music education. Proper vocal technique for young students and the teaching of music fundamentals is covered as well. This course is designed for music majors seeking music licensure. (Fall, odd years)

CI 401/AR 401 Methods for Teaching Art in the Secondary School

2 hours
This is a comprehensive study of secondary art curricula and instructional methods relevant to today’s art educator in the public schools. Discussions will address a multitude of current trends, issues, and “hot” topics on the national scene, including the National Art Standards. Considerable time and effort will be spent on writing and developing art curricula around the four content areas of art production, art history, art criticism, and aesthetics. Preparing and delivering a micro-teaching experience at McPherson High School is also a component of this course. Prerequisite: CI 220. (Spring)

CI 404 Methods for Teaching Modern Language

3 hours
This course is designed to prepare the prospective second language teacher for successful teaching at the PK-12 level. It provides theories of second language acquisition and second language teaching methods. Includes planning strategies, measurement/evaluations, test item construction, effective discipline, inclusionary practices, and technology media. Students become familiar with professional organizations and their publication/resources. In microteaching, including group and self-evaluation, students demonstrate current second language methodology. Prerequisite: CI 220. (As needed)

CI 406 (ED 406) Methods for Teaching Natural Science in the Secondary School

3 hours
This course is designed to provide the prospective teacher with knowledge and skill for teaching the natural sciences at the secondary level (grades 6-12). Content includes curriculum selection and design, safe laboratory management and operation, integration of curriculum, inclusionary practices, methods and modalities of teaching, assessment, classroom application of various forms of technology, and professional organizations. Microteaching, classroom observation and group and self-evaluation are included. Prerequisite: CI 220. (Spring. Offered through KICA. Course meets in person.)

CI 407 (ED 467) Methods for Teaching Mathematics in the Secondary School

3 hours
This course is designed to provide the prospective secondary level (grades 6-12) mathematics teacher the methods of teaching contemporary mathematics content. Topics include methods of presentation, awareness of national mathematics organizations, the writing of unit/daily lesson plans, microteaching of a math lesson, selecting materials, techniques of assessment, inclusionary practices, classroom application of various forms of technology, and techniques of assessment. Prerequisite: CI 220. (Spring. Offered through KICA. Course meets in person.)

CI 408 (ED 440) Methods for Teaching Social and Behavioral Science in the Secondary School

3 hours
This course is designed to prepare students for successful teaching at the secondary level (grades 6-12) in both the social and behavioral sciences. Emphasis is placed on different approaches and practices of instruction planning and classroom management, selection and classroom application of various forms of technology, evaluation and questioning techniques, state assessments, research methods, professional organizations and the inclusive classroom. Prerequisite: CI 220. (Spring. Offered through KICA. Course meets in person.)

CI 410/PE 410 Methods for Teaching Physical Education and Health in the Secondary Schools

4 hours
A study of various teaching techniques and analysis of fundamental skills of physical education activities in the secondary school setting. The course offers an opportunity to explore various teaching techniques in individual, dual, and team activities in the field of physical education and health for the secondary schools. Additionally, this course has been designed to integrate theory and conceptual learning with practical laboratory experiences. Creating an inclusive gym/classroom as well as adaptive PE are included. Prerequisites: PE 110, PE 160, PE 161, G-CI 150, G-CI 251, CI 220. (Interterm)

CI 416 (ED 416) Methods for Teaching Speech and Theatre in the Secondary School

3 hours
This course requires students to apply speech and drama content to the techniques needed for effective secondary level (grades 6-12) classroom teaching. Opportunities are provided for students to exercise their teaching skills in the areas of unit plans, daily lesson plans, teaching strategies, evaluation, assessment, classroom management, inclusion and different learning styles. Discussions of resource allocation, safety, classroom application of various forms of technology, and professional organizations are also included. Each student is encouraged to develop his/her personal philosophy of education and incorporate it in relation to integrity/ethics in the classroom and personal evaluation to maintain a sense of balance and growth. Prerequisite: CI 220. (As needed)

CI 417 (ED 415) Methods for Teaching English and Language Arts in the Secondary School

3 hours
This course is designed to assist student teachers in becoming confident, effective professional educators in secondary level English (grades 6-12). Students will become familiar with a variety of specific methods to use in teaching literature, composition, and language. Among topics to be considered will be current trends in English curriculum development, the six-trait writing process, inclusionary practices, classroom organization, assessment, classroom application of various forms of technology, and professional organizations. Each student will develop a unit of instruction suitable for a secondary level classroom. Prerequisite: CI 220. (Spring. Offered through KICA. Course meets in person.)

CI 428 Methods for Teaching English as a Second Language in the Elementary & Secondary School

3 hours
This course is designed to prepare students to teach English to non-native speakers at either the K-6 level or the 6-12 level. Students will be exposed to teaching techniques, lesson and unit planning, and language assessment. Cultural issues will also be explored. Prerequisite: CI 220. (Fall. Offered concurrently with CI628 ESOL Methods.)

CI 455 The Teaching-Learning Process

3 hours (Language Intensive)
A comprehensive course that deals primarily with the learner, the learning process, and the learning situation. Examines the role of the teacher in relationship to each of these. This class should be taken the semester before student teaching. Prerequisite: CI 220. If possible, concurrent with junior practicum  – EE 375 or CI 351. (Fall and Spring)

CI 475 Student Teaching in the Secondary School

6 or 12 hours
Student Teaching in the Secondary School at McPherson College is a capstone experience allowing students to practice the skills and talents necessary to become effective educators. McPherson College offers student teaching at the appropriate level for all licensure purposes. Student teaching occurs after students have fulfilled all the necessary requirements as outlined in the Advisor/Advisee Handbook. The student teaching experience is scheduled for a full semester, but a minimum of 14 consecutive weeks. Placement and hours may depend on the area(s) of licensure. Students enrolled in this course must have completed the student teaching application process and be concurrently enrolled in CI 476. (Fall and Spring) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

CI 476 Professional Seminar in Education

2 hours
This is a capstone seminar for teaching candidates allowing an interactive opportunity to reflect upon and share their insight, expertise, and commitment to professional education. Must be taken in conjunction with CI 475 and/or EE 465. (Fall and Spring)

CI 495/295 Field Experiences in Education

1-4 hours
An elective laboratory oriented field experience that the student elects to take, or is assigned to, in an educational setting that is designed to enrich their understanding of the profession of education. This experience may or may not be tied to requirements in another course within the department or college. Involvement may be in an educational related role or with an approved experience anywhere in the world. Arrangements must be made in advance. (Fall/Interterm/Spring. By Permission Only.) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

G-EE 210 Children’s Literature

3 hours
In this course students use the language arts of reading, writing, listening, and speaking to explore the historical development of children’s literature in English from its origins through the contemporary period, with an emphasis on contemporary works. While exploring how children’s literature artfully structures people’s experiences, values, and cultures, students will learn the elements of children’s literature, different genres, and current issues pertaining to children’s literature.  For elementary education majors, the knowledge and appreciation of children’s literature developed in the course will serve as foundational knowledge for the Reading/Language Arts methods courses. Prerequisite: Sophomore status or consent of instructor. (Spring)

EE 230 Methods for Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary School I

3 hours
This course provides the knowledge base for future elementary teachers to know, understand, and use major concepts, procedures, and reasoning processes of mathematics that define numbers and operations, geometry, measurement, data analysis and probability, and algebra so that all students understand relationships that can represent phenomena, solve problems, and manage data. This course focuses on assessment and evaluation and teaching strategies for grades K-2. Prerequisite: CI 220. (Fall)

EE 301/AR 358 Methods for Teaching Art in the Elementary School

1 or 4 hours (1 hour for ELED majors, 4 hours for Art majors)
This course is a comprehensive study of elementary art curricula and methods relevant to today’s educator in the public schools. Topics to be covered include: current techniques and materials, issues in art, basic design concepts, the developmental states of children in an art program, and curriculum implementation. (Fall)

EE 303 Reading and Language Arts I

4 hours 
This course delivers the knowledge base for understanding and using concepts from emerging literacy, science of reading, language, and child development to teach reading, writing, speaking, viewing, listening, and thinking skills and to help all students successfully apply their developing literacy skills to many different situation, materials, and ideas. This course focuses on literacy assessment and evaluation and methods for teaching K-3 grade levels. (Fall) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

EE 304 Methods for Teaching Music in the Elementary School

1 hour
This course is for elementary education majors. The emphasis is placed on methods for teaching elementary school children and the integration of music into the elementary school curriculum. Prerequisite: CI 220.(Fall)

EE 305/PE 409 Methods for Teaching Physical Education and Health in the Elementary School

2 hours (2 hours for ELED majors, 4 hours for PE majors)
This course is designed to introduce prospective elementary school health, physical education and classroom teachers to the fundamentals, principles, and practices of physical education at the elementary school level. Movement exploration and methods will be stressed in the variety of play activities introduced. Additionally, this course has been designed to integrate theory and concept learning with practical laboratory experiences. Prerequisites: CI 220. (Spring)

EE 306 Methods for Teaching Science in the Elementary School

3 hours
This course provides the knowledge base for future elementary teachers to understand and use fundamental concepts in science (including physical, life, and earth and space) as well as concepts in science and technology, science in personal social perspective, the history and nature of science, the unifying concepts of science, and the inquiry process scientists use in discovery of new knowledge to build a base for scientific and technological literacy for all students. Prerequisite: CI 220. (Fall) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

EE 307 Methods for Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary School II

3 hours
This course provides the knowledge base for future elementary teachers to know, understand, and use the major concepts, procedures, and reasoning processes of mathematics that define numbers and operations, geometry, measurement, data analysis and probability, and algebra so that all students understand relationships that can represent phenomena, solve problems, and manage data. This course focuses on assessment and evaluation and teaching strategies for grades 3-6.  Prerequisite: CI 220 and EE 230. (Spring) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

EE 309 Methods for Teaching Social Studies in the Elementary School

3 hours
A class designed for equipping elementary pre-service teachers with skills, strategies, and major concepts germane to the six social studies literacies: history, geography, socio-politics, citizenship, economics, and culture. This course includes a field experience. Prerequisite: CI 220. (Spring) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

EE 375 Elementary Education Practicum & Seminar

1-2 hours
A field experience and seminar for those seeking licensure in elementary education at the K-6 level and those seeking licensure in art, physical education, and Spanish at the PK-12 level. This course is offered for variable hour credit depending on student’s past experience(s) and licensure area(s). Student should consult with her/his advisor and the Chair of Teacher Education Program for appropriate registration. This practicum must occur between CI 251 and EE 465. Prerequisites: CI 220. Full acceptance to Teacher Education Program required. (Fall and Spring; Interterm by education department permission only) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

EE 444 Reading/Language Arts II

3 hours (Language Intensive)
This course provides a structure for providing future elementary teachers an opportunity to use concepts from emerging literacy, science of reading, language, and child development to teach reading, writing, speaking, viewing, listening, and thinking skills and to help all students successfully apply their developing literacy skills to many different situation, materials, and ideas. This course focuses on assessment and evaluation and teaching strategies for grades 4-6. This course includes a field experience. Prerequisites: EE 303 and CI 220 (Spring) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

EE 465 Student Teaching in the Elementary School

6 or 12 hours
Student Teaching in the Elementary School at McPherson College is a capstone experience allowing students to practice the skills and talents necessary to become effective educators. McPherson College offers student teaching at the appropriate level for all licensure purposes. Student teaching occurs after students have fulfilled all the necessary requirements as outlined in the Advisor/Advisee Handbook. The student teaching experience is scheduled for a full semester, a minimum of 14 consecutive weeks. Placement and hours may depend on the area(s) of licensure. Students enrolled in this course must have completed the student teaching application process and be concurrently enrolled in CI 476. (Fall and Spring) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

SE 210 Introduction to Infants, Children, and Youth with Special Needs

3 hours
This class is a survey of federal and state mandates for special education, including an overview of categorical exceptionalities delineated in the laws; service delivery systems; advocacy groups; the concept of natural environments and least restrictive environments; and the purpose and function of the IFSP and IEP. The class, which is required for all students seeking licensure in education, is designed to introduce all pre-service teachers to mild and moderate disabilities. The course also serves as a foundation for additional special education coursework. This course is a prerequisite for other special education courses. (Fall and Spring)

SE 220 Field Experience in Services for Students with Special Needs

1 hour
An early field placement for directed observation of special education teachers working with elementary- or secondary-level students with mild/moderate disabilities. (Fall, Interterm, Spring, and Summer) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

SE 310 Foundations for Special Education Services

4 hours
This course addresses historical perspectives and current practices (Module A), laws, regulations, and policies governing practice (Module B), and affects of individual differences, language, and culture on educational performance (Module C). The course includes a supervised field experience (Module D). Concurrent: Modules A-D. (Fall & Spring)

SE 315: General Methods for Special Education Services

4 hours
This course addresses assessments used for eligibility, placement and curricular decisions (Module A), the special education process from pre-identification through individual program implementation (Module B), and effective collaboration and communication skills with diverse learners, families, colleagues, and community stakeholders (Module C). The course includes a supervised field experience (Module D). Concurrent: Modules A-D Prerequisite: SPED 310 (Fall & Spring)

SE 321 Grades K-6 Methods for Special Needs and Field Experience

5 hours
This course addresses IEP implementation using evidence-based practices. Emphasis is on collaborative teaching models. Topics of study include lesson planning, basic skill and content area instruction, adapting methods and materials, positive behavior supports, and progress monitoring. SPED 331: Grades K-6 Field Experience must be taken concurrently. Prerequisites: SPED 310 & 315. (Fall & Spring)

SE 341 Grades PreK-3 Methods and Field Experience

5 hours
Grades PreK-3 Methods, addresses strategies to individual and group needs using evidence-based practices. Topics of study include learning plans, embedded instruction within a tiered framework, setting up the environment, adapting methods and materials, positive behavior supports, and progress monitoring. SPED 351, Grades PreK-3 Field Experience, must be taken concurrently. SPED 341 will involve 15 to 20 contact hours including 10 hours reading/pre-literacy and writing/pre-writing interventions with 1 child.

SE 345 Behavior Management

2 hours
This course addresses culturally sensitive methods for preventing and intervening with problem behavior. Topics include school-wide discipline systems, classroom management, social skills instruction, student support meetings (Module A) and functional analysis, non-aversive intervention, and behavior intervention plans (Module B). (Fall & Spring)

SE 361 Grades 6-12 Methods for Special Needs and Field Experience

5 hours
This course addresses IEP implementation, including transition components. Emphasis is on self-determination, self-advocacy, career awareness, and post- school options in specific outcome areas. Topics of study include curriculum standards, lesson planning, basic skills instruction, learning strategies, adapting methods, materials and assessments, positive behavior supports, and progress monitoring. SPED 371: Grades 6-12 Field Experience must be taken concurrently. Prerequisites: SPED 310 & 315. (Fall)

SE 381 Grades 4-12 Methods and Field Experience

5 hours
The SPED 381 course covers both general and specific methods used by special educators to teach students with disabilities. The course includes transition planning and IEP development, instructional planning, and selection of instructional methods to meet the needs of students with adaptive special education needs. Approaches for selecting methods and materials, for delivering instruction, and for evaluating instructional outcomes based on assessment information will also be demonstrated. (Spring)

SE 431 Grades K-6 Clinical Experience (Student Teaching)

6 hours
This course is a supervised teaching experience with a special educator who provides services for elementary level students with adaptive learning needs. The preservice teacher will work collaboratively with the cooperating special educator, families, and school team members to apply research-based knowledge of assessment, instruction aligned to IEP goals, and positive behavioral supports. Emphasis is on reflective, culturally sensitive practice. Prerequisites: SPED 210, 310, 315, 345, and 321 or 331. Concurrent or subsequent semester: SPED 499. (Fall, Spring & Summer) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

SE 433 Grades K-6 Internship

4-6 hours
This course is a supervised teaching experience with an on-site mentor who provides or supervises services for elementary level students with adaptive learning needs. Emphasis is on application of research-based content knowledge and pedagogy and reflective, culturally sensitive practice. This internship is designed for practicing teachers adding grades K-6 adaptive licensure or for students who have completed a special education clinical experience. Prerequisites: SPED 210, 310, 315, 345, and 321 or 331. Concurrent or subsequent semester: SPED 499. (Fall, Spring & Summer) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

SE 451 Grades PreK-12 Clinical Experience

5 hours
This course is a supervised teaching experience with a special educator who provides services for any of the grades PreK–12 level students with adaptive learning needs.  The pre-service teacher will work collaboratively with the cooperating special educator, families, and school team members to apply research-based knowledge of assessment, instruction aligned to IEP goals, and positive behavioral supports.  Emphasis is on reflective, culturally sensitive practice.  Prerequisites: SPED 310, 315, 345, 341, 351, 361, and 371.  Concurrent or subsequent semester: SPED 499. (Fall, Spring & Summer) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

SE 453 Grades PreK-12 Internship

5 hours
This course is a supervised teaching experience working with an on-site mentor and/or evaluator. Emphasis is on application of research-based content knowledge and pedagogy and reflective, culturally sensitive practice. This internship is designed for the student hired on a waiver teaching in his/her own classroom. The intern will apply knowledge from all coursework and learning experiences to appropriately adapt and modify learning; manage students and classroom environment being culturally-sensitive to student and family differences;  align and implement learning with IEP goals; assess learning; develop and implement academic and behavior intervention plans based on assessments and best practices; develop a case study/IEP,  plan, implement, and evaluate lessons; plan and implement appropriate transitions, education and services for the specified grade level (PreK-12)/ages of students; and practice systematic self-evaluation.  Prerequisites: SPED 310, 315, 345, 341, 351, 361, and 371.  Concurrent or subsequent semester: SPED 499. (Fall, Spring & Summer) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

SE 471 Grades 6-12 Clinical Experience (Student Teaching)

6 hours
This course is a supervised teaching experience with a special educator who provides services for secondary level students with adaptive learning needs. The pre-service teacher will work collaboratively with the cooperating special educator, families, and school team members to apply research-based knowledge of assessment, instruction aligned to IEP goals, and positive behavioral supports. Emphasis is on reflective, culturally sensitive practice. Prerequisites: SPED 210, 310, 315, 345, and 361 or 371 Concurrent or subsequent semester: SPED 499. (Fall, Spring & Summer) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

SE 473 Grades 6-12 Internship

4-6 hours
This course is a supervised teaching experience with an on-site mentor who provides or supervises services for secondary level students with adaptive learning needs. Emphasis is on application of research-based content knowledge and pedagogy and reflective, culturally sensitive practice. This internship is designed for practicing teachers adding grades 6-12 adaptive licensure or for students who have completed a special education clinical experience. Prerequisites: SPED 210, 310, 315, 345, and 361 or 371. Concurrent or subsequent semester: SPED 499. (Fall, Spring & Summer) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

SE 499 Capstone Issues

1 hour
This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to reflect on their clinical experience or internship and professional role with peers, ACCK faculty, and special educators. Topics of discussion include professionalism, ethical issues, advocacy, diversity, and resources. Prerequisites: SPED 210, 310, 315, 345, 321 & 331 or 361 & 371. Concurrent or previous semester: SPED 431 or SPED 471 (or comparable Internship). (Fall, Spring & Summer)

SE 349 Communication Development and Communication Disorders

3 hours
This class offers a survey of normal and atypical language development, assessment, bilingual education, contributions of the educator to overcoming language problems, and the relationships between oral language and reading and writing. There are no prerequisites for this course. (Interterm and Summer)

SE 380/678 Topics in Special Education:

1 hour
This course will focus on bringing the students up to date on current methods, changes In the field of special education, and new information related to the characteristics of children and youth with special needs. With consent of advisor.

Special Course Options
295/495 Field Experience (1-4 hours)
297  Study Abroad (12-16 hours)
299/499 Independent Study (1-4 hours)
388 Career Connections (3-10 hours)
445 Readings and Research (1-4 hours)

 

2023|Catalog 23-24, Curriculum & Instruction|

Personnel List

President of McPherson College

Michael P. Schneider, Ed.D., McPherson, Kansas

Faculty

Photo directory of current Faculty

Edward Barr, B.A., B.S., M.A. (2010)
Associate Professor of Technology (2016)
B.A., University of the South; B.S., McPherson College; M.A., University of Kansas.

Becki Bowman, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (2006)
Professor of Communication (2018)
B.A., McPherson College; M.A., Wichita State University; Ph.D., Kent State University.

Jd. Bowman, B.A., M.A., M.F.A. (2005)
Professor of Theatre (2018)
B.A., McPherson College; M.A., M.F.A., Kent State University.

Mary Gere Bridger, B.S., B.A., M.S. (2017)
Instructor in English (2022)
B.S., Southwestern, B.A., M.A, Fort Hays State University

Lindsey Burgey, B.A., M.B.A., M.Ed. (2022)
Visiting Assistant Professor of Business
B.A., M.B.A., Kansas Wesleyan University, M.Ed. Fort Hayes State University

Luke Chennell, A.T., B.A., M.A. (2003-2011; 2015)
Associate Professor of Technology (2019)
A.T., B.A., McPherson College; M.A., Wichita State University.

Ku-Sup Chin, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (2003)
Professor of Behavioral Science: Sociology (2020)
B.A., Korea University; M.A., Ph.D., University of California-Irvine.

Christopher Clark, B.S., B.S. (2016)
Assistant Professor of Technology
B.S., MidAmerica Nazarene University; B.S., McPherson College.

April Counts, B.S., M.A.Ed. (2017)
Associate Professor of Education (2023)
B.S., University of Central Missouri; M.A.Ed., Baker University; ESOL Endorsement.

Amber Dittert, B.A., M.S. (2016)
Assistant Professor of Mathematics (2017)
B.A., St. Mary’s University; M.S., Texas Tech University.

Kerry Dobbins, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (2010)
Associate Professor of History (2016)
B.A., Skidmore College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Michael Dudley, B.S., B.S., M.S. (2014)
Associate Professor of Technology (2020)
B.S., University of Nebraska-Lincoln; B.S., McPherson College;
M.S., Pittsburg State University.

Dee Erway-Sherwood, B.F.A., M.F.A. (2003)
Professor  of Art (2016)
Executive Director of Visual & Digital Arts (2017)
B.F.A., M.F.A., Fort Hays State University.

Jonathan Frye, B.S., M.S., Ph.D. (1993)
Professor of Natural Science (2011)
B.S., Lebanon Valley College; M.S., Ph.D., University of Virginia.

Timothy Frye, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (2020)
Assistant Professor of Mathematics
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Oklahoma-Norman.

Jamie Fuqua, B.S., D.P.T. (2021)
Instructor of Health Science
B.S., McPherson College; D.P.T., Rockhurst University

Frank Gersich, B.S B.A., M.S., Ed.D (2022)
Professor of Business
B.S,.B.A., M.S., University of North Dakota; Ed.D., Northern Illinois University.

Rodney Gieselman, B.S., M.B.A. (2003)
Professor of Business (2016)
B.S., University of Nebraska-Kearney; M.B.A., Bellarmine University.

Lindsey Godfrey, B.S., M.B.A. (2017)
Associate Professor of Business (2023)
B.S., McPherson College; M.B.A., Columbia Southern University.

Curtis Goodwin, A.S., B.S., M.S. (2014)
Associate Professor of Technology
A.S., Colby Community College;, B.S., M.S., Pittsburg State University.

Kelsy Gossett Dennis, A.S., B.A., M.F.A. (2019)
Assistant Professor of Photography, Art & Design
A.S., Pratt Community College; Diploma, Hallmark Institute of Photography;
B.A., M.F.A., Wichita State University.

Garrick Green, A.T., B.A., M.S. (2001)
Professor of Technology (2019)
A.T., B.A., McPherson College; M.S., Pittsburg State University.

Michaela Groeblacher, B.A., M.F.A. (2014)
Associate Professor of Art (2020)
B.A., McPherson College ; M.F.A., Fort Hays State University.

Norman Hope, B.S., M.B.A., Ph.D. (1982-1991; 2020)
Professor of Business (2023)
B..S., Manchester University; M.B.A., Emporia State University; Ph.D., Kansas State University.

Kyle Hopkins, B.A., B.M.E., M.M. (2013)
Associate Professor of Music and Director of Bands
B.A., University of Kansas; B.M.E., Washburn University; M.M., Kansas State University.

Stephen Hoyer, B.A., M.S.Ed., Ph.D. (2016)
Assistant Professor of Behavioral Science: Psychology 
B.S., M.S.Ed., University of Nebraska-Kearney; Ph.D., Oklahoma State University.

Min Jung Kim, B.S., M.Ed., Ph.D (2022)
Assistant Professor of Sport Management
B.S., School of Foreign Languages Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China
M.Ed., Springfield College, Ph.D. University of New Mexico

Shane Kirchner, B.A., M.Ed., Ph.D. (2004)
Professor of Education (2018)
Director of M.Ed. Program (2015)

B.A., McPherson College; M.Ed., Wichita State University;
ESL Licensure, Emporia State University; Ph.D., Kansas State University.

Elliot Koester, B.S., M.P.H. (2022)
Assistant Professor of Healthcare Management and Rural Health Outreach Representative
B.S., Southwestern College, M.P.H. North Dakota State University

Manjula Koralegedara, B.S., M.S., Ph.D. (2010)
Associate Professor of Chemistry (2016)
B.S., University of Peradeniya, Sri Lanka; M.S., Ph.D., Wichita State University.

Julia Largent Kuttler, B.S., M.A., Ph.D. (2017)
Associate Professor of Communication (2023)
B.S., Manchester University; M.A., Ball State University; Ph.D., Bowling Green State University.

Kirk MacGregor, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. (2016)
Associate Professor of Philosophy & Religion (2019)
A.B., Miami University; M.A., Biola University; Ph.D., University of Iowa.

Ami Martinez, B.A., M.Ed. (2012)
Associate Professor of English (2020)
B.A., M.Ed., Wichita State University.

Ruth Mbah, B.S., M.B.A., Ph.D. (2023)
Assistant Professor of Business
B.S., University of Buea; M.B.A., Amity University; Ph.D., Southern University and A&M College

Austin McCulloch, B.S., M.S., Ph.D. (2021)
Assistant Professor of Sports Science
B.S., Tarleton State University; M.S., Ph.D., Tarleton State University

Lorena Medrano, B.A., M.S., M.S., M.A. (2013)
Associate Professor of Spanish (2019)
B.A., Universidad Rafael Urdaneta; M.S., Universidad del Zulia; M.S., M.A., University of Missouri-Columbia.

Anna Michelson, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., (2022)
Assistant Professor of Sociology
B.A., Macalester College, M.A., Ph.D. Northwestern University

Bryan D. Midgley, B.S., M.A., Ph.D. (2000)
Professor of Behavioral Science: Psychology (2019)
B.S., Eastern Michigan University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Kansas.

Katharine O’Connor, B.S., M.O.T (2022)
Assistant Professor of Health Science
B.S., Kansas State University, B.S., M.O.T. University of Kansas

Christopher Paulsen, A.T., B.S., M.S. (2004)
Associate Professor of Technology (2018)
A.T., B.S., McPherson College; M.S., Pittsburg State University.

Jennifer Pollard, B.A., M.A. (2018)
Visiting Assistant Professor of Theatre
B.A., McPherson College; M.A., Michigan State University.

Nathan Pollard, B.A. (2016)
Associate Professor of Digital Media (2023)
B.A., Ravensbourne College-U.K.; BTEC National Diploma in Graphic Design, Plymouth College-U.K.

Keiran President, B.S., M.B.A., (2021)
Guest Lecturer – Marketing and International Business
B.S., Ottawa University; M.B.A., William Woods University.

Karrie Rathbone, B.S., M.S., Ph.D. (2003-2006; 2019)
Associate Professor of Biology (2019)
B.S., M.S., Emporia State University; Ph.D., Kansas State University.

Ricardo Rodriguez, B.S., B.S., M.S., Ph.D. (2018)
Assistant Professor of Physics
B.S., B.S., University of Los Andes-Bogota, Colombia; M.S., Ph.D., Iowa State University.

Duke Rogers, A.S., B.A., M.B.A. M.M.M.I.S., Ph.D. (2023)
Associate Professor of Business
A.S., B.A., Friends University; M.B.A., M.M.I.S., Friends University, Ph.D., Walden University.

Vicki Schmidt, A.A.S., B.S., M.S. (2015)
Assistant Professor of Education
A.A.S., Kansas State University; B.S., Fort Hays State University; M.S., Baker University.

Kerri Snell, B.A., M.F.A. (2016)
Assistant Professor of English
B.A., McPherson College; M.F.A., Ashland University.

Kimberly Diane Stanley, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (1988)
Professor of English (1997)
B.A., Trinity University; M.A., St. John’s College at Santa Fe; Ph.D., University of Texas.

Cory Unruh, B.S., M.S., (2023)
Assistant Professor of Technology
B.S., M.S., Pittsburg State University.

Allan van Asselt, B.S., Ph.D. (2000)
Professor of Chemistry
B.A., McPherson College; Ph.D., California Institute of Technology.

Kara Voss, B.S., M.Ed. (2019)
Assistant Professor of Sport Studies (2022)
Adjunct Professor (2019)
B.S., Minnesota State University, M.Ed., McPherson College

Andrew Voth, B.A., M.M., D.M.A, (2023)
Assistant Professor of Music
B.A., Bethel College, M.M., D.M.A, University of Wisconsin

Dustin Wilgers, B.S., M.S., Ph.D. (2011)
Professor of Biology (2023)
B.S., Southwestern College; M.S., Kansas State University; Ph.D., University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

Amanda Yamasaki, B.A., M.S., Ph.D. (2021)
Assistant Professor of Biology, Director of Undergraduate Research
B.A., Princeton University; M.S., Roosevelt University, Ph.D., University of Notre Dame.

Kenneth Yohn, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (1999)
Professor of History (2005)
B.A., Manchester College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Iowa.

Special Education Faculty (KICA)

Lynette Cross, B.S., M.S. (2018)
Instructor of Special Education
B.S., Tabor College; M.S., Wichita State University.

Beverly Schottler, B.S., M.S., Ed.D. (2005)
Program Director; Instructor of Special Education
B.S., M.S., Fort Hays State University; Ed.D., Kansas State University.

Faculty Emeriti

Bruce Clary, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (1983)
Vice President for Academic Affairs (2014)
Professor of English (2014); Maurice Hess Chair in English (2000)
B.A., McPherson College; M.A., Wichita State University; Ph.D., Kansas State University.

Wayne A. Conyers, B.A., M.A., M.F.A. (1983)
Professor Emeritus of Art (2018)
B.A., Bethany College; M.A., University of Missouri-Kansas City; M.F.A., Fort Hays State University.

Doris E. Coppock, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. (1950)
Professor Emerita of Health, Physical Education and Recreation (1992)
A.B., McPherson College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Iowa.

Alfred Dutrow, B.S., M.S. (1973)
Professor Emeritus of Agriculture (2009)
B.S., McPherson College; M.S., Michigan State University.

Dale C. Goldsmith, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. (1969)
Professor Emeritus of Philosophy and Religion (2017)
A.B., Princeton University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago.

Bob R. Green, A.A., B.A., M.A. (1967)
Professor Emeritus of English (1993)
A.A., Central College; B.A., Seattle Pacific University; M.A., Emporia State University.

Steven C. Gustafson, B.M., M.M., D.M.A. (1980)
Professor Emeritus of Music (2014)
B.M., Bethany College; M.M., D.M.A., University of Colorado-Boulder.

Dan Hoffman, B.S., M.Ed. (1982)
Professor Emeritus of Physical Education (2019)
B.S., Manchester College; M.Ed., Wichita State University.

Corinne Neubauer Hughbanks, B.A., M.S., Ph.D. (1966)
Professor Emerita of Languages (1993)
B.A., Asbury College; M.S., Emporia State University; Ph.D., University of Nebraska.

Gilford J. Ikenberry, Jr., B.S., M.S., Ph.D. (1961)
Professor Emeritus of Biology (1993)
B.S., McPherson College; M.S., Oklahoma State University; Ph.D., Iowa State University.

Shingo Kajinami, B.S., Ph.D. (1986)
Professor Emeritus of Chemistry (2003)
B.S., Bethel College; Ph.D., University of Oklahoma.

Larry Kitzel, B.S., M.M., D.M.A. (1970)
Professor Emeritus of Music (2004)
B.S., McPherson College; M.M., Wichita State University; D.M.A., University of Oklahoma.

Robert W. Neufeld, B.A., M.A., M.S., Ph.D. (1991)
Professor Emeritus of Computer Science (2004)
B.A., Bethel College; M.A., M.S., Wichita State University; Ph.D., Iowa State University.

Herbert Smith, B.A., M. Div., Ph.D. (1982)
Professor of Philosophy and Religion (1994)
Burton Metzler Chair in Philosophy and Religion (1999)
B.A., Elizabethtown College; M.Div., Bethany Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Claremont Graduate School.

Susan Krehbiel Taylor, B.A., M.L.S., Ph.D. (1979)
Professor Emerita of Journalism (2010); College Librarian Emerita (2010)
B.A., McPherson College; M.L.S., Emporia State University; Ph.D., Kansas State University.

Roger Trimmell, B.S., M.Ed. (1982)
Professor Emeritus of Physical Education (2011)
B.S., McPherson College; M.Ed., Wichita State University.

Karlene Morphew Tyler, B.A., M.A. (1975)
Professor Emerita of Theatre (2018)
B.A., McPherson College; M.A., Emporia State University.

Ricky W. Tyler, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (1977)
Professor Emeritus of Theatre (2018)
B.A., McPherson College; M.A., Emporia State University; Ph.D., Michigan State University.

Jan van Asselt, B.S., M.A., Ph.D. (1965)
Professor Emeritus of German and Linguistics (2000)
B.S., McPherson College; M.A., University of Colorado, Boulder; Ph.D., University of California.

Ann Zerger, B.S., M.F.A. (2004)
Professor Emerita of Art (2019)
B.S., University of Kentucky; M.F.A., Wichita State University.

Full-time Administrative and General

Photo directory of current Staff

Steve Anderson (2002)
Facilities Management: Custodian

Abbey Archer-Rierson, B.S., M.Ed. (2008)
Chief of Staff (2011)
B.S., University of Kansas; M.Ed., McPherson College.

Dave Auman (rehire 2021)
Assistant Director of Facilities

Leslie Auman (rehire 2022)
Custodial Supervisor

David Barrett, B.S., M.S.S. (1991)
Advancement Officer (2014)
B.S., McPherson College, M.S.S., United States Sports Academy.

Linda Barrett, B.S. (1996)
Coordinator of Student Success and Engagement (2017)
B.S., McPherson College.

Kris Beauchamp, B.S., M.S., (2021)
Assistant Football Coach (2022)
Seasonal  Assistant Football Coach
B.A. Centre College, M.S., Liberty College

Amy Beckman, B.S., M.A. (2019)
Executive Director of Career & Experiential Learning
B.S., Kansas State University; M.A., City University of Seattle.

Abby Bolton, B.A. (2022)
Head Softball Coach
B.A., Friends University.

Damien Brigham, B.S.(2023)
Director of Track, Field and Cross Country
B.S., Jackson State University.

Sara Brubaker, B.S., M.S. (2002)
Director of Financial Aid and Admissions Operations (2012)
B.S., McPherson College: M.S., Friends University.

Rachael Bruce. A.A., B.S., M.S., (2023)
Athletic Academic Support Specialist
A.A., Allen Community College; B.S., Emporia State University; M.S., Emporia State University.

Morgan Bryand, A.S., B.A. (2023)
Assistant Volleyball Coach
A.S., Butler Community College, B.A. Kansas Wesleyan University.

Cory Cahill, B.S. (2019)
Head Coach: Men’s & Women’s Volleyball
B.S., Hannibal-La Grange University.

Nichole Carver, B.S. (2022)
Academic Records Specialist
B.S. Fort Hays State University.

Bryce Chavis, B.A., M.B.A. (2020)
Assistant Football Coach
B.A., M.B.A., Washburn University.

Vanessa Cisneros, A.A., B.A., M.S. (2023)
Assistant Women’s Soccer Coach
A.A., McPherson College: B.S., McPherson College; M.S., Arizona State University.

Chad Clevenger, B.S., M.A. (2021)
Director of Track and Field
B.S., Grand Valley State University, M.A., Concordia University.

Jerod Corbus, B.S. (2020)
Executive Assistant to the Provost
B.S., McPherson College.

Dakota Cornwell, (2022)
Custodian

Anthony Cotton, B.S., M.Ed. (2022)
Assistant Football Coach
B.S., Bethel College, M.Ed., Langston University

Matthew Cotton, B.A., M.A. (2021)
Advisor (2023)
B.A., Kansas State University; M.A., University of Kansas.

Scott Cox, A.A.S., B.A., M.B.A. (2022)
Assistant Athletic Director for Marketing and Promotions (Sports Information)
A.A.S. Hutch Community College, B.A. Wichita State University, M.B.A. Friends University.

Joshua Daume, B.S., M.S. (2023)
Athletic Director
B.S., Midwestern State University; M.S., Texas A & M.

Michael Davis, B.S., (2022)
Admissions and  Financial Aid Counselor
B.S., Lourdes University.

Chris Dawson, B.S. (2021)
Head Coach: Baseball
B.S., Central Christian College.

Dara Dix, B.S., (2013)
Student Account Financial Manager; Campus Store Manager (2022)
B.S., McPherson College.

T.J. Eskildsen, B.S., M.S. (2010)
Head Coach: Men’s Basketball (2019)
B.S., Iowa Wesleyan College; M.S., William Woods University.

Jeremiah Fiscus, B.S., M.S., M.Ed. (2018)
Head Coach: Football
B.S., McPherson College; M.S., Northwestern State University; M.Ed., Texas Christian University.

Kendra Flory, B.A., M.Div. (2017)
Advancement and Alumni Assistant
B.A., Bridgewater College; M.Div., Bethany Theological Seminary.

Kent Freund, B.S., M.S. (2019)
Head Coach: Men’s Soccer
B.S., Fort Hays State University; M.S., Baker University.

Johnny Gilkey (2019)
Facilities Management: Maintenance Technician

Joyce Gingrich (2023)
Payroll/AP Specialist 

Darryl Glenn, B.S., M.S. (2023)
Assistant Dean of Students/Director of Residence Life
B.S., University of Central Missouri; M.S., Fort Hays State University.

Blake Goforth, B.A. (2023)
Controller
B.A., Seattle Pacific University.

Tina Goodwin, B.A. (2017)
Director of Public Relations
B.A., Creighton University.

Amanda Gutierrez, B.S., M.B.A. (1995, 2009)
Provost and Executive Vice President
B.A., Kansas Wesleyan University; M.B.A., Friends University.

Rudolph Haberer, B.A., M.S. (2023)
Director of Athletic Facilities and Game Operations
B.S., Bethany College, M.S., University of Mary Hardin-Baylor.

Patricia Hartshorn, B.A. (2014)
Registrar (2014)
B.A., Bethany College.

Sandra Hiebert, B.S., M.A. (2022)
Director of Institutional Assessment and Academic Compliance
B.S., Kansas State University; M.A., University of Minnesota.

 Christi Hopkins, B.S., M.A. (2007)
Vice President for Enrollment (2014)
B.S., Southwest Baptist University; M.A., Baker University.

Mariah Hudson-Palmer, B.S. (2014)
Facilities Management: Grounds Assistant
B.S., University of California-Davis.

Meghan Iglehart, B.A., M.B.A. (2021)
Director of Enrollment Development
B.A., Oklahoma State University, M.B.A., Emporia State University.

Billy Jamison, B.S.  (2023)
Director of Alumni and Constituent Relations
B.S., McPherson College.

Tracy Jex, B.A., M.A. (2022)
Assistant Cross Country and Track Coach
B.A., Colorado Christian University, M.A., Adams State University.

Evan Knight, B.S., M.S. (2019)
Assistant Coach: Football
B.S., M.S., University of Central Missouri.

Ramona “Mona” Lange-Wisdom, B.S. (2022)
Student Accounts Specialist, PDSO
B.S., McPherson College

Amber Lehman (2022)
Facilities Management: Custodian

Edward Loeb III, B.A, M.A. Ph.D. (2023)
Associate Athletic Director
B.A., Bethany College; M.A. Ph.D., University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

Dayna Love (2023)
Facilities Management: Custodian 

Brian Lundberg, A.A. (2003)
Director of Marketing (2015)
A.A., Art Institute of Dallas.

Amelia Lutz, B.A. (2018)
Advancement Services Coordinator
B.A., Southwestern College.

Brian Martin, B.S. (2009)
Director of Historic Automotive Restoration Projects (2014)
B.S., McPherson College.

Heather Mierkiewicz (2016)
Admissions Associate; Operations manager (2018)

Janelle Miller (2000)
Facilities Management: Custodian (2001)

Abigayle Morgan, B.S. (2019)
Coordinator of Auto Restoration Events
B.S., McPherson College.

Kevin Morris, A.S., B.S. (2016)
Computer Services Assistant
A.S., B.S., Brown Mackie College.

Robert Mowat (2017)
Facilities Management: Maintenance Technician/HVAC

Ryo Nakazono, B.S., M.S. (2021)
Athletic Trainer
B.S., Yokohama College of Rehabilitation; M.S., Weber State University.

Jeremy Nelson (2023)
Director of Facilities

Joshua Nichols, A.A., B.S., M.A. (2018)
Head Coach: Women’s Basketball
A.A., Northern Oklahoma College; B.S., Oklahoma Wesleyan University; M.A., Baker University.

Andy Olsen, B.S. (2014)
Director of Financial Aid
B.S., Central Christian College.

Kelly Olson, B.S. (2018)
Admissions Associate; Campus Visit Coordinator
B.S., Northern State University.

Mark Olson, B.S. (2015)
Head Coach: Women’s Soccer (2019)
B.S., Wichita State University.

Louis Parker, B.S., (2021)
Assistant Men’s Basketball Coach, Resident Director (2023)
B.S., McPherson College

Christine Paulsen, B.A., M.S.,(2022)
ERP Manager
B.A., McPherson College, M.S., Friends University.

David Penalva (2007)
Facilities Management: Custodian

Amanda Peterson, B.S. (2014)
Facilities Management: Grounds Assistant
B.S., Kansas State University.

Matt Pfannenstiel, B.S., M.Ed., (2006, 2022)
Associate VP for Enrollment
B.A., Bethany College; M.Ed., McPherson College

Hannah Piechowski, B.A, M.Ed., Ph.D. (2021)
Associate Vice President for Student Life & Dean of Students
B.A., Bellarmine University; M.Ed., University of Louisville; Ph.D., Bellarmine University.

Jamie Pjesky, B.S. (2015)
Advisor (2023)
B.S., Pittsburg State University.

Keiran President, B.S., M.B.A., (2021)
Head Coach: Tennis
B.S., Ottawa University; M.B.A., William Woods University.

Bela Raimondi, B.S., M.B.A. (2023)
Assistant Women’s Basketball Coach
B.S., Friends University; M.B.A., Friends University

Rhianna Reed, B.S. (2019)
Assistant Registrar (2020)
B.S., McPherson College; M.B.A., Emporia State University

Samuel Reed, B.A. (2023)
Admissions & Financial Aid Counselor
B.A., Bethany College

Raquel Resendiz,  B.A., (2023)
Advisor
B.A., Southwestern College

Michael P. Schneider, B.S., M.B.A., Ed.D. (2002)
President (2009)
B.S., McPherson College; M.B.A., Denver University;
Ed.D., University of Pennsylvania.

Phillip Schoenwetter, B.S., M.S. (2008)
Head Athletic Trainer (2013)
B.S., MidAmerica Nazarene University; M.S., Kansas State University; ATC, LAT.

Jen Sjuts, B.A. (2023)
Director of Advising & Student Services
B.A., Augustana College

Matthew Skillen, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (2023)
Assistant Provost and Dean of Faculty
B.A., Friends University, M.A., Ph.D., Kansas State University

Kananda Skinner (2023)
Head Competitive Dance Coach
Salina Area Technical College

Marty Sigwing, B.S., M.Ed. (2012)
Director of Facilities
B.S., Southwestern College; M.Ed., McPherson College.

Tammy Sigwing (2015)
Manager of Administrative Services (2022)

Kristina Sojka, B.A., M.Ed., (2021)
Director of Library Services
B.A., Wichita State University; M.S., Kent State University

Mack Stephenson, B.S., M.B.A., M.Ed. (2023)
Assistant Baseball Coach
B.S, M.B.A., M.Ed., William Jewel College

Brenda Stocklin-Smith, B.S.B.A., M.Ed. (2012)
Director of Human Resources
B.S.B.A., University of Missouri-Columbia; M.Ed., McPherson College; PHR, SHRM-CP.

Connie Stucky (1991)
Facilities Management: Office Manager (2001)

Carol Summervill, B.B.A. (2019)
Vice President for Finance, CFO
B.B.A., Wichita State University; CPA, CGMA.

Ashley Templeton. B.S., M.S. E., Ed.D (2023)
Director of Student Transitions
B.S., M.S.E., Fort Hays State; Ed.D, University of Southern Mississippi

Richard (Rick) L. Tuxhorn, B.S., M.Ed. (2012)
Assistant Vice President for Finance
B.S., Sterling College; M.Ed., McPherson College; CPA, CGMA.

Sheridan Weinbrenner, B.S., M.A. (2022)
Assistant Director, Career Services and Experiential Learning
B.S., Central Christian College, M.A., Emporia State University.

Erik Vogel, B.S.  (2003-2007; 2019)
Vice President for Advancement (2019)
B.S., McPherson College.

Bonnie Wall (2009)
Facilities Management: Custodian

Courtney Weesner, B.S. (2021)
Admissions and Financial Aid Counselor
B.S., McPherson College.

Krista Williams, B.S. (2023)
Head Cheer Coach
B.S., University of Nebraska-Kearney

Jessy Wisdom, B.S. (2015)
Financial Aid Coordinator
B.S., McPherson College.

Sarah Wood, B.S. (2021)
Director of Student Life
B.S., Oklahoma Panhandle State University.

Part-time Staff

Bill Fuqua (2022)
Facilities Management:  Facilities Management:  Custodian

Jacob Greenfield, B.S., M.S. (2023)
Assistant Football Coach
B.S., Henderson State University Arkansas, M.S. Henderson State University.

Jill Hemenway, B.A. (2017)
Administrative Assistant for Teacher Education
B.A., Bethany College.

Kemryn Jenkins, A.A., B. S. (2022)
Assistant Men’s Basketball Coach
A.A., Iowa Central Community College; B.S. McPherson College. 

Kelvin Kelly, B.S. (2023)
Assistant Football Coach
B.S., Point University

Sheresa Layton, B.S. (2022)
Sports Information Intern
B.S. McPherson College. 

Bev Nye, B.S., M.S., (2022)
Writing Center Coordinator
B.S., University of Colorado, M.S., University of Northern Colorado

Joshua Pisik, B.S. (2023)
Assistant Football Coach
B.S., McPherson College.

Nathan Robl, B.S., (2022)
Assistant Baseball Coach
B.S., McPherson College

2023|11 Personnel, Catalog 23-24|

Financial Aid Process

Over 99 percent of McPherson College students receive financial assistance each year from McPherson College scholarships and awards, federal and state programs, work-study programs, and educational loans.

McPherson College has a financial aid awarding policy that considers a variety of factors including academic achievement, participation in co-curricular activities, and financial need. The college’s goal is to award enough financial assistance to provide incentive, recognition, and access.

Financial Aid Application Process

To be considered for and receive financial aid, students should take the following steps:

  • Submit their Application for Admission and academic transcripts to McPherson College. Students must be admitted to McPherson College in order to be considered for aid.
  • Submit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). McPherson College’s priority deadline for FAFSA submissions is March 1 each year. McPherson College’s federal school code is 001933.
  • Review their Student Aid Report (SAR) and submit verification documentation to the Financial Aid Office. Students whose Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) is selected by the Department of Education for verification must complete the Verification Worksheet (Dependent, Independent) and submit official tax transcripts from the IRS for the student and/or parents/spouse. If supporting schedules are required, the college will ask for them separately.
  • Await receipt of their Financial Aid Award Notice, which the college prepares and mails/emails, usually within 3–5 working days after their financial aid record is complete.
  • Follow the instructions enclosed with the Financial Aid Award Notice by the date indicated to acknowledge acceptance of awards.
  • Complete the required application/promissory note if taking advantage of student loan opportunities.
  • Complete entrance interview if borrowing direct loans.

Financial Aid Calendar

October 1 – Application process begins. Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA).
November 1 – Financial aid award notification begins for admitted students.
March 1 – Priority deadline for financial aid. Offers of aid after this date will be extended only as funds remain available.
April 1 – FAFSA submission deadline for Kansas Comprehensive Grant.

Scholarships and Awards

Every student meeting McPherson College’s admission standards who is enrolled full time is eligible for a Merit Award. In addition to the Merit Award, qualifying students may receive additional scholarship assistance based on academic achievement, co-curricular participation, demographic characteristics, leadership qualities, and major areas of interest. A financial aid calculator and detailed information about institutional awards and scholarships are available at https://www.mcpherson.edu/admissions/scholarships/

Endowed Scholarship Funds

The endowed scholarships and loan funds listed below have been established through personal generosity and a desire on the part of the donors to assist future generations of students in attending McPherson College. The college is grateful for these endowed gifts, which provide a permanent expression of love and support for the college and for the students who will benefit from this kindness. These gifts fund the existing McPherson College Scholarship and Grant Program.

Unrestricted Endowed Scholarship Fund with no specifics for awarding:

  • Walter E. Beery Scholarship Fund
  • Virgil Meyers Berkebile Scholarship
  • Earl Bowman Scholarship Fund
  • R.S. Christensen Endowment Scholarship Fund
  • Earl E. Curtis Memorial Scholarship Fund
  • Samuel L. Elrod Scholarship Fund
  • Esther Eslinger Memorial Scholarship Fund
  • Leland and Pauline Flory Endowment Scholarship Fund
  • Oscar C. Frantz & Flora Gish Frantz Scholarship
  • Roy O. Frantz Endowed Scholarship Fund
  • Harry H. and Marguerite Gilbert Memorial Endowment Scholarship
  • Raenell Hall Endowed Scholarship Fund
  • Ira M. Hoover Endowed Scholarship Fund
  • Helen Jacobs Memorial Scholarship
  • Ralph F. Johnson & Irene Ramey Johnson Memorial Scholarship Fund
  • Edith Keller Scholarship Fund
  • John Giolin Pearson Scholarship
  • Ralph H. Rindt Endowed Scholarship Fund
  • Scott Robinson Memorial Scholarship Fund
  • Ray Simmons Endowed Scholarship Fund
  • Stucky Scholarship Fund
  • Dr. Galen M. Tice & Ruth Kilmer Tice Memorial Scholarship Fund
  • Robert George Wolfe Memorial Scholarship
  • Worthington Church Scholarship Fund
  • Una Yoder Memorial Scholarship

Restricted Endowed Scholarships:

  • African-American: Harrison African-American Academic Scholarship
  • Alumni Legacy Scholarshipfor children and grandchildren of alumni
  • Andes: John and Elrae Andes Performing Arts Scholarship—for performing arts &/or music majors
  • Appel Family Scholarshipsupports student with need in an internship experience
  • Austin: Charles & John Austin Memorial Scholarship Fund—no restrictions
  • Austin: Glen D. Austin Scholarship—western Colorado residents
  • Barrett-Jackson Auction Co.: Brian Jackson Scholarship—auto restoration students with financial need; 3.0 GPA
  • Barrett-Jackson Auction Co.: Russ Jackson Scholarship—auto restoration students with financial need; 3.0 GPA
  • Beach – Carolyn Beach Scholarship Fund – Full time students pursuing degree in health science fields; 3.0 GPA
  • Beam: Royce & Phyllis Bowman Beam Scholarship in Vocal Music—student(s) enrolled in Performing Arts with preference to vocal music students
  • Beech: Olive Ann Beech Scholarship—Wichita, Kansas residents
  • Beeghly: Milford & Dorothy Graham Beeghly Scholarship—Iowa or Northern Plains District Church of the Brethren; display leadership qualities
  • Bell: Pauline L. Bell Memorial Scholarship—junior or senior students majoring in music education or music
  • Bittinger: Desmond & Irene Bittinger Scholarship—institution acceptable academic standing
  • Bowman: J.L. & Elva Bowman Scholarship—science majors
  • Brammell: Ira N.H. & Freda E. Brammell Scholarship—excellent leadership ability
  • Breon: Earl & Margaret Breon Scholarship—financial need
  • Breon: Phil & Clara Breon Scholarship—financial need
  • Brown: Elizabeth & Ed Brown & Classic Thunderbird Club of S. Florida Scholarship—2nd-, 3rd-, or 4th-year auto restoration students
  • Brown: Larry Brown Scholarship—student athletes majoring in physical education
  • Brubaker: Earl Brubaker Scholarship—financial need
  • Butler: Edward R. & Judith Brammell Butler Student Leadership Scholarship—students who demonstrate leadership potential in student services
  • Campbell: David V. Campbell Scholarship—orphaned, handicapped, and underprivileged students
  • Casebeer: John & George Casebeer Scholarship—financial need
  • Cassler: Winston Cassler Scholarship—students studying music
  • Chisholm: Will Edwin & Olive M. Chisholm Scholarship—no restrictions
  • Class of 1953 Scholarship— freshman student with financial need
  • Class of 1967 Scholarship**—full-time student in any academic program; minimum GPA; financial need
  • Class of 1968 Scholarship—full-time student in any academic program; minimum GPA; financial need
  • Cobb: Redell & Barbara Cobb Scholarship—former students of Canton-Galva High School; 3.0 GPA
  • Coppock: X.L. & Martha Coppock Scholarship **—financial need
  • Crago Family Scholarshipfinancial need; exchange student; minimum GPA or students(s) pursuing math, science or business major
  • Dalke: Elmer O. & Velma L. Dalke Scholarship—financial need
  • Darby: Edith & Harry Darby Foundation Scholarship— juniors and seniors; minimum GPA
  • DeCoursey: Wesley & Verda DeCoursey Scholarship in Chemistry—full-time student majoring in chemistry; minimum GPA; without regard for financial need
  • Dell: Lois E. Dell Scholarship Fund for Women—women who have been absent from a college campus; business majors
  • Dennison: Nora Dennison Scholarship—financial need
  • Detrick: Herbert & Lula Detrick Scholarship— financial need
  • Dodson: Susan Wheeler Dodson Scholarship—visual arts major; minimum GPA; without regard for financial need
  • Doman: David T. Doman/Franklin Club Scholarship – freshmen or sophomore auto restoration major; priority to student with H.H. Franklin Club membership
  • Dotzour: Royer & Edna Dotzour Scholarship—freshman male & female; Kingman County (KS) high school graduates; preference to Norwich High School
  • Duesenberg: Fred Duesenberg Scholarship—auto restoration student
  • Edwards: James “Jim” Edwards Scholarship – automotive restoration student with financial aid; minimum GPA of 3.0
  • Ehling: Lucas Ehling eSports Scholarship Fund – student in E-Sports program, minimum 3.0 GPA; academic merit, financial need
  • Eisenbise: Bernette Eisenbise Scholarship—sophomore, junior, or senior teacher education major
  • Elliott Family Scholarshipfinancial need
  • Evans: Franklin Evans & Roberta Brown Evans Scholarship—sophomores, juniors, seniors; minimum GPA; leadership/campus involvement
  • F & J Foundation Scholarshipauto restoration student
  • Fasnacht: Everett M. & Joy C. Fasnacht Scholarship—Church of the Brethren members seeking career in church service, peace studies, conflict resolution
  • Fike: Duane & Ruthita Fike Scholarship **—no restrictions
  • Flory: Glen & Esther Flory Family Scholarship—financial need
  • Forror: Elizabeth Wagoner Forror & Jo Wagoner Scholarship—Church of the Brethren members or student seeking service-oriented career in health services or dependents of missionary workers
  • Forsyth/Switzer: Lyle & Florence Forsyth & Merl & Ola Switzer Scholarship – financial need
  • Frankenbery/Werner Family Scholarship—financial need; student(s) in natural science and education; minimum GPA
  • Frantz: Earl & Lela Frantz Scholarship —Church of the Brethren members; financial need
  • Frantz: Edward R. & Virginia L. Frantz Scholarship – students pursuing interest in Entrepreneurship and/or athletics; enrolled full-time; financial need
  • Frantz: Merlin & ImoJean Sheller Frantz Scholarship—financial need
  • Fries: Ramona R. Fries & Arthur H. Fries Scholarship—academic merit; financial need
  • Geisert: Fred J. & Martha E. Geisert Scholarship—Dickinson County (KS) high school graduate or resident; preference to New Basel United Church of Christ, Abilene, KS, members/children
  • Gish: Warren & Luella Gish Scholarship—no restrictions
  • Glaser: Adelaide Glaser Scholarship—sophomores, juniors, seniors; Kansas resident; B average; financial need; good leadership qualities
  • Global Studies Endowed Fundno restrictions
  • Goering: Raymond “Dutch” & Dorothy L. Goering Scholarship—financial need
  • Green: Bob and Gayla Green Scholarship – first generation members of their family to attend college, financial need, minimum GPA of 3.0
  • Greim: Mary Roop Greim Scholarship—Missouri residents
  • Groff: Forrest & Della Groff Scholarship—Church of the Brethren/Groff family members; minimum GPA
  • Grossnickle: J. Edgar & Willa Grossnickle Scholarship—Iowa Church of the Brethren members, COB students from Iowa, or students from Iowa; preference given to COB students
  • Grover: Mable Beyer Grover Scholarship—financial need
  • Haas: William W. Haas Scholarship—Dickinson County (KS) high school graduates
  • Hall: Henry & Nellie Krebbs Hall Scholarship—financial need
  • Hanzlik: Evan and Edward J Hanzlik Scholarship – auto restoration students, financial need, demonstrate service through involvement in activities and/or in the community, minimum GPA of 3.0
  • Harden: Len & Stella Harden & Joyce Harden Brown Scholarship—juniors & seniors; science, math, pre-med majors
  • Hart: Dorothy Bryant Hart Scholarship—financial need
  • Hatcher: Eugenia D. Hatcher Scholarship—female students
  • Hatfield: Verlin L. & Florence M. Hatfield Scholarship—resident students; financial need
  • Haury: Kenneth Haury Scholarship—business or accounting majors
  • Hershey: Dr. J. Willard Hershey Scholarship—juniors & seniors; science majors
  • Hess: Dick & Beverly Hess Fine Arts Fund—fine arts students; leadership/service ability; financial need
  • Hess: Dick & Beverly Hess Science Fund—science students who have demonstrated talent; financial need
  • Hess: Lou Ann (Dyck) Hess Fine Arts Fund—music students; other fine arts students; financial need
  • Hess: Lou Ann (Dyck) Hess Science Fund—biology students; other science students; financial need
  • Hewitt: Sharon & David Hewitt Scholarship—JR/SR students interested in auto or motorcycle restoration
  • Hodgson: Gayle (Tammel) Hodgson Scholarship – primary consideration given to Iowa students, good academic standing
  • Hoerner: Della Hoerner Scholarship—students seeking career in nursing, medicine, medical technology
  • Hofen: Phillip J. Hofen Scholarship—Iowa residents; financial need
  • Hoffert: John and Mary Hoffert Scholarship – auto restoration student, maintain 3.0 GPA, academic merit, financial need, recommended by AR faculty
  • Hoffman: Paul & Joanna Hoffman Scholarship—Church of the Brethren members (US)
  • Hoffman: Samuel Hoffman Scholarship**—financial need; high achievement
  • Holden Family Scholarshipstudent enrolled in automotive restoration program; financial need; show interest in restoration and preservation of vehicles or vintage cars of historic importance
  • Holl: Dennis A. Holl Scholarship—Church of the Brethren members; students with Brethren Volunteer Service experience; financial need
  • Hornbaker: Royal & Norma Hornbaker Scholarship—financial need
  • Ikenberry: Alta Gross Ikenberry Scholarship—freshman Idaho or Kansas resident, female athletes or pursuing career in education, pre-med or pre-dental
  • Ikenberry: Ernest & Olivia Ikenberry Scholarship**— financial need and good academic standing
  • Ingalls: Grace Vaniman Ingalls & Roscoe Ingalls Scholarship—financial need and good academic standing
  • Insurance Management Association Scholarshipbusiness majors; financial need
  • Jewell: J. Paul & Fern Watkins Jewell Scholarship – full-time business and economics major; preference to 2nd-, 3rd-, and 4th-year students; minimum 3.0 GPA
  • Johnson: Daniel Palmer Johnson Scholarship—students majoring in math or science
  • Keim: Howard Keim & Winifred O’Connor-Keim Scholarship—women who will have achieved 23rd birthday prior to award; financial need
  • Kindig: Ethel Ward Kindig Scholarship—Nebraska residents; students interested in Christian ministry or service; financial need; good academic standing
  • Kinzie Foundation Scholarshipjuniors or seniors; Church of the Brethren members; financial need
  • Kough: John K. & Arlene Flory Kough Scholarship—Church of the Brethren members from Kansas, Iowa, Missouri, Nebraska, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Colorado, North Dakota, Texas, and Montana
  • Kreider: Roy Levi Kreider Scholarship—financial need
  • Kuhn: Walter & Ruby Kuhn Scholarship—business, computer science, auto restoration majors
  • Lee: William & Mary Lee Scholarship—financial need
  • Lehman: Harry & Minnie Lehman Scholarship—financial need
  • Lehman: Harvey & Ruth Kurtz Lehman Scholarship—financial need
  • Lehman: Henry L. Lehman & Anna Burkholder Lehman Scholarship—demonstrated academic and leadership ability; financial need
  • Lengel: Leland L. Lengel Scholarship in History—sophomores, juniors, seniors; top history majors in each class; minimum GPA
  • Lichty: Henry Lichty Lovett, Dorothy Lichty Vogel, Mr. & Mrs. Glenn A. Lichty, Lucile Lichty West Scholarship—financial need; students from Northeast quarter of Kansas
  • Lingenfelter: The Fern Lingenfelter Artist Series and the Fern Lingenfelter Scholarship of Music—full-time student majoring in music; minimum 3.0 GPA
  • Long: V. Allen Long Scholarship—physical or natural science major and good academic standing
  • Marchand: F.E. & Cora A. Marchand Scholarship—Church of the Brethren members; financial need
  • Martin: Alice B. Martin Scholarship—financial need
  • Martin: Martha Cecile Martin Endowed Scholarship—teacher education student; McPherson County origin; financial need
  • Maune: Louie Maune Scholarship—financial need
  • McCluggage: The Denise McCluggage Scholarship—female student demonstrating passions in the fields of auto restoration, journalism, photography, communication, media arts, and/or writing; minimum 3.0 GPA
  • McDaneld: Wallace & Nellie Wagner McDaneld Scholarship—Kansas residents; interested in Christian ministry or service; financial need
  • McGhee: Grace Brunk McGhee Scholarship— financial need
  • McGonigle: Josephine Shirar McGonigle Scholarship—financial need
  • McHugh: Ellen McHugh Scholarship— financial need
  • McIlwaine: Delia Chavez McIlwaine Scholarship—music education major
  • McSpadden: Dwight McSpadden Scholarship—student athletes
  • Meguiar Family Scholarship in Automobile Restoration—auto restorations students
  • Melhorn: J. Mark & Katherine J. Ramsey Melhorn Scholarship—McPherson County student participating in at least one athletic program and intention to major in science field
  • Merkey: Samuel R. Merkey Scholarship—financial need
  • Metzler: Burton & Mabel Metzler Scholarship—financial need
  • Metzler: David & Doris Metzler Scholarship **—full-time student preparing for the ministry or Christian service or PreK-12 classroom teaching
  • Miller: Delma Miller Scholarship—Church of the Brethren members
  • Miller: Oscar & Vida Miller Scholarship— financial need
  • Mingenback: Mary Mingenback Scholarship—art or music students; financial need
  • Moats/Neher: Edgar & Marie Moats/Roy & Wava Neher/Edna Neher Scholarship—preference to Ivester (Grundy Center, IA) and Osage (McKune, KS) Church of the Brethren members
  • Moore: Alma Anderson Moore Scholarship—speech/theatre students
  • Morrison: Milton & Rebecca Morrison Scholarship—financial need
  • Moyers: David W. & Florence Smith Moyers Scholarship—Church of the Brethren members who demonstrate church leadership potential
  • Mugler: Carrie Mugler Scholarship—financial need
  • Murrey: Chester & Pearl Crumpacker Murrey Scholarship—freshmen, first-year transfer; financial need
  • Myers: Phil & Jean Myers Scholarship—priority consideration given to students who, due to unique opportunities, crisis situations, or extraordinary accomplishments and/or contributions to their community in the face of difficulties, deserve recognition and encouragement to complete their education; minimum 3.0 GPA; financial need
  • Negley Family ScholarshipChurch of the Brethren members; financial need
  • Nichols: Connie Nichols /Ethel McClure Scholarship—interior design or art majors; participate in at least one extra-curricular or volunteer activity on campus or in McPherson
  • Nonken: Ray Nonken Scholarship—Kansas residents who reside in a rural area; athletes; minimum 3.0 GPA
  • Nordling: Barbara & Bernard Nordling /Leland E. Nordling Family ScholarshipKansas residents west of Highway 81, excluding Sedgwick County; academic achievement
  • Noyes: Pat Noyes Men’s Basketball Scholarship—juniors and seniors in previous year; exemplify character of Pat Noyes (leadership, positive attitude, team player, exert maximum effort, passion for the game of basketball); good academic standing
  • Page: Chief Staph Page Salute Heroes Veteran Scholarship – auto restoration major; primary consideration given to combat wounded post 911 veteran of the United States Uniformed Armed Services; secondary consideration to post 911 veterans of the United States Uniformed Armed Services; minimum 3.0 GPA
  • Pair: Paul & Pauline Vaniman Pair Scholarship for Computer Science—computer science majors
  • Pair: Pauline Vaniman Pair Scholarship for the Fine Arts—art, music, theatre majors; good academic standing
  • Paul: Paul Family Scholarship – minimum 2.5 GPA; financial need
  • Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance Scholarship—auto restorations majors
  • Peckover: Lila Marie Peckover Scholarship—Hutchinson (KS) Community Church of the Brethren members
  • Penland: M.W. & Hallie Goforth Penland Scholarship—philosophy/religion, science, or education majors
  • Pepsi-Cola Scholarship—auto restorations majors
  • Peterson: Ernest & Inez Peterson Scholarship—juniors and seniors; business and accounting majors; minimum GPA
  • Porter: Irwin and Betty Porter Fund—no restrictions
  • Powell Family Scholarship in Science and Religion—science or religion/philosophy majors with preference to those studying both disciplines
  • Prather: A.B. & Vera Prather Scholarship—financial need
  • Quapaw: Benjamin Quapaw Scholarship—Native-American students
  • Quint: Don Quint Memorial Soccer Scholarship Fund—business majors who also are a member of the soccer team; minimum GPA
  • Ray: Art Ray Track & Field /Cross Country Scholarship—students participating in track and field or cross country; minimum GPA
  • Reed: Blake Reed Mac2Mac Scholarship—graduated from McPherson High School and participated in high school football program as a senior and plans to attend McPherson College and participate in the college’s football program; current McPherson College football player with financial need
  • Rock: Kenneth M. Rock Scholarship—upper 25% of their high school class; financial need
  • Rolls-Royce Foundation Scholarship—auto restorations students with demonstrated interest in Rolls-Royce and Bentley cars
  • Royer: Patricia A. .Royer Endowed Scholarship Fund—full-time students; affiliated with COB; majors in fine arts, business, sciences, or teacher education; minimum 3.0 GPA
  • Royer: William D. & Alice Nash Royer Scholarship—biology majors
  • Sahl: Bob Sahl Scholarship—2nd-, 3rd- and 4th-year auto restoration students who demonstrate interest in pre-’16 autos; recommendation from the auto restoration faculty; financial need
  • Sargent: Paul & Rowena Vaniman Sargent Scholarship in Business—priority given to business majors; minimum GPA; financial need; nominated by business faculty
  • Sargent: Paul & Rowena Vaniman Sargent Scholarship in Foreign Language – for majors in any field with a commitment to study abroad for a minimum of one (1) semester
  • Sell: Orlin N. Sell Scholarship—students interested in Christian education, ministry, teaching, or social work
  • Sheller: Arlene Barley Sheller Scholarship—Ivester Church of the Brethren members/friends
  • Smith: Delbert L. & Barbara J. Smith Cross Country and Track & Field Scholarship—Student who participates in cross country and/or track and field; financial need
  • Smith: Dwight Smith Scholarship—financial need
  • Smith: Paul E. “Gene” Smith Scholarship—junior; football player who excelled at athletic performance, attitude, sportsmanship, and team play during sophomore year; recommendation from athletic staff
  • Snavely: Paul & Edna Snavely Scholarship—financial need
  • Sneddon: Jack [Super Toe] Sneddon Scholarship
  • Snell: Dale Snell Scholarship—junior or senior music major; good academic standing
  • Spear: Spear Brothers Scholarship—full-time student enrolled in the Auto Restoration program; financial need
  • Staats: Elmer B. Staats & Margaret Rich Staats Scholarship for Public Service—students seeking career in public service
  • Strickler: Dale & Velma Strickler Scholarship—junior or senior students interested in social work, business or economics
  • Strickler: Lois Wood Strickler Secondary Teacher Education Scholarship – primary consideration given to students in secondary teacher ed program, students participating in student debt project, and then any student with financial need; minimum 3.0 GPA
  • Sutton: Charlie & Wilma Sutton Scholarship – full-time student; financial need
  • Trinity Church of the Brethren Scholarship—students interested in ministry
  • Trostle: Bernice McClellan Trostle Scholarship—priority to history, English, humanities, or social science majors
  • Trostle: Raymond H. Trostle Scholarship—priority to chemistry or history majors
  • Turner/Harris: Turner/Harris Endowed Scholarship—full-time students in automotive restoration, graphic arts, or music programs; minimum 3.0 GPA; preference given to veterans
  • Ullom: Victor and Rosalie Ullom Scholarship—Colorado residents; financial need
  • van Asselt/Higgins: Peggy van Asselt/Pam Higgins Scholarship**—priority to biology/foreign language double majors; financial need may be considered
  • VanGoethem: James & Lori VanGoethem Family Scholarship—full-time student; financial need; minimum GPA
  • Vaniman: Elmer E. Vaniman Scholarship in Music—music students; priority to Church of the Brethren students
  • Voshell: LaVerne M. “Tony” Voshell Athletic Scholarship—students participating in football, basketball, or track
  • Wagoner: Paul and Mery Metzler Wagoner Scholarship – minimum 2.5 GPA
  • Wall: Ernest A. Wall & Eunice Almen Wall & Rollyn E. Wall Scholarship—freshmen students
  • Ward: John Ward & Bonnie Martin Ward Scholarship—resident of McPherson, Kansas; planning to become a teacher; minimum GPA
  • Watkins-Gerhard Scholarship—financial need
  • Weaver: Paul & Frances Weaver Scholarship—students pursuing career in Christian ministry; philosophy/religion students
  • Will: W. Marvin & Doreen Will Scholarship—two annual scholarships to incoming freshmen majoring in political science, history or both
  • Wise: Jacob & Ruth Wise Scholarship—financial need
  • Witmore: Irma Cloe Witmore Scholarship—students of English, journalism, communication, theatre or library science who participate in at least one (1) extra-curricular or volunteer activity on campus each semester
  • Wittig: Randy & Sonya Wittig Scholarship—auto restoration students
  • Wittig: Roger & Rita Wittig Scholarship—auto restoration students
  • Yoder: Dayton & Hazel Yoder Scholarship—Church of the Brethren students with rural/agricultural background; academic achievement, leadership ability
  • York: H. Laverne & Evelyn Herr York Scholarship—student athlete majoring in physical education
  • Ziegler: Paul Ziegler Scholarship—priority given to member of the tennis team; demonstrate compassion, encouragement, and leadership; financial need

** not fully funded

Work Study and Employment

All students may apply for on-campus jobs, but students qualifying for the Federal College Work Study program are given priority. These jobs include clerical assistants, maintenance workers, housekeeping, resident assistants, admissions assistants, athletic event staff, etc.

Off-campus employment is usually available to students. The community of McPherson normally enjoys an unemployment rate far below the national average, and there are many requests for part-time student help. The Career Services Offices posts notices of available positions for both on- and off-campus jobs online at https://www.mcpherson.edu/career/.

Other Sources of Financial Assistance

Veteran’s Benefits may be used to attend McPherson College. For information on eligibility and to obtain application materials, students should contact the Veteran’s Administration by phone at 1-888-442-4551 or online at http:www.gibill.va.gov.

Local service agencies such as Kiwanis, Rotary, Lions, PEO, AAUW and others often have funding available for qualified students. Inquire with these agencies for scholarship forms.

Other forms of financial aid may also be available. Please contact the Financial Aid Office for further information.

2022|03 Financial Information, Catalog 22-23|

Bachelor’s Degrees

Bachelor’s degrees are awarded in 25 majors. Most majors include a variety of emphases from which to choose as well as licensure programs that qualify students for a career in education. Please see the departmental curricula later in this catalog for complete descriptions of the emphases and licensure available within each major.

Major Requirements

A major consists of no fewer than 32 and no more than 62 semester hours, including all required courses for the major, regardless of prefix. Interdisciplinary and student-designed majors (see guidelines below) are exempt from the 62-hour cap. Not all current majors may be used towards an interdisciplinary or student-designed major. Departmental or program requirements for specific courses, field experiences, or comprehensive tests must be met. Those requirements are specified along with the departmental curricula.

Minor Requirements

A minor typically consists of a minimum of 18 credit hours of study within a particular academic discipline. Minors are available in biology, business administration, chemistry, communication, English, environmental science, environmental stewardship, graphic design, history, mathematics, Spanish, peace studies, performing arts, philosophy and religion, psychology, sociology,  transformative entrepreneurship, and visual arts. Requirements for the minors in each of these areas are specified in the departmental sections of this catalog. For the minor to be recognized on the transcript, the student must achieve a minimal GPA of 2.0 in the minor coursework.

Teacher Education Program

The Teacher Education Program at McPherson College focuses on three major levels of licensure. The type of degree earned (BA or BS) mirrors the content area. The following are lists of the levels and the programs:

6-12 Licensure
Biology, Chemistry, English, English for Speakers of Other Languages, History and Government, Mathematics, High-Incidence Special Education, Speech/Theatre.

K-6 Licensure
Elementary Education, English for Speakers of Other Languages, High-Incidence Special Education

PK-12 Licensure
Art, Health, Music, Spanish, Sport Studies

 

Bachelor of Arts Degrees

A minimum of one hundred twenty-four (124) academic credit hours are required for the B.A. degree. A Bachelor of Arts degree may be obtained for the following majors:

  • Art and Design
  • Communication
  • Digital Media
  • English
  • History
  • Music
  • Theatre
  • Philosophy and Religion
  • Religion, Politics, and Law
  • Spanish

Students completing one of the above majors who want a Bachelor of Science degree must take eight additional hours in a B.S. major beyond the general education requirements in that area.

Bachelor of Science Degrees

One hundred twenty-four (124) academic credit hours are required for the B.S. degree. A Bachelor of Science degree may be obtained for the following majors:

  • Automotive Restoration Technology
  • Biology
  • Biochemistry
  • Business Administration
  • Chemistry
  • Elementary Education (including Special Education licensure)
  • Environmental Stewardship
  • Health Science
  • Healthcare Management
  • Politics and History
  • Mathematics
  • Psychology
  • Secondary Education (see Teacher Education Program section above for options)
  • Sociology
  • Sport Studies (Health and P.E. licensure available)
  • Sport Management

Students completing one of the above majors who want a Bachelor of Arts degree must take two semesters of a single second human language.

Requirements for a Bachelor’s Degree

  • A minimum of 124 credit hours.
  • Fulfillment of the major program requirements.
  • Fulfillment of general education requirements, or completion of an Associate of Arts or Associate of Science degree at an accredited institution. (Note: Education majors must complete all of the general education requirements, even if they have earned an associate’s degree.)
  • A minimum, overall residential GPA of 2.0.
  • A minimum, residential GPA of 2.0 in the major.
  • A minimum of 32 credit hours completed at McPherson College.
  • 20 of the last 30 or 40 of the last 60 credit hours completed at McPherson College.
  • A minimum of 8 hours of the major completed at McPherson College.
  • The last 60 credit hours completed at a four-year college or university.
  • No more than 64 credit hours from two-year institutions counted toward the degree.
  • At least six hours outside the home department of the major, in addition to the major and general education requirements. (Students with more than one major automatically meet this requirement. Students with a student-designed major must complete at least six hours outside both home departments of the major.)
  • Approval by majority vote at Faculty Meeting.

Interdisciplinary Programs and Student-Designed Major Programs

Interdisciplinary programs and student-designed major programs allow faculty and students to combine courses from two or three departments into one major.

Interdisciplinary Programs

Interdisciplinary programs are typically initiated by faculty.  The following guidelines must be followed:

  • An interdisciplinary major shall consist of a minimum of 44 semester hours and a maximum of 75 semester hours.
  • The program of study shall consist of at least 20 semester hours from two different departments.
  • The instructors supervising the program must come from from the departments providing 20 or more semester hours to the program of study.

When faculty initiate an interdisciplinary major program, two or more instructors from the appropriate departments plan the interdisciplinary concentration and submit the proposal to the Educational Policies Committee following the guidelines available from the registrar’s office. Examples of faculty initiated interdisciplinary majors are Environmental Stewardship, Health Science and Digital Media.

Student-Designed Major Programs

Student-Designed Major programs are initiated by the student.

The following guidelines must be followed:

  • The student must complete the Student Designed Major form available in the registrar’s office or on Bulldog Connect.
  • An interdisciplinary major shall consist of a minimum of 44 semester hours and a maximum of 75 semester hours.
  • The program of study shall consist of at least 20 semester hours from two different departments.
  • The instructors supervising the program must come from the departments providing 20 or more semester hours to the program of study.
  • The student should strive for a balance of 18 credits at 300 level, with a minimum of one 400 level course.
  • The program must be approved by the Educational Policies Committee no later than the second semester of the junior year.

A student may, in consultation with faculty advisors, propose a previously unestablished student-designed major. The chairs of each department represented in the program must approve the proposal. The proposal is submitted to the Educational Policies Committee (EPC) according to the guidelines. The student and a faculty advisor must present the proposal to EPC in person to explain and defend its academic integrity.

The following are examples of student-designed majors that have been approved by Educational Policies Committee and completed by recent graduates of McPherson College. They are listed here to illustrate the possibilities students may explore.

  • Family Life and Human Development
  • Pre-Nursing and Human Behavior
  • Bioethics/International Studies/Political Science
  • Psychology and Music

2022|04 Degree Programs, Catalog 22-23|

General Education Foundation Courses

 

A. Oral Communication:

Student Learning Outcome: Students should be able to deliver messages appropriate to their audience, purpose, and context.

Performance Indicators – Students should be able to:

  1. Perform verbal and nonverbal communication behaviors that illustrate the competency of an effective communicator.
  2. Support and organize their ideas in a coherent manner.

Required: 1 Course
G-CM 130 Interpersonal Communication
G-CM 140 Public Speaking
G-CM 218 Business and Professional Communication

B. Written Communication & Information Literacy

Student Learning Outcome for Written Communication: Students should be able to write with skill and clarity.

Performance Indicators – Students should be able to:

  1. Produce writing that shows an awareness of audience.
  2. Support their ideas with appropriate details and examples.
  3. Coherently organize their writing.
  4. Produce writing that shows careful attention to craft.

Student Learning Outcome for Information Literacy: Students should be able to demonstrate ethical and efficient use of information.

Performance Indicators – Students should be able to:

  1. Show that they can find appropriate sources.
  2. Show that they can evaluate the reliability of sources.
  3. Use information from sources appropriately in their work.

Required: 4 Courses
G-EN 110 College Composition I
G-EN 111 College Composition II
and:
Students pursuing a Bachelor of Arts are required to take Spanish and one Language Intensive (LI) course in their major department.  Students pursuing a Bachelor of Science are required to take two Language Intensive courses with at least one LI course in the student’s major department.

Language Intensive – Oral and Written Communication

Student Learning Outcome for Oral Communication: Students should be able to clearly voice a coherent message.

Performance Indicators – Students should be able to:

  1. Show that they can speak clearly and audibly.
  2. Support their ideas with appropriate research.

Speaking Component

(1) Informal oral communication exercises should be used frequently in the LI classroom. Most often, these will consist of required participation in small-group and class discussions. LI instructors can make even routine student participation in class discussions and activities into helpful oral communication exercises simply by (a) raising students’ consciousness about the variety of signals they send when they speak informally in class, and (b) helping students eliminate their careless habits in speech and delivery.

(2) At least one formal oral presentation should be included in the LI course. The presentation, probably brief, may be delivered to part or all of the class, or some other audience. It may derive from a formal writing assignment, recast for oral delivery.

Student Learning Outcome for Written Communication: Students should be able to write with skill and clarity.

Performance Indicators – Students should be able to:

  1. Produce writing that shows an awareness of audience.
  2. Demonstrate effective participation in the writing process.
  3. Coherently organize their writing.
  4. Produce writing that shows careful attention to craft.

Writing Component

(1) Informal writing assignments should be frequent, perhaps one per class session, but certainly one per week. Most informal writing activities are in the “writing to learn” mode; that is, they are intended to push students to read, think about, and interpret course material more carefully and deeply than they otherwise might do. From a handful of basic, informal writing models, such as journals and microthemes, LI instructors can improvise an almost endless array of specific informal writing activities.

(2) Formal writing assignments should be substantial (but the meaning of “substantial” depends upon the course and the exact nature of the assignment). There should be at least one formal, polished piece of writing. Whenever possible, LI instructors should give formal assignments in stages, confer with students over drafts, and allow ample time for revision(s).

Courses designated as Language Intensive:

G-AR 310 Art History I
G-AR 311 Art History II
BA 475 Business Strategy & Policy
CI 455 Teaching-Learning Process
G-CM 130 Interpersonal Communication
G-CM 218 Business & Professional Communication
G-CM 221 Intercultural Communication
CM 220 Special Topics in Popular Culture
CM 475A Senior Seminar in Communication Research
CM 475B Senior Project in Communication
EE 303 Reading/Language Arts I
G-EN 210L Masterpieces of World Literature (4 hours)
G-EN 220L Contemporary World Literature (4 hours)
G-EN 255L American Literature II (4 hours)
G-EN 270L Fiction (4 hours)
EN 313 Expository Writing
G-EN 370L Poetry (4 hours)
EN 475B  Senior Project in English
G-HI 333 Technology & Society
HI 475  Senior Thesis
MA 475 Senior Project in Mathematics
ML 385 Advanced Level Composition and Conversation
NS 300 Research Methods
NS 475 Senior Research
G-TH 265 Topics in Dramatic Literature
G-TH 385 Theatre History & Dramatic Literature I
TH 475 Senior Theatre Capstone
PE 380 History & Philosophy of Health, PE, Sport
PE 445  Readings and Research for Health Science
G-PR 104L Ethics (4 hours)
G-PR 106L Spiritual Pathways
G-PS 215  Global Peace Studies
PS 475  Senior Thesis
PY 450 History and Systems of Psychology
PY 475 Senior Thesis
SO 475 Senior Thesis
G-TE 333 Technology & Society
TE 475 Senior Project

C. Mathematics

Student Learning Outcome: Students will be able to reason about and solve quantitative problems from a wide array of contexts.

Performance Indicators – Students should be able to:

    1. Identify a quantitative problem (Understand the problem.)
    2. Use mathematical processes to solve the problem (Devise and implement a plan.)
    3. Evaluate the solution for reasonableness and/or implications for further study. (Look back at your solution.)

Required: 3-4 hours chosen from the following:
G-MA 105 College Algebra
G-MA 106 Pre-Calculus
G-MA 111 Calculus I
G-MA 123 Discrete Mathematics
G-MA 153 Principles of Geometry
G-MA 201 Survey of Mathematics
G-BA 220 Business Applied Statistics
G-MA 221 Elementary Applied Statistics

D. Religion/Beliefs/Values

Student Learning Outcome: Students should be able to answer fundamental religious or philosophical questions.

Performance Indicators – Students should be able to:

  1. Develop answers relative to alternative religious/philosophical perspectives.
  2. Explain their position on religious or philosophical issues.

Required: 3-4 hours chosen from the following:
G-PR 101 Old Testament-Hebrew Bible: God and People in Ancient Israel
G-PR 102 Jesus: New Testament Foundations
G-PR 104 Ethics
*G-PR 104L Ethics (LI if taken as G-PR104L for 4 hours)
*G-PR 106L Spiritual Pathways: Transformation, Compassion, and Vocation
G-PR 107 Critical Thinking
G-PR 201 Introduction to Philosophy
G-PR 202 Christian Traditions
G-PR 203 Science and Religion
G-PR 204 Peacemaking: Religious Perspectives
G-PR 206 Religion and Environmental Stewardship
G-PR 302 Religion and Politics
G-PR 304 The Church of the Brethren and Beyond: The Christian Church Serves Our World
G-PR 306 World Religions

E. Wholeness/Health/Fitness

Student Learning Outcome: Students should be able to identify optimal behaviors that promote lifelong personal health.

Performance Indicators – Students should be able to:

  1. Develop a personal strategy for health and fitness emphasizing the physical domain.
  2. Illustrate the relationship between personal behaviors and lifelong health and wellness.

Required: 1 course 
G-PE 150 Concepts in Holistic Health
G-PE 170 Personal & Community Health
G-HS/PE 190 Social & Behavioral Determinants of Health

F. Global/Intercultural Experience

Student Learning Outcome: Students should be able to understand they live in a world of diverse cultures.

Performance Indicators – Students should be able to:

  1. Identify social, cultural, religious, or linguistic differences.
  2. Explain how values and contributions of diverse societies affect individual experiences.

Required: 3 hours+ chosen from the following:
G-BA 342IT International Business (Travel required)
G-CI 251
Introduction to Education Practicum
G-CI 333 Intercultural Education
*G-CM 221 Intercultural Communication
G-EN 210 Masterpieces of World Literature
*G-EN 210L Masterpieces of World Literature (LI if taken as G-EN 210L for four hours)
G-EN 220 Contemporary World Literature
*G-EN 220L Contemporary World Literature (LI if taken as G-EN 220L for four hours)
*G-HI 333 Technology and Society
G-ML 108 Spanish Level I
G-ML 109 Spanish Level II
G-ML 208 Spanish Level III
G-ML 209 Spanish Level IV
G-ML 350 Junior Year Abroad
G-MU 210 Introduction to World Music
G-PR 306 World Religions
G-PS 130 Principles of Geography
*G-PS 215 Global Peace Studies
G-SO 202 Minorities in the U.S.
*G-TE 333 Technology and Society

+Students completing a Bachelor of Arts degree must take G-ML 108 Level I Spanish for three hours as well as three additional hours in the Global/Intercultural Experience Foundation. These students will be required to take only one Language Intensive (LI) course.

College Seminars

In the seminar series, students will demonstrate (1) that they have explored traditional Church of the Brethren values; (2) that they understand service-learning and can complete a service project; (3) that they can make informed ethical decisions in personal and professional situations; and (4) that they have investigated career options in the fields of study. In addition, the various seminars address the following goals.

  1. G-ID 101 Academic Community Essentials (ACE) Seminar: Students will show that they have learned about college life, create a degree plan, and practice good study skills, critical thinking, and conflict resolution.
  2. G-ID 201 Sophomore Seminar: Students will complete a service project, develop a career plan, and show that they have explored internship options.
  3. Senior Capstone Experience: Students will complete a senior project, as designed by department faculty.
2022|08 General Education, Catalog 22-23|

Teacher Education Course Descriptions

(Course numbers listed in parentheses after McPherson College numbers are KICA course numbers.)

CI 101 (SPED 320) Beginning American Sign Language

2 hours
The purpose of this course is to learn the basics of sign language. It will provide the student with an opportunity to express and receive signed communication. (Fall and Spring)

G-CI 150 Introduction to Education

3 hours
This course provides an overview of the historical role of schools in our society, the current governance and finance structures, and the challenges schools face in this new century. It also addresses planning for a career in professional education, and becoming a successful teacher.(Fall and Spring)

CI 202 (SPED 322) Intermediate American Sign Language

2 hours
The purpose of this course is to increase conversational sign language and to introduce interpreting skills. It will provide the student with an opportunity to increase his/her ability to express and receive signed communication, expand his/ her vocabulary, and improve his/her fluency in signing.(Spring)

CI 220 Principles and Strategies of Teaching

3 hours
A general methods class required of all education students. This course must be taken before or concurrent with other EE or CI courses. If taking concurrent, must have permission from the instructor. The class provides an introduction to teaching, including defining the teaching act, developing classroom communities, classroom management, assessment and evaluation, models of teaching, integration of technology, and professional responsibilities. Pre-requisite/co-requisite: G-CI 150 with grade C or better. (Fall and Spring) A minimum grade of C in CI 220 is required as a prerequisite for ALL 300 & 400 level CI, EE or SE courses except G-CI 333.

CI 232 Educational Technology

2 hours
Educational Technology is designed to ensure that teacher education candidates understand the function of technology in schools and society, exhibit skills using instructional tools and technology to gather, analyze, and present information, improve instructional practices, facilitate professional productivity and communication, and help all students use instructional technology effectively. Pre-requisite/co-requisite: CI 220. (Fall and Spring)

G-CI 251 Introduction to Education Practicum

1 hour
This practicum is conducted in the Wichita Public Schools or another urban district. It must be completed before enrolling for EE375 or CI 351. Students are required to spend 30 contact hours in a classroom. This class is offered every semester; however, a block of time must be established to ensure a worthwhile and quality experience. Students will maintain a reflective journal with emphasis on recording observations of teaching and learning, management techniques, the diversity of the student population, and the use of technology. Prerequisite: G-CI 150 and consent of the Director of Field Experiences. To facilitate timely and efficient placements in area schools, the enrollment for this course will close on December 1. (Interterm; Fall or Spring by education department approval only) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense. Candidates are responsible for their own transportation.

CI 310 Topics in Education

2 hours
This course explores one topic relevant to education. As a general rule, students get to more deeply engage in a particular teaching strategy. Possible topics include (but are not limited to) cooperative learning, quantum learning, brain-based education, project-based learning, classroom management, education in the news, and teachers as portrayed in popular media. Prerequisite: G-CI 150 Introduction to Education or instructor’s consent. (Interterm)

CI 315 Reading in the Content Field

2 hours
This course provides students seeking licensure at the PK-12 and 6-12 level the strategies necessary for reading to learn. The strategies learned are appropriate for all content areas and all learners. Future educators will learn how to plan instruction based upon the knowledge of all students, community, subject matter, curriculum outcomes, and current methods of teaching reading. Prerequisite: CI 220. (Fall)

G-CI 333 Intercultural Education 

2 hours
A study of our diverse society and how it pertains to education and the educational setting. Students electing to participate in the related field study that adequately depicts intercultural relations in an educational setting must also enroll in CI 495 Field Experience in Education. Prerequisite: CI 220. (Fall and Spring)

CI 351 Secondary Education Practicum & Seminar

1-2 hours
A field experience and seminar for those seeking licensure at the secondary or PK-12 level. This course is offered for variable hour credit depending on the student’s past experience(s) and licensure area(s). Student should consult with her/his advisor and the chair of the Department of Curriculum & Instruction for appropriate registration. This practicum must occur between CI 251 and CI 475. It is recommended that students seeking license at the 6-12 level take this class in conjunction with the appropriate content methods class. Prerequisites: CI 220. Full acceptance to the Teacher Education Program required. If possible, concurrent with CI 455. Enrollment Deadlines–Fall: In order to facilitate efficient and timely placements at area schools, enrollment for this course will close May 1. Interterm: In order to facilitate efficient and timely placements at area schools, enrollment for this course will close December 1. Spring: In order to facilitate efficient and timely placements at area schools, enrollment for this course will close the first day of interterm.  (Fall and Spring) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

CI 370/MU 370 Methods for Teaching Instrumental Music

3 hours, by consent of Instructor
This course provides an overview of and practical applications in the basic technical aspects of organizing, administrating, teaching, and conducting instrumental ensembles at the public school level. This course is designed for music majors seeking music licensure. (Spring, even years)

CI 371/MU 371 Methods for Teaching Choral Music

3 hours, by consent of Instructor
Materials and procedures for teaching vocal music in grades 7-12. Emphasis is placed on voice production, choral literature and rehearsal, diction, and administration of the classroom. This course is designed for students seeking music licensure. (Spring, odd years)

CI 372/MU 372 Methods for Teaching General Music

3 hours, by consent of Instructor
Materials and procedures for teaching general music in grades PreK-6. Emphasis is placed on understanding the basic concepts of music as they relate to specific age levels, as well as studying the major approaches to music education. Proper vocal technique for young students and the teaching of music fundamentals is covered as well. This course is designed for music majors seeking music licensure. (Fall, odd years)

CI 401/AR 401 Methods for Teaching Art in the Secondary School

2 hours
This is a comprehensive study of secondary art curricula and instructional methods relevant to today’s art educator in the public schools. Discussions will address a multitude of current trends, issues, and “hot” topics on the national scene, including the National Art Standards. Considerable time and effort will be spent on writing and developing art curricula around the four content areas of art production, art history, art criticism, and aesthetics. Preparing and delivering a micro-teaching experience at McPherson High School is also a component of this course. Prerequisite: CI 220. (Spring)

CI 404 Methods for Teaching Modern Language

3 hours
This course is designed to prepare the prospective second language teacher for successful teaching at the PK-12 level. It provides theories of second language acquisition and second language teaching methods. Includes planning strategies, measurement/evaluations, test item construction, effective discipline, inclusionary practices, and technology media. Students become familiar with professional organizations and their publication/resources. In microteaching, including group and self-evaluation, students demonstrate current second language methodology. Prerequisite: CI 220. (As needed)

CI 406 (ED 406) Methods for Teaching Natural Science in the Secondary School

3 hours
This course is designed to provide the prospective teacher with knowledge and skill for teaching the natural sciences at the secondary level (grades 6-12). Content includes curriculum selection and design, safe laboratory management and operation, integration of curriculum, inclusionary practices, methods and modalities of teaching, assessment, classroom application of various forms of technology, and professional organizations. Microteaching, classroom observation and group and self-evaluation are included. Prerequisite: CI 220. (Spring. Offered through KICA. Course meets in person.)

CI 407 (ED 467) Methods for Teaching Mathematics in the Secondary School

3 hours
This course is designed to provide the prospective secondary level (grades 6-12) mathematics teacher the methods of teaching contemporary mathematics content. Topics include methods of presentation, awareness of national mathematics organizations, the writing of unit/daily lesson plans, microteaching of a math lesson, selecting materials, techniques of assessment, inclusionary practices, classroom application of various forms of technology, and techniques of assessment. Prerequisite: CI 220. (Spring. Offered through KICA. Course meets in person.)

CI 408 (ED 440) Methods for Teaching Social and Behavioral Science in the Secondary School

3 hours
This course is designed to prepare students for successful teaching at the secondary level (grades 6-12) in both the social and behavioral sciences. Emphasis is placed on different approaches and practices of instruction planning and classroom management, selection and classroom application of various forms of technology, evaluation and questioning techniques, state assessments, research methods, professional organizations and the inclusive classroom. Prerequisite: CI 220. (Spring. Offered through KICA. Course meets in person.)

CI 410/PE 410 Methods for Teaching Physical Education and Health in the Secondary Schools

4 hours
A study of various teaching techniques and analysis of fundamental skills of physical education activities in the secondary school setting. The course offers an opportunity to explore various teaching techniques in individual, dual, and team activities in the field of physical education and health for the secondary schools. Additionally, this course has been designed to integrate theory and conceptual learning with practical laboratory experiences. Creating an inclusive gym/classroom as well as adaptive PE are included. Prerequisites: PE 110, PE 160, PE 161, G-CI 150, G-CI 251, CI 220. (Interterm)

CI 416 (ED 416) Methods for Teaching Speech and Theatre in the Secondary School

3 hours
This course requires students to apply speech and drama content to the techniques needed for effective secondary level (grades 6-12) classroom teaching. Opportunities are provided for students to exercise their teaching skills in the areas of unit plans, daily lesson plans, teaching strategies, evaluation, assessment, classroom management, inclusion and different learning styles. Discussions of resource allocation, safety, classroom application of various forms of technology, and professional organizations are also included. Each student is encouraged to develop his/her personal philosophy of education and incorporate it in relation to integrity/ethics in the classroom and personal evaluation to maintain a sense of balance and growth. Prerequisite: CI 220. (As needed)

CI 417 (ED 415) Methods for Teaching English and Language Arts in the Secondary School

3 hours
This course is designed to assist student teachers in becoming confident, effective professional educators in secondary level English (grades 6-12). Students will become familiar with a variety of specific methods to use in teaching literature, composition, and language. Among topics to be considered will be current trends in English curriculum development, the six-trait writing process, inclusionary practices, classroom organization, assessment, classroom application of various forms of technology, and professional organizations. Each student will develop a unit of instruction suitable for a secondary level classroom. Prerequisite: CI 220. (Spring. Offered through KICA. Course meets in person.)

CI 428 Methods for Teaching English as a Second Language in the Elementary & Secondary School

3 hours
This course is designed to prepare students to teach English to non-native speakers at either the K-6 level or the 6-12 level. Students will be exposed to teaching techniques, lesson and unit planning, and language assessment. Cultural issues will also be explored. Prerequisite: CI 220. (Fall. Offered concurrently with CI628 ESOL Methods.)

CI 455 The Teaching-Learning Process

3 hours (Language Intensive)
A comprehensive course that deals primarily with the learner, the learning process, and the learning situation. Examines the role of the teacher in relationship to each of these. This class should be taken the semester before student teaching. Prerequisite: CI 220. If possible, concurrent with junior practicum  – EE 375 or CI 351. (Fall and Spring)

CI 475 Student Teaching in the Secondary School

6 or 12 hours
Student Teaching in the Secondary School at McPherson College is a capstone experience allowing students to practice the skills and talents necessary to become effective educators. McPherson College offers student teaching at the appropriate level for all licensure purposes. Student teaching occurs after students have fulfilled all the necessary requirements as outlined in the Advisor/Advisee Handbook. The student teaching experience is scheduled for a full semester, but a minimum of 14 consecutive weeks. Placement and hours may depend on the area(s) of licensure. Students enrolled in this course must have completed the student teaching application process and be concurrently enrolled in CI 476. (Fall and Spring) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

CI 476 Professional Seminar in Education

2 hours
This is a capstone seminar for teaching candidates allowing an interactive opportunity to reflect upon and share their insight, expertise, and commitment to professional education. Must be taken in conjunction with CI 475 and/or EE 465. (Fall and Spring)

CI 495/295 Field Experiences in Education

1-4 hours
An elective laboratory oriented field experience that the student elects to take, or is assigned to, in an educational setting that is designed to enrich their understanding of the profession of education. This experience may or may not be tied to requirements in another course within the department or college. Involvement may be in an educational related role or with an approved experience anywhere in the world. Arrangements must be made in advance. (Fall/Interterm/Spring. By Permission Only.) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

G-EE 210 Children’s Literature

3 hours
In this course students use the language arts of reading, writing, listening, and speaking to explore the historical development of children’s literature in English from its origins through the contemporary period, with an emphasis on contemporary works. While exploring how children’s literature artfully structures people’s experiences, values, and cultures, students will learn the elements of children’s literature, different genres, and current issues pertaining to children’s literature.  For elementary education majors, the knowledge and appreciation of children’s literature developed in the course will serve as foundational knowledge for the Reading/Language Arts methods courses. Prerequisite: Sophomore status or consent of instructor. (Spring)

EE 230 Methods for Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary School I

3 hours
This course provides the knowledge base for future elementary teachers to know, understand, and use major concepts, procedures, and reasoning processes of mathematics that define numbers and operations, geometry, measurement, data analysis and probability, and algebra so that all students understand relationships that can represent phenomena, solve problems, and manage data. This course focuses on assessment and evaluation and teaching strategies for grades K-2. Prerequisite: CI 220. (Fall)

EE 301/AR 358 Methods for Teaching Art in the Elementary School

1 or 4 hours (1 hour for ELED majors, 4 hours for Art majors)
This course is a comprehensive study of elementary art curricula and methods relevant to today’s educator in the public schools. Topics to be covered include: current techniques and materials, issues in art, basic design concepts, the developmental states of children in an art program, and curriculum implementation. (Fall)

EE 303 Reading and Language Arts I

4 hours 
This course delivers the knowledge base for understanding and using concepts from emerging literacy, science of reading, language, and child development to teach reading, writing, speaking, viewing, listening, and thinking skills and to help all students successfully apply their developing literacy skills to many different situation, materials, and ideas. This course focuses on literacy assessment and evaluation and methods for teaching K-3 grade levels. (Fall) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

EE 304 Methods for Teaching Music in the Elementary School

1 hour
This course is for elementary education majors. The emphasis is placed on methods for teaching elementary school children and the integration of music into the elementary school curriculum. Prerequisite: CI 220.(Fall)

EE 305/PE 409 Methods for Teaching Physical Education and Health in the Elementary School

2 hours (2 hours for ELED majors, 4 hours for PE majors)
This course is designed to introduce prospective elementary school health, physical education and classroom teachers to the fundamentals, principles, and practices of physical education at the elementary school level. Movement exploration and methods will be stressed in the variety of play activities introduced. Additionally, this course has been designed to integrate theory and concept learning with practical laboratory experiences. Prerequisites: CI 220. (Spring)

EE 306 Methods for Teaching Science in the Elementary School

3 hours
This course provides the knowledge base for future elementary teachers to understand and use fundamental concepts in science (including physical, life, and earth and space) as well as concepts in science and technology, science in personal social perspective, the history and nature of science, the unifying concepts of science, and the inquiry process scientists use in discovery of new knowledge to build a base for scientific and technological literacy for all students. Prerequisite: CI 220. (Fall) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

EE 307 Methods for Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary School II

3 hours
This course provides the knowledge base for future elementary teachers to know, understand, and use the major concepts, procedures, and reasoning processes of mathematics that define numbers and operations, geometry, measurement, data analysis and probability, and algebra so that all students understand relationships that can represent phenomena, solve problems, and manage data. This course focuses on assessment and evaluation and teaching strategies for grades 3-6.  Prerequisite: CI 220 and EE 230. (Spring) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

EE 309 Methods for Teaching Social Studies in the Elementary School

3 hours
A class designed for equipping elementary pre-service teachers with skills, strategies, and major concepts germane to the six social studies literacies: history, geography, socio-politics, citizenship, economics, and culture. This course includes a field experience. Prerequisite: CI 220. (Spring) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

EE 375 Elementary Education Practicum & Seminar

1-2 hours
A field experience and seminar for those seeking licensure in elementary education at the K-6 level and those seeking licensure in art, physical education, and Spanish at the PK-12 level. This course is offered for variable hour credit depending on student’s past experience(s) and licensure area(s). Student should consult with her/his advisor and the Chair of Teacher Education Program for appropriate registration. This practicum must occur between CI 251 and EE 465. Prerequisites: CI 220. Full acceptance to Teacher Education Program required. (Fall and Spring; Interterm by education department permission only) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

EE 444 Reading/Language Arts II

3 hours (Language Intensive)
This course provides a structure for providing future elementary teachers an opportunity to use concepts from emerging literacy, science of reading, language, and child development to teach reading, writing, speaking, viewing, listening, and thinking skills and to help all students successfully apply their developing literacy skills to many different situation, materials, and ideas. This course focuses on assessment and evaluation and teaching strategies for grades 4-6. This course includes a field experience. Prerequisites: EE 303 and CI 220 (Spring) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

EE 465 Student Teaching in the Elementary School

6 or 12 hours
Student Teaching in the Elementary School at McPherson College is a capstone experience allowing students to practice the skills and talents necessary to become effective educators. McPherson College offers student teaching at the appropriate level for all licensure purposes. Student teaching occurs after students have fulfilled all the necessary requirements as outlined in the Advisor/Advisee Handbook. The student teaching experience is scheduled for a full semester, a minimum of 14 consecutive weeks. Placement and hours may depend on the area(s) of licensure. Students enrolled in this course must have completed the student teaching application process and be concurrently enrolled in CI 476. (Fall and Spring) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

SE 210 Introduction to Infants, Children, and Youth with Special Needs

3 hours
This class is a survey of federal and state mandates for special education, including an overview of categorical exceptionalities delineated in the laws; service delivery systems; advocacy groups; the concept of natural environments and least restrictive environments; and the purpose and function of the IFSP and IEP. The class, which is required for all students seeking licensure in education, is designed to introduce all pre-service teachers to mild and moderate disabilities. The course also serves as a foundation for additional special education coursework. This course is a prerequisite for other special education courses. (Fall and Spring)

SE 220 Field Experience in Services for Students with Special Needs

1 hour
An early field placement for directed observation of special education teachers working with elementary- or secondary-level students with mild/moderate disabilities. (Fall, Interterm, Spring, and Summer) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

SE 310 Foundations for Special Education Services

4 hours
This course addresses historical perspectives and current practices (Module A), laws, regulations, and policies governing practice (Module B), and affects of individual differences, language, and culture on educational performance (Module C). The course includes a supervised field experience (Module D). Concurrent: Modules A-D. (Fall & Spring)

SE 315: General Methods for Special Education Services

4 hours
This course addresses assessments used for eligibility, placement and curricular decisions (Module A), the special education process from pre-identification through individual program implementation (Module B), and effective collaboration and communication skills with diverse learners, families, colleagues, and community stakeholders (Module C). The course includes a supervised field experience (Module D). Concurrent: Modules A-D Prerequisite: SPED 310 (Fall & Spring)

SE 321 Grades K-6 Methods for Special Needs and Field Experience

5 hours
This course addresses IEP implementation using evidence-based practices. Emphasis is on collaborative teaching models. Topics of study include lesson planning, basic skill and content area instruction, adapting methods and materials, positive behavior supports, and progress monitoring. SPED 331: Grades K-6 Field Experience must be taken concurrently. Prerequisites: SPED 310 & 315. (Fall & Spring)

SE 341 Grades PreK-3 Methods and Field Experience

5 hours
Grades PreK-3 Methods, addresses strategies to individual and group needs using evidence-based practices. Topics of study include learning plans, embedded instruction within a tiered framework, setting up the environment, adapting methods and materials, positive behavior supports, and progress monitoring. SPED 351, Grades PreK-3 Field Experience, must be taken concurrently. SPED 341 will involve 15 to 20 contact hours including 10 hours reading/pre-literacy and writing/pre-writing interventions with 1 child.

SE 345 Behavior Management

2 hours
This course addresses culturally sensitive methods for preventing and intervening with problem behavior. Topics include school-wide discipline systems, classroom management, social skills instruction, student support meetings (Module A) and functional analysis, non-aversive intervention, and behavior intervention plans (Module B). (Fall & Spring)

SE 361 Grades 6-12 Methods for Special Needs and Field Experience

5 hours
This course addresses IEP implementation, including transition components. Emphasis is on self-determination, self-advocacy, career awareness, and post- school options in specific outcome areas. Topics of study include curriculum standards, lesson planning, basic skills instruction, learning strategies, adapting methods, materials and assessments, positive behavior supports, and progress monitoring. SPED 371: Grades 6-12 Field Experience must be taken concurrently. Prerequisites: SPED 310 & 315. (Fall)

SE 381 Grades 4-12 Methods and Field Experience

5 hours
The SPED 381 course covers both general and specific methods used by special educators to teach students with disabilities. The course includes transition planning and IEP development, instructional planning, and selection of instructional methods to meet the needs of students with adaptive special education needs. Approaches for selecting methods and materials, for delivering instruction, and for evaluating instructional outcomes based on assessment information will also be demonstrated. (Spring)

SE 431 Grades K-6 Clinical Experience (Student Teaching)

6 hours
This course is a supervised teaching experience with a special educator who provides services for elementary level students with adaptive learning needs. The preservice teacher will work collaboratively with the cooperating special educator, families, and school team members to apply research-based knowledge of assessment, instruction aligned to IEP goals, and positive behavioral supports. Emphasis is on reflective, culturally sensitive practice. Prerequisites: SPED 210, 310, 315, 345, and 321 or 331. Concurrent or subsequent semester: SPED 499. (Fall, Spring & Summer) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

SE 433 Grades K-6 Internship

4-6 hours
This course is a supervised teaching experience with an on-site mentor who provides or supervises services for elementary level students with adaptive learning needs. Emphasis is on application of research-based content knowledge and pedagogy and reflective, culturally sensitive practice. This internship is designed for practicing teachers adding grades K-6 adaptive licensure or for students who have completed a special education clinical experience. Prerequisites: SPED 210, 310, 315, 345, and 321 or 331. Concurrent or subsequent semester: SPED 499. (Fall, Spring & Summer) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

SE 451 Grades PreK-12 Clinical Experience

5 hours
This course is a supervised teaching experience with a special educator who provides services for any of the grades PreK–12 level students with adaptive learning needs.  The pre-service teacher will work collaboratively with the cooperating special educator, families, and school team members to apply research-based knowledge of assessment, instruction aligned to IEP goals, and positive behavioral supports.  Emphasis is on reflective, culturally sensitive practice.  Prerequisites: SPED 310, 315, 345, 341, 351, 361, and 371.  Concurrent or subsequent semester: SPED 499. (Fall, Spring & Summer) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

SE 453 Grades PreK-12 Internship

5 hours
This course is a supervised teaching experience working with an on-site mentor and/or evaluator. Emphasis is on application of research-based content knowledge and pedagogy and reflective, culturally sensitive practice. This internship is designed for the student hired on a waiver teaching in his/her own classroom. The intern will apply knowledge from all coursework and learning experiences to appropriately adapt and modify learning; manage students and classroom environment being culturally-sensitive to student and family differences;  align and implement learning with IEP goals; assess learning; develop and implement academic and behavior intervention plans based on assessments and best practices; develop a case study/IEP,  plan, implement, and evaluate lessons; plan and implement appropriate transitions, education and services for the specified grade level (PreK-12)/ages of students; and practice systematic self-evaluation.  Prerequisites: SPED 310, 315, 345, 341, 351, 361, and 371.  Concurrent or subsequent semester: SPED 499. (Fall, Spring & Summer) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

SE 471 Grades 6-12 Clinical Experience (Student Teaching)

6 hours
This course is a supervised teaching experience with a special educator who provides services for secondary level students with adaptive learning needs. The pre-service teacher will work collaboratively with the cooperating special educator, families, and school team members to apply research-based knowledge of assessment, instruction aligned to IEP goals, and positive behavioral supports. Emphasis is on reflective, culturally sensitive practice. Prerequisites: SPED 210, 310, 315, 345, and 361 or 371 Concurrent or subsequent semester: SPED 499. (Fall, Spring & Summer) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

SE 473 Grades 6-12 Internship

4-6 hours
This course is a supervised teaching experience with an on-site mentor who provides or supervises services for secondary level students with adaptive learning needs. Emphasis is on application of research-based content knowledge and pedagogy and reflective, culturally sensitive practice. This internship is designed for practicing teachers adding grades 6-12 adaptive licensure or for students who have completed a special education clinical experience. Prerequisites: SPED 210, 310, 315, 345, and 361 or 371. Concurrent or subsequent semester: SPED 499. (Fall, Spring & Summer) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

SE 499 Capstone Issues

1 hour
This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to reflect on their clinical experience or internship and professional role with peers, ACCK faculty, and special educators. Topics of discussion include professionalism, ethical issues, advocacy, diversity, and resources. Prerequisites: SPED 210, 310, 315, 345, 321 & 331 or 361 & 371. Concurrent or previous semester: SPED 431 or SPED 471 (or comparable Internship). (Fall, Spring & Summer)

SE 349 Communication Development and Communication Disorders

3 hours
This class offers a survey of normal and atypical language development, assessment, bilingual education, contributions of the educator to overcoming language problems, and the relationships between oral language and reading and writing. There are no prerequisites for this course. (Interterm and Summer)

SE 380/678 Topics in Special Education:

1 hour
This course will focus on bringing the students up to date on current methods, changes In the field of special education, and new information related to the characteristics of children and youth with special needs. With consent of advisor.

Special Course Options
295/495 Field Experience (1-4 hours)
297  Study Abroad (12-16 hours)
299/499 Independent Study (1-4 hours)
388 Career Connections (3-10 hours)
445 Readings and Research (1-4 hours)

 

2022|Catalog 22-23, Curriculum & Instruction|

Sociology Course Descriptions

G-SO 101 Introduction to Sociology

3 hours
An introduction to the general field of sociology and its principle subdivisions; the nature of culture; the socialization of the individual; the character and behavior of social groups; social organization and institutions; social interaction, deviant behavior and social change. (Fall, Interterm)

G-SO 202 Minorities in the U.S.

3-4 hours
An exploration of the problems faced by physical, cultural, economic, and behavioral minority groups in American society; the causes and consequences of prejudice, stereotypes, and discrimination; the nature of minority-majority group interaction; current crises and possible solutions; and some comparison with similar situations in other countries. (Fall, Spring)

SO 206 Social Problems

3-4 hours
A study of contemporary American and world social problems, including prostitution, drug addiction, poverty, sexism, racism, and war. (Spring)

SO/PY 210 Human Sexuality

3 hours
A study of female roles, male roles, values, life adjustments, sexual identities, religion, language, and behavior differences based on cultural, educational and socioeconomic factors related to human sexuality. Course uses lectures, audio- visuals, discussions, guest resource persons, assigned readings, and projects or papers to present information. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or higher or instructor consent. (Spring)

G-SO 246 Marriage and Family

3-4 hours
This course explores the institution of marriage and family in American society from a sociological perspective. Topics covered include socialization, dating, courtship, marriage, parenting, dysfunctions, divorce and remarriage. Family dynamics and major social changes affecting the family are discussed. The course allows the individual to explore her/his own marriage and family attitudes and experiences. (Interterm)

SO 260 Introduction to Human Services

3 hours
An introduction to the history, theory, practice, and trends in human services. The goals, functions, and organization of human services are examined in the context of contemporary social problems; a historical survey of human services is presented as a background against which current efforts can be viewed; major theories, techniques, and methods that govern helping efforts are covered; a description of consumers of human services, and the strategies both consumers and service providers initiate to overcome barriers to effective service delivery, are discussed. Career opportunities in the human services field are also explored. (Spring)

SO 275 Criminal Justice

3 hours
An introduction to the field of criminology and the American criminal justice system. Emphasis is placed upon the nature of crime, and trends and theories of crime along with components and functions of the criminal justice system including police, courts, and corrections. (Spring)

SO 285/PE 285 Sociological Implications of Sport & Recreation

2 hours
A study of the interrelationships of sport and society.

SO/PY 303 Social Psychology

3 hours
A study of the individual as he/she is affected by other persons. Topics covered include: interpersonal relations, social learning, conformity and individuality, attitudes, groups and organizations, and others. Discussion and involvement methods are emphasized. Prerequisite: G-PY 101 and PY 204 or G-SO 101 and G-SO 202. (Spring)

SO/PY 308 Counseling

3 hours
A study of the theory and practice of counseling including a survey of the various systems of psychotherapy (person-centered therapy, psychoanalysis, behavioral therapy, cognitive-behavioral therapy, etc.) and learning, through role- play, of skills needed to be a helper. Prerequisite: PY 405 or instructor consent. (Spring)

SO 320 Urban Sociology

3 hours
A study of the development of modern cities, theories of urban growth, and urban problems and policies. Topics will include urbanization, urban renewal, economic restructuring and globalization, international migration, culture and politics of urban places, gentrification, crime and poverty, and ecological patterns of land use. Prerequisite: G-SO 101 or instructor consent. (Fall)

SO/PY 335 Research Methods I

4 hours
The basic research methods course for behavioral science majors. Correlational, survey, and case study techniques, basic experimental design, research ethics, and general professional conduct of empirical investigation are studied in a team- taught format. Lecture, laboratory, and practical field exercises are used as learning methods. Prerequisite: G-MA 221. Concurrent enrollment is acceptable. (Fall)

SO/PY 336 Research Methods II

4 hours
The second of the two basic research methods courses for behavioral science majors. Relatively advanced scientific research designs and statistical analyses are studied. SPSS, a statistical package, is used for most of the work in the course. Prerequisites: G-MA 221 and SO/PY 335. (Interterm)

SO 355 Juvenile Delinquency

3 hours
A comprehensive examination of juvenile delinquency and the juvenile justice system. An emphasis on the causes of juvenile delinquency; its relation to family, school, peers, and society; treatment of juvenile delinquents; and criminal proceedings and the family court. (Fall)

SO 365 Social Work in American Society

3 hours
An introduction to the social work movement, profession, and practice in the United States. The course examines the social welfare policies and client populations that engage social workers, and explores the social work practice settings that range from child maltreatment and health care to work with older adults and corrections. Social issues are raised and case examples are presented to give insight into the clients and issues for which social workers initiate advocacy and social change through leadership positions in American society. Career opportunities in the social work profession are also explored. (Fall)

SO/PY 375 Junior Seminar

1 hour
Several topics and issues are examined in a seminar format. These include ethical practices and concerns as they relate to research and clinical work, the development and execution of basic and applied research, and career development and related matters. Students work toward developing appropriate research topics for their senior theses and may explore internship opportunities. (Spring)

SO 401 Sociological Theory

4 hours
A review and analysis of historical sociological theory including the masters of sociology: Durkheim, Weber, Marx, Pareto, Veblen, and others. Prerequisite: Six hours in sociology. (Spring, even years)

SO 425 Deviant Behavior

3 hours
This course exposes the student to the perspectives, principles, issues and research findings of the deviant behavior field. Topics covered include: poverty, substance abuse, prostitution, homosexuality, violent behavior, family violence, mental disorders, crime and social control. Prerequisite: SO 206, SO/PY 335 or instructor consent. ( Fall)

SO 435 Special Topics in Behavioral Sciences

3 hours
This course explores topics not normally found in regular offerings allowing students the opportunity to explore and grow their sociological imagination as well as their knowledge of theory and research methods.

SO 450 Proseminar in Sociology

3 hours
An advanced-level seminar to integrate the information learned in earlier sociology courses. The goal is to bring full circle the sociological knowledge of students who are about to graduate. The course will explore a number of enduring sociological issues, including the meaning of sociology, the purpose of sociology and the effect sociology has on the world. Prerequisite: Upper division majors/minors only or instructor consent. (Spring, odd years)

SO 455 Police and Law Enforcement

3 hours
An analysis of the evolution of police, the police system, and the police role. Organization and jurisdiction of local, state, and federal law enforcement agencies along with philosophical and ethical issues surrounding their role will be discussed. (Fall, even years)

SO 460 Correctional Institutions

3 hours
An exploration of the historical and philosophical development of correctional systems with an emphasis on categories of inmates, treatment policies and their effectiveness, staff organization and training and their relation to the criminal justice system, and problems associated with correctional practices and procedures. (Fall, odd years)

SO 470 Social Gerontology

3 hours
A comprehensive introduction to an emerging field dealing with the social aspects of human aging. The course covers major areas of theory, research, social policy, and practice that impact older adults, and discusses the strengths and contributions that elders bring to their peers, families, and communities. The historical overview of aging in the United States, as well as the human and social meanings behind longevity population shift, is also explored. Also examined are social issues and psychological perspectives and strategies, as well as political and economic situations that produce undesirable outcomes as well as promote well- being in later life. Career options in the field of social gerontology are also explored. (Fall, even years)

SO/PY 474 Scientific Writing for the Behavioral Sciences

2 hours
This course is intended to help students develop the skills needed for writing research reports in the social sciences. It is a research-based course in which students learn to synthesize what they have read and present it as a scientific review of the literature; these are the primary goals. Thus, it focuses on how to apply social science theories and research methods to the writing of the senior research proposal. This course also provides students with the opportunity to prepare papers for regional conferences in sociology and psychology. Research manual required. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing in the Behavioral Sciences. (Fall)

SO/PY 475 Senior Seminar/Thesis

2 hours (Language Intensive)
This is the culminating or capstone course for behavioral science majors. Coordinated guidance is given on the preparation of the Senior Thesis. Discussion of current topics in sociology and psychology is combined with guidance on practical matters such as application to graduate study, developing a career, and so on. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing in the Behavioral Sciences. (Spring)

SO 495 Field Placement

1-4 hours
Practical experience working in an established social agency, mental health clinic, or correctional institution. Supervision and direction given on the job by the agency personnel. College personnel visit and give consultation.

 

Special Course Options
295/495 Field Experience (1-4 hours)
297  Study Abroad (12-16 hours)
299/499 Independent Study (1-4 hours)
388 Career Connections (3-10 hours)
445 Readings and Research (1-4 hours)

2022|Catalog 22-23, Sociology|

Personnel List

President of McPherson College

Michael P. Schneider, Ed.D., McPherson, Kansas

Faculty

Photo directory of current Faculty

Edward Barr, B.A., B.S., M.A. (2010)
Associate Professor of Technology (2016)
B.A., University of the South; B.S., McPherson College; M.A., University of Kansas.

Becki Bowman, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (2006)
Professor of Communication (2018)
B.A., McPherson College; M.A., Wichita State University; Ph.D., Kent State University.

Jd. Bowman, B.A., M.A., M.F.A. (2005)
Professor of Theatre (2018)
B.A., McPherson College; M.A., M.F.A., Kent State University.

Mary Bridger, B.S., B.A., M.S. (2017)
Instructor in English 2022
B.S., Southwestern, B.A., M.A, Fort Hays State University

Luke Chennell, A.T., B.A., M.A. (2003-2011; 2015)
Associate Professor of Technology (2019)
A.T., B.A., McPherson College; M.A., Wichita State University.

Ku-Sup Chin, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (2003)
Professor of Behavioral Science: Sociology (2020)
B.A., Korea University; M.A., Ph.D., University of California-Irvine.

Christopher Clark, B.S., B.S. (2016)
Assistant Professor of Technology
B.S., MidAmerica Nazarene University; B.S., McPherson College.

April Counts, B.S., M.A.Ed. (2017)
Assistant Professor of Education
B.S., University of Central Missouri; M.A.Ed., Baker University; ESOL Endorsement.

Amber Dittert, B.A., M.S. (2016)
Assistant Professor of Mathematics (2017)
B.A., St. Mary’s University; M.S., Texas Tech University.

Kerry Dobbins, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (2010)
Associate Professor of History (2016)
B.A., Skidmore College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Michael Dudley, B.S., B.S., M.S. (2014)
Associate Professor of Technology (2020)
B.S., University of Nebraska-Lincoln; B.S., McPherson College;
M.S., Pittsburg State University.

Dee Erway-Sherwood, B.F.A., M.F.A. (2003)
Professor  of Art (2016)
Executive Director of Visual & Digital Arts (2017)
B.F.A., M.F.A., Fort Hays State University.

Jonathan Frye, B.S., M.S., Ph.D. (1993)
Professor of Natural Science (2011)
B.S., Lebanon Valley College; M.S., Ph.D., University of Virginia.

Timothy Frye, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (2020)
Assistant Professor of Mathematics
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Oklahoma-Norman.

Jamie Fuqua, B.S., D.P.T. (2021)
Instructor of Health Science
B.S., McPherson College; D.P.T., Rockhurst University

Rodney Gieselman, B.S., M.B.A. (2003)
Professor of Business (2016)
B.S., University of Nebraska-Kearney; M.B.A., Bellarmine University.

Lindsey Godfrey, B.S., M.B.A. (2017)
Assistant Professor of Business
B.S., McPherson College; M.B.A., Columbia Southern University.

Curtis Goodwin, A.S., B.S., M.S. (2014)
Associate Professor of Technology
A.S., Colby Community College;, B.S., M.S., Pittsburg State University.

Kelsy Gossett Dennis, A.S., B.A., M.F.A. (2019)
Assistant Professor of Photography, Art & Design
A.S., Pratt Community College; Diploma, Hallmark Institute of Photography;
B.A., M.F.A., Wichita State University.

Garrick Green, A.T., B.A., M.S. (2001)
Professor of Technology (2019)
A.T., B.A., McPherson College; M.S., Pittsburg State University.

Michaela Groeblacher, B.A., M.F.A. (2014)
Associate Professor of Art (2020)
B.A., McPherson College ; M.F.A., Fort Hays State University.

Norman Hope, B.S., M.B.A., Ph.D. (1982-1991; 2020)
Associate Professor of Business (2020)
B..S., Manchester University; M.B.A., Emporia State University; Ph.D., Kansas State University.

Kyle Hopkins, B.A., B.M.E., M.M. (2013)
Associate Professor of Music and Director of Bands
B.A., University of Kansas; B.M.E., Washburn University; M.M., Kansas State University.

Stephen Hoyer, B.A., M.S.Ed., Ph.D. (2016)
Assistant Professor of Behavioral Science: Psychology 
B.S., M.S.Ed., University of Nebraska-Kearney; Ph.D., Oklahoma State University.

Min Jung Kim, B.S., M.Ed., Ph.D (2022)
Assistant Professor of Sport Management
B.S., School of Foreign Languages Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China
M.Ed., Springfield College, Ph.D. University of New Mexico

Shane Kirchner, B.A., M.Ed., Ph.D. (2004)
Professor of Education (2018)
Director of M.Ed. Program (2015)

B.A., McPherson College; M.Ed., Wichita State University;
ESL Licensure, Emporia State University; Ph.D., Kansas State University.

Elliot Koester, B.S., M.P.H. (2022)
Assistant Professor of Healthcare Management and Rural Health Outreach Representative
B.S., Southwestern College, M.P.H. North Dakota State University

Manjula Koralegedara, B.S., M.S., Ph.D. (2010)
Associate Professor of Chemistry (2016)
B.S., University of Peradeniya, Sri Lanka; M.S., Ph.D., Wichita State University.

Julia Largent, B.S., M.A., Ph.D. (2017)
Assistant Professor of Communication
B.S., Manchester University; M.A., Ball State University; Ph.D., Bowling Green State University.

Austin McCulloch, B.S., M.S., Ph.D. (2021)
Assistant Professor of Sports Science
B.S., Tarleton State University; M.S., Ph.D., Tarleton State University

Kirk MacGregor, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. (2016)
Associate Professor of Philosophy & Religion (2019)
A.B., Miami University; M.A., Biola University; Ph.D., University of Iowa.

Ami Martinez, B.A., M.Ed. (2012)
Associate Professor of English (2020)
B.A., M.Ed., Wichita State University.

Lorena Medrano, B.A., M.S., M.S., M.A. (2013)
Associate Professor of Spanish (2019)
B.A., Universidad Rafael Urdaneta; M.S., Universidad del Zulia; M.S., M.A., University of Missouri-Columbia.

Anna Michelson, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., (2022)
Assistant Professor of Sociology
B.A., Macalester College, M.A., Ph.D. Northwestern University

 Bryan D. Midgley, B.S., M.A., Ph.D. (2000)
Professor of Behavioral Science: Psychology (2019)
B.S., Eastern Michigan University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Kansas.

Lanh Nguyen, B.S., M.S., Ph.D. (2021)
Assistant Professor of Business
B.S., Banking Academy of Vietnam; M.S., University of Birmingham; Ph.D., Illinois Institute of Technology.

Katharine O’Connor, B.S., M.O.T (2022)
Assistant Professor of Health Science
B.S., Kansas State University, B.S., M.O.T. University of Kansas

Christopher Paulsen, A.T., B.S., M.S. (2004)
Associate Professor of Technology (2018)
A.T., B.S., McPherson College; M.S., Pittsburg State University.

Jennifer Pollard, B.A., M.A. (2018)
Visiting Assistant Professor of Theatre
B.A., McPherson College; M.A., Michigan State University.

Nathan Pollard, B.A. (2016)
Assistant Professor of Digital Media (2020)
B.A., Ravensbourne College-U.K.; BTEC National Diploma in Graphic Design, Plymouth College-U.K.

Matthew Porter, B.A., M.B.A. (2016)
Assistant Professor of Business
B.A., McPherson College; M.B.A., Colorado State University.

Karrie Rathbone, B.S., M.S., Ph.D. (2003-2006; 2019)
Associate Professor of Biology (2019)
B.S., M.S., Emporia State University; Ph.D., Kansas State University.

Ricardo Rodriguez, B.S., B.S., M.S., Ph.D. (2018)
Assistant Professor of Physics
B.S., B.S., University of Los Andes-Bogota, Colombia; M.S., Ph.D., Iowa State University.

Vicki Schmidt, A.A.S., B.S., M.S. (2015)
Assistant Professor of Education
A.A.S., Kansas State University; B.S., Fort Hays State University; M.S., Baker University.

Kerri Snell, B.A., M.F.A. (2016)
Assistant Professor of English
B.A., McPherson College; M.F.A., Ashland University.

Kimberly Diane Stanley, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (1988)
Professor of English (1997)
B.A., Trinity University; M.A., St. John’s College at Santa Fe; Ph.D., University of Texas.

Allan van Asselt, B.S., Ph.D. (2000)
Professor of Chemistry
B.A., McPherson College; Ph.D., California Institute of Technology.

Kara Voss, B.S., M.Ed. (2019)
Assistant Professor of Sport Studies (2022)
Adjunct Professor (2019)
B.S., Minnesota State University, M.Ed., McPherson College

Brad Vogel, B.S., M.M., D.M.A. (2021)
Associate Professor of Music and Director of Choral Activities
B.S., Tabor College; M.M., University of Northern Colorado; D.M.A., University of Missouri.

Dustin Wilgers, B.S., M.S., Ph.D. (2011)
Associate Professor of Biology (2017)
B.S., Southwestern College; M.S., Kansas State University; Ph.D., University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

Amanda Yamasaki, B.A., M.S., Ph.D. (2021)
Assistant Professor of Biology, Director of Undergraduate Research
B.A., Princeton University; M.S., Roosevelt University, Ph.D., University of Notre Dame.

Kenneth Yohn, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (1999)
Professor of History (2005)
B.A., Manchester College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Iowa.

Special Education Faculty (KICA)

Lynette Cross, B.S., M.S. (2018)
Instructor of Special Education
B.S., Tabor College; M.S., Wichita State University.

Beverly Schottler, B.S., M.S., Ed.D. (2005)
Program Director; Instructor of Special Education
B.S., M.S., Fort Hays State University; Ed.D., Kansas State University.

Faculty Emeriti

Bruce Clary, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (1983)
Vice President for Academic Affairs (2014)
Professor of English (2014); Maurice Hess Chair in English (2000)
B.A., McPherson College; M.A., Wichita State University; Ph.D., Kansas State University.

Wayne A. Conyers, B.A., M.A., M.F.A. (1983)
Professor Emeritus of Art (2018)
B.A., Bethany College; M.A., University of Missouri-Kansas City; M.F.A., Fort Hays State University.

Doris E. Coppock, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. (1950)
Professor Emerita of Health, Physical Education and Recreation (1992)
A.B., McPherson College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Iowa.

Alfred Dutrow, B.S., M.S. (1973)
Professor Emeritus of Agriculture (2009)
B.S., McPherson College; M.S., Michigan State University.

Laura Workman Eells, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (1996)
Professor of Behavioral Science: Sociology (2015)
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

Dale C. Goldsmith, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. (1969)
Professor Emeritus of Philosophy and Religion (2017)
A.B., Princeton University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago.

Bob R. Green, A.A., B.A., M.A. (1967)
Professor Emeritus of English (1993)
A.A., Central College; B.A., Seattle Pacific University; M.A., Emporia State University.

Steven C. Gustafson, B.M., M.M., D.M.A. (1980)
Professor Emeritus of Music (2014)
B.M., Bethany College; M.M., D.M.A., University of Colorado-Boulder.

Dan Hoffman, B.S., M.Ed. (1982)
Professor Emeritus of Physical Education (2019)
B.S., Manchester College; M.Ed., Wichita State University.

Paul W. Hoffman, B.S., M.Div., M.A., Ph.D. (1976)
President Emeritus (1996)
Professor Emeritus of Psychology (1996)
B.S., Manchester College; M.Div., Bethany Theological Seminary; M.A., University of Michigan;
Ph.D., Purdue University; Certificate, Harvard Institute for Educational Management.

Corinne Neubauer Hughbanks, B.A., M.S., Ph.D. (1966)
Professor Emerita of Languages (1993)
B.A., Asbury College; M.S., Emporia State University; Ph.D., University of Nebraska.

Gilford J. Ikenberry, Jr., B.S., M.S., Ph.D. (1961)
Professor Emeritus of Biology (1993)
B.S., McPherson College; M.S., Oklahoma State University; Ph.D., Iowa State University.

Shingo Kajinami, B.S., Ph.D. (1986)
Professor Emeritus of Chemistry (2003)
B.S., Bethel College; Ph.D., University of Oklahoma.

Larry Kitzel, B.S., M.M., D.M.A. (1970)
Professor Emeritus of Music (2004)
B.S., McPherson College; M.M., Wichita State University; D.M.A., University of Oklahoma.

Robert W. Neufeld, B.A., M.A., M.S., Ph.D. (1991)
Professor Emeritus of Computer Science (2004)
B.A., Bethel College; M.A., M.S., Wichita State University; Ph.D., Iowa State University.

Herbert Smith, B.A., M. Div., Ph.D. (1982)
Professor of Philosophy and Religion (1994)
Burton Metzler Chair in Philosophy and Religion (1999)
B.A., Elizabethtown College; M.Div., Bethany Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Claremont Graduate School.

Jeanne Jacoby Smith, B.A., M.A., Ed.D. (1982)
Professor Emerita of Education (2009)
B.A., Elizabethtown College; M.A., James Madison University; Ed.D., Kansas State University.

Susan Krehbiel Taylor, B.A., M.L.S., Ph.D. (1979)
Professor Emerita of Journalism (2010); College Librarian Emerita (2010)
B.A., McPherson College; M.L.S., Emporia State University; Ph.D., Kansas State University.

Roger Trimmell, B.S., M.Ed. (1982)
Professor Emeritus of Physical Education (2011)
B.S., McPherson College; M.Ed., Wichita State University.

Karlene Morphew Tyler, B.A., M.A. (1975)
Professor Emerita of Theatre (2018)
B.A., McPherson College; M.A., Emporia State University.

Ricky W. Tyler, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (1977)
Professor Emeritus of Theatre (2018)
B.A., McPherson College; M.A., Emporia State University; Ph.D., Michigan State University.

Jan van Asselt, B.S., M.A., Ph.D. (1965)
Professor Emeritus of German and Linguistics (2000)
B.S., McPherson College; M.A., University of Colorado, Boulder; Ph.D., University of California.

Ann Zerger, B.S., M.F.A. (2004)
Professor Emerita of Art (2019)
B.S., University of Kentucky; M.F.A., Wichita State University.

Full-time Administrative and General

Photo directory of current Staff

Steve Anderson (2002)
Facilities Management: Custodian

Brenda Andrews, B.S., (2021)
Payroll Manager, PDSO
B.S., University of Nevada-Las Vegas.

Abbey Archer-Rierson, B.S., M.Ed. (2008)
Chief of Staff (2011)
B.S., University of Kansas; M.Ed., McPherson College.

Dave Auman (rehire 2021)
Assistant Director of Facilities

Leslie Auman (rehire 2022)
Custodial Supervisor

David Barrett, B.S., M.S.S. (1991)
Advancement Officer (2014)
B.S., McPherson College, M.S.S., United States Sports Academy.

Linda Barrett, B.S. (1996)
Coordinator of Student Success and Engagement (2017)
B.S., McPherson College.

Kris Beauchamp, B.S., M.S., (2021)
Assistant Football Coach (2022)
Seasonal  Assistant Football Coach
B.A. Centre College, M.S., Liberty College

Amy Beckman, B.S., M.A. (2019)
Executive Director of Career & Experiential Learning
B.S., Kansas State University; M.A., City University of Seattle.

Abby Bolton, B.A. (2022)
Head Softball Coach
B.A., Friends University.

Sara Brubaker, B.S., M.S. (2002)
Director of Financial Aid and Admissions Operations (2012)
B.S., McPherson College: M.S., Friends University.

Cory Cahill, B.S. (2019)
Head Coach: Men’s & Women’s Volleyball
B.S., Hannibal-La Grange University.

Connor Carman, B.S. (2019)
Assistant Men’s Basketball Coach
B.S., Wichita State University.

Duane Carroll, B.S. (2021)
Director of Facilities
B.S., Colorado State University.

Nichole Carver, B.S. (2022)
Academic Records Specialist
B.S. Fort Hays State University.

 Bryce Chavis, B.A., M.B.A. (2020)
Assistant Football Coach
B.A., M.B.A., Washburn University.

Bruce Clary, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (1983)
Academic Affairs Specialist (2022)
Vice President for Academic Affairs (2014)
Professor of English (2014)
Maurice Hess Chair in English (2000)
B.A., McPherson College; M.A., Wichita State University; Ph.D., Kansas State University.

 Madison Clatt B.A., M.A. (2022)
Library Services Assistant
B.A., Iowa State University; M.A., Arizona State University.

Chad Clevenger, B.S., M.A. (2021)
Director of Track and Field
B.S., Grand Valley State University, M.A., Concordia University.

Jerod Corbus, B.S. (2020)
Executive Assistant to the Provost
B.S., McPherson College.

Dakota Cornwell, (2022)
Custodian

Anthony Cotton, B.S., M.Ed. (2022)
Assistant Football Coach
B.S., Bethel College, M.Ed., Langston University

Matthew Cotton, B.A., M.A. (2021)
Admissions and Financial Aid Counselor
B.A., Kansas State University; M.A., University of Kansas.

Robert Cox, B.S. (2022)
Assistant Football Coach
B.S., Kansas Wesleyan University.

 Jerrod Dalke (2021)
Maintenance Technician

Chris Dawson, B.S. (2021)
Assistant Coach, Baseball
B.S., Central Christian College.

Michael Davis, B.S., (2022)
Admissions and  Financial Aid Counselor
B.S., Lourdes University.

Dara Dix, B.S., (2013)
Accounting Specialist
B.S., McPherson College.

T.J. Eskildsen, B.S., M.S. (2010)
Head Coach: Men’s Basketball (2019)
B.S., Iowa Wesleyan College; M.S., William Woods University.

Jeremiah Fiscus, B.S., M.S., M.Ed. (2018)
Head Coach: Football
B.S., McPherson College; M.S., Northwestern State University; M.Ed., Texas Christian University.

Kendra Flory, B.A., M.Div. (2017)
Advancement and Alumni Assistant
B.A., Bridgewater College; M.Div., Bethany Theological Seminary.

Kent Freund, B.S., M.S. (2019)
Assistant Coach: Men’s Soccer
B.S., Fort Hays State University; M.S., Baker University.

Johnny Gilkey (2019)
Facilities Management: Maintenance Technician

Tina Goodwin, B.A. (2017)
Director of Public Relations
B.A., Creighton University.

Amanda Gutierrez, B.S., M.B.A. (2009)
Provost and Executive Vice President
B.A., Kansas Wesleyan University; M.B.A., Friends University.

Patricia Hartshorn, B.A. (2014)
Registrar (2014)
B.A., Bethany College.

Tony Helfrich, B.S. (2019)
Director of Adventure Program (2019)
B.S., Kansas State University.

Sandra Hiebert, B.S., M.A. (2022)
Director of Institutional Assessment and Academic Compliance
B.S., Kansas State University; M.A., University of Minnesota.

Ally Holloway, B.S. (2022)
Assistant Women’s Soccer Coach
B.S. Lewis University.

 Christi Hopkins, B.S., M.A. (2007)
Vice President for Enrollment (2014)
B.S., Southwest Baptist University; M.A., Baker University.

Mariah Hudson-Palmer, B.S. (2014)
Facilities Management: Grounds Assistant
B.S., University of California-Davis.

Meghan Iglehart, B.A., M.B.A. (2021)
Director of Enrollment Development
B.A., Oklahoma State University, M.B.A., Emporia State University.

Tracy Jex, B.A., M.A. (2022)
Assistant Cross Country and Track Coach
B.A., Colorado Christian University, M.A., Adams State University.

Lindsey Kepka, B.A., M.B.A., M.Ed. (2022)
Director of Annual Giving
B.A., M.B.A., Kansas Wesleyan University, M.Ed. Fort Hayes State University

Evan Knight, B.S., M.S. (2019)
Assistant Coach: Football
B.S., M.S., University of Central Missouri.

Ramona “Mona” Lange, B.S. (2022)
Student Accounts Specialist
B.S., McPherson College

Brian Lundberg, A.A. (2003)
Director of Marketing (2015)
A.A., Art Institute of Dallas.

Amelia Lutz, B.A. (2018)
Advancement Services Coordinator
B.A., Southwestern College.

Michael Marshall, B.S. (2022)
Information Technology Assistant
B.S., Tabor College

Brian Martin, B.S. (2009)
Director of Historic Automotive Restoration Projects (2014)
B.S., McPherson College.

Travis Mason, B.S., M.Ed. (2021)
Assistant Coach, Football
B.S., M.Ed., Northwest Missouri State University.

Heather Mierkiewicz (2016)
Admissions Operations Coordinator (2018)

Janelle Miller (2000)
Facilities Management: Custodian (2001)

Abigayle Morgan, B.S. (2019)
Coordinator of Auto Restoration Events
B.S., McPherson College.

Kevin Morris, A.S., B.S. (2016)
Computer Services Assistant
A.S., B.S., Brown Mackie College.

Robert Mowat (2017)
Facilities Management: Maintenance Technician/HVAC

Ryo Nakazono, B.S., M.S. (2021)
Athletic Trainer
B.S., Yokohama College of Rehabilitation; M.S., Weber State University.

Jeremy Nelson, B.A. (2018)
Director of Athletic Communications; Assistant Athletic Director
B.A., Bethany College.

Joshua Nichols, A.A., B.S., M.A. (2018)
Head Coach: Women’s Basketball
A.A., Northern Oklahoma College; B.S., Oklahoma Wesleyan University; M.A., Baker University.

Lisa Nightingale (2021)
Financial Aid & Admissions Operations Specialist

Andy Olsen, B.S. (2014)
Director of Financial Aid
B.S., Central Christian College.

Kelly Olson, B.S. (2018)
Admissions Associate; Campus Visit Coordinator
B.S., Northern State University.

Mark Olson, B.S. (2015)
Head Coach: Women’s Soccer (2019)
B.S., Wichita State University.

Louis Parker, B.S., (2021)
Assistant Men’s Basketball Coach
B.S., McPherson College

Christine Paulsen, B.A., M.S.,(2022)
ERP Manager
B.A., McPherson College, M.S., Friends University.

Dane Pavlovich, B.S., M.B.A. (2019)
Director of Admissions (2020)
B.S., Kansas State University; M.B.A., Stephens College.

David Penalva (2007)
Facilities Management: Custodian

Amanda Peterson, B.S. (2014)
Facilities Management: Grounds Assistant
B.S., Kansas State University.

Hannah Piechowski, B.A, M.Ed., Ph.D. (2021)
Associate Vice President for Student Life & Dean of Students
B.A., Bellarmine University; M.Ed., University of Louisville; Ph.D., Bellarmine University.

Jamie Pjesky, B.S. (2015)
Assistant Dean of Campus Life and Belonging (2020)
B.S., Pittsburg State University.

Andrew Pratt, B.S. (2021)
Assistant Coach, Baseball
B.S., Colby-Sawyer College

Keiran President, B.S., M.B.A., (2021)
Guest Lecturer – Marketing and International Business
B.S., Ottawa University; M.B.A., William Woods University.

Doug Quint, A.A., B.S. (2003)
Head Coach, Men’s Soccer 
A.A., Allen County Community College; B.S., Bethel College; USSF ‘C’ License; NSCAA Advanced National Diploma; NSCAA Levels I and II GK License.

Rhianna Reed, B.S. (2019)
Assistant Registrar (2020)
B.S., McPherson College.

Monica Rice, B.S., M.A. (2016)
Director of Alumni and Constituent Relations
B.S., Manchester College; M.A., Bethany Theological Seminary.

Michael P. Schneider, B.S., M.B.A., Ed.D. (2002)
President (2009)
B.S., McPherson College; M.B.A., Denver University;
Ed.D., University of Pennsylvania.

Phillip Schoenwetter, B.S., M.S. (2008)
Head Athletic Trainer (2013)
B.S., MidAmerica Nazarene University; M.S., Kansas State University; ATC, LAT.

Tony Segovia, B.S. (2018)
Assistant Athletic Director (2022)
Head Coach: Softball
B.S., McPherson College.

Chandler Short, B.S., M.Ed. (2017)
Athletic Director (2020)
B.S., McPherson College; M.Ed., University of Oklahoma.

De Marcus Stid, B.S., (2021)
Assistant Coach: Track and Field
B.S., Indiana Institute of Technology

Zack Sigler, A.S., Butler Community College
Assistant Director of Athletic Facilities
A.S., Butler Community College

Marty Sigwing, B.S., M.Ed. (2012)
Director of Facilities
B.S., Southwestern College; M.Ed., McPherson College.

Tammy Sigwing (2015)
Accounting Specialist

Kristina Sojka, B.A., M.Ed.,  (2021)
Director of Library Services
B.A., Wichita State University; M.S., Kent State University

Brenda Stocklin-Smith, B.S.B.A., M.Ed. (2012)
Director of Human Resources
B.S.B.A., University of Missouri-Columbia; M.Ed., McPherson College; PHR, SHRM-CP.

Connie Stucky (1991)
Facilities Management: Office Manager (2001)

Carol Summervill, B.B.A. (2019)
Vice President for Finance, CFO
B.B.A., Wichita State University; CPA, CGMA.

Richard (Rick) L. Tuxhorn, B.S., M.Ed. (2012)
Assistant Vice President for Finance
B.S., Sterling College; M.Ed., McPherson College; CPA, CGMA.

Kristi Van Boskereck, B.S., M.S. (2020)
Athletic Trainer
B.S., M.A., Oklahoma State University

Spencer Williams, B.A., M.B.A. (2022)
Assistant Athletic Director, Marketing and Promotions
B.A., M.B.A., Mercer University.

Erik Vogel, B.S.  (2003-2007; 2019)
Vice President for Advancement (2019)
B.S., McPherson College.

Bonnie Wall (2009)
Facilities Management: Custodian

Courtney Weesner, B.S. (2021)
Admissions and Financial Aid Counselor
B.S., McPherson College.

Jessy Wisdom, B.S. (2015)
Financial Aid Assistant
B.S., McPherson College.

Sarah Wood, B.S. (2021)
Director of Student Life
B.S., Oklahoma Panhandle State University.

Part-time Staff

Brittany Baroni B.S., (2021)
Assistant Coach: Softball
B.S., McPherson College

Aubrey Beaumont, B.A., M.Ed. (2021)
Assistant Coach: Volleyball
B.A., M.Ed., University of Jamestown

Coshan Campbell, A.A., B.A. (2021)
Athletic Financial Intern 
A.A., Highland Community College; B.A., Wayland Baptist University

Jill Hemenway, B.A. (2017)
Administrative Assistant for Teacher Education
B.A., Bethany College.

 

 

2022|11 Personnel, Catalog 22-23|

Financial Aid Process

Over 99 percent of McPherson College students receive financial assistance each year from McPherson College scholarships and awards, federal and state programs, work-study programs, and educational loans.

McPherson College has a financial aid awarding policy that considers a variety of factors including academic achievement, participation in co-curricular activities, and financial need. The college’s goal is to award enough financial assistance to provide incentive, recognition, and access.

Financial Aid Application Process

To be considered for and receive financial aid, students should take the following steps:

  • Submit their Application for Admission and academic transcripts to McPherson College. Students must be admitted to McPherson College in order to be considered for aid.
  • Submit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). McPherson College’s priority deadline for FAFSA submissions is March 1 each year. McPherson College’s federal school code is 001933.
  • Review their Student Aid Report (SAR) and submit verification documentation to the Financial Aid Office. Students whose Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) is selected by the Department of Education for verification must complete the Verification Worksheet (Dependent, Independent) and submit official tax transcripts from the IRS for the student and/or parents/spouse. If supporting schedules are required, the college will ask for them separately.
  • Await receipt of their Financial Aid Award Notice, which the college prepares and mails/emails, usually within 3–5 working days after their financial aid record is complete.
  • Follow the instructions enclosed with the Financial Aid Award Notice by the date indicated to acknowledge acceptance of awards.
  • Complete the required application/promissory note if taking advantage of student loan opportunities.
  • Complete entrance interview if borrowing direct loans.

Financial Aid Calendar

October 1 – Application process begins. Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA).
November 1 – Financial aid award notification begins for admitted students.
March 1 – Priority deadline for financial aid. Offers of aid after this date will be extended only as funds remain available.
April 1 – FAFSA submission deadline for Kansas Comprehensive Grant.

Scholarships and Awards

Every student meeting McPherson College’s admission standards who is enrolled full time is eligible for a Merit Award. In addition to the Merit Award, qualifying students may receive additional scholarship assistance based on academic achievement, co-curricular participation, demographic characteristics, leadership qualities, and major areas of interest. A financial aid calculator and detailed information about institutional awards and scholarships are available at https://www.mcpherson.edu/admissions/scholarships/

Endowed Scholarship Funds

The endowed scholarships and loan funds listed below have been established through personal generosity and a desire on the part of the donors to assist future generations of students in attending McPherson College. The college is grateful for these endowed gifts, which provide a permanent expression of love and support for the college and for the students who will benefit from this kindness. These gifts fund the existing McPherson College Scholarship and Grant Program.

Unrestricted Endowed Scholarship Fund with no specifics for awarding:

  • Walter E. Beery Scholarship Fund
  • Virgil Meyers Berkebile Scholarship
  • Earl Bowman Scholarship Fund
  • R.S. Christensen Endowment Scholarship Fund
  • Earl E. Curtis Memorial Scholarship Fund
  • Samuel L. Elrod Scholarship Fund
  • Esther Eslinger Memorial Scholarship Fund
  • Leland and Pauline Flory Endowment Scholarship Fund
  • Oscar C. Frantz & Flora Gish Frantz Scholarship
  • Roy O. Frantz Endowed Scholarship Fund
  • Harry H. and Marguerite Gilbert Memorial Endowment Scholarship
  • Raenell Hall Endowed Scholarship Fund
  • Ira M. Hoover Endowed Scholarship Fund
  • Helen Jacobs Memorial Scholarship
  • Ralph F. Johnson & Irene Ramey Johnson Memorial Scholarship Fund
  • Edith Keller Scholarship Fund
  • John Giolin Pearson Scholarship
  • Ralph H. Rindt Endowed Scholarship Fund
  • Scott Robinson Memorial Scholarship Fund
  • Ray Simmons Endowed Scholarship Fund
  • Stucky Scholarship Fund
  • Dr. Galen M. Tice & Ruth Kilmer Tice Memorial Scholarship Fund
  • Robert George Wolfe Memorial Scholarship
  • Worthington Church Scholarship Fund
  • Una Yoder Memorial Scholarship

Restricted Endowed Scholarships

  • African-American: Harrison African-American Academic Scholarship
  • Alumni Legacy Scholarshipfor children and grandchildren of alumni
  • Andes: John and Elrae Andes Performing Arts Scholarship—for performing arts &/or music majors
  • Appel Family Scholarshipsupports student with need in an internship experience
  • Austin: Charles & John Austin Memorial Scholarship Fund—no restrictions
  • Austin: Glen D. Austin Scholarship—western Colorado residents
  • Barrett-Jackson Auction Co.: Brian Jackson Scholarship—auto restoration students with financial need; 3.0 GPA
  • Barrett-Jackson Auction Co.: Russ Jackson Scholarship—auto restoration students with financial need; 3.0 GPA
  • Beam: Royce & Phyllis Bowman Beam Scholarship in Vocal Music—student(s) enrolled in Performing Arts with preference to vocal music students
  • Beech: Olive Ann Beech Scholarship—Wichita, Kansas residents
  • Beeghly: Milford & Dorothy Graham Beeghly Scholarship—Iowa or Northern Plains District Church of the Brethren; display leadership qualities
  • Bell: Pauline L. Bell Memorial Scholarship—junior or senior students majoring in music education or music
  • Bittinger: Desmond & Irene Bittinger Scholarship—institution acceptable academic standing
  • Bowman: J.L. & Elva Bowman Scholarship—science majors
  • Brammell: Ira N.H. & Freda E. Brammell Scholarship—excellent leadership ability
  • Breon: Earl & Margaret Breon Scholarship—financial need
  • Breon: Phil & Clara Breon Scholarship—financial need
  • Brown: Elizabeth & Ed Brown & Classic Thunderbird Club of S. Florida Scholarship—2nd-, 3rd-, or 4th-year auto restoration students
  • Brown: Larry Brown Scholarship—student athletes majoring in physical education
  • Brubaker: Earl Brubaker Scholarship—financial need
  • Butler: Edward R. & Judith Brammell Butler Student Leadership Scholarship—students who demonstrate leadership potential in student services
  • Campbell: David V. Campbell Scholarship—orphaned, handicapped, and underprivileged students
  • Casebeer: John & George Casebeer Scholarship—financial need
  • Cassler: Winston Cassler Scholarship—students studying music
  • Chisholm: Will Edwin & Olive M. Chisholm Scholarship—no restrictions
  • Class of 1953 Scholarship— freshman student with financial need
  • Class of 1967 Scholarship**—full-time student in any academic program; minimum GPA; financial need
  • Class of 1968 Scholarship—full-time student in any academic program; minimum GPA; financial need
  • Cobb: Redell & Barbara Cobb Scholarship—former students of Canton-Galva High School; 3.0 GPA
  • Coppock: X.L. & Martha Coppock Scholarship **—financial need
  • Crago Family Scholarshipfinancial need; exchange student; minimum GPA or students(s) pursuing math, science or business major
  • Dalke: Elmer O. & Velma L. Dalke Scholarship—financial need
  • Darby: Edith & Harry Darby Foundation Scholarship— juniors and seniors; minimum GPA
  • DeCoursey: Wesley & Verda DeCoursey Scholarship in Chemistry—full-time student majoring in chemistry; minimum GPA; without regard for financial need
  • Dell: Lois E. Dell Scholarship Fund for Women—women who have been absent from a college campus; business majors
  • Dennison: Nora Dennison Scholarship—financial need
  • Detrick: Herbert & Lula Detrick Scholarship— financial need
  • Dodson: Susan Wheeler Dodson Scholarship—visual arts major; minimum GPA; without regard for financial need
  • Doman: David T. Doman/Franklin Club Scholarship – freshmen or sophomore auto restoration major; priority to student with H.H. Franklin Club membership
  • Dotzour: Royer & Edna Dotzour Scholarship—freshman male & female; Kingman County (KS) high school graduates; preference to Norwich High School
  • Duesenberg: Fred Duesenberg Scholarship—auto restoration student
  • Eisenbise: Bernette Eisenbise Scholarship—sophomore, junior, or senior teacher education major
  • Elliott Family Scholarshipfinancial need
  • Evans: Franklin Evans & Roberta Brown Evans Scholarship—sophomores, juniors, seniors; minimum GPA; leadership/campus involvement
  • F & J Foundation Scholarshipauto restoration student
  • Fasnacht: Everett M. & Joy C. Fasnacht Scholarship—Church of the Brethren members seeking career in church service, peace studies, conflict resolution
  • Fike: Duane & Ruthita Fike Scholarship **—no restrictions
  • Flory: Glen & Esther Flory Family Scholarship—financial need
  • Forror: Elizabeth Wagoner Forror & Jo Wagoner Scholarship—Church of the Brethren members or student seeking service-oriented career in health services or dependents of missionary workers
  • Forsyth/Switzer: Lyle & Florence Forsyth & Merl & Ola Switzer Scholarship – financial need
  • Frankenbery/Werner Family Scholarship—financial need; student(s) in natural science and education; minimum GPA
  • Frantz: Earl & Lela Frantz Scholarship —Church of the Brethren members; financial need
  • Frantz: Edward R. & Virginia L. Frantz Scholarship – students pursuing interest in Entrepreneurship and/or athletics; enrolled full-time; financial need
  • Frantz: Merlin & ImoJean Sheller Frantz Scholarship—financial need
  • Fries: Ramona R. Fries & Arthur H. Fries Scholarship—academic merit; financial need
  • Geisert: Fred J. & Martha E. Geisert Scholarship—Dickinson County (KS) high school graduate or resident; preference to New Basel United Church of Christ, Abilene, KS, members/children
  • Gish: Warren & Luella Gish Scholarship—no restrictions
  • Glaser: Adelaide Glaser Scholarship—sophomores, juniors, seniors; Kansas resident; B average; financial need; good leadership qualities
  • Global Studies Endowed Fundno restrictions
  • Goering: Raymond “Dutch” & Dorothy L. Goering Scholarship—financial need
  • Greim: Mary Roop Greim Scholarship—Missouri residents
  • Groff: Forrest & Della Groff Scholarship—Church of the Brethren/Groff family members; minimum GPA
  • Grossnickle: J. Edgar & Willa Grossnickle Scholarship—Iowa Church of the Brethren members, COB students from Iowa, or students from Iowa; preference given to COB students
  • Grover: Mable Beyer Grover Scholarship—financial need
  • Haas: William W. Haas Scholarship—Dickinson County (KS) high school graduates
  • Hall: Henry & Nellie Krebbs Hall Scholarship—financial need
  • Harden: Len & Stella Harden & Joyce Harden Brown Scholarship—juniors & seniors; science, math, pre-med majors
  • Hart: Dorothy Bryant Hart Scholarship—financial need
  • Hatcher: Eugenia D. Hatcher Scholarship—female students
  • Hatfield: Verlin L. & Florence M. Hatfield Scholarship—resident students; financial need
  • Haury: Kenneth Haury Scholarship—business or accounting majors
  • Hershey: Dr. J. Willard Hershey Scholarship—juniors & seniors; science majors
  • Hess: Dick & Beverly Hess Fine Arts Fund—fine arts students; leadership/service ability; financial need
  • Hess: Dick & Beverly Hess Science Fund—science students who have demonstrated talent; financial need
  • Hess: Lou Ann (Dyck) Hess Fine Arts Fund—music students; other fine arts students; financial need
  • Hess: Lou Ann (Dyck) Hess Science Fund—biology students; other science students; financial need
  • Hewitt: Sharon & David Hewitt Scholarship—JR/SR students interested in auto or motorcycle restoration
  • Hoerner: Della Hoerner Scholarship—students seeking career in nursing, medicine, medical technology
  • Hofen: Phillip J. Hofen Scholarship—Iowa residents; financial need
  • Hoffman: Paul & Joanna Hoffman Scholarship—Church of the Brethren members (US)
  • Hoffman: Samuel Hoffman Scholarship**—financial need; high achievement
  • Holden Family Scholarshipstudent enrolled in automotive restoration program; financial need; show interest in restoration and preservation of vehicles or vintage cars of historic importance
  • Holl: Dennis A. Holl Scholarship—Church of the Brethren members; students with Brethren Volunteer Service experience; financial need
  • Hornbaker: Royal & Norma Hornbaker Scholarship—financial need
  • Ikenberry: Alta Gross Ikenberry Scholarship—freshman Idaho or Kansas resident, female athletes or pursuing career in education, pre-med or pre-dental
  • Ikenberry: Ernest & Olivia Ikenberry Scholarship**— financial need and good academic standing
  • Ingalls: Grace Vaniman Ingalls & Roscoe Ingalls Scholarship—financial need and good academic standing
  • Insurance Management Association Scholarshipbusiness majors; financial need
  • Jewell: J. Paul & Fern Watkins Jewell Scholarship – full-time business and economics major; preference to 2nd-, 3rd-, and 4th-year students; minimum 3.0 GPA
  • Johnson: Daniel Palmer Johnson Scholarship—students majoring in math or science
  • Keim: Howard Keim & Winifred O’Connor-Keim Scholarship—women who will have achieved 23rd birthday prior to award; financial need
  • Kindig: Ethel Ward Kindig Scholarship—Nebraska residents; students interested in Christian ministry or service; financial need; good academic standing
  • Kinzie Foundation Scholarshipjuniors or seniors; Church of the Brethren members; financial need
  • Kough: John K. & Arlene Flory Kough Scholarship—Church of the Brethren members from Kansas, Iowa, Missouri, Nebraska, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Colorado, North Dakota, Texas, and Montana
  • Kreider: Roy Levi Kreider Scholarship—financial need
  • Kuhn: Walter & Ruby Kuhn Scholarship—business, computer science, auto restoration majors
  • Lee: William & Mary Lee Scholarship—financial need
  • Lehman: Harry & Minnie Lehman Scholarship—financial need
  • Lehman: Harvey & Ruth Kurtz Lehman Scholarship—financial need
  • Lehman: Henry L. Lehman & Anna Burkholder Lehman Scholarship—demonstrated academic and leadership ability; financial need
  • Lengel: Leland L. Lengel Scholarship in History—sophomores, juniors, seniors; top history majors in each class; minimum GPA
  • Lichty: Henry Lichty Lovett, Dorothy Lichty Vogel, Mr. & Mrs. Glenn A. Lichty, Lucile Lichty West Scholarship—financial need; students from Northeast quarter of Kansas
  • Lingenfelter: The Fern Lingenfelter Artist Series and the Fern Lingenfelter Scholarship of Music—full-time student majoring in music; minimum 3.0 GPA
  • Long: V. Allen Long Scholarship—physical or natural science major and good academic standing
  • Marchand: F.E. & Cora A. Marchand Scholarship—Church of the Brethren members; financial need
  • Martin: Alice B. Martin Scholarship—financial need
  • Martin: Martha Cecile Martin Endowed Scholarship—teacher education student; McPherson County origin; financial need
  • Maune: Louie Maune Scholarship—financial need
  • McCluggage: The Denise McCluggage Scholarship—female student demonstrating passions in the fields of auto restoration, journalism, photography, communication, media arts, and/or writing; minimum 3.0 GPA
  • McDaneld: Wallace & Nellie Wagner McDaneld Scholarship—Kansas residents; interested in Christian ministry or service; financial need
  • McGhee: Grace Brunk McGhee Scholarship— financial need
  • McGonigle: Josephine Shirar McGonigle Scholarship—financial need
  • McHugh: Ellen McHugh Scholarship— financial need
  • McIlwaine: Delia Chavez McIlwaine Scholarship—music education major
  • McSpadden: Dwight McSpadden Scholarship—student athletes
  • Meguiar Family Scholarship in Automobile Restoration—auto restorations students
  • Melhorn: J. Mark & Katherine J. Ramsey Melhorn Scholarship—McPherson County student participating in at least one athletic program and intention to major in science field
  • Merkey: Samuel R. Merkey Scholarship—financial need
  • Metzler: Burton & Mabel Metzler Scholarship—financial need
  • Metzler: David & Doris Metzler Scholarship **—full-time student preparing for the ministry or Christian service or PreK-12 classroom teaching
  • Miller: Delma Miller Scholarship—Church of the Brethren members
  • Miller: Oscar & Vida Miller Scholarship— financial need
  • Mingenback: Mary Mingenback Scholarship—art or music students; financial need
  • Moats/Neher: Edgar & Marie Moats/Roy & Wava Neher/Edna Neher Scholarship—preference to Ivester (Grundy Center, IA) and Osage (McKune, KS) Church of the Brethren members
  • Moore: Alma Anderson Moore Scholarship—speech/theatre students
  • Morrison: Milton & Rebecca Morrison Scholarship—financial need
  • Moyers: David W. & Florence Smith Moyers Scholarship—Church of the Brethren members who demonstrate church leadership potential
  • Mugler: Carrie Mugler Scholarship—financial need
  • Murrey: Chester & Pearl Crumpacker Murrey Scholarship—freshmen, first-year transfer; financial need
  • Myers: Phil & Jean Myers Scholarship—priority consideration given to students who, due to unique opportunities, crisis situations, or extraordinary accomplishments and/or contributions to their community in the face of difficulties, deserve recognition and encouragement to complete their education; minimum 3.0 GPA; financial need
  • Negley Family ScholarshipChurch of the Brethren members; financial need
  • Nichols: Connie Nichols /Ethel McClure Scholarship—interior design or art majors; participate in at least one extra-curricular or volunteer activity on campus or in McPherson
  • Nonken: Ray Nonken Scholarship—Kansas residents who reside in a rural area; athletes; minimum 3.0 GPA
  • Nordling: Barbara & Bernard Nordling /Leland E. Nordling Family ScholarshipKansas residents west of Highway 81, excluding Sedgwick County; academic achievement
  • Noyes: Pat Noyes Men’s Basketball Scholarship—juniors and seniors in previous year; exemplify character of Pat Noyes (leadership, positive attitude, team player, exert maximum effort, passion for the game of basketball); good academic standing
  • Pair: Paul & Pauline Vaniman Pair Scholarship for Computer Science—computer science majors
  • Pair: Pauline Vaniman Pair Scholarship for the Fine Arts—art, music, theatre majors; good academic standing
  • Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance Scholarship—auto restorations majors
  • Peckover: Lila Marie Peckover Scholarship—Hutchinson (KS) Community Church of the Brethren members
  • Penland: M.W. & Hallie Goforth Penland Scholarship—philosophy/religion, science, or education majors
  • Pepsi-Cola Scholarship—auto restorations majors
  • Peterson: Ernest & Inez Peterson Scholarship—juniors and seniors; business and accounting majors; minimum GPA
  • Porter: Irwin and Betty Porter Fund—no restrictions
  • Powell Family Scholarship in Science and Religion—science or religion/philosophy majors with preference to those studying both disciplines
  • Prather: A.B. & Vera Prather Scholarship—financial need
  • Quapaw: Benjamin Quapaw Scholarship—Native-American students
  • Quint: Don Quint Memorial Soccer Scholarship Fund—business majors who also are a member of the soccer team; minimum GPA
  • Ray: Art Ray Track & Field /Cross Country Scholarship—students participating in track and field or cross country; minimum GPA
  • Reed: Blake Reed Mac2Mac Scholarship—graduated from McPherson High School and participated in high school football program as a senior and plans to attend McPherson College and participate in the college’s football program; current McPherson College football player with financial need
  • Rock: Kenneth M. Rock Scholarship—upper 25% of their high school class; financial need
  • Rolls-Royce Foundation Scholarship—auto restorations students with demonstrated interest in Rolls-Royce and Bentley cars
  • Royer: Patricia A. .Royer Endowed Scholarship Fund—full-time students; affiliated with COB; majors in fine arts, business, sciences, or teacher education; minimum 3.0 GPA
  • Royer: William D. & Alice Nash Royer Scholarship—biology majors
  • Sahl: Bob Sahl Scholarship—2nd-, 3rd- and 4th-year auto restoration students who demonstrate interest in pre-’16 autos; recommendation from the auto restoration faculty; financial need
  • Sargent: Paul & Rowena Vaniman Sargent Scholarship in Business—priority given to business majors; minimum GPA; financial need; nominated by business faculty
  • Sargent: Paul & Rowena Vaniman Sargent Scholarship in Foreign Language – for majors in any field with a commitment to study abroad for a minimum of one (1) semester
  • Sell: Orlin N. Sell Scholarship—students interested in Christian education, ministry, teaching, or social work
  • Sheller: Arlene Barley Sheller Scholarship—Ivester Church of the Brethren members/friends
  • Smith: Delbert L. & Barbara J. Smith Cross Country and Track & Field Scholarship—Student who participates in cross country and/or track and field; financial need
  • Smith: Dwight Smith Scholarship—financial need
  • Smith: Paul E. “Gene” Smith Scholarship—junior; football player who excelled at athletic performance, attitude, sportsmanship, and team play during sophomore year; recommendation from athletic staff
  • Snavely: Paul & Edna Snavely Scholarship—financial need
  • Snell: Dale Snell Scholarship—junior or senior music major; good academic standing
  • Spear: Spear Brothers Scholarship—full-time student enrolled in the Auto Restoration program; financial need
  • Staats: Elmer B. Staats & Margaret Rich Staats Scholarship for Public Service—students seeking career in public service
  • Strickler: Dale & Velma Strickler Scholarship—junior or senior students interested in social work, business or economics
  • Sutton: Charlie & Wilma Sutton Scholarship – full-time student; financial need
  • Trinity Church of the Brethren Scholarship—students interested in ministry
  • Trostle: Bernice McClellan Trostle Scholarship—priority to history, English, humanities, or social science majors
  • Trostle: Raymond H. Trostle Scholarship—priority to chemistry or history majors
  • Turner/Harris: Turner/Harris Endowed Scholarship—full-time students in automotive restoration, graphic arts, or music programs; minimum 3.0 GPA; preference given to veterans
  • Ullom: Victor and Rosalie Ullom Scholarship—Colorado residents; financial need
  • van Asselt/Higgins: Peggy van Asselt/Pam Higgins Scholarship**—priority to biology/foreign language double majors; financial need may be considered
  • VanGoethem: James & Lori VanGoethem Family Scholarship—full-time student; financial need; minimum GPA
  • Vaniman: Elmer E. Vaniman Scholarship in Music—music students; priority to Church of the Brethren students
  • Voshell: LaVerne M. “Tony” Voshell Athletic Scholarship—students participating in football, basketball, or track
  • Wall: Ernest A. Wall & Eunice Almen Wall & Rollyn E. Wall Scholarship—freshmen students
  • Ward: John Ward & Bonnie Martin Ward Scholarship—resident of McPherson, Kansas; planning to become a teacher; minimum GPA
  • Watkins-Gerhard Scholarship—financial need
  • Weaver: Paul & Frances Weaver Scholarship—students pursuing career in Christian ministry; philosophy/religion students
  • Will: W. Marvin & Doreen Will Scholarship—two annual scholarships to incoming freshmen majoring in political science, history or both
  • Wise: Jacob & Ruth Wise Scholarship—financial need
  • Witmore: Irma Cloe Witmore Scholarship—students of English, journalism, communication, theatre or library science who participate in at least one (1) extra-curricular or volunteer activity on campus each semester
  • Wittig: Randy & Sonya Wittig Scholarship—auto restoration students
  • Wittig: Roger & Rita Wittig Scholarship—auto restoration students
  • Yoder: Dayton & Hazel Yoder Scholarship—Church of the Brethren students with rural/agricultural background; academic achievement, leadership ability
  • York: H. Laverne & Evelyn Herr York Scholarship—student athlete majoring in physical education
  • Ziegler: Paul Ziegler Scholarship—priority given to member of the tennis team; demonstrate compassion, encouragement, and leadership; financial need

** not fully funded

Work Study and Employment

All students may apply for on-campus jobs, but students qualifying for the Federal College Work Study program are given priority. These jobs include clerical assistants, maintenance workers, housekeeping, resident assistants, admissions assistants, athletic event staff, etc.

Off-campus employment is usually available to students. The community of McPherson normally enjoys an unemployment rate far below the national average, and there are many requests for part-time student help. The Career Services Offices posts notices of available positions for both on- and off-campus jobs online at https://www.mcpherson.edu/career/.

Other Sources of Financial Assistance

Veteran’s Benefits may be used to attend McPherson College. For information on eligibility and to obtain application materials, students should contact the Veteran’s Administration by phone at 1-888-442-4551 or online at http:www.gibill.va.gov.

Local service agencies such as Kiwanis, Rotary, Lions, PEO, AAUW and others often have funding available for qualified students. Inquire with these agencies for scholarship forms.

Other forms of financial aid may also be available. Please contact the Financial Aid Office for further information.

2021|03 Financial Information, Catalog 21-22|

General Education Foundation Courses

 

A. Oral Communication:

Student Learning Outcome: Students should be able to deliver messages appropriate to their audience, purpose, and context.

Performance Indicators – Students should be able to:

  1. Perform verbal and nonverbal communication behaviors that illustrate the competency of an effective communicator.
  2. Support and organize their ideas in a coherent manner.

Required: 1 Course
G-CM 130 Interpersonal Communication
G-CM 140 Public Speaking
G-CM 218 Business and Professional Communication

B. Written Communication & Information Literacy

Student Learning Outcome for Written Communication: Students should be able to write with skill and clarity.

Performance Indicators – Students should be able to:

  1. Produce writing that shows an awareness of audience.
  2. Support their ideas with appropriate details and examples.
  3. Coherently organize their writing.
  4. Produce writing that shows careful attention to craft.

Student Learning Outcome for Information Literacy: Students should be able to demonstrate ethical and efficient use of information.

Performance Indicators – Students should be able to:

  1. Show that they can find appropriate sources.
  2. Show that they can evaluate the reliability of sources.
  3. Use information from sources appropriately in their work.

Required: 4 Courses
G-EN 110 College Composition I
G-EN 111 College Composition II
and:
Students pursuing a Bachelor of Arts are required to take Spanish and one Language Intensive (LI) course in their major department.  Students pursuing a Bachelor of Science are required to take two Language Intensive courses with at least one LI course in the student’s major department.

Language Intensive – Oral and Written Communication

Student Learning Outcome for Oral Communication: Students should be able to clearly voice a coherent message.

Performance Indicators – Students should be able to:

  1. Show that they can speak clearly and audibly.
  2. Support their ideas with appropriate research.

Speaking Component

(1) Informal oral communication exercises should be used frequently in the LI classroom. Most often, these will consist of required participation in small-group and class discussions. LI instructors can make even routine student participation in class discussions and activities into helpful oral communication exercises simply by (a) raising students’ consciousness about the variety of signals they send when they speak informally in class, and (b) helping students eliminate their careless habits in speech and delivery.

(2) At least one formal oral presentation should be included in the LI course. The presentation, probably brief, may be delivered to part or all of the class, or some other audience. It may derive from a formal writing assignment, recast for oral delivery.

Student Learning Outcome for Written Communication: Students should be able to write with skill and clarity.

Performance Indicators – Students should be able to:

  1. Produce writing that shows an awareness of audience.
  2. Demonstrate effective participation in the writing process.
  3. Coherently organize their writing.
  4. Produce writing that shows careful attention to craft.

Writing Component

(1) Informal writing assignments should be frequent, perhaps one per class session, but certainly one per week. Most informal writing activities are in the “writing to learn” mode; that is, they are intended to push students to read, think about, and interpret course material more carefully and deeply than they otherwise might do. From a handful of basic, informal writing models, such as journals and microthemes, LI instructors can improvise an almost endless array of specific informal writing activities.

(2) Formal writing assignments should be substantial (but the meaning of “substantial” depends upon the course and the exact nature of the assignment). There should be at least one formal, polished piece of writing. Whenever possible, LI instructors should give formal assignments in stages, confer with students over drafts, and allow ample time for revision(s).

Courses designated as Language Intensive:

G-AR 310 Art History I
G-AR 311 Art History II
BA 475 Business Strategy & Policy
BI 391 Evolution
CI 455 Teaching-Learning Process
G-CM 130 Interpersonal Communication
G-CM 218 Business & Professional Communication
G-CM 221 Intercultural Communication
CM 220 Special Topics in Popular Culture
CM 475A Senior Seminar in Communication Research
CM 475B Senior Project in Communication
G-EE 210 Children’s Literature
EE 303 Reading/Language Arts I
G-EN 210L Masterpieces of World Literature (4 hours)
G-EN 220L Contemporary World Literature (4 hours)
G-EN 255L American Literature II (4 hours)
G-EN 270L Fiction (4 hours)
EN 313 Expository Writing
G-EN 370L Poetry (4 hours)
EN 475B  Senior Project in English
G-HI 333 Technology & Society
HI 475  Senior Thesis
G-MA 290 History of Mathematics
MA 475 Senior Project in Mathematics
ML 385 Advanced Level Composition and Conversation
NS 300 Research Methods
NS 475 Senior Research
G-TH 265 Topics in Dramatic Literature
G-TH 385 Theatre History & Dramatic Literature I
TH 475 Senior Theatre Capstone
PE 380 History & Philosophy of Health, PE, Sport
PE 445  Readings and Research for Health Science
G-PR 104L Ethics (4 hours)
G-PR 106L Spiritual Pathways
G-PS 215  Global Peace Studies
PS 475  Senior Thesis
PY 450 History and Systems of Psychology
PY 475 Senior Thesis
SO 475 Senior Thesis
G-TE 333 Technology & Society
TE 475 Senior Project

C. Mathematics

Student Learning Outcome: Students should be able to use mathematical concepts.

Performance Indicators – Students should be able to:

  1. Demonstrate understanding by performing accurate computations.
  2. Apply algorithms to solve problems.

Required: 3-4 hours chosen from the following:
G-MA 105 College Algebra
G-MA 106 Pre-Calculus
G-MA 111 Calculus I
G-MA 123 Discrete Mathematics
G-MA 153 Principles of Geometry
G-MA 201 Survey of Mathematics
G-BA 220 Business Applied Statistics
G-MA 221 Elementary Applied Statistics

D. Religion/Beliefs/Values

Student Learning Outcome: Students should be able to answer fundamental religious or philosophical questions.

Performance Indicators – Students should be able to:

  1. Develop answers relative to alternative religious/philosophical perspectives.
  2. Explain their position on religious or philosophical issues.

Required: 3-4 hours chosen from the following:
G-PR 101 Old Testament-Hebrew Bible: God and People in Ancient Israel
G-PR 102 Jesus: New Testament Foundations
G-PR 104 Ethics
*G-PR 104L Ethics (LI if taken as G-PR104L for 4 hours)
*G-PR 106L Spiritual Pathways: Transformation, Compassion, and Vocation
G-PR 107 Critical Thinking
G-PR 201 Introduction to Philosophy
G-PR 202 Christian Traditions
G-PR 203 Science and Religion
G-PR 204 Peacemaking: Religious Perspectives
G-PR 206 Religion and Environmental Stewardship
G-PR 302 Religion and Politics
G-PR 304 The Church of the Brethren and Beyond: The Christian Church Serves Our World
G-PR 306 World Religions

E. Wholeness/Health/Fitness

Student Learning Outcome: Students should be able to identify optimal behaviors that promote lifelong personal health.

Performance Indicators – Students should be able to:

  1. Develop a personal strategy for health and fitness emphasizing the physical domain.
  2. Illustrate the relationship between personal behaviors and lifelong health and wellness.

Required: 1 course 
G-PE 150 Concepts in Holistic Health
G-PE 170 Personal & Community Health
G-HS/PE 190 Social & Behavioral Determinants of Health

F. Global/Intercultural Experience

Student Learning Outcome: Students should be able to understand they live in a world of diverse cultures.

Performance Indicators – Students should be able to:

  1. Identify social, cultural, religious, or linguistic differences.
  2. Explain how values and contributions of diverse societies affect individual experiences.

Required: 3 hours+ chosen from the following:
G-BA 342IT International Business (Travel required)
G-CI 251
Introduction to Education Practicum
G-CI 333 Intercultural Education
*G-CM 221 Intercultural Communication
G-EN 210 Masterpieces of World Literature
*G-EN 210L Masterpieces of World Literature (LI if taken as G-EN 210L for four hours)
G-EN 220 Contemporary World Literature
*G-EN 220L Contemporary World Literature (LI if taken as G-EN 220L for four hours)
*G-HI 333 Technology and Society
*G-MA 290 History of Mathematics
G-ML 108 Spanish Level I
G-ML 109 Spanish Level II
G-ML 208 Spanish Level III
G-ML 209 Spanish Level IV
G-ML 350 Junior Year Abroad
G-MU 210 Introduction to World Music
G-PR 306 World Religions
G-PS 130 Principles of Geography
*G-PS 215 Global Peace Studies
G-SO 202 Minorities in the U.S.
*G-TE 333 Technology and Society

+Students completing a Bachelor of Arts degree must take G-ML 108 Level I Spanish for three hours as well as three additional hours in the Global/Intercultural Experience Foundation. These students will be required to take only one Language Intensive (LI) course.

College Seminars

In the seminar series, students will demonstrate (1) that they have explored traditional Church of the Brethren values; (2) that they understand service-learning and can complete a service project; (3) that they can make informed ethical decisions in personal and professional situations; and (4) that they have investigated career options in the fields of study. In addition, the various seminars address the following goals.

  1. G-ID 101 Academic Community Essentials (ACE) Seminar: Students will show that they have learned about college life, create a degree plan, and practice good study skills, critical thinking, and conflict resolution.
  2. G-ID 201 Sophomore Seminar: Students will complete a service project, develop a career plan, and show that they have explored internship options.
  3. Senior Capstone Experience: Students will complete a senior project, as designed by department faculty.
2021|08 General Education, Catalog 21-22|

Teacher Education Course Descriptions

(Course numbers listed in parentheses after McPherson College numbers are ACCK course numbers.)

CI 101 (SPED 320) Beginning American Sign Language

2 hours
The purpose of this course is to learn the basics of sign language. It will provide the student with an opportunity to express and receive signed communication. (Fall and Spring)

G-CI 150 Introduction to Education

3 hours
This course provides an overview of the historical role of schools in our society, the current governance and finance structures, and the challenges schools face in this new century. It also addresses planning for a career in professional education, and becoming a successful teacher.(Fall and Spring)

CI 202 (SPED 322) Intermediate American Sign Language

2 hours
The purpose of this course is to increase conversational sign language and to introduce interpreting skills. It will provide the student with an opportunity to increase his/her ability to express and receive signed communication, expand his/ her vocabulary, and improve his/her fluency in signing.(Spring)

CI 220 Principles and Strategies of Teaching

3 hours
A general methods class required of all education students. This course must be taken before or concurrent with other EE or CI courses. If taking concurrent, must have permission from the instructor. The class provides an introduction to teaching, including defining the teaching act, developing classroom communities, classroom management, assessment and evaluation, models of teaching, integration of technology, and professional responsibilities. Pre-requisite/co-requisite: G-CI 150 with grade C or better. (Fall and Spring) A minimum grade of C in CI 220 is required as a prerequisite for ALL 300 & 400 level CI, EE or SE courses except G-CI 333.

CI 232 Educational Technology

2 hours
Educational Technology is designed to ensure that teacher education candidates understand the function of technology in schools and society, exhibit skills using instructional tools and technology to gather, analyze, and present information, improve instructional practices, facilitate professional productivity and communication, and help all students use instructional technology effectively. Pre-requisite/co-requisite: CI 220. (Fall and Spring)

G-CI 251 Introduction to Education Practicum

1 hour
This practicum is conducted in the Wichita Public Schools or another urban district. It must be completed before enrolling for EE375 or CI 351. Students are required to spend 30 contact hours in a classroom. This class is offered every semester; however, a block of time must be established to ensure a worthwhile and quality experience. Students will maintain a reflective journal with emphasis on recording observations of teaching and learning, management techniques, the diversity of the student population, and the use of technology. Prerequisite: G-CI 150 and consent of the Director of Field Experiences. To facilitate timely and efficient placements in area schools, the enrollment for this course will close on December 1. (Interterm; Fall or Spring by education department approval only) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense. Candidates are responsible for their own transportation.

CI 310 Topics in Education

2 hours
This course explores one topic relevant to education. As a general rule, students get to more deeply engage in a particular teaching strategy. Possible topics include (but are not limited to) cooperative learning, quantum learning, brain-based education, project-based learning, classroom management, education in the news, and teachers as portrayed in popular media. Prerequisite: G-CI 150 Introduction to Education or instructor’s consent. (Interterm)

CI 315 Reading in the Content Field

2 hours
This course provides students seeking licensure at the PK-12 and 6-12 level the strategies necessary for reading to learn. The strategies learned are appropriate for all content areas and all learners. Future educators will learn how to plan instruction based upon the knowledge of all students, community, subject matter, curriculum outcomes, and current methods of teaching reading. Prerequisite: CI 220. (Fall)

G-CI 333 Intercultural Education Seminar

2 hours
A study of our diverse society and how it pertains to education and the educational setting. Students electing to participate in the related field study that adequately depicts intercultural relations in an educational setting must also enroll in CI 495 Field Experience in Education. Prerequisite: CI 220. (Fall and Spring)

CI 351 Secondary Education Practicum & Seminar

1-2 hours
A field experience and seminar for those seeking licensure at the secondary or PK-12 level. This course is offered for variable hour credit depending on the student’s past experience(s) and licensure area(s). Student should consult with her/his advisor and the chair of the Department of Curriculum & Instruction for appropriate registration. This practicum must occur between CI 251 and CI 475. It is recommended that students seeking license at the 6-12 level take this class in conjunction with the appropriate content methods class. Prerequisites: CI 220. Completed application and interview to Teacher Education Program required. Concurrent with CI 455. Enrollment Deadlines–Fall: In order to facilitate efficient and timely placements at area schools, enrollment for this course will close May 1. Interterm: In order to facilitate efficient and timely placements at area schools, enrollment for this course will close December 1. Spring: In order to facilitate efficient and timely placements at area schools, enrollment for this course will close the first day of interterm.  (Fall and Spring) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

CI 401/AR 401 Methods for Teaching Art in the Secondary School

2 hours
This is a comprehensive study of secondary art curricula and instructional methods relevant to today’s art educator in the public schools. Discussions will address a multitude of current trends, issues, and “hot” topics on the national scene, including the National Art Standards. Considerable time and effort will be spent on writing and developing art curricula around the four content areas of art production, art history, art criticism, and aesthetics. Preparing and delivering a micro-teaching experience at McPherson High School is also a component of this course. Prerequisite: CI 220. (Spring)

CI 404 (ED 450) Methods for Teaching Modern Language

3 hours
This course is designed to prepare the prospective second language teacher for successful teaching at the PK-12 level. It provides theories of second language acquisition and second language teaching methods. Includes planning strategies, measurement/evaluations, test item construction, effective discipline, inclusionary practices, and technology media. Students become familiar with professional organizations and their publication/resources. In microteaching, including group and self-evaluation, students demonstrate current second language methodology. Prerequisite: CI 220. (As needed)

CI 406 (ED 406) Methods for Teaching Natural Science in the Secondary School

3 hours
This course is designed to provide the prospective teacher with knowledge and skill for teaching the natural sciences at the secondary level (grades 6-12). Content includes curriculum selection and design, safe laboratory management and operation, integration of curriculum, inclusionary practices, methods and modalities of teaching, assessment, classroom application of various forms of technology, and professional organizations. Microteaching, classroom observation and group and self-evaluation are included. Prerequisite: CI 220. (Spring)

CI 407 (ED 467) Methods for Teaching Mathematics in the Secondary School

3 hours
This course is designed to provide the prospective secondary level (grades 6-12) mathematics teacher the methods of teaching contemporary mathematics content. Topics include methods of presentation, awareness of national mathematics organizations, the writing of unit/daily lesson plans, microteaching of a math lesson, selecting materials, techniques of assessment, inclusionary practices, classroom application of various forms of technology, and techniques of assessment. Prerequisite: CI 220. (Spring)

CI 408 (ED 440) Methods for Teaching Social and Behavioral Science in the Secondary School

3 hours
This course is designed to prepare students for successful teaching at the secondary level (grades 6-12) in both the social and behavioral sciences. Emphasis is placed on different approaches and practices of instruction planning and classroom management, selection and classroom application of various forms of technology, evaluation and questioning techniques, state assessments, research methods, professional organizations and the inclusive classroom. Prerequisite: CI 220. (Spring)

CI 410/PE 410 Methods for Teaching Physical Education in the Secondary Schools

2 hours
A study of various teaching techniques and analysis of fundamental skills of physical education activities in the secondary school setting. The course offers an opportunity to explore various teaching techniques in individual, dual, and team activities in the field of physical education for the secondary schools. Prerequisites: PE 110, PE 160, PE 161, G-CI 150, G-CI 251, CI 220. (Interterm)

CI 416 (ED 416) Methods for Teaching Speech and Theatre in the Secondary School

3 hours
This course requires students to apply speech and drama content to the techniques needed for effective secondary level (grades 6-12) classroom teaching. Opportunities are provided for students to exercise their teaching skills in the areas of unit plans, daily lesson plans, teaching strategies, evaluation, assessment, classroom management, inclusion and different learning styles. Discussions of resource allocation, safety, classroom application of various forms of technology, and professional organizations are also included. Each student is encouraged to develop his/her personal philosophy of education and incorporate it in relation to integrity/ethics in the classroom and personal evaluation to maintain a sense of balance and growth. Prerequisite: CI 220. (Spring)

CI 417 (ED 415) Methods for Teaching English and Language Arts in the Secondary School

3 hours
This course is designed to assist student teachers in becoming confident, effective professional educators in secondary level English (grades 6-12). Students will become familiar with a variety of specific methods to use in teaching literature, composition, and language. Among topics to be considered will be current trends in English curriculum development, the six-trait writing process, inclusionary practices, classroom organization, assessment, classroom application of various forms of technology, and professional organizations. Each student will develop a unit of instruction suitable for a secondary level classroom. Prerequisite: CI 220. (Spring)

CI 426/PE 409 Methods for Teaching Health in the Elementary & Secondary School

1 or 2 hours (1 hour for ELED majors; 2 hours for PE majors)
This course is designed to acquaint the student with a variety of methods and modalities for teaching school health. The health problems of the individual school child and her/his environment will also be studied. Students will be videotaped when teaching a lesson. Prerequisites: G-PE 150 or G-PE 170,G-CI 150, G-CI 251, and CI 220. (Fall) NOTE: PE 150 and PE 170 need to reflect the new course.

CI 428 Methods for Teaching English as a Second Language in the Elementary & Secondary School

3 hours
This course is designed to prepare students to teach English to non-native speakers at either the K-6 level or the 6-12 level. Students will be exposed to teaching techniques, lesson and unit planning, and language assessment. Cultural issues will also be explored. Prerequisite: CI 220. (Fall of even years)

CI 451/MU 451 Methods for Teaching General Music in the Elementary School

3 hours
For music education majors. The methods and materials for music teaching at elementary level. (Fall, odd years)

CI 453/MU 453 Methods for Teaching Vocal Music in the Secondary School

3 hours
For music education majors. The methods and materials for music teaching at secondary level. (Spring, even years)

CI 454/MU 454 Methods for Teaching Instrumental Music in the Secondary School

3 hours
For music education majors. The methods and materials for music teaching at secondary level. (Spring, odd years)

CI 455 The Teaching-Learning Process

3 hours (Language Intensive)
A comprehensive course that deals primarily with the learner, the learning process, and the learning situation. Examines the role of the teacher in relationship to each of these. This class should be taken the semester before student teaching. Prerequisite: CI 220. If possible, concurrent with junior practicum  – EE 375 or CI 351. (Fall and Spring)

CI 475 Student Teaching in the Secondary School

6 or 12 hours
Student Teaching in the Secondary School at McPherson College is a capstone experience allowing students to practice the skills and talents necessary to become effective educators. McPherson College offers student teaching at the appropriate level for all licensure purposes. Student teaching occurs after students have fulfilled all the necessary requirements as outlined in the Advisor/Advisee Handbook. The student teaching experience is scheduled for a minimum of 14 consecutive weeks. Placement and hours may depend on the area(s) of licensure. Students enrolled in this course must have completed the student teaching application process and be concurrently enrolled in CI 476. (Fall and Spring) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

CI 476 Professional Seminar in Education

2 hours
This is a capstone seminar for teaching candidates allowing an interactive opportunity to reflect upon and share their insight, expertise, and commitment to professional education. Must be taken in conjunction with CI 475 and/or EE 465. (Fall and Spring)

CI 495/295 Field Experiences in Education

1-4 hours
An elective laboratory oriented field experience that the student elects to take, or is assigned to, in an educational setting that is designed to enrich their understanding of the profession of education. This experience may or may not be tied to requirements in another course within the department or college. Involvement may be in an educational related role or with an approved experience anywhere in the world. Arrangements must be made in advance. (Fall/Interterm/Spring. By Permission Only.) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

G-EE 210 Children’s Literature

3 hours
In this course students use the language arts of reading, writing, listening, and speaking to explore the historical development of children’s literature in English from its origins through the contemporary period, with an emphasis on contemporary works. While exploring how children’s literature artfully structures people’s experiences, values, and cultures, students will learn the elements of children’s literature, different genres, and current issues pertaining to children’s literature.    Students will also develop presentation skills for sharing literature with children. For elementary education majors, the knowledge and appreciation of children’s literature developed in the course will serve as foundational knowledge for the Reading/Language Arts methods courses. Prerequisite: Sophomore status or consent of instructor. (Spring)

EE 230 Methods for Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary School I

3 hours
This course provides the knowledge base for future elementary teachers to know, understand, and use major concepts, procedures, and reasoning processes of mathematics that define numbers and operations, geometry, measurement, data analysis and probability, and algebra so that all students understand relationships that can represent phenomena, solve problems, and manage data. This course focuses on assessment and evaluation and teaching strategies for grades K-2. (Fall)

EE 301/AR 358 Methods for Teaching Art in the Elementary School

1 or 4 hours (1 hour for ELED majors, 4 hours for Art majors)
This course is a comprehensive study of elementary art curricula and methods relevant to today’s educator in the public schools. Topics to be covered include: current techniques and materials, issues in art, basic design concepts, the developmental states of children in an art program, and curriculum implementation. (Fall)

EE 303 Reading and Language Arts I

4 hours 
This course delivers the knowledge base for understanding and using concepts from emerging literacy, reading, language and child development to teach reading, writing, speaking, viewing, listening, and thinking skills and to help all students successfully apply their developing literacy skills to many different situation, materials, and ideas. This course focuses on literacy assessment and evaluation and methods for teaching K-3 grade levels. (Fall)

EE 304 Methods for Teaching Music in the Elementary School

1 hour
This course is for elementary education majors. The emphasis is placed on methods for teaching elementary school children and the integration of music into the elementary school curriculum. Prerequisite: CI 220.(Fall)

EE 305/PE 305 Methods for Teaching Physical Education in the Elementary School

1 or 2 hours (1 hour for ELED majors, 2 hours for PE majors)
This course is designed to introduce prospective elementary school physical education and classroom teachers to the fundamentals, principles, and practices of physical education at the elementary school level. Movement exploration and methods will be stressed in the variety of play activities introduced. Additionally, this course has been designed to integrate theory and concept learning with practical laboratory experiences. Prerequisites: CI 150, CI 220 and G-CI 251. (Spring)

EE 306 Methods for Teaching Science in the Elementary School

3 hours
This course provides the knowledge base for future elementary teachers to understand and use fundamental concepts in science (including physical, life, and earth and space) as well as concepts in science and technology, science in personal social perspective, the history and nature of science, the unifying concepts of science, and the inquiry process scientists use in discovery of new knowledge to build a base for scientific and technological literacy for all students. Prerequisite: CI 220. (Fall) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

EE 307 Methods for Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary School II

3 hours
This course provides the knowledge base for future elementary teachers to know, understand, and use the major concepts, procedures, and reasoning processes of mathematics that define numbers and operations, geometry, measurement, data analysis and probability, and algebra so that all students understand relationships that can represent phenomena, solve problems, and manage data. This course focuses on assessment and evaluation and teaching strategies for grades 3-6.  (Spring) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

EE 309 Methods for Teaching Social Studies in the Elementary School

3 hours
A class designed for equipping elementary pre-service teachers with skills, strategies, and major concepts germane to the six social studies literacies: history, geography, socio-politics, citizenship, economics, and culture. This course includes a field experience. Prerequisite: CI 220. (Spring) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

EE 375 Elementary Education Practicum & Seminar

1-2 hours
A field experience and seminar for those seeking licensure in elementary education at the K-6 level and those seeking licensure in art, physical education, and Spanish at the PK-12 level. This course is offered for variable hour credit depending on student’s past experience(s) and licensure area(s). Student should consult with her/his advisor and the Chair of Teacher Education Program for appropriate registration. This practicum must occur between CI 251 and EE 465. Prerequisites: CI 220. Accepted application to Teacher Education Program required. (Fall and Spring; Interterm by education department permission only) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

EE 444 Reading/Language Arts II

3 hours (Language Intensive)
This course provides a structure for providing future elementary teachers an opportunity to use concepts from emerging literacy, reading, language and child development to teach reading, writing, speaking, viewing, listening, and thinking skills and to help all students successfully apply their developing literacy skills to many different situation, materials, and ideas. This course focuses on assessment and evaluation and teaching strategies for grades 4-6. This course includes a field experience. Prerequisites: EE 303 and CI 220 (Spring) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

EE 465 Student Teaching in the Elementary School

6 or 12 hours
Student Teaching in the Elementary School at McPherson College is a capstone experience allowing students to practice the skills and talents necessary to become effective educators. McPherson College offers student teaching at the appropriate level for all licensure purposes. Student teaching occurs after students have fulfilled all the necessary requirements as outlined in the Advisor/Advisee Handbook. The student teaching experience is scheduled for a minimum of 14 consecutive weeks. Placement and hours may depend on the area(s) of licensure. Students enrolled in this course must have completed the student teaching application process and be concurrently enrolled in CI 476. (Fall and Spring) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

SE 210 Introduction to Infants, Children, and Youth with Special Needs

3 hours
This class is a survey of federal and state mandates for special education, including an overview of categorical exceptionalities delineated in the laws; service delivery systems; advocacy groups; the concept of natural environments and least restrictive environments; and the purpose and function of the IFSP and IEP. The class, which is required for all students seeking licensure in education, is designed to introduce all pre-service teachers to mild and moderate disabilities. The course also serves as a foundation for additional special education coursework. This course is a prerequisite for other special education courses. (Fall and Spring)

SE 220 Field Experience in Services for Students with Special Needs

1 hour
An early field placement for directed observation of special education teachers working with elementary- or secondary-level students with mild/moderate disabilities. (Fall, Interterm, Spring, and Summer) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

SE 310 Foundations for Special Education Services

4 hours
This course addresses historical perspectives and current practices (Module A), laws, regulations, and policies governing practice (Module B), and affects of individual differences, language, and culture on educational performance (Module C). The course includes a supervised field experience (Module D). Concurrent: Modules A-D. (Fall & Spring)

SE 315: General Methods for Special Education Services

4 hours
This course addresses assessments used for eligibility, placement and curricular decisions (Module A), the special education process from pre-identification through individual program implementation (Module B), and effective collaboration and communication skills with diverse learners, families, colleagues, and community stakeholders (Module C). The course includes a supervised field experience (Module D). Concurrent: Modules A-D Prerequisite: SPED 310 (Fall & Spring)

SE 321 Grades K-6 Methods for Special Needs and Field Experience

5 hours
This course addresses IEP implementation using evidence-based practices. Emphasis is on collaborative teaching models. Topics of study include lesson planning, basic skill and content area instruction, adapting methods and materials, positive behavior supports, and progress monitoring. SPED 331: Grades K-6 Field Experience must be taken concurrently. Prerequisites: SPED 310 & 315. (Fall & Spring)

SE 341 Grades PreK-3 Methods and Field Experience

5 hours
Grades PreK-3 Methods, addresses strategies to individual and group needs using evidence-based practices. Topics of study include learning plans, embedded instruction within a tiered framework, setting up the environment, adapting methods and materials, positive behavior supports, and progress monitoring. SPED 351, Grades PreK-3 Field Experience, must be taken concurrently. SPED 341 will involve 15 to 20 contact hours including 10 hours reading/pre-literacy and writing/pre-writing interventions with 1 child.

SE 345 Behavior Management

2 hours
This course addresses culturally sensitive methods for preventing and intervening with problem behavior. Topics include school-wide discipline systems, classroom management, social skills instruction, student support meetings (Module A) and functional analysis, non-aversive intervention, and behavior intervention plans (Module B). (Fall & Spring)

SE 361 Grades 6-12 Methods for Special Needs and Field Experience

5 hours
This course addresses IEP implementation, including transition components. Emphasis is on self-determination, self-advocacy, career awareness, and post- school options in specific outcome areas. Topics of study include curriculum standards, lesson planning, basic skills instruction, learning strategies, adapting methods, materials and assessments, positive behavior supports, and progress monitoring. SPED 371: Grades 6-12 Field Experience must be taken concurrently. Prerequisites: SPED 310 & 315. (Fall)

SE 381 Grades 4-12 Methods and Field Experience

5 hours
The SPED 381 course covers both general and specific methods used by special educators to teach students with disabilities. The course includes transition planning and IEP development, instructional planning, and selection of instructional methods to meet the needs of students with adaptive special education needs. Approaches for selecting methods and materials, for delivering instruction, and for evaluating instructional outcomes based on assessment information will also be demonstrated. (Spring)

SE 431 Grades K-6 Clinical Experience (Student Teaching)

6 hours
This course is a supervised teaching experience with a special educator who provides services for elementary level students with adaptive learning needs. The preservice teacher will work collaboratively with the cooperating special educator, families, and school team members to apply research-based knowledge of assessment, instruction aligned to IEP goals, and positive behavioral supports. Emphasis is on reflective, culturally sensitive practice. Prerequisites: SPED 210, 310, 315, 345, and 321 or 331. Concurrent or subsequent semester: SPED 499. (Fall, Spring & Summer) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

SE 433 Grades K-6 Internship

4-6 hours
This course is a supervised teaching experience with an on-site mentor who provides or supervises services for elementary level students with adaptive learning needs. Emphasis is on application of research-based content knowledge and pedagogy and reflective, culturally sensitive practice. This internship is designed for practicing teachers adding grades K-6 adaptive licensure or for students who have completed a special education clinical experience. Prerequisites: SPED 210, 310, 315, 345, and 321 or 331. Concurrent or subsequent semester: SPED 499. (Fall, Spring & Summer) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

SE 451 Grades PreK-12 Clinical Experience

5 hours
This course is a supervised teaching experience with a special educator who provides services for any of the grades PreK–12 level students with adaptive learning needs.  The pre-service teacher will work collaboratively with the cooperating special educator, families, and school team members to apply research-based knowledge of assessment, instruction aligned to IEP goals, and positive behavioral supports.  Emphasis is on reflective, culturally sensitive practice.  Prerequisites: SPED 310, 315, 345, 341, 351, 361, and 371.  Concurrent or subsequent semester: SPED 499. (Fall, Spring & Summer) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

SE 453 Grades PreK-12 Internship

5 hours
This course is a supervised teaching experience working with an on-site mentor and/or evaluator. Emphasis is on application of research-based content knowledge and pedagogy and reflective, culturally sensitive practice. This internship is designed for the student hired on a waiver teaching in his/her own classroom. The intern will apply knowledge from all coursework and learning experiences to appropriately adapt and modify learning; manage students and classroom environment being culturally-sensitive to student and family differences;  align and implement learning with IEP goals; assess learning; develop and implement academic and behavior intervention plans based on assessments and best practices; develop a case study/IEP,  plan, implement, and evaluate lessons; plan and implement appropriate transitions, education and services for the specified grade level (PreK-12)/ages of students; and practice systematic self-evaluation.  Prerequisites: SPED 310, 315, 345, 341, 351, 361, and 371.  Concurrent or subsequent semester: SPED 499. (Fall, Spring & Summer) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

SE 471 Grades 6-12 Clinical Experience (Student Teaching)

6 hours
This course is a supervised teaching experience with a special educator who provides services for secondary level students with adaptive learning needs. The pre-service teacher will work collaboratively with the cooperating special educator, families, and school team members to apply research-based knowledge of assessment, instruction aligned to IEP goals, and positive behavioral supports. Emphasis is on reflective, culturally sensitive practice. Prerequisites: SPED 210, 310, 315, 345, and 361 or 371 Concurrent or subsequent semester: SPED 499. (Fall, Spring & Summer) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

SE 473 Grades 6-12 Internship

4-6 hours
This course is a supervised teaching experience with an on-site mentor who provides or supervises services for secondary level students with adaptive learning needs. Emphasis is on application of research-based content knowledge and pedagogy and reflective, culturally sensitive practice. This internship is designed for practicing teachers adding grades 6-12 adaptive licensure or for students who have completed a special education clinical experience. Prerequisites: SPED 210, 310, 315, 345, and 361 or 371. Concurrent or subsequent semester: SPED 499. (Fall, Spring & Summer) This course requires proof of negative TB test, completion of liability and felony forms, and may require a fingerprint background check (depending on placement) at an added expense.

SE 499 Capstone Issues

1 hour
This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to reflect on their clinical experience or internship and professional role with peers, ACCK faculty, and special educators. Topics of discussion include professionalism, ethical issues, advocacy, diversity, and resources. Prerequisites: SPED 210, 310, 315, 345, 321 & 331 or 361 & 371. Concurrent or previous semester: SPED 431 or SPED 471 (or comparable Internship). (Fall, Spring & Summer)

SE 349 Communication Development and Communication Disorders

3 hours
This class offers a survey of normal and atypical language development, assessment, bilingual education, contributions of the educator to overcoming language problems, and the relationships between oral language and reading and writing. There are no prerequisites for this course. (Interterm and Summer)

SE 380/678 Topics in Special Education:

1 hour
This course will focus on bringing the students up to date on current methods, changes In the field of special education, and new information related to the characteristics of children and youth with special needs. With consent of advisor.

Special Course Options
295/495 Field Experience (1-4 hours)
297  Study Abroad (12-16 hours)
299/499 Independent Study (1-4 hours)
388 Career Connections (3-10 hours)
445 Readings and Research (1-4 hours)

 

2021|Catalog 21-22, Curriculum & Instruction|

Sociology Course Descriptions

G-SO 101 Introduction to Sociology

3 hours
An introduction to the general field of sociology and its principle subdivisions; the nature of culture; the socialization of the individual; the character and behavior of social groups; social organization and institutions; social interaction, deviant behavior and social change. (Fall, Interterm)

G-SO 202 Minorities in the U.S.

3-4 hours
An exploration of the problems faced by physical, cultural, economic, and behavioral minority groups in American society; the causes and consequences of prejudice, stereotypes, and discrimination; the nature of minority-majority group interaction; current crises and possible solutions; and some comparison with similar situations in other countries. (Fall, Spring)

SO 206 Social Problems

3-4 hours
A study of contemporary American and world social problems, including prostitution, drug addiction, poverty, sexism, racism, and war. ( Spring)

SO/PY 210 Human Sexuality

3 hours
A study of female roles, male roles, values, life adjustments, sexual identities, religion, language, and behavior differences based on cultural, educational and socioeconomic factors related to human sexuality. Course uses lectures, audio- visuals, discussions, guest resource persons, assigned readings, and projects or papers to present information. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or higher or instructor consent. (Spring)

G-SO 246 Marriage and Family

3-4 hours
This course explores the institution of marriage and family in American society from a sociological perspective. Topics covered include socialization, dating, courtship, marriage, parenting, dysfunctions, divorce and remarriage. Family dynamics and major social changes affecting the family are discussed. The course allows the individual to explore her/his own marriage and family attitudes and experiences. (Interterm)

SO 260 Introduction to Human Services

3 hours
An introduction to the history, theory, practice, and trends in human services. The goals, functions, and organization of human services are examined in the context of contemporary social problems; a historical survey of human services is presented as a background against which current efforts can be viewed; major theories, techniques, and methods that govern helping efforts are covered; a description of consumers of human services, and the strategies both consumers and service providers initiate to overcome barriers to effective service delivery, are discussed. Career opportunities in the human services field are also explored. (Spring)

SO 275 Criminal Justice

3 hours
An introduction to the field of criminology and the American criminal justice system. Emphasis is placed upon the nature of crime, and trends and theories of crime along with components and functions of the criminal justice system including police, courts, and corrections. (Spring)

SO 285/PE 285 Sociological Implications of Sport & Recreation

2 hours
A study of the interrelationships of sport and society.

SO/PY 303 Social Psychology

3 hours
A study of the individual as he/she is affected by other persons. Topics covered include: interpersonal relations, social learning, conformity and individuality, attitudes, groups and organizations, and others. Discussion and involvement methods are emphasized. Prerequisite: 6 hours in the behavioral sciences or instructor consent. (Spring)

SO/PY 308 Counseling

3 hours
A study of the theory and practice of counseling including a survey of the various systems of psychotherapy (person-centered therapy, psychoanalysis, behavioral therapy, cognitive-behavioral therapy, etc.) and learning, through role- play, of skills needed to be a helper. (Spring)

SO 320 Urban Sociology

3 hours
A study of the development of modern cities, theories of urban growth, and urban problems and policies. Topics will include urbanization, urban renewal, economic restructuring and globalization, international migration, culture and politics of urban places, gentrification, crime and poverty, and ecological patterns of land use. ( Fall)

SO/PY 335 Research Methods I

4 hours
The basic research methods course for behavioral science majors. Correlational, survey, and case study techniques, basic experimental design, research ethics, and general professional conduct of empirical investigation are studied in a team- taught format. Lecture, laboratory, and practical field exercises are used as learning methods. Prerequisite: G-MA 221. Concurrent enrollment is acceptable. (Fall)

SO/PY 336 Research Methods II

4 hours
The second of the two basic research methods courses for behavioral science majors. Relatively advanced scientific research designs and statistical analyses are studied. SPSS, a statistical package, is used for most of the work in the course. Prerequisites: G-MA 221 and SO/PY 335. (Interterm)

SO 355 Juvenile Delinquency

3 hours
A comprehensive examination of juvenile delinquency and the juvenile justice system. An emphasis on the causes of juvenile delinquency; its relation to family, school, peers, and society; treatment of juvenile delinquents; and criminal proceedings and the family court. (Fall)

SO 365 Social Work in American Society

3 hours
An introduction to the social work movement, profession, and practice in the United States. The course examines the social welfare policies and client populations that engage social workers, and explores the social work practice settings that range from child maltreatment and health care to work with older adults and corrections. Social issues are raised and case examples are presented to give insight into the clients and issues for which social workers initiate advocacy and social change through leadership positions in American society. Career opportunities in the social work profession are also explored. (Fall)

SO/PY 375 Junior Seminar

1 hour
Several topics and issues are examined in a seminar format. These include ethical practices and concerns as they relate to research and clinical work, the development and execution of basic and applied research, and career development and related matters. Students work toward developing appropriate research topics for their senior theses and may explore internship opportunities. (Spring)

SO 401 Sociological Theory

4 hours
A review and analysis of historical sociological theory including the masters of sociology: Durkheim, Weber, Marx, Pareto, Veblen, and others. Prerequisite: Six hours in sociology. (Spring, even years)

SO 425 Deviant Behavior

3 hours
This course exposes the student to the perspectives, principles, issues and research findings of the deviant behavior field. Topics covered include: poverty, substance abuse, prostitution, homosexuality, violent behavior, family violence, mental disorders, crime and social control. Prerequisite: SO 206, SO/PY 335 or instructor consent. ( Fall)

SO 430 Topics in Behavioral Sciences

3 hours
This course explores topics not normally found in regular offerings allowing students the opportunity to explore and grow their sociological imagination as well as their knowledge of theory and research methods. (Fall)

SO 450 Proseminar in Sociology

3 hours
An advanced-level seminar to integrate the information learned in earlier sociology courses. The goal is to bring full circle the sociological knowledge of students who are about to graduate. The course will explore a number of enduring sociological issues, including the meaning of sociology, the purpose of sociology and the effect sociology has on the world. Prerequisite: Upper division majors/minors only or instructor consent. (Spring, odd years)

SO 455 Police and Law Enforcement

3 hours
An analysis of the evolution of police, the police system, and the police role. Organization and jurisdiction of local, state, and federal law enforcement agencies along with philosophical and ethical issues surrounding their role will be discussed. (Fall, even years)

SO 460 Correctional Institutions

3 hours
An exploration of the historical and philosophical development of correctional systems with an emphasis on categories of inmates, treatment policies and their effectiveness, staff organization and training and their relation to the criminal justice system, and problems associated with correctional practices and procedures. (Fall, odd years)

SO 470 Social Gerontology

3 hours
A comprehensive introduction to an emerging field dealing with the social aspects of human aging. The course covers major areas of theory, research, social policy, and practice that impact older adults, and discusses the strengths and contributions that elders bring to their peers, families, and communities. The historical overview of aging in the United States, as well as the human and social meanings behind longevity population shift, is also explored. Also examined are social issues and psychological perspectives and strategies, as well as political and economic situations that produce undesirable outcomes as well as promote well- being in later life. Career options in the field of social gerontology are also explored. (Fall, even years)

SO/PY 474 Scientific Writing for the Behavioral Sciences

2 hours
This course is intended to help students develop the skills needed for writing research reports in the social sciences. It is a research-based course in which students learn to synthesize what they have read and present it as a scientific review of the literature; these are the primary goals. Thus, it focuses on how to apply social science theories and research methods to the writing of the senior research proposal. This course also provides students with the opportunity to prepare papers for regional conferences in sociology and psychology. Research manual required. (Fall)

SO/PY 475 Senior Seminar/Thesis

2 hours (Language Intensive)
This is the culminating or capstone course for behavioral science majors. Coordinated guidance is given on the preparation of the Senior Thesis. Discussion of current topics in sociology and psychology is combined with guidance on practical matters such as application to graduate study, developing a career, and so on. (Spring)

SO 495 Field Placement

1-4 hours
Practical experience working in an established social agency, mental health clinic, or correctional institution. Supervision and direction given on the job by the agency personnel. College personnel visit and give consultation.

 

Special Course Options
295/495 Field Experience (1-4 hours)
297  Study Abroad (12-16 hours)
299/499 Independent Study (1-4 hours)
388 Career Connections (3-10 hours)
445 Readings and Research (1-4 hours)

2021|Catalog 21-22, Sociology|

Personnel List

President of McPherson College

Michael P. Schneider, Ed.D., McPherson, Kansas

Faculty

Photo directory of current Faculty

Nick Baldetti, B.S., M.S., M.B.A., D.B.A. (2020)
Executive Director of Health Care Initiatives, Assistant Professor of  Healthcare Management
B.A., Wayne State College; M.S., M.B.A., Pittsburg State University; D.B.A., Creighton University.

Edward Barr, B.A., B.S., M.A. (2010)
Associate Professor of Technology (2016)
B.A., University of the South; B.S., McPherson College; M.A., University of Kansas.

Becki Bowman, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (2006)
Professor of Communication (2018)
B.A., McPherson College; M.A., Wichita State University; Ph.D., Kent State University.

Jd. Bowman, B.A., M.A., M.F.A. (2005)
Professor of Theatre (2018)
B.A., McPherson College; M.A., M.F.A., Kent State University.

Michael Capobianco, B.S., M.A., Ph.D. (2019)
Assistant Professor of Exercise Science
B.S., Brock University; M.A., University of Ottawa; Ph.D., Western University (Canada).

Luke Chennell, A.T., B.A., M.A. (2003-2011; 2015)
Associate Professor of Technology (2019)
A.T., B.A., McPherson College; M.A., Wichita State University.

Ku-Sup Chin, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (2003)
Professor of Behavioral Science: Sociology (2020)
B.A., Korea University; M.A., Ph.D., University of California-Irvine.

Christopher Clark, B.S., B.S. (2016)
Assistant Professor of Technology
B.S., MidAmerica Nazarene University; B.S., McPherson College.

Bruce Clary, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (1983)
Vice President for Academic Affairs (2014)
Professor of English (2014); Maurice Hess Chair in English (2000)
B.A., McPherson College; M.A., Wichita State University; Ph.D., Kansas State University.

April Counts, B.S., M.A.Ed. (2017)
Assistant Professor of Education
B.S., University of Central Missouri; M.A.Ed., Baker University; ESOL Endorsement.

Amber Dittert, B.A., M.S. (2016)
Assistant Professor of Mathematics (2017)
B.A., St. Mary’s University; M.S., Texas Tech University.

Kerry Dobbins, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (2010)
Associate Professor of History (2016)
B.A., Skidmore College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Michael Dudley, B.S., B.S., M.S. (2014)
Associate Professor of Technology (2020)
B.S., University of Nebraska-Lincoln; B.S., McPherson College;
M.S., Pittsburg State University.

Laura Workman Eells, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (1996)
Professor of Behavioral Science: Sociology (2015)
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

Dee Erway-Sherwood, B.F.A., M.F.A. (2003)
Professor  of Art (2016)
Executive Director of Visual & Digital Arts (2017)
B.F.A., M.F.A., Fort Hays State University.

Jonathan Frye, B.S., M.S., Ph.D. (1993)
Professor of Natural Science (2011)
B.S., Lebanon Valley College; M.S., Ph.D., University of Virginia.

Timothy Frye, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (2020)
Assistant Professor of Mathematics
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Oklahoma-Norman.

Rodney Gieselman, B.S., M.B.A. (2003)
Professor of Business (2016)
B.S., University of Nebraska-Kearney; M.B.A., Bellarmine University.

Lindsey Godfrey, B.S., M.B.A. (2017)
Assistant Professor of Business
B.S., McPherson College; M.B.A., Columbia Southern University.

Curtis Goodwin, A.S., B.S., M.S. (2014)
Associate Professor of Technology
A.S., Colby Community College;, B.S., M.S., Pittsburg State University.

Kelsy Gossett Dennis, A.S., B.A., M.F.A. (2019)
Assistant Professor of Photography, Art & Design
A.S., Pratt Community College; Diploma, Hallmark Institute of Photography;
B.A., M.F.A., Wichita State University.

Garrick Green, A.T., B.A., M.S. (2001)
Professor of Technology (2019)
A.T., B.A., McPherson College; M.S., Pittsburg State University.

Michaela Groeblacher, B.A., M.F.A. (2014)
Associate Professor of Art (2020)
B.A., McPherson College ; M.F.A., Fort Hays State University.

Norman Hope, B.S., M.B.A., Ph.D. (1982-1991; 2020)
Associate Professor of Business (2020)
B..S., Manchester University; M.B.A., Emporia State University; Ph.D., Kansas State University.

Kyle Hopkins, B.A., B.M.E., M.M. (2013)
Associate Professor of Music and Director of Bands
B.A., University of Kansas; B.M.E., Washburn University; M.M., Kansas State University.

Stephen Hoyer, B.S., M.S.Ed., Ph.D. (2016)
Assistant Professor of Behavioral Science: Psychology 
B.S., M.S.Ed., University of Nebraska-Kearney; Ph.D., Oklahoma State University.

Shane Kirchner, B.A., M.Ed., Ph.D. (2004)
Professor of Education (2018)
Director of M.Ed. Program (2015)

B.A., McPherson College; M.Ed., Wichita State University;
ESL Licensure, Emporia State University; Ph.D., Kansas State University.

Manjula Koralegedara, B.S., M.S., Ph.D. (2010)
Associate Professor of Chemistry (2016)
B.S., University of Peradeniya, Sri Lanka; M.S., Ph.D., Wichita State University.

Julia Largent, B.S., M.A., Ph.D. (2017)
Assistant Professor of Communication
B.S., Manchester University; M.A., Ball State University; Ph.D., Bowling Green State University.

Kirk MacGregor, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. (2016)
Associate Professor of Philosophy & Religion (2019)
A.B., Miami University; M.A., Biola University; Ph.D., University of Iowa.

Ami Martinez, B.A., M.Ed. (2012)
Associate Professor of English (2020)
B.A., M.Ed., Wichita State University.

Lorena Medrano, B.A., M.S., M.S., M.A. (2013)
Associate Professor of Spanish (2019)
B.A., Universidad Rafael Urdaneta; M.S., Universidad del Zulia; M.S., M.A., University of Missouri-Columbia.

Bryan D. Midgley, B.S., M.A., Ph.D. (2000)
Professor of Behavioral Science: Psychology (2019)
B.S., Eastern Michigan University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Kansas.

Christopher Paulsen, A.T., B.S., M.S. (2004)
Associate Professor of Technology (2018)
A.T., B.S., McPherson College; M.S., Pittsburg State University.

Jennifer Pollard, B.A., M.A. (2018)
Visiting Assistant Professor of Theatre
B.A., McPherson College; M.A., Michigan State University.

Nathan Pollard, B.A. (2016)
Assistant Professor of Digital Media (2020)
B.A., Ravensbourne College-U.K.; BTEC National Diploma in Graphic Design, Plymouth College-U.K.

Matthew Porter, B.A., M.B.A. (2016)
Assistant Professor of Business
B.A., McPherson College; M.B.A., Colorado State University.

Karrie Rathbone, B.S., M.S., Ph.D. (2003-2006; 2019)
Associate Professor of Biology (2019)
B.S., M.S., Emporia State University; Ph.D., Kansas State University.

Ricardo Rodriguez, B.S., B.S., M.S., Ph.D. (2018)
Assistant Professor of Physics
B.S., B.S., University of Los Andes-Bogota, Colombia; M.S., Ph.D., Iowa State University.

Vicki Schmidt, A.A.S., B.S., M.S. (2015)
Assistant Professor of Education
A.A.S., Kansas State University; B.S., Fort Hays State University; M.S., Baker University.

Herbert Smith, B.A., M. Div., Ph.D. (1982)
Professor of Philosophy and Religion (1994)
Burton Metzler Chair in Philosophy and Religion (1999)
B.A., Elizabethtown College; M.Div., Bethany Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Claremont Graduate School.

Kerri Snell, B.A., M.F.A. (2016)
Assistant Professor of English
B.A., McPherson College; M.F.A., Ashland University.

Kimberly Diane Stanley, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (1988)
Professor of English (1997)
B.A., Trinity University; M.A., St. John’s College at Santa Fe; Ph.D., University of Texas.

Allan van Asselt, B.S., Ph.D. (2000)
Professor of Chemistry
B.A., McPherson College; Ph.D., California Institute of Technology.

Dustin Wilgers, B.S., M.S., Ph.D. (2011)
Associate Professor of Biology (2017)
B.S., Southwestern College; M.S., Kansas State University; Ph.D., University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

Kenneth Yohn, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (1999)
Professor of History (2005)
B.A., Manchester College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Iowa.

Special Education Faculty (KICA)

Lynette Cross, B.S., M.S. (2018)
Instructor of Special Education
B.S., Tabor College; M.S., Wichita State University.

Beverly Schottler, B.S., M.S., Ed.D. (2005)
Program Director; Instructor of Special Education
B.S., M.S., Fort Hays State University; Ed.D., Kansas State University.

Faculty Emeriti

Wayne A. Conyers, B.A., M.A., M.F.A. (1983)
Professor Emeritus of Art (2018)
B.A., Bethany College; M.A., University of Missouri-Kansas City; M.F.A., Fort Hays State University.

Doris E. Coppock, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. (1950)
Professor Emerita of Health, Physical Education and Recreation (1992)
A.B., McPherson College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Iowa.

Alfred Dutrow, B.S., M.S. (1973)
Professor Emeritus of Agriculture (2009)
B.S., McPherson College; M.S., Michigan State University.

Dale C. Goldsmith, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. (1969)
Professor Emeritus of Philosophy and Religion (2017)
A.B., Princeton University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago.

Bob R. Green, A.A., B.A., M.A. (1967)
Professor Emeritus of English (1993)
A.A., Central College; B.A., Seattle Pacific University; M.A., Emporia State University.

Steven C. Gustafson, B.M., M.M., D.M.A. (1980)
Professor Emeritus of Music (2014)
B.M., Bethany College; M.M., D.M.A., University of Colorado-Boulder.

Dan Hoffman, B.S., M.Ed. (1982)
Professor Emeritus of Physical Education (2019)
B.S., Manchester College; M.Ed., Wichita State University.

Paul W. Hoffman, B.S., M.Div., M.A., Ph.D. (1976)
President Emeritus (1996)
Professor Emeritus of Psychology (1996)
B.S., Manchester College; M.Div., Bethany Theological Seminary; M.A., University of Michigan;
Ph.D., Purdue University; Certificate, Harvard Institute for Educational Management.

Corinne Neubauer Hughbanks, B.A., M.S., Ph.D. (1966)
Professor Emerita of Languages (1993)
B.A., Asbury College; M.S., Emporia State University; Ph.D., University of Nebraska.

Gilford J. Ikenberry, Jr., B.S., M.S., Ph.D. (1961)
Professor Emeritus of Biology (1993)
B.S., McPherson College; M.S., Oklahoma State University; Ph.D., Iowa State University.

Shingo Kajinami, B.S., Ph.D. (1986)
Professor Emeritus of Chemistry (2003)
B.S., Bethel College; Ph.D., University of Oklahoma.

Larry Kitzel, B.S., M.M., D.M.A. (1970)
Professor Emeritus of Music (2004)
B.S., McPherson College; M.M., Wichita State University; D.M.A., University of Oklahoma.

Robert W. Neufeld, B.A., M.A., M.S., Ph.D. (1991)
Professor Emeritus of Computer Science (2004)
B.A., Bethel College; M.A., M.S., Wichita State University; Ph.D., Iowa State University.

Jeanne Jacoby Smith, B.A., M.A., Ed.D. (1982)
Professor Emerita of Education (2009)
B.A., Elizabethtown College; M.A., James Madison University; Ed.D., Kansas State University.

Susan Krehbiel Taylor, B.A., M.L.S., Ph.D. (1979)
Professor Emerita of Journalism (2010); College Librarian Emerita (2010)
B.A., McPherson College; M.L.S., Emporia State University; Ph.D., Kansas State University.

Roger Trimmell, B.S., M.Ed. (1982)
Professor Emeritus of Physical Education (2011)
B.S., McPherson College; M.Ed., Wichita State University.

Karlene Morphew Tyler, B.A., M.A. (1975)
Professor Emerita of Theatre (2018)
B.A., McPherson College; M.A., Emporia State University.

Ricky W. Tyler, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (1977)
Professor Emeritus of Theatre (2018)
B.A., McPherson College; M.A., Emporia State University; Ph.D., Michigan State University.

Jan van Asselt, B.S., M.A., Ph.D. (1965)
Professor Emeritus of German and Linguistics (2000)
B.S., McPherson College; M.A., University of Colorado, Boulder; Ph.D., University of California.

Ann Zerger, B.S., M.F.A. (2004)
Professor Emerita of Art (2019)
B.S., University of Kentucky; M.F.A., Wichita State University.

Full-time Administrative and General

Photo directory of current Staff

Clay Allen, B.A. (2020)
Head Coach: Tennis
B.A., Colby-Sawyer College.

Jesse Tyler (JT) Alexander, B.A. (2019)
Head Coach: Track & Field
B.A., Augustana College.

Scott Anderson, B.S., M.Ed. (2019)
Assistant Coach: Football
Bachelor of Aerospace Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology;
M.Ed., University of Texas-Austin.

Steve Anderson (2002)
Facilities Management: Custodian

Abbey Archer-Rierson, B.S., M.Ed. (2008)
Chief of Staff (2011)
B.S., University of Kansas; M.Ed., McPherson College.

Carole Barr, B.A., M.A. (2010)
Director of Academic Development (2014)
B.A., M.A., University of Kansas.

David Barrett, B.S., M.S.S. (1991)
Advancement Officer (2014)
B.S., McPherson College, M.S.S., United States Sports Academy.

Linda Barrett, B.S. (1996)
Coordinator of Student Success and Engagement (2017)
B.S., McPherson College.

Amy Beckman, B.S., M.A. (2019)
Executive Director of Career & Experiential Learning
B.S., Kansas State University; M.A., City University of Seattle.

Sara Brubaker, B.S., M.S. (2002)
Director of Financial Aid and Admissions Operations (2012)
B.S., McPherson College: M.S., Friends University.

Timothy Bruton, B.S., M.Ed. (2002)
Assistant Director of Facilities Management (2017)
B.S., M.Ed., McPherson College.

Cory Cahill, B.S. (2019)
Head Coach: Men’s & Women’s Volleyball
B.S., Hannibal-La Grange University.

Renee Carlson (1995)
Facilities Management: Custodian

Connor Carman, B.S. (2019)
Assistant Men’s Basketball Coach
B.S., Wichita State University

Bryce Chavis, B.A., M.B.A. (2020)
Assistant Football Coach
B.A., M.B.A., Washburn University

Bruce Clary, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (1983)
Vice President for Academic Affairs (2014)
Professor of English (2014)
Maurice Hess Chair in English (2000)
B.A., McPherson College; M.A., Wichita State University; Ph.D., Kansas State University.

Jerod Corbus, B.S. (2020)
Academic Records Specialist
B.S., McPherson College.

Derrien Covington, B.S. (2020)
Assistant Football Coach
B.S., Delta State University.

Dara Dix (2013)
Accounting Specialist
Diploma, Spencer School of Business.

T. J. Eskildsen, B.S., M.S. (2010)
Head Coach: Men’s Basketball (2019)
B.S., Iowa Wesleyan College; M.S., William Woods University.

Jeremiah Fiscus, B.S., M.S., M.Ed. (2018)
Head Coach: Football
B.S., McPherson College; M.S., Northwestern State University; M.Ed., Texas Christian University.

Kendra Flory, B.A., M.Div. (2017)
Advancement and Alumni Assistant
B.A., Bridgewater College; M.Div., Bethany Theological Seminary.

Kent Freund, B.S., M.S. (2019)
Assistant Coach: Men’s Soccer
B.S., Fort Hays State University; M.S., Baker University.

Tammy Gamache (2015)
Accounting Specialist

Johnny Gilkey (2019)
Facilities Management: Maintenance Technician

Lisa Goering, A.S., B.A. (2018)
Student Success Specialist
A.S., Hutchinson Community College; B.A., McPherson College.

Mary Goering (2019)
Facilities Management: Custodial Supervisor

Tina Goodwin, B.A. (2017)
Director of Public Relations
B.A., Creighton University.

Amanda Gutierrez, B.S., M.B.A. (2009)
Vice President for Historic Automotive Restoration (2012)
B.A., Kansas Wesleyan University; M.B.A., Friends University.

Cheryl Hammarlund, B.A. (2002)
Facilities Management: Custodian
B.A., McPherson College.

Patricia Hartshorn, B.A. (2014)
Registrar (2014)
B.A., Bethany College.

Tony Helfrich, B.S. (2019)
Director of Adventure Program (2019)
B.S., Kansas State University.

Christi Hopkins, B.S., M.A. (2007)
Vice President for Enrollment (2014)
B.S., Southwest Baptist University; M.A., Baker University.

Jeff Hoskisson, B.S., M.S. (2019)
Assistant Coach: Track and Field
B.S., Eastern Oregon University; M.S., Central Missouri State University.

Mariah Hudson-Palmer, B.S. (2014)
Facilities Management: Grounds Assistant
B.S., University of California-Davis.

Evan Knight, B.S., M.S. (2019)
Assistant Coach: Football
B.S., M.S., University of Central Missouri.

Brock Long, B.S., M.S. (2019)
Assistant Coach: Football
B.S., M.S., Fort Hays State University.

Lindsey Loucks, B.S., M.L.S. (2020)
Library Assistant
B.S., University of Kansas; M.L.S., Emporia State University.

Brian Lundberg, A.A. (2003)
Director of Marketing (2015)
A.A., Art Institute of Dallas.

Amelia Lutz, B.A. (2018)
Advancement Services Coordinator
B.A., Southwestern College.

Brian Martin, B.S. (2009)
Director of Historic Automotive Restoration Projects (2014)
B.S., McPherson College.

Kerryn McQuilliam, B.S., M.Ed. (2016)
Assistant Athletic Trainer
B.S., Fort Hays State University; M.Ed., Wichita State University.

Heather Mierkiewicz (2016)
Admissions Operations Coordinator (2018)

Janelle Miller (2000)
Facilities Management: Custodian (2001)

Abigayle Morgan, B.S. (2019)
Coordinator of Auto Restoration Events
B.S., McPherson College.

Kevin Morris, A.S., B.S. (2016)
Computer Services Assistant
A.S., B.S., Brown Mackie College.

Bryan Moses, B.A., M.S. (2016)
Head Coach: Baseball
B.A., Sonoma State University; M.S., Western Kentucky University.

Robert Mowat (2017)
Facilities Management: Maintenance Technician/HVAC

Jeremy Nelson, B.A. (2018)
Director of Athletic Communications; Assistant Athletic Director
B.A., Bethany College.

Joshua Nichols, A.A., B.S., M.A. (2018)
Head Coach: Women’s Basketball
A.A., Northern Oklahoma College; B.S., Oklahoma Wesleyan University; M.A., Baker University.

Andy Olsen, B.S.M. (2014)
Assistant Director of Financial Aid
B.S.M., Central Christian College.

Kelly Olson, B.S. (2018)
Admissions Associate; Campus Visit Coordinator
B.S., Northern State University.

Mark Olson, B.S. (2015)
Head Coach: Women’s Soccer (2019)
B.S., Wichita State University.

Dane Pavlovich, B.S., M.B.A. (2019)
Assistant Director of Admissions (2020)
B.S., Kansas State University; M.B.A., Stephens College.

David Penalva (2007)
Facilities Management: Custodian

Amanda Peterson, B.S. (2014)
Facilities Management: Grounds Assistant
B.S., Kansas State University.

Jamie Pjesky, B.S. (2015)
Assistant Dean of Campus Life and Belonging (2020)
B.S., Pittsburg State University.

Doug Quint, A.A., B.S. (2003)
Head Coach, Men’s Soccer 
A.A., Allen County Community College; B.S., Bethel College; USSF ‘C’ License; NSCAA Advanced National Diploma; NSCAA Levels I and II GK License.

Rhianna Smith Reed, B.S. (2019)
Institutional Research and Assessment Coordinator (2020)
B.S., McPherson College.

Monica Rice, B.S., M.A. (2016)
Director of Alumni and Constituent Relations
B.S., Manchester College; M.A., Bethany Theological Seminary.

Kathryn Russell, (2008)
Facilities Management: Custodian

Michael P. Schneider, B.S., M.B.A., Ed.D. (2002)
President (2009)
B.S., McPherson College; M.B.A., Denver University;
Ed.D., University of Pennsylvania.

Phillip Schoenwetter, B.S., M.S. (2008)
Head Athletic Trainer (2013)
B.S., MidAmerica Nazarene University; M.S., Kansas State University; ATC, LAT.

Tony Segovia, B.S. (2018)
Head Coach: Softball
B.S., McPherson College.

Chandler Short, B.S., M.Ed. (2017)
Athletic Director (2020)
B.S., McPherson College; M.Ed., University of Oklahoma.

Marty Sigwing, B.S., M.Ed. (2012)
Director of Facilities
B.S., Southwestern College; M.Ed., McPherson College.

Brenda Stocklin-Smith, B.S.B.A., M.Ed. (2012)
Director of Human Resources
B.S.B.A., University of Missouri-Columbia; M.Ed., McPherson College; PHR, SHRM-CP.

Connie Stucky (1991)
Facilities Management: Office Manager (2001)

Carol Summervill, B.B.A. (2019)
Assistant Vice President for Finance
B.B.A., Wichita State University; CPA, CGMA.

Richard (Rick) L. Tuxhorn, B.S., M.Ed. (2012)
Vice President for Finance
B.S., Sterling College; M.Ed., McPherson College; CPA, CGMA.

Andrew Ullom, B.S. (1999)
Director of Computer Services (2015)
B.S., McPherson College.

Erik Vogel, B.S.  (2003-2007; 2019)
Vice President for Advancement (2019)
B.S., McPherson College.

Bonnie Wall (2009)
Facilities Management: Custodian

Christopher Wallace, B.A. (2017)
Admissions & Financial Aid Counselor
B.A., Bethany College.

Gabrielle Williams, B.S., M.S.Ed. (2018)
Director of Student Life (2020)
B.S., Lincoln University; M.S.Ed., Southern Illinois University.

Jessy Wisdom, B.S. (2015)
Financial Aid Assistant
B.S., McPherson College.

Part-time Staff

Cheryl Brunholtz, A.A. (2018)
Accounting Clerk
A.A., Hutchinson Community College.

Chris Dawson, B.S. (2019)
Assistant Coach: Baseball
B.S., Central Christian College.

Dillion (D.J.) Engle, A.A., B.S. (2018)
Assistant Coach: Baseball
A.A., College of Lake County; B.S., Chicago State University.

Kayla Faust, B.S. (2020)
Assistant Coach: Women’s Soccer
B.S., McPherson College.

Thomas Feazell, B.S. (2018)
Assistant Coach: Football
B.S., Eastern Kentucky University.

Daniel Hayashi, B.S. (2019)
Assistant Coach: Volleyball
B.S., California Statue University–Fullerton.

Jill Hemenway, B.A. (2017)
Administrative Assistant for Teacher Education
B.A., Bethany College.

Whitney Jefferson, B.A. (2020)
Assistant Coach: Women’s Basketball
B.A., McPherson College.

Anthony Saldivar, B.S. (2019)
Assistant Coach: Softball
B.S., University of Phoenix.

Brad Stucky, B.A. (1978)
Facilities Management: Specialist (2017)
B.A., McPherson College.

2021|11 Personnel, Catalog 21-22|

Financial Aid Process

Over 99 percent of McPherson College students receive financial assistance each year from McPherson College scholarships and awards, federal and state programs, work-study programs, and educational loans.

McPherson College has a financial aid awarding policy that considers a variety of factors including academic achievement, participation in co-curricular activities, and financial need. The college’s goal is to award enough financial assistance to provide incentive, recognition, and access.

Financial Aid Application Process

To be considered for and receive financial aid, students should take the following steps:

  • Submit their Application for Admission and academic transcripts to McPherson College. Students must be admitted to McPherson College in order to be considered for aid.
  • Submit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). McPherson College’s priority deadline for FAFSA submissions is March 1 each year. McPherson College’s federal school code is 001933.
  • Review their Student Aid Report (SAR) and submit verification documentation to the Financial Aid Office. Students whose Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) is selected by the Department of Education for verification must complete the Verification Worksheet (Dependent, Independent) and submit official tax transcripts from the IRS for the student and/or parents/spouse. If supporting schedules are required, the college will ask for them separately.
  • Await receipt of their Financial Aid Award Notice, which the college prepares and mails/emails, usually within 3–5 working days after their financial aid record is complete.
  • Follow the instructions enclosed with the Financial Aid Award Notice by the date indicated to acknowledge acceptance of awards.
  • Complete the required application/promissory note if taking advantage of student loan opportunities.
  • Complete entrance interview if borrowing direct loans.

Financial Aid Calendar

October 1 – Application process begins. Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA).
November 1 – Financial aid award notification begins for admitted students.
March 1 – Priority deadline for financial aid. Offers of aid after this date will be extended only as funds remain available.
April 1 – FAFSA submission deadline for Kansas Comprehensive Grant.

Scholarships and Awards

Every student meeting McPherson College’s admission standards who is enrolled full time is eligible for a Merit Award. In addition to the Merit Award, qualifying students may receive additional scholarship assistance based on academic achievement, co-curricular participation, demographic characteristics, leadership qualities, and major areas of interest. A financial aid calculator and detailed information about institutional awards and scholarships are available at https://www.mcpherson.edu/admissions/scholarships/

Endowed Scholarship Funds

The endowed scholarships and loan funds listed below have been established through personal generosity and a desire on the part of the donors to assist future generations of students in attending McPherson College. The college is grateful for these endowed gifts, which provide a permanent expression of love and support for the college and for the students who will benefit from this kindness. These gifts fund the existing McPherson College Scholarship and Grant Program.

Unrestricted Endowed Scholarship Fund with no specifics for awarding:

  • Walter E. Beery Scholarship Fund
  • Virgil Meyers Berkebile Scholarship
  • Earl Bowman Scholarship Fund
  • R.S. Christensen Endowment Scholarship Fund
  • Earl E. Curtis Memorial Scholarship Fund
  • Samuel L. Elrod Scholarship Fund
  • Esther Eslinger Memorial Scholarship Fund
  • Leland and Pauline Flory Endowment Scholarship Fund
  • Oscar C. Frantz & Flora Gish Frantz Scholarship
  • Roy O. Frantz Endowed Scholarship Fund
  • Harry H. and Marguerite Gilbert Memorial Endowment Scholarship
  • Raenell Hall Endowed Scholarship Fund
  • Ira M. Hoover Endowed Scholarship Fund
  • Helen Jacobs Memorial Scholarship
  • Ralph F. Johnson & Irene Ramey Johnson Memorial Scholarship Fund
  • Edith Keller Scholarship Fund
  • John Giolin Pearson Scholarship
  • Ralph H. Rindt Endowed Scholarship Fund
  • Scott Robinson Memorial Scholarship Fund
  • Ray Simmons Endowed Scholarship Fund
  • Stucky Scholarship Fund
  • Dr. Galen M. Tice & Ruth Kilmer Tice Memorial Scholarship Fund
  • Robert George Wolfe Memorial Scholarship
  • Worthington Church Scholarship Fund
  • Una Yoder Memorial Scholarship

Restricted Endowed Scholarships